JoNova

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One of the most famous skeptics in the world just died — but who’s going to mention that

They couldn’t cancel Prince Philip, but the media have cancelled that he was a skeptic of climate change.

Prince Philip not only read Ian Plimer’s books, and said good things about him, he wrote, thanked and endorsed him on official letterhead. He organised a speech for Plimer at the Royal Society of Artists (which then cancelled by other people).

The Duke of Edinburgh was a fan of David Bellamy and Christopher Booker too. He invited Bellamy to give a lecture at Buckingham Palace and wrote a “long and thoughtful” letter to Christopher Booker.

So while the BBC et al are lavishly and justifiably praising the Great Duke, they prefer not to mention that he thought wind farms were “useless” “monstrosities” that were ‘completely reliant on subsidies’ and ‘would never work’. The Australian ABC found time to say that he once made a joke asking whether Australian Aboriginals still threw spears at each other. The ABC called it a “faux pas” as if the Duke might have been asking it seriously, or aboriginals might not have a sense of humor? (There’s that soft racism again).

So his opinion on national energy policy is not worth discussing, but a one liner from nineteen years ago that didn’t offend anyone, is?

We all know that if the Duke of Edinburgh had donated funds to Al Gore we’d be hearing all about it (again).

Prince Philip, climate sceptic, already spinning in his grave

Rowan Dean, The Spectator

Here is the letter from Windsor castle, dated 29 April 2018: …

What is extraordinary about that letter is that as well as confirming the Prince’s admiration for the Professor, it points out that the Royal Family should have nothing to do with the politics of climate change. Yet today, a decade on, both future monarchs Prince Charles and Prince William, the former in particular in advocating the Great Reset and embracing Greta Thunberg, and the latter in his fondness for Sir David Attenborough, are in climate politics up to their eyeballs.

Duke Edinburgh, Climate Change, Letter to Ian Plimer.

Duke Edinburgh, Climate Change, Letter to Ian Plimer.

 

From the GWPF

It is with deep sadness that we learn of the death of HRH Prince Philip, who passed earlier today. The GWPF offers its condolences to Her Majesty the Queen and the Royal Family on the death of the Duke of Edinburgh. Prince Philip, an  environmental campaigner and fellow climate realist, will be profoundly missed. 

9.9 out of 10 based on 128 ratings

195 comments to One of the most famous skeptics in the world just died — but who’s going to mention that

  • #
    ivan

    At least one person stepped up and acknowledged his stand against the green stupidity.

    https://www.breitbart.com/europe/2021/04/09/delingpole-rip-prince-philip-the-last-royal-climate-sceptic/

    472

    • #
      OldOzzie

      Loved the Comment

      One such was the time ten years ago when the Duke was evidently infuriated by an encounter with a wind turbine operator. The man’s name was Esbjorn Wilmar, managing director of Infinergy, one of the companies blighting Britain’s seascape with offshore windturbines. Wilmar impertinently suggested that the Duke install wind turbines on his royal property. The Duke, as the Mail reported, gave him short shrift.

      Mr Wilmar said he introduced himself to the 90-year-old Duke at a reception and suggested he put wind turbines on royal property.

      ‘He said that they were absolutely useless, completely reliant on subsidies and an absolute disgrace. I was surprised by his very frank views,’ he said.

      When Mr Wilmar tried to argue that onshore turbines are one of the most cost-effective forms of renewable energy, the Duke apparently replied: ‘You don’t believe in fairy tales do you?’

      Mr Wilmar added: ‘He said they would never work as they need back-up capacity.’

      And the Duke apparently told him: ‘You stay away from my estate young man.’

      The Duke’s muscular views inevitably brought him into conflict with his woke whelp the Prince of Wales who is, of course, a notorious climate alarmist and relentless green campaigner.

      582

    • #
      Mal

      Unlike his son Prince Charles who lives in the green utopian fantasy world
      I can see a backlash against the royals after the queen passes on and Charles takes over

      342

      • #
        Sceptical Sam

        Yep.

