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“Royalties for Voters” — WA political party offers $38,000 to each voter to expose just how big the government grab is

A new party is forming in WA in time for the state election next March. It’s skeptical, and very cheeky, and as The Spectator says “a chance to shame the Nats”.  Where the Nats offer Royalties for Regions, but the new party wickedly offers Royalties for Voters.

Real democracy starts with the freedom to vote with our wallets

It needs to reach 500 members by Sunday Monday: WA Voters can join for free online  

What if voters could choose to keep the funds themselves instead of  giving bureaucrats a blank cheque to spend it on their behalf?  Our pollies casually toss around billions of our dollars and Royalties for Voters will expose just how big those sums are. Hands up who wants $38,000?

West Australians pay their 10% GST (Goods and services tax) like the rest of the nation, but they get only a third of it back from the Federal Gobblerment at the moment — which leaves Sandgropers feeling pretty miffed over here. No other state has ever got less than about 80% back. The mining boom meant the population grew a massive 40% from 2000 to 2015. Infrastructure, roads, rail, public transport has failed to keep up. Plus somehow the supposedly conservative local state government managed to run up a huge debt during the boom — yes, it’s that bad. The Nationals leader, Brendon Grylls, wants to do something about the GST imbalance but is proposing to get the money back by adding a bigger tax onto BHP and Rio. Go figure.

This is a monster money-grab risking WA’s reputation as a good place to invest. It’s got sovereign risk written all over it. Brendon Grylls wants to use his Royalties for Regions plan – which put mining royalties back into the regional areas where the royalties were mostly earned. Though vast sums of money ended up being fed into things like community centres sculptures and touring performers.

The new party is against the levy increase.  If it is to be imposed, they say the best thing to do with the money is pay it direct to the voters of rural WA. To give you some idea of just how much money is at stake, if this new tax came in, hypothetically, each rural voter  could get an extraordinary $38,000 each to spend or invest over the next four years.

Yes, it’s naked vote buying — a cynical protest, taking what all the other parties do to its logical conclusion. If ever there was a party with a name on the ticket that would get people talking, this surely would be it.

 Royalties for Voters  $38,000 Cash

Join for free online in 1 minute  http://www.royaltiesforvoters.com.au/

How many voters would rather have $38,000 to spend themselves and donate to local causes they believe in? Hmm. Real democracy starts with the freedom to vote with our wallets — every spending choice is a vote on the kind of lifestyle and priorities a voter prefers.

So this is a very anti-establishment, small government themed party. Check them out on Facebook Royalties for Voters $38,000 cash.

The fledgling party needs 500 bonafide members to get off the ground, and it needs those names by this Sunday Monday Oct 31. The form can be done online, or printed and posted (but given the timeframe, if you post it, make sure you tell the party via email or phone). All details are secure and protected by law. There are no costs to join, and in the tradition of the oldest democracies, any member can tick a box to get the chance to be selected to be a candidate.  (Salary for the Legislative Council in WA is $156,000 if the urge strikes you to run. )

So if you can vote in WA, and want to poke a stick at Big Government, click the link, put your name down.

Royalties for Voters

Membership information

  • The WA Electoral Commission may contact me and I will make sure they know I am now a member of a real political party. No joke!I
  •  I believe in always trying to do the right thing.I am opposed to government corruption.
  • More democracy is good. Give me free life membership and send me stuff.
  • Put me in any draw to be a candidate and I might even get elected to the Legislative Council of the Parliament in Perth The base salary is $156,536 per annum for four years, a total of $626,144
The first ever democracy was in Athens in Ancient Greece. Politicians were chosen by lottery because democracy was fair and Athenians loved democracy! Sortition is in Wikipedia. In that democratic spirit the Party Secretary may select candidates by lottery. The person who told me about this may have an extra chance to be selected. The name of that person is:

 Party Secretary: 0402 558 947

Please share this widely in Western Australia.  A bonus is that everyone involved in the new party is a declared opponent of the Global Warming Cult. The leaders include climate skeptic David Archibald.

* GST  The Australian: “WA is complaining now because it’s receiving less than 40 cents for every $ its residents pay in GST – down from 79c in 2009-10 – at a time when its mining tax revenue has slumped. * Some states and territories receive more GST revenue than their residents pay: NT $5.6 for every tax dollar; Tasmania $1.63; South Australia $1.28; ACT $1.24; Queensland $1.08.”

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"Royalties for Voters" -- WA political party offers $38,000 to each voter to expose just how big the government grab is, 9.7 out of 10 based on 33 ratings

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97 comments to “Royalties for Voters” — WA political party offers $38,000 to each voter to expose just how big the government grab is

  • #
    John F. Hultquist

    I live in WA. Washington State, that is.
    Does that make me eligible? No? Rats!
    I think I need a drink.

    [I have to remember to spell Washington when doing searches, or even put in Puget Sound. There is the Oz"WA", and also that other washington {Once a swamp, always a swamp.} in the eastern USA.]

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    • #

      I know this is not on the same topic, but it is somewhat interesting where John mentions the similarity between names, Washington, reduced to its initials WA, and the WA here in Australia.

      While I was based in Wagga Wagga with the RAAF, I checked up on why it was named twice, and that’s due to the indigenous people who inhabit that area as their home, the Wiradjuri people. The Wiradjuri people’s name is translated to be known as The People From Three Rivers, The Wambool (Macquarie River) The Kalari (Lachlan River) and the Murrumbidjeri. (Murrumbidgee River)

      There are numerous towns and place names in the area close by Wagga Wagga which also have two names the same, and that’s due to the aborigines in that area, instead of pluralising things as we do by adding the letter ‘S’, they just say the word twice, so Wagga Wagga is crow crow, or place of many crows.

      One of those double named towns in that vast Wiradjuri Nation’s area is Walla Walla, (rock rock)

      There is also a Walla Walla in Washington, a city named with that name in the County also with the same name. The City, the River, and the County are all named after the local Indigenous people in that area in the State of Washington.

      Here I want to point out a similarity between these two indigenous people, on opposite sides of the Planet and never having associated with each other in any way.

      The Wiradjuri people here in Australia are the people of the three rivers.

      The Walla Walla people in Washington State are the people of many rivers.

      You may the link might be somewhat tenuous, but I would like to think of the similarity between the two.

      Tony.

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      • #
        Mark D.