        If the Republican movement manages to get itself sorted out by removing the dills running the show at the moment, we could see a resurgence of the push as soon as the idiot child takes over.

        Of course, Mal the greenies pal, who is up to his ears in everything that undermines the future prosperity of Australia, would need to be the first one ousted. Followed by the red-bandanaed dill.

        They’d need to leave the Constitution pretty much untouched. Just change the name “Governor-General” to “President” and have the Government of the day appoint the President in place of seeking Her Majesty’s sign-off, as at present.

        153

        • #
          Peter C

          That solves a few problems but does not answer the issue of the reserve power to call an election.

          If Sir John Kerr was answerable to the ‘government of the day”, instead of the sovereign power he would not have been able to act to dismiss a tragic and misguided government.

          93

          • #
            Sceptical Sam

            Surely a President would hold the reserve power. He would just need to legally exercise it and release the decision before the government of the day could dismiss him.

            Once the decision to dismiss the was exercised the government would no longer have the power to sack the President. It’s all a question of who gets in first. In the end, if there were issues, the High Court would decide.

            44

            • #
              Peter C

              If you say So.

              It is an important question. It should not be a matter of who gets in first.

              52

              • #
                Sceptical Sam

                Peter C,

                I don’t “say so”. I’m merely suggesting.

                However, I can’t see how the situation in 1975 was any different.

                Had Gough got in first and sacked the GG then the GG would not be in a position to sack Gough. However, Gough was too full of his own whatever and missed his chance.

                41

              • #
                ColA

                SS,

                I don’t think Gough could of sacked the GC, as I understand it, the GC is appointed by the Queen on the recommendation of parliament so it is thew Queen who sacks the GC. Which she may or may not have done for Gough, thankfully she did not get asked to sack him, that would have put her in a real no win position.

                31

              • #
                Sceptical Sam

                thew Queen who sacks the GC.

                Correct.

                However, (according to Wikipedia) “a governor-general may be recalled or dismissed by the monarch before their term is complete. By convention, this may only be upon advice from the prime minister, who retains responsibility for selecting an immediate replacement or letting the vacancy provisions take effect”.

                11

            • #
              Kalm Keith

              Nope.

              11

          • #
            Kalm Keith

            A Good point Peter, and it ultimately comes down to trust.

            I think we trusted the Queen to give the appropriate yea or nay to our GGs petition.

            No such trust would be forthcoming from me in the event that Prince Charles had to assess similar situations, so a republic seems the next step for us.

            The reason that the last vote fell through was that Australians could see that a Turnbull Presidency was waiting in the wings; totally unacceptable.

            One thing’s for sure, we need a relief mechanism to intervene in the event that Our Government loses its way again.

            KK

            61

      • #
        Speedy

        Long Live the Queen!

        121

  • #
    tom0mason

    As much as I disagree with the whole idea of British Royalty, I do understand that Prince Philip was (what appears to be) the last person in a position of power, who argued against the increasingly hysterical climate worrier loonies, and the ‘cancel culture’ of the politically correct mobs. Unfortunately however he was a Malthusian at heart.

    193

    • #
      Mikky

      Are you sure? I’m unaware of him arguing against anything in particular, and he had no power, he just did his job as the Queen’s husband very well. The only Malthusian comment I’m aware of is to do with the excessive number of useless MPs in the UK Parliament.

      Sceptics tend to talk only about things they consider to be important, hence the one-sided nature of Climate Change comments from public figures.

      116

    • #
      MrGrimNasty

      No he wasn’t a malthusian – I suggest you understand his sense of humour and check the context of the ‘virus’ quote you are referring to – much misused by the anti-royal hate mob.

      223

  • #
    Ted O’Brien.

    I recall a report of Prince Phillip in the 1960s standing on a balcony in North Africa looking down on a crowd, saying: “What can I do for them?”

    It was a pretty impossible job.

    192

  • #
    Phillip Bratby

    The BBC has gone out of its way to call Prince Philip an environmentalist. But it has also gone out of its way to avoid mentioning his climate change scepticism and his opinion on useless wind turbines.