        Here I want to point out a similarity between these two indigenous people, on opposite sides of the Planet and never having associated with each other in any way.

        I agree with you up until “never having associated with each other in any way” which is (let me assume) based upon “expert” opinion of the science of today.

        It would be off topic here but please remind me during a weekend unthreaded, to tell you a story of an amateur historian I ran into.

        I too, have wondered about how and why many “indigenous” peoples across the globe share similarities.

        40

        • #
          John F. Hultquist

          Will it explain why the Water Buffalo is so prominent in the the creation story of the Navaho of the SW USA?

          30

          • #
            Mark D.

            John, it might, but not because I recall anything about water buffalo in my conversations with this person.

            That said, it does tie in a big way to the possible heritage of the cliff dwelling indigenous peoples of the same region.

            30

        • #
          Rereke Whakaaro

          It is quite common for languages to repeat words to indicate purality. In fact adding letters on the end of words (“s” in English and “aux” in French) is the exception rather than the rule. Even in English, small children talk of “lots and lots” of something, to indicate a large number.

          10

  • #

    It should be remembered that before the WA mining boom, Vic and NSW ‘donated’, via taxes, vast amounts of money to WA, which was supposedly struggling to survive (Queensland wasn’t far behind in wanting handouts). Vic and NSW fuel taxes, for example, were going to WA (and Qld) in large lumps while our roads etc deteriorated. It’s a matter of Quid Pro Quo. WA sometimes complains a little too much for its own good.

    112

    • #
      Dennis

      That’s right Bemused.

      41

      • #
        toorightmate

        Bemuses and Dennis,
        That is also ancient history.
        The mid 60′s saw WA and QLD propping up Australia when the sheep’s back (and wheat) fell flat.

        41

        • #

          That’s what I meant by Quid Pro Quo. It’s all about swings and roundabouts, what WA (and Qld) gets one decade, it gives the next.

          71

          • #
            toorightmate

            I presume that you good folk all realise that it was Broken Hill mining royalties which propped up NSW Govt coffers from 1900 to 1970. Those royalties were horrific.

            40

    • #
      Bulldust

      Would love to add some to this topic, but a tad hard on the mobile phone on free WiFi in Nha Trang while sipping a Tiger beer. Beer gets too warm if I type too much. Maybe I can weigh in a few days hence from Ho Chi Minh or Bali :)

      50

      • #

        It’s still too cold in Victoria to be drinking much beer, so the red is going down well. If anyone wants to see global warming in action, check out my blog tomorrow when I publish a story about a trip I did last weekend. The rains will never fill the dams; children won’t know what snow looks like; hottest day, month, year on record etc, etc.

        30

    • #
      WayneT

      And it should be remembered that at the time WA was getting ‘handouts’ from VIC & NSW, the population and infrastructure that needed support was very low. Since Mining took off in WA they have carried the rest of the country by providing indirect tax revenue and freeing up large amounts of GST revenue. I would guess they have more than paid back any perceived debt long ago. In fact they go on supporting (carrying) the rest of the nation to this day. But then again I always assumed we were a Country not just a collection of States. My mistake I guess.

      10

  • #
    gbees

    If I was in WA i would join. I really think to put the cat amongst the pigeons that the GST collected by states , less a small (very) admin fee to the feds should be returned completely to the contributing state. Then basket case states like SA and TAS would have to learn how to pay their own way. It’s called competition!

    101

    • #
      Dennis

      Unfortunately, at this time WA is also a basket case in economic terms and technically in recession based on state GDP growth going backwards. The reason is the decline in mining and related state mining resources rent tax and mining sector related businesses also in decline. The snowball effect hits the broader community too.

      At present the three Eastern States are carrying the nation with NSW leading with state GDP growth over 4 per cent per annum which is slightly above the long term national average. VIC is second and QLD third. But noting that after 16 years of NSW Labor government the state was on the way down the economic performance ladder.

      But in my opinion we should think as a nation, as a federation of states, and as Australians and not single out winners and losers. On the other hand we should criticise states like TAS and SA where Labor Green governments have effectively placed a handbrake on economic growth based on extremist greenism socialism.

      171

      • #
        Yonniestone

        We should really be criticising the Voters that habitually elect these Labor/Green regressive’s, there has to be an un-diagnosed political bipolar disorder in the population surely?!

        151

        • #
          ianl8888

          The populations of SA and Tas KNOW these States are economic basket cases without any realistic hope of reversing that in a lifetime.

          Given that, how else would one expect them to vote ? As long as Federal-supplied helicopter money keeps arriving, why does ALP/Green tomfoolery really matter ?

          71

        • #
          PeterS

          You are correct on the political bipolar disorder part. Trouble is the problem extends all the way to the federal level. On top of that we have opposing sides on each side of parliament – upper and lower. Perhaps in the past we had a good reason for a Senate but today all we are doing is effectively trying to push the accelerator with one foot and the brakes with the other. Someone from another planet would think we are mad – and we are. As long as we have this system pf government we will continue to slide down and eventually crash and burn. Perhaps then we will wake up and change the style of government, hopefully to something a lot better.

          51

          • #
            Yonniestone

            It could be a form of Self-destructive behaviour used as a coping mechanism, when things get to be ‘too much’. For example, faced with an economic downturn, someone may choose the best supply of helicopter money (ianl8888) for their salvation rather than tackling the cause through sensible voting choices, this as we know adds to the economic death spiral but however evident to the lazy it removes the worry associated with it.

            51

        • #
        • #
          Geoffrey Williams

          Perhaps they only get BBC news in places like Victoria and South Australia (and are suitably brainwashed). . .
          GeoffW

          20

    • #
      TdeF

      That was the original deal. It has slowly been corrupted by the Commonwealth Grants Commission. This was a state tax, a collection of state taxes collected federally which must be returned to the states as originally. The Commonwealth argued that States were supposed to include more taxes like Stamp Duty and Payroll Tax, but the states reneged.

      However the taxes they did surrender included exclusively state taxes like State specific Sales Tax, so it was a major tax distribution exercise and now WA gets half the GST of SA because they have minerals and work harder. SA has Uranium, Coal, haematite and much more, but collectively the activists do everything possible to stop mining, manufacturing, farming and refining and demand compensation. Submarines? As the former Minister said, they could not build a canoe. Now why would he say that?

      72

      • #
        ianl8888

        SA has Uranium, Coal, haematite and much more, but collectively the activists do everything possible to stop mining, manufacturing, farming and refining and demand compensation

        And the ALP/Green govts encourage this. Although they do favour Barossa vineyards.

        Astonishing, isn’t it ?

        About 2 hours north of Adelaide, north of Gawler, there is a small-enough village, quaintly attractive and set up for the casual tourist. Centrally located is a large, pegmatitic boulder with an historic plaque attached to it. The plaque records the time and date of a large copper ore find in the district, circa 1850 (from memory). So ?

        The timing of the find was serendipitious, as the SA Govt was then flat broke and in panic. One can imagine the Cabinet room, where all attending were in dire woes-is-us. The Cabinet Secretary bursts into the room, waving a telegram: “Copper, gentlemen, rich copper !! We are saved !!”

        Not any more. In fact, even the power grid is being deliberately destroyed – with this being used as a template for NSW and Qld.

        141

        • #
          TdeF

          plus Victoria. No rationale, no science. Just anti everything. We lost $1Billion in paying contractors to not build a road we desperately need and Andrew’s own committee still recommend as our highest priority. We are putting suburban trains in the air over suburbs instead of underground because it is cheaper? For whom? The city is nearly closed to cars. We even have closed a floor of the new Cancer hospital as the Labor government objects to the funding by rich people who get their names on the ward.

          The People Against Everything who call themselves facetiously Progressives, rapidly undoing the achievements of a century. No forward planning, just destruction.

          Liberal NSW though is now exceptional. Stopping dog racing based on a fake report. Then Pro shark and anti human. All driven by paid activists and their ABC/SBS. Sell the publicly funded ABC. Save the $1.3Billion annual cost. Stop this rot.

          91

  • #
    Dennis

    Not an important contribution but I am at present in WA travelling and I have a very long association with WA based on business activities and branch operations when I was working. It always amuses me to be asked if I am from “the east”. A few days I heard an ABC radio presenter comment to his guest: “so you are going east soon”.

    I wonder if they realise that the three wise men came from the east.

    61

  • #
    toorightmate

    On behalf of Tasmania and South Australia, I would just like to say,
    “SEND MORE GST”.

    61

  • #
    pat

    all I know is the pollies we have are playing with our grid:

    25 Oct: UK Telegraph: Emily Gosden: Britain risks ‘sleepwalking into blackouts’ under Ofgem reforms, Sir Ed Davey warns
    The warning from Sir Ed, who was in charge of UK energy policy from 2012 to 2015, is the starkest intervention yet into a fierce industry debate over plans by regulator Ofgem to change the way Britain’s power grids are paid for.
    Under the current, highly complex, network charging system, small generators enjoy certain benefits that are not enjoyed by bigger power plants – both by tapping extra revenues, and avoiding costs.
    This has led to a boom in small power plants, including polluting diesel generators, which have been able to undercut big new gas plants to secure subsidies through the Government’s “capacity market” scheme to help keep the lights on…
    But Sir Ed pointed to a new report by consultants Cornwall Energy, which warned that the changes could jeopardise Britain’s security of supply by causing “the early closure of a potentially significant amount of distribution-connected generators”…
    “This rushed change will hit exactly the flexible plant such a biomass, CHP [combined heat and power] and energy-from-waste that the Government says they want. And its impact could be much larger than they currently admit, resulting in Britain sleepwalking into brownouts and blackouts.”…
    Britain’s spare energy capacity this winter is forecast to be just 3.4GW including emergency schemes…
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2016/10/24/britain-risks-sleepwalking-into-blackouts-under-ofgem-reforms-si/

    SCROLL DOWN, LEFT COLUMN, SUBSCRIPTION REQUIRED TO READ:

    Headlines Wednesday 26 October
    Report warns against embedded benefit changes
    https://www.energy-uk.org.uk/press-releases/338-2016/5912-energy-uk-comment-on-ofgem-changes-to-the-priority-service-register.html

    31

  • #
    TdeF

    The world is warming even though it isn’t? The solution, a carbon tax. The Greens want windmills. The solution, the RET. This morning on the front page of the Australia, young people can’t afford houses (what’s new?). The solution, a land tax on your own home. Now the GST, itself a tax is unfairly distributed. The solution, more taxes.

    Public servants do not generally mind more taxes. They live on the taxes and do not pay them. Benefits receivers and 80% of the population who do not pay nett tax want more taxes too, so they can get more from ‘the government’. In the end, we will be sitting in the dirt, demanding more money from the one person who is still being paid for the last piece of coal. Then we can forage and hunt kangaroos and pay the kangaroo tax, the carbon tax. No need to pay the RET because the windmills stopped turning long ago.

    121

  • #
    Pete of Freo

    Bvendan Gwylls should suggest that farmers pay “lease rental” to the WA Government of $25.00 per tonne of anything they produce so that it could be put into a fund to pay for the regeneration of the vast tracts of land which they have salted and destroyed while creating low-paid employment for as few people as they could whilst demanding that the State provide them with all the amenities enjoyed by the city folks.

    34

  • #
    pat

    can’t recall this being posted.
    on previous thread, I posted CBC defence of Levant & co, and it’s good to see Toronto Star do their bit for free speech:

    21 Oct: Toronto Star Editorial: UN should not bar The Rebel from climate conference: Editorial
    The decision to bar The Rebel Media from attending a United Nations climate conference next month is seriously out of line.
    We don’t often find ourselves in agreement with The Rebel Media, the online outfit run by right-wing firebrand Ezra Levant.
    But the decision to bar the outlet from attending a United Nations climate conference next month is seriously out of line. You don’t have to agree with anything The Rebel says to be concerned about UN officials discriminating against media organizations on the basis of their political leanings…READ ON
    https://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorials/2016/10/21/un-should-not-bar-the-rebel-from-climate-conference-editorial.html?utm_medium=twitter&utm_source=twitterfeed

    re-posting this as well, because it went up late on the last thread:

    24 Oct: WESH TV: Dan Billow: Candidates discuss plans for space program
    Trump wants big changes for NASA, which his campaign said has become little more than a logistics agency supporting the space station…
    Trump’s advisors said in a statement that “human exploration of our entire solar system by the end of this century should be NASA’s focus and goal.” That goes far beyond NASA’s plan to send people to Mars in the 2030s.
    Clinton’s plan keeps NASA part of the effort to “tackle the urgent threat of climate change,” aides said, while Trump’s campaign turns up its nose at what it calls “politically correct environmental monitoring.” …
    http://www.wesh.com/article/candidates-discuss-plans-for-space-program/7159750

    31

  • #
    el gordo

    ‘Federal Agriculture Minister Barnaby Joyce has accused the Labor Party of adopting land clearing laws that are akin to communism, in an aggressive key note address at the National Farmers’ Federation Congress.’