    442

  • #

    I’m sure those Aborigines were amused rather than insulted. They need only have suggested that spears were preferable to bombs if they wanted to get in a riposte. Philip would have enjoyed it if they had countered him in that way.
    He was an excellent example of a witty, wide ranging thinker who never took personal offence whatever was said to him and expected his listeners to be the same. He did take offence at time wasters and woolly thinkers whatever their ethnicity or background but that is a good trait in my view.

    462

    • #
      Yonniestone

      The real story behind that quip is the same tribe did a demonstration of spear throwing at each other a few years earlier for Phillip and it was a simple question with a humorous innuendo that was naturally taken out of context by the MSM, can appreciate a dry wit and his was no exception.

      412

      • #
        John F Hultquist

        Woke folks and climate cult folks (repeating myself) know very little about anything and have no sense of humor.

        232

  • #
    Graham Richards

    Bring on The Australian Republic. When Charles or William become the monarch I’m afraid that will be the end of GB as we know it.
    Start a slow & well planned move to becoming a Republic now. Save the need to move too quickly & risk errors in a new constitution.
    The “new, coming monarchy” will only disadvantage Australia & more than likely the whole commonwealth. It’ll suffer a similar fate to the EU. Reset, build back better clap trap & all!!

    2410

    • #

      Graham

      Can you clarify your comments? What do you mean it will suffer a similar fate to the EU?

      22

      • #
        Graham Richards

        Tonyb,
        30 years ago the EEC was launched with much fanfare as the European Economic Community.
        Over time it has been constantly, under the guise of a trading block, been engineered to become a very large socialist political dictatorship & the people of Europe today have no control over the unelected bureaucracy in Brussels. State governments do exactly what the EU order under threat of huge economic & other penalties.
        The EU experiment is the forerunner of the UN plans for world government. Brexit has really thrown that plan into confusion but we’re already starting to see activities to try to reverse that.
        You must pay more attention to their actions which are always aimed at maintaining & increasing influence. Keep an eye on the sudden but disturbing border situation in Northern Ireland. Nothing like a bit of unrest to try to get UK to reopen negotiations. Agitation in the Irish republic will soon kick in!

        272

    • #
      Yonniestone

      What model for a Republic Graham? the 1999 version where the parliament make the final decision of leader or the USA where a reset is still possible when things go bad, note that when the 1999 referendum was done 55% voted no 45% yes, 45%!! that’s a lot of people willing to hand over their one true democratic power to anyone to use on their behalf.

      Then consider where we are now, constitutional laws overridden by surveys, Prime Ministers swapped during their terms to appease the party. polls and the press, illegal lock downs, border closures and use of force by police, the sales of assets and resources, signing of treaties, and political insider trading with foreign powers or entities without the consideration or consent from Australian citizens.

      It would appear the 1999 model was brought in by stealth and that 45% figure was enough to give them the balls to try it, give me the USA model and we have a chance to turn that number around even a chance is better than the alternative we face.

      202

      • #
        glen Michel

        Minimilist; substitute GG with a popularly elected President with the same ceremonial station; no dismissal of elected government. The selection process should sift the chaff from the hay. French system or German for that matter seems unobtrusive to my understanding. I think for matters concerning national pride such a move – to a properly constituted republic would work. Thanks RH Philip for your service to Empire and Commonwealth.

        35

        • #
          Richard Owen No.3

          Do you really think that the French system selects the best candidate? Macron v Le Pen.
          Still that is a real improvement on Turnbull v Shorten, so you may have a point.

          112

        • #
          Richard Jenkins

          Glen,
          The reason the Republic vote faied was becaue the selection of Pesident was addressed.
          Constitutinal professors cannot find a method and when Republicans they hope a method will be invented.
          Charles is manipulated by mob opinions but he will keep out of our politics as has his mum.
          We are totally independant. The GG has great power but keeps out of politics.
          A President with an electrol mandate would wreak our system.
          Imagine President Malcolm or President Kevin.
          If it’s not broke don’t fix it.
          Let King Charles III yabba away in England. We can laugh here but keep his GG from politics, appointed for short terms by our goevernment and able to be dismissed by them. Cutting ribbons and making dignified speeches on specal occaisions whilst avoiding politcs is good head of state.