    ABC

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    • #
      Robert Rosicka

      Gordo , Barnaby was spot on there is a good balance of reserved land in oz for nature etc .
      Farmers bought the land for clearing and primary production to restrict this for the good of the collective is communism but labor is a communist based ideology so it shouldn’t surprise .

      61

    • #
      clive

      Hate to be the bearer of bad news,but”Little Johnny Howard” introduced these land clearing laws,many moons ago,at the behest of the UN.
      I think Jo did a piece on it at the time.
      He is”NO”conservative,by any stretch of the “Imagination”

      00

  • #
    philthegeek

    LoL! Preference Harvesting anyone?? Or am i just a cynic? :)

    anyhow not a Rural Voter so stuff the hillbillies. I’ll vote so that the $38000 gets spent where i lice thanks.

    32

  • #

    Ahem, this was accidentally posted as a draft a bit early, so it’s had a lot of polishing, and additions. See The Spectator article. It’s really very good. http://spectator.com.au/2016/10/38000-cash-per-voter/

    $38,000 cash for each lucky voter plus a chance to shame the Nats
    Resurrected Western Australian Nationals leader Brendon Grylls is standing firm. Deluded, but standing firm.

    He’s demanding that a future government deliver on the scheme he proposed on his return to the top job back in August to slug major the miners with a $5.00 per tonne iron ore tax, a 20 fold increase on the 25 cent iron ore levy they already pay.

    Grylls’ cunning plan would make Western Australia the highest taxing jurisdiction for iron ore in the world with a rate three times that of Brazil, the state’s biggest competitor.

    He sees it as a revamped Royalties for Regions….

    52

    • #
      toorightmate

      The main impetus for the development of the iron ore industry in Brazil was the stupidity of unions in the Pilbara in the 1960s.
      Australia’s interest in copper has gone to Chile which does not have the same government and union imposts as Australia.
      So why shouldn’t we further help the iron ore industry in Brazil and Africa by further burdening the Pilbara operations with government stupidity.
      Do Australians realise how much the Pilbara mines have helped WA AND Australia – for the past 50 years?
      Do Australians also realise that NONE of the risk capital for these ventures came from Australia?

      41

      • #

        WA totally avoided the GFC thanks to iron ore. While most of the West was struggling, house prices here were doubling, stayed high, and there were ads looking for 14 year olds to work in supermarkets and resturants because it was so hard to find staff.

        30

  • #
    pat

    26 Oct: Breitbart: James Delingpole: Americans more scare of Clowns than Climate Change
    According to a poll conducted by Chapman University, 42 per cent of Americans are afraid of clowns, whereas only 32 per cent are afraid of climate change.
    They’re also more scared of terrorist attacks (41 per cent), gun rights infringement (38 per cent), family members dying (38 per cent), economic collapse (37 per cent), Obamacare (36 per cent), and biological warfare (35 per cent).
    If you believe Vox’s snarky coverage, this is evidence that the American public is very stupid…READ ON
    http://www.breitbart.com/london/2016/10/26/americans-scared-clowns-climate-change/

    31

    • #
      John F. Hultquist

      Regarding those numbers:
      terrorist attacks (41 per cent)” Because these are much reported nationally and worldwide, people pay a lot of attention, but I would not rank it because it is not likely to happen to me or anyone I know. [… until North Korea and Iran can deliver nukes]
      In contrast, consider auto accidents: about 38,300 people were killed and 4.4 million injured on U.S. roads in 2015. It used to be more, dropped & held for awhile, and is now increasing. This might be what others think of when they fear “family members dying” because it is not predictable, is emotional, and is disruptive of the family. Otherwise, I think we can all expect family members to die.
      There is not a direct link to accidents in the wording of the survey except this: “Illness and Death …. High medical bills, becoming ill, dying

      Look at this one:
      Personal Fears …. Tight spaces, public speaking, clowns, vaccines

      “vaccines”: Do they mean the pain of getting a shot in the arm or butt, getting sick from the flu, or their children (do they have any) becoming X,Y,Z from the vaccine? Who knows what the respondent was responding to.

      Did I mention I hate these sorts of polls?

      41

  • #
    Richard Ilfeld

    There is a difficulty here. Actually two.

    One applauds the thought that voters should keep their money.

    But, first, the money still goes into the government, then some of it comes back. Is this trip really necessary?

    Second, uniform payments make this a re-distribution. There is a conservative case to made for this (Milton Friedman &
    Charles Murray have both done so with grace & intellectual rigor) but imbuing the government with redistributive powers
    might be the root of many of or current problems.

    Certain jurisdictions have toyed with this before — recently the state of Alaska & some countries in the Persian Gulf.

    One wishes there were some government, somewhere, sometime that practiced minimalism so we would have a control group.
    The closest I can come in modern times is the federal government of Calvin Coolidge.

    Of course, there is humor here. Its hard for a joke to exist without some underlying truth.

    One might also make the argument that we have such a government now. In the Throes of the US election, one can the the
    win-at-all-costs efforts of the left. Many ascribe this to ideology. But consider: if the Democrats lose n the US, they don’t eat as well.
    Government employees & welfare and subsidy clients & crony capitalists & marginally competant government service providers arguably receive “royalties” for their vote, which are theoretically constrained under a more conservative government.

    If you get housing and insurance aid, or teach school, or work in the department of whatever, or run a wind farm, you are most likely voting your “rice bowl”.

    From the time of the Greeks, this rent seeking as been known as the Achilles heel of Democracy.

    Thus the reason for the Franklin line “A Republic Ma’m, if you can keep it”.

    61

    • #
      David Maddison

      The problem is the eligibilty to vote. As long as net wealth consumers are allowed to vote they will continue to vote themselves funds from the public coffers until the society is so bankrupted that collapse is inevitable. We are close to that point now.

      There used to be a system that variously applied in the UK, US, Australia, Canada (although I don’t know much about the extent of it outside the UK) whereby only people who had a certain amount of property could vote. In the UK they were called Forty Shilling Freeholders.

      Our Western societies would benefit from the reintroduction of some variation of this system. Of course, it won’t happen, societies will collapse first. And there are wolves waiting to take over and we all know who they are…

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forty-shilling_freeholders?wprov=sfsi1

      31

  • #
    Owen Morgan

    This story reminds me of a time, quite a few years ago, when I was in a small minibus going up a very narrow mountain road and we came to a place where a sort of triangular-shaped piece of the road had disappeared and gone two thousand feet down the mountain. We managed to squeeze through the bit of road that was still there (the alternative being to reverse all the way back down the mountain). When we returned, somebody was trying to plug the hole in the road with what looked like mud. I couldn’t understand why there was any reason to expect that stuffing the mud into the gap was going to defy gravity and miraculously repair the road.

    I am always suspicious of any political party which hypothecates predicted tax *, while also, supposedly, being able to foresee the amount of tax to be raised. If your State budget looks like a Peruvian road with a huge hole in it, you may as well put lots of mud in it rather than billions more Aussie dollars, since the effect will be same, anyway (except that you won’t have wasted lots of
    dollars).

    The other problem, though, is that prophesying tax revenue is about as useful as examining birds’ entrails, especially when you drastically change the rules. I think Western Australia threatens to go the way of California, which also came to fame as a state with great mineral resources, but which haemorrhages people by the thousand to other US states every week. No doubt, the Nationals’ logic, such as it is, is that Rio and BHP can’t very well move the mines to Monaco, but that overlooks the fact that these companies have both resources and listings in all sorts of places outside the jurisdiction of Western Australia.

    My guess is that they would reduce the scale of their operations in WA, which would automatically reduce the amount of mud available for the hole, but would also have a knock-on effect, with tax-paying miners no longer paying taxes, or having money to put into the general economy. The Billiton bit of BHP Billiton is South African, although listed in London for about twenty years, and it retains interests in South Africa, eastern parts of Australia and North and South America. I can’t see why either BHP or Rio could realistically be expected to continue under a drastically different tax regime, as if nothing had changed.

    They have plenty of, well, irons in the fire. The proposed twenty-times hike to the lease rental may as well be designed to kill off the industry, since it bears no relation to an indexed rental (which the lease rental is not). The iron ore will still be in the ground, however, and WA could find itself renting the leases to miners who strike much harder bargains.

    * Despite being a convinced Brexit-supporter, I didn’t think it was a good idea to express the ending of subventions to Brussels in terms of health expenditure, which implied that would be hypothecated and assumed that increased expenditure on anything necessarily produces a superior result.

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    Grant (NZ)

    Wow. I knew WA was in a different time zone. BUT a different calendar zone?

    31 October 2016 is a Monday on this side of the ditch (and presumably elsewhere in Aussie) :-)

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    Roy Hogue

    Wow! $38,000 signing bonus from a political party. How do I get in on that? I could do no end of beneficial things with $38,000 AUD, even without knowing what the current exchange rate is.

    Where are you, the U.S. equivalent of this protest party? Or is it revolution party?

    Wonders never cease. Of course, it looks like the Democrats have done something roughly equivalent by paying protesters and if you believe the grapevine, even worse. Money is a powerful thing.

    I’ve always believed that Marx correctly understood that it’s human competitiveness at the root of all our conflicts. And this year proves him right more powerfully than ever. When you want your way you want your way, damn the rules. Marx’s only mistake was in believing he could change that competitive nature with socialism — or any other way. Too bad it didn’t work. It’s too bad competitiveness is built in and won’t ever go away because nature prefers survival of the species over survival of the individual. Thus we must compete for everything or perish in favor of the better competitor, whether he’s one of “us” or one of “them”. And I can readily imagine how much worse the competitiveness would need to be if nature prefered it the other way around.

    Now if we would only teach our children the true nature of the world we live in instead of pretending we can do away with grading in school, eliminating competitive games at recess, all the other nonsense we’re doing instead of the right thing…

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    Mark M

    The CSIRO-BoM 2016 “State of The Climate” report is out. Get ready to laugh.

    The fourth State of the Climate report found Australia’s mean surface temperature has risen by about 1 degree since 1910 …

    While surface temperatures fluctuate sharply – driven by the El Nino-La Nina cycle – the report focuses on the increasing proof that the oceans are heating up.

    At 3.00 mins, “Now, surface temperature tend to dominate the news. Its where we live, it’s where we have our thermometers …”

    The oceans really provide us with the most reliable indicator of how the globe as a whole is warming,” said Steve Rintoul, interim director of the Climate Science Centre at the CSIRO.”
    . . .
    Most people are not fish, most people live on land,” Professor Karoly said, noting that the sustained warming over land had been about 40 per cent more than over the oceans.

    Whoa! Wait. What?

    NASA: “There is far too much focus on surface temperatures

    Prof. Matt England:
    “This is only the global average surface temperature and it’s only one measure of the climate system – and it’s a very fickle measure.

    There’s an over-emphasis on the surface air temperature.

    (non)-Skeptical Science: “Over the past decade, we’ve seen less warming at the surface and more warming in the oceans.”

    That’s 97% Settled science for you.

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      Mark M

      Link limits.

      Gavin Schmidt, NASA: That’s not to say the satellite measurements don’t provide some value, but it is an indication why the surface temperature data analyzed and reported by NASA, NOAA and others is viewed as the gold standard.

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        el gordo

        I can’t get behind the Fairfax paywall, not that it matters because there is a growing consensus that the shiny orb might have some influence over severe weather on earth.

        ‘Earth is heating up lately, but so are Mars, Pluto and other worlds in our solar system, leading some scientists to speculate that a change in the sun’s activity is the common thread linking all these baking events.’

        Live Science 2007

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          Mark M

          El Gordo.
          I find fairfax climate articles can be accessed via Hannam’s twitter account.

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          toorightmate

          If you get behind the Fairfax paywall, you will find as much sh*t there as there is in front of the paywall.

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          • #
            Mark D.

            shit is why firewalls (as opposed to paywalls) were invented. Shit on either side that is

            Odd isn’t it? we used to just put it in a hole or spread it on the field.