          42

      • #
        Graham Richards

        I’m sure you noticed the last Republican Movement’s attempt at a stealthy ATTEMPT at a “quick fix”
        with as little debate as possible. A signature of Turnbull BS baffles brains way of thinking!

        That’s why I specifically suggest the process be started now to lay down the basics of a future Republic, carefully, slowly, risk averse, & most importantly free of BS artists like the discarded one!

        Neither of us are experts in the field of constitutional law etc but we could make contributions via a contribution to the debate focused on the best possible outcome for all.

        The earlier one starts a journey the earlier a successful journey can be completed.

        64

        • #
          Yonniestone

          That’s a good lateral way to go about it and in the process educate the people on the way a fair system would work for them, problem is the self interested minorities with the control they have over the MSM and public broadcasters would never allow a fair debate to occur, look at the way a failed hypothesis has been elevated in status enough to rewrite policies and laws in this and other countries!

          92

      • #
        graham dunton

        give me the USA model, yes it does have merit, it is under an extreme test right now, as it has been circumvented by the deep state for some time?

        If Charles becomes King, it will spurn a new British comedy series, here comes the king?

        21

    • #
      Annie

      I’m not aware of any republic that would serve better than the British Monarchy. Just take a good look at present day republics, yuk, no thankyou.

      204

    • #
      Hasbeen

      Any changes to the constitution will be mostly in error, & will do nothing good for anyone, except the lawyers who will be rolling in money from challenges of interpretation for decades.

      62

  • #
    Gerry

    Didn’t see any mentions of the Duke of Edinburgh Awards…….challenging young people to be their best ……. perhaps the journalists of today don’t know the Duke of Edinburg was …or maybe making the best of yourself doesn’t fir with the beloved victim culture

    [Slight edit]AD

    262

    • #

      Over here there has been a great deal of coverage of the awards with most commentators including the BBC reckoning that it will be Philips longest lasting legacy

      132

      • #
        OldOzzie

        Ex PM Tony Abbott: Why I was right to give Prince Philip a knighthood

        Hi decision to honour Prince Philip with a knighthood cost him dearly, but former PM Tony Abbott has no regrets in wanting to pay tribute to a decent man

        Prince Philip had been part of the wartime naval defence of Australia, he’d opened the 1956 Melbourne Olympics, visited our country more than 20 times, and inspired the Duke of Edinburgh Award gained by three quarters of a million young Australians.

        If that wasn’t service to our country, what was?

        I hope it gave him some satisfaction in his last years, especially as it’s so clear now — if not to everyone then — how much he deserved it.

        532

        • #
          Dennis

          PM Abbott did not “give Prince Philip a knighthood”, are those the words of Tony Abbott or a newspaper journalist?

          The fact is that while PM Abbott was not in a position to defend his NOMINATION for Prince Philip to new awarded a Knighthood by The Queen for services to the Commonwealth of Nations, of which the Commonwealth of Australia is one member nation, PM Abbott was asked by “Buckingham Palace” for a nomination from Australia, I understand other leaders also nominated Prince Philip.

          113

          • #
            Richard Jenkins

            Dennis,There was a lot of flack about nominting Phillip.
            To his credit Abbott took the flak off the govrnment and the Libs. Tony said it was ‘a captain’s call’ and explained his personal reasoning.

            40

            • #
              Dennis

              I have remained surprised that people did not work out that an award, the Knighthood to Prince Philip by the Queen for his services to the Commonwealth of Nations, would involve nominations from Commonwealth governments.

              Australia, Prime Minister Tony Abbott, was one of those nations.

              31

    • #
      glen Michel

      Since that has been replaced by the the collectivist low bar any child who shows excellence goes back of the line.

      153

    • #
      David Maddison

      The Duke of Edinburgh Awards are not mentioned because the Left abhors individual achievement, excellence and reward for effort.

      342

      • #

        But they are mentioned. A lot.

        Did you falsely state this just so you could blame the “left”.