            Technology has brought us out of the field at least.

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        Graeme No.3

        Shouldn’t that read “is viewed as the FOOL’S gold standard”?

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    Mark M

    State of the Climate 2016: Bureau of Meteorology and CSIRO via the Conversation:

    “Observations also show that atmospheric circulation changes in the Southern Hemisphere have led to an average reduction in rainfall across parts of southern Australia.

    In particular, May–July rainfall has reduced by around 19% since 1970 in the southwest of Australia.
    There has been a decline of around 11% since the mid-1990s in April–October rainfall in the continental southeast.
    Southeast Australia has had below-average rainfall in 16 of the April–October periods since 1997.

    Whoa! Wait. What?

    What does the 97% science say via the Conversation? Increases in rainfall extremes linked to global warming

    “Rainfall extremes are increasing around the world, and the increase is linked to the warming of the atmosphere which has taken place since pre-industrial times.

    This is the conclusion of a recent study which investigated extreme rainfall trends using data from 8326 weather-recording stations globally, some of which have records spanning more than a hundred years.

    Of all the stations analysed, we found that two-thirds showed increasing trends over the course of the 20th and early 21st centuries.

    When we looked at the association between the intensity of rainfall extremes and a record of global mean near-surface atmospheric temperature, rainfall intensity was found to increase at a rate of between 5.9% and 7.7% for each degree, depending on the method of analysis.

    The implications of this are likely to be significant for flood risk around the world.”
    . . .
    If Global Warming causes flooding rainfall and less rainfall simultaneously, how do you know when the climate is ‘fixed’?

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      el gordo

      The Conversation piece by Seth Westra who cleverly created propaganda, its all in the half truths.

      ‘…we can probably expect in the order of three to five degrees of warming by the end of the 21st century. If the relationship between extreme rainfall and atmospheric temperature continues to hold, then this could mean as much as a 35% increase in extreme rainfall intensity on average globally.’

      Atmospheric temperatures haven’t increased for two decades and at this rate it would be impossible to reach five degrees by the end of century.

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  • #
    pat

    27 Oct: ABC: BOM, CSIRO forecast more hot days, longer fire-danger season in State of the Climate report
    By Chris McLoughlin
    Next month will mark one year since South Australia’s deadly Pinery bushfire, which killed two people, and destroyed almost 100 homes…
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-10-27/bom-csiro-forecast-more-hot-days-fire-season-climate-change/7968992

    related article on same page!

    31 Aug: ABC: South Australia’s bushfire danger lowest in years, outlook shows
    By Tom Fedorowytsch
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-08-31/south-australia-bushfire-danger-lower-due-to-soil-moisture/7802450

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    pat

    25 Oct: ProvidenceJournal: Voter rolls off by 189,000 in Rhode Island, Journal analysis finds
    Based on estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau, Rhode Island would be expected to have 592,672 registered voters.
    But the state has 781,770 people listed as eligible to vote in the Nov. 8 election, according to the voter registration database maintained by Secretary of State Nellie M. Gorbea. That’s an excess of 189,098.
    “Oh, my! Wow! Holy crap!” Brandon S. Bell, the state’s Republican Party chairman said in reaction to The Journal’s analysis. “I have to wrap my head around this, but that’s a really huge number.”
    After digesting it a bit further, he continued. “I wouldn’t want to throw out words like ‘fraud’ and ‘rigged,’ ” he said. “The integrity of the entire system is at stake.” How many eligible voters? …
    “Donald Trump talks about voter fraud,” said Rep. Joseph Trillo, the Republican presidential candidate’s honorary state campaign chairman. “If this is the case that there’s this many people, this is really of concern. What are the safeguards that these 189,000 people can’t vote in two jurisdictions?”
    “Voter fraud is very rare,” said Gorbea, a Democrat. “Elections are community exercises. There’s a lot of people involved.”…
    “I think it would be extremely difficult today for someone to vote who is fraudulent,” (state’s Democratic Party chairman Joseph) McNamara said. “I have complete confidence in the system.”
    Gorbea said that Rhode Islanders can “absolutely” trust the integrity of the state’s elections…
    “If there’s 189,000 people … there’s something very, very wrong going on,” he (Trillo) said. “It could just be pure stupidity or incompetence. But it’s surely going to end up in unfair elections. Guaranteed it’s going to benefit the Democrats.”
    http://www.providencejournal.com/news/20161025/voter-rolls-off-by-189000-in-ri-journal-analysis-finds

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    Royalties for West Australia Voters $38,000 Cash ?

    “A royalty is a payment to an owner for the use of property, especially patents, copyrighted works, franchises or natural resources.”

    Whereas a ‘Dividend’ is: a sum of money paid regularly (typically annually) by a company to its shareholders out of its profits (or reserves).

    Alaska residents to get $1,884 payout from oil royalty fund | Reuters
    http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-dividend-alaska-idUSKBN0HC2E320140917
    Sep 17, 2014 – But it is still off from a high of $2,069 paid in 2008. Alaska’s Permanent Fund was established by a constitutional amendment passed by voters in 1976 requiring a portion of state oil revenues be put into a savings account to be available for the distant future, when North Slope oil fields are tapped out.

    From a Canadian friend:
    The State of Alaska has been paying its citizens dividends for decades, the policy has been enormously popular and I have heard of no significant difficulties in practical administration of the program. It was opposed by the usual interests but to no avail.

    I understand that a couple of Alberta “Social Credit” Cabinet Ministers flew up to Juno at Governor Jay Hammond’s invitation to assist in formulating the Dividend plan. It was done promptly and has been continued to the present.

    With the collapse of oil prices the plan may be headed for some difficulties because the excess revenue from oil exports has been sourced for Dividend funds.
    Alaska is the only state that does not collect state sales tax or levy an individual income tax on any type of personal income, either earned or unearned. Instead, every Alaskan, children as well as adults, receives a payment each year from the Alaska Permanent Fund Corporation.

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    Streetcred

    Can’t find where to draw attention to this CSIRO alarmism that is being spread around

    http://www.swiftpage6.com/SpeClicks.aspx?X=2Y13O2VRIN6P8SYS0MF2WG

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    Perth Miner

    Why only rural voters! And please don’t tell me that it’s because that’s where the ore is extracted. Where do you think the money comes from to build the mines…certainly not the rural voters.

    Rather than a royalty, I would rather see a straight tax cut…cut out the bureaucrats. By the time a royalty gets churned through the tax office and gets back to the voter, at least half of it would be gone!

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    Mark D.

    Quoting Joanne:

    Real democracy starts with the freedom to vote with our wallets

    I think I get your intent here. However, be careful that bigger wallets don’t get more “democracy”.

    Precisely why our Founders set U.S. up as a Republic. Pure democracy has it’s own serious problems.

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    OriginalSteve

    Its spring, and right on cue, the garden neds a good dose of fertilizer…here’s some now….

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-10-27/extreme-heat-events-increasing-in-duration-frequency-bom-report/7965650

    “Temperatures in Australia — both in the air and on the sea surface — have warmed by a degree since 1910, the report said.

    It may not sound like much, but according to the Bureau of Meteorology’s Karl Braganza, it is a big deal.

    “It’s not significant when you think about the shift from night to day, but we’re talking about a shift in the actual climatology of Australia,” Dr Braganza said.

    “If you move from one climate zone to another in Australia — where there’s only a degree or two of difference — you’ll notice quite a different environment.”

    Yep…its warmer…funny that….t-shirts not jumpers….

    Natural variability anyone?

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      Graeme No.3

      We must move the ABC Headquarters from Sydney to Hobart to compensate for AGW. And cut their wages by 2% because they won’t need air-conditioning.
      Let it be mooted and see what changes in the ABC presentation.

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    pat

    “I love a sunburnt country”…

    Australian continent getting sunburnt
    NEWS.com.au-2 hours ago
    “Climate change is happening now, it’s having a tangible impact on Australia,” the Bureau of Meteorology’s climate monitoring manager Karl Braganza said.

    Climate is hotter, drier and more turbulent
    The Australian Financial Review – ‎14 hours ago

    Australia Climate Report Predicts More Hot Days and Harsher Fire Seasons
    New York Times – ‎12 hours ago‎
    Australia is viewed as a leading example of a developed country being hit hard by climate change

    This Scary Weather Graph Could Ruin Your Avocado Toast
    The Bureau of Meteorology’s latest report is frightening stuff
    Huffington Post – 4 hours ago

    APN regional paper, Chinchilla News, has a big,bizarre story today!! their Northern Rivers paper, Northern Star, also has it – why?

    27 Oct: Chinchilla News: General warns climate change refugee wars are coming
    And countries which attempted to deal with the coming crisis by resorting to “narrow nationalistic instincts” – for example, by building walls to keep out refugees – will only make the problem worse, according to Major General Munir Muniruzzaman, chairman of the Global Military Advisory Council On Climate Change (GMACCC)…
    The GMACCC was set up in 2009 to investigate the security implications of climate change and its members include serving and retired military officers from around the world, such as the UK’s Rear Admiral Neil Morisetti and Brigadier General Stephen Cheney, a former US Marine…
    But the solution might need a significant rethink of the whole concept of the modern nation, which is said by some historians to have been born out of the Peace of Westphalia treaty in 1648…
    “What has become more difficult now is we have boxed ourselves into the Westphalian system of states.
    “That is in conflict with nature, with the movement of people … we need to find a common ground.
    “We need leaders with vision … we have to have a global solution to the problem, this is a civilisational problem…
    http://www.chinchillanews.com.au/news/general-warns-climate-change-refugee-wars-are-comi/3104913/‎

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    pat

    can’t wait to (not) read it:

    26 Oct: Hollywood Reporter: AP: Michael Bloomberg Co-Authoring Climate Change Book
    Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is working with environmentalist Carl Pope on a book about climate change.
    St. Martin’s Press told the Associated Press on Wednesday that Overheated: How Cooler Heads Can Cool the World will come out April 18.
    According to St. Martin’s, Bloomberg and Pope hope to remove the “partisan rhetoric” and offer “viable, concrete solutions.”…
    Pope, executive director of the Sierra Club from 1992-2010, works with Bloomberg as a climate adviser.
    http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/michael-bloomberg-authoring-climate-change-book-941367

    ***anything that will keep politicians “more on their toes” is surely to be welcomed!

    26 Oct: Phys.org: Climate change: Voters will be hot under the collar by 2099
    By 2099 the nature of democratic politics could change in costly ways for politicians because of climate change, says Nick Obradovich of Harvard University in a paper in Springer’s journal Climatic Change. Leveraging a century’s worth of political science research, he predicts that voters’ disgruntlement about the societal effects of climatic extremes and weather-related disasters they experience will translate into more frequent turnover of political parties elected in and out of office, and will ***keep politicians of especially warmer, poorer countries more on their toes than is currently the case…
    He analyzed over 1.5 billion votes cast in over 4,800 electoral contests held in 19 countries between 1925 and 2011, and coupled it with meteorological data as well as climate models…
    http://phys.org/news/2016-10-climate-voters-hot-collar.html

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    pat

    26 Oct: Breitbart: CNBC Misleads on Renewable Energy
    by Steven Capozzola
    The business news network featured an article in the “Sustainable Energy” section of its Website that proclaimed: “Renewables surged past coal in 2015 to become world’s biggest source of electricity: IEA.”…
    The opening paragraph of the article by “Freelance digital reporter” Anmar Frangoul gives a clue as to the sleight of hand being used. Frangoul cites the International Energy Agency (IEA) as reporting that “Renewable energy moved past coal in 2015 to become the biggest source of global electricity capacity.” The key word there is “capacity.”
    What’s noteworthy is that capacity is far different from actual production…
    In contrast, and as the IEA itself notes, coal provided 40.8 percent of worldwide power generation in 2014. The renewables that Frangoul crows about—defined by the IEA as “geothermal, solar, wind, heat, etc.”—produced only 6.3 percent of all power…
    …the IEA astutely notes (LINK) that “renewable power expanded at its fastest-ever rate in 2015, thanks to supportive government policies.”…
    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2016/10/26/cnbc-misleads-renewable-energy/

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    pat

    defining Hurricanes?