        Is there anything that is not the fault of this left you fear?

        323

        • #
          Dennis

          The left are of course people who in politics are left of centre, the far-left are therefore far away from the centre, like Greens (Watermelons) and the far-left factions of The Australian Labor Party.

          Some here might remember the split between The Australian Labor Party and The Australian Democratic Labor Party in the 1950s, the DLP formed to enable centre-left to get away from the far-left Communist-Marxist and other fellow travellers.

          Menzies’ Australian Liberal Party is a centre to centre-right party however the break away leftists sometimes called moderates are centre-left and further to the left and as the Labor factions are often at war with one another the Lib-Turn LINO (Liberal In Name Only) are effectively at war with the centre-right real Liberals.

          Australia does not have far-right groups of any real significance or power base.

          132

          • #
            Peter C

            Australia does not have far-right groups of any real significance or power base.

            True. I don’t think I would call any of Australia’s political parties ‘far right’. None of them call for the end of democracy. Push back against wokeness is not ‘far right’.

            102

        • #
          Kalm Keith

          We need more circles, they’re much more inclusive, and no sharp corners.

          01

  • #
    el gordo

    Extraterrestrials and all that, he was ahead of his time.

    ‘It is believed his interest was sparked by his uncle, Lord Mountbatten, who wrote an official report about a flying saucer landing at his Broadlands estate in Romsey, Hampshire.

    Prince Philip reportedly spent the summer of 2019 reading The Halt Perspective which explores the Rendlesham Forest Incident which has been dubbed “Britain’s Roswell”. (Inews)

    84

  • #
    David Maddison

    Even though he was joking with the quip about Aborigines spearing each other, and Aboriginals understood that, it is nevertheless true that Aboriginals still spear each other.

    Even extreme Marxist SBS admits that.

    A man who bashed his girlfriend to death in outback South Australia faces a traditional Aboriginal spearing after he serves more than 20 years in jail for manslaughter and rape.

    https://www.sbs.com.au/nitv/nitv-news/article/2016/10/14/sa-man-faces-traditional-aboriginal-spearing-punishment

    202

  • #
    TdeF

    It’s interesting that even Prince Phillip, a perceptive straight forward person, saw through what is now called Climate Change. It is interesting to note how the scare has changed from 2008 Global Warming to 2018 Climate Change. And we are forced to go along, now with no promise of global warming at all.

    As activist and perennial Climate job seeker Dr. Glasson demonstrated in the Australian, it is now about a nebulous thing called Climate Change which means in his view, rapid cycling of La Nina and El Nino and relative sea rise, one part of the ocean more than another. Importantly the idea that the planet is going to warm has been dropped completely from his list and so has CO2! Our military need to be worried about Climate Change far more than Chinese expansionism. I think the real problem is handing out PhDs for fiction.

    And note that Climate Change has no connection with science. Or CO2. But we are told it can be stopped with windmills and solar panels and electric cars and the total elimination of fossil fuels, cows, sheep, cars, planes, meat, termites and rats and people in Western democracies only. And socialism and massive taxation and total government control is the key to safety from Climate Change. So it’s know your enemy and the enemy is Climate Change.

    I do not know the total of giant windmills, 300,000 a few years ago. But at least it is working. The world appears to be cooling rapidly as predicted, despite the laughable attempts in the press to find places which did not suffer their coldest winter in decades. Soon it will not matter. Because rapid Global cooling is also Climate Change. And your fault.

    362

    • #
      Richard Owen No.3

      When you ask these believers (if you can get a word in edgewise) why we must sacrifice our standard of living when 67% of CO2 emissions come from countries that don’t have any restrictions, you always get the stock reply “we must set an example”. With the sudden upsurge in new coal fired plants in Africa and Asia I think we have got a message across.

      242

    • #
      Peter C

      Rapid Cooling here in Melbourne TdeF.
      Last weekend was indian summer. This weekend the depths of winter

      132

      • #
        Greg in NZ

        C’mon Peter, that’s Obama’s policies finally kicking in…

        Dams full to overflowing; ski slopes covered in early-season snow; sub-zero temps up on the tops: who will think of the koalas and roos and wannabes!