    Phil Klotzbach is a Research Scientist in the Department of Atmospheric Science at Colorado State University; Brian McNoldy is a senior research associate at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science:

    26 Oct: WaPo: Hurricane intensity is not exaggerated to scare people, and here’s how we know
    By Phil Klotzbach and Brian McNoldy
    Drudge argued the point based on data from Caribbean weather stations and buoys that were not reporting winds as strong as what the National Hurricane Center used in its advisories. But the National Hurricane Center uses a lot of different methods to determine a hurricane’s actual peak intensity, and there are some serious issues with relying simply on weather stations and buoys.
    The National Hurricane Center — or NHC — uses a variety of satellite-based tools to estimate a hurricane’s winds when the storm is far from land, and as the storm moves closer to land, additional devices are employed…BLAH BLAH
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2016/10/26/no-hurricane-intensity-is-not-exaggerated-to-scare-people-and-heres-how-we-know/

    UNISON is Scotland’s public service union, so Dave probably isn’t concerned about Scotland’s reckless rush into renewables, but he does pick up on a defining matter:

    25 Oct: UnisonDaveBlog: We need a new strategy to end fuel poverty
    The Scottish Government has missed the statutory target to eradicate fuel poverty this year by some distance. So, new reports on fuel poverty should be welcomed, but only if they are quickly followed by a new strategy.
    According to the latest statistics (2014), there are 35% or around 845,000 households living in fuel poverty in Scotland, and 9.5% (229,000 households) living in extreme fuel poverty. This high rate of fuel poverty is largely unchanged since 2009, and has doubled since the Scottish Government‟s fuel poverty target was set in 2002…
    The Strategic Working Group has made 4 high level recommendations:
    #4 The Scottish Government should review the current ***definition of fuel poverty and establish a policy objective and monitoring programme that addresses all four causes of fuel poverty…
    It would be hard to disagree with the recommendations in these reports, although it is strange that the Scottish Government ***chose to highlight a review of the definition of fuel poverty in their press release. The definition probably does need reviewing, but leading with that gives the impression that the problem can be wished away with a new definition…
    http://unisondave.blogspot.com.au/2016/10/we-need-new-strategy-to-end-fuel-poverty.html

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    pat

    a must-read:

    26 Oct: National Review: Robert Bryce: How the Center for American Progress campaigned to suppress speech
    (Robert Bryce is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute)
    Perhaps the tawdriest story to be exposed by Podesta’s pilfered e-mails is the bragging by an employee of ThinkProgress, an arm of the Center for American Progress, about how they got Roger Pielke Jr.’s scalp.
    A July 2014 e-mail from Judd Legum, an editor at ThinkProgress, to billionaire Democratic climate activist (and former coal-mine investor) Tom Steyer exposes the climate-change McCarthyism that the Left — and its myriad allies in the liberal media — use to discredit or silence anyone who doesn’t adhere to the orthodoxy of the climate catastrophists…
    This week I spoke to Pielke by phone. Asked for his initial reaction to the ThinkProgress e-mail, he replied, “I was just a professor with a blog. I had no funding. Really? They are going to go brag to a billionaire to shut down a professor with a blog? If that’s the case, I guess I was doing some pretty good stuff.”…
    “Nothing less than removing my voice from the public space was acceptable.”…
    The WikiLeaks story about Pielke has, predictably, been ignored by the liberal media…READ ALL
    http://www.nationalreview.com/article/441438/

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    pat

    26 Oct: ABC11: Donald and Melania Trump sit down in exclusive interview with ‘Good Morning America’
    With less than two weeks until the presidential election, Donald Trump and his wife Melania sat down in an exclusive interview with George Stephanopolous to air on Thursday’s Good Morning America…
    In the interview, Trump addressed criticism on the amount of time he’s focused on his own businesses during his campaign and stated that his opponent Hillary Clinton took time off for less demanding reasons.
    “I built one of the great hotels of the world. What am I supposed to do, not show up? I’m taking one hour off. I’m going to North Carolina right after this, then I’m going back down to Florida. I’m going up to New Hampshire. I’m all over the place,” Trump said in the exclusive interview.
    “She has no energy. She’s got nothing going. She does one stop. And nobody complains about that. Nobody complains when she goes to an Adele concert all night long, while I’m making two speeches at rallies with, you know, massive crowds.”
    Trump also addressed in the interview criticism he has received about his military strategy. “You can tell your military expert that I’ll sit down and I’ll teach him a couple of things,” Trump told Stephanopolous…
    http://abc11.com/politics/donald-and-melania-trump-sit-down-in-exclusive-interview-with-good-morning-america/1574657/

    apparently Stephanopolous interviewed Trump after the opening of his new hotel in DC today.
    Drudge posted Trump’s speech at the opening & asked: “TRUMP’S BEST SPEECH?”.

    videos of the 10-min speech are being pulled down, but i found this one, which i was able to watch just now:

    Full Video: Trump opens new hotel in D C, praises Newt Gingrich
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YgLezYPhYmU

    comments at FreeRepublic:
    This was the media’s anti-Trump meme of the day: “Waaa! He is taking time off for business!”
    Crooked media.
    No candidate has ever campaigned as hard as Trump has…
    Trump is not afraid to go into enemy territory unlike Hillary.

    Wikipedia: Stephanopoulos rose to early prominence as a Communications Director for the 1992 U.S. Presidential Campaign of Bill Clinton, subsequently becoming White House Communications Director, then Senior Advisor for Policy and Strategy… Stephanopoulos is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations…
    Stephanopoulos donated $25,000 in 2012, 2013, and 2014, a total of $75,000, to the Clinton Foundation, but did not disclose the donations to ABC News, his employer, or to his viewers…Stephanopoulos failed to reveal the donations even on April 26, 2015, while interviewing Peter Schweizer, the author of Clinton Cash…
    The story was broken by The Washington Free Beacon…
    Based on Stephanopoulos’ donations to The Clinton Foundation charity and his behavior during prior interviews and presidential debates, Republican party leaders and candidates expressed their distrust, and called for him to be banned from moderating 2016 Presidential debates, due to bias and conflict of interest…

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    KinkyKeith

    There’s nothing that excites people more than money so it’s great to have this type of post being done to inform voters.

    Just how much money is there sloshing around in these war chests that are unmonitored by any objective standard.
    The recent article about Hillary Clinton’s slush fund was a real eye-opener.

    It’s one thing to take money and abuse the voters in your own country but to then find groups to cause disturbances and undermine another country is absolutely appalling.

    Is this interference in our national affairs legal simply because those doing it are protected by a vaguely defined charity status?

    KK

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