        Meanwhile it’s pleasantly warm & humid & tropical here in Jacindaland.

        142

      • #
        Annie

        Snow in Marysville today, sleet in Buxton. Cold, sometimes semi-sleety rain where we are. Luvverly. Come back warmth!

        92

      • #
        TdeF

        The same in London where the news enthusiastically trumpeted the warmest first days of Easter in many years. Followed by a huge drop in temperature for one of the coldest days. Reporting warm days seems to be the only objective of the twitterati who still hold to some crazy idea of Global Warming. It’s Climate Change, dummy. Warming is so Y2K. Remember that scare? Aircraft falling out the sky. Nuclear missiles launching themselves. Elevators breaking down. And when nothing happened, everyone said what a good job they did.

        142

    • #
      Dennis

      It frustrates and angers me that so many voters and politicians seem to accept the climate hoax and creatively accounted warming trend despite people like UN Official Christiana Figureres admitting (October 2015 just before the Paris Conference) that climate change is a diversion, the real agenda is to destroy free market capitalism that has of course provided the numerous benefits people in developed countries enjoy and developing countries benefit from via foreign aid.

      Climate titled political manipulation and propaganda.

      162

  • #
    David Maddison

    Quoted from elsewhere:

    At a World Wildlife Fund meeting, 1986: “If it has got four legs and it is not a chair, if it has got two wings and it flies but is not an aeroplane, and if it swims and it is not a submarine, the Cantonese will eat it.”

    When asked if he would like to touch a koala while in Sydney in 1992: “Oh no, I might catch some ghastly disease.”

    While chatting to a fashion writer Serena French, 1993: “You’re not wearing mink knickers, are you?”

    Chatting to a British man during a visit to Budapest, 1993: “You can’t have been here that long – you haven’t got a pot belly.”

    To a group of businessmen in the Cayman Islands, 1994: “Aren’t most of you descended from pirates?”

    While speaking to female solicitor: “I thought it was against the law these days for a woman to solicit.”

    Shouting at the Queen, from the deck of the Britannia, while she spoke to their hosts on the quay during an official visit to Belize, 1994: “Yak, yak, yak; come on get a move on.”

    Of daughter, Princess Anne: “If it doesn’t fart or eat hay, she isn’t interested.”

    452

    • #
      TdeF

      All very enjoyable. A real hero who did not believe the promises of Adolph, so unlike Malcolm Turnbull’s Great Uncle, George Lansbury. In hindsight it is amazing that anyone believed Hitler. I am not surprised that Queen Elizabeth and Sir Phillip had no interest in rehabilitating her uncle Edward VIII.

      Britain survived the horror years despite Edward VIII and Lansbury and Chamberlain. And now the enemies of the very successful Anglophone world want to get rid of the British monarchy, introduce socialism (Hitler’s and Mussolini’s Fascists were the National Socialists) and put an unholy alliance of communists and big business in power, which is Fascism. And make sure the people are helpless against their brownshirts and blackshirts and Antifa.

      This was also attempted by Victoria’s Daniel Andrews who legislated a paramilitary force outside the army and police with powers of arrest and indefinite detention outside the rule of law. And where would they put these people? Concentration camps run by an unaccountable private army, Government approved and paid with your taxes. Like his inner city Hotel scheme with his private ‘security’ company, a decision which has not been explained and which no one made after midnight on a Sunday morning.

      It is amazing that this appalling Law easily passed the Victorian lower house only to be stopped by two Green votes in the upper house! Nothing like this had been seen in an English democracy since 1933 in Berlin. And we can only presume driven by his private and improper State deal with China. Again, nothing more is said in the press.

      Prince Phillip lived through an era of real evil. The Wu Flu and Belt and Road and Victorian Premier Daniel Andrew’s behaviour cannot be dismissed. He should be subject to his own brutal law which makes him personally liable for the manslaughter of most of the poor souls in Australia, 820 of 909 nationally. And his ‘accident’ needs explanation.

      432

      • #
        Analitik

        A proper, wartime serving naval officer for his adopted country, too. Not someone just endowed with a politically motivated military rank.

        I will add that his knighthood bestowed by Tony Abbot WAS a politically motivated endowment and the most pointless act of his Prime Ministerial term. Plus it ended up just providing his opposition (media, other parties and the Turncoat faction) with material with which to attack him.

        47

  • #
    William

    RIP my long time favourite Royal, and sincere condolences to her Majesty the Queen.

    232

  • #
    Old Goat

    Prince Phillip was a pragmatist . He worked with what he saw as practical means to achieve the best solutions . He was not perfect but no one is . Today fantasy trumps reality and rationality is rare (except here). R.I.P.

    172

    • #
      Hanrahan

      The good Prince managed to ruffle feathers occasionally. I have fond memories of his “Indian electrician” comment

      During a visit to an electronics factory in Scotland, Prince Philip saw a messy fuse box and said it looked “as though it was put in by an Indian”. Within hours, Buckingham Palace said: “The Duke of Edinburgh regrets any offence which may have been caused by remarks he is reported as making earlier today. With hindsight, he accepts what were intended as light-hearted comments were inappropriate.”

      62

  • #
    Ruairi

    The late Prince Philip the Duke,
    Had on climate the skeptic’s outlook,
    Gave the realist sort,
    An ear at the Court,
    And enjoyed a sound skeptical book.

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    […] JoNova – In the age of flamboyant woke British Royals who demand climate sacrifices from the […]

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    […] JoNova – In the age of flamboyant woke British Royals who demand climate sacrifices from the […]

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  • #
    Tilba Tilba

    I don’t like cancel culture very much, and nor selective biographies and obituaries.

    However I think people are trying to be nice and respectful to Prince Philip. The media, and official spokespeople, do not want to sully or besmirch his reputation, by pointing out that he was a global warming sceptic-denier. And didn’t like wind turbines on the landscape much either.

    Saying he admired Ian Plimer’s book wouldn’t be seen as very complimentary either, given Plimer’s global warming denialism, his track record, and his association with Big Coal and Big Mining.

    Anyway – Landline is interesting today. A long story about landowners being paid for not farming, out in southwest Queensland (earning carbon-credit cash for growing mulga trees), and in other news, farming productivity worldwide (and in Australia) has dropped 20-25% because of global warming over the last six decades. There you go.

    Cold, windy, wet, and wintry in Melbourne today … summer may be over.

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    • #
      el gordo

      Phil was sceptical about AGW theory and he also believed in UFO, its not a crime.

      Growing back the mulga is ok, but what is your opinion on bringing water to the MDB from Papua New Guinea?

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      • #
        Tilba Tilba

        Of course it’s not a crime … but it looks a bit icky if you’re trying to gloss the guy’s obituary, and it needs a lot of glossing.

        But he did enough good things I reckon to more than balance out the comical, inappropriate, and totally tone-deaf ones. His appalling judgement as to what a “joke” was is nearly matched by my father’s foot-in-mouth disease.

        I don’t have a strong view about shipping excess water from Port Moresby to Mildura – but it’s all downhill isn’t it? Actually when we lived in Alice Springs (with its beautiful bore water) we were told it was a million years old and came there from PNG.

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        • #
          Ross Holding

          Your claim of falling agricultural production is totally wrong..”.the share of land devoted to agriculture (37 % of world land surface) hasn’t changed since 1990, according to a 2015:2030 FAO/UN perspective report. We have been able to feed 34% more people in that time and feed them better than ever, using the same amount of land. “

          201

          • #
            Tilba Tilba

            It wasn’t my claim, digger … it was them watermelons wot have invaded and taken over Landline wot said it! It use to be the Cocky’s Friend until it went all commie and hippie!

            60

            • #
              OldOzzie

              I don’t know about Watermelons but the Chinese are sure giving it a go in Australia

              Chinese owner’s ‘catastrophic failure’ drives Australia’s biggest dairy farm into the ground

              Australia’s largest and oldest dairy farm has been hit with claims of animal welfare abuse and overstocking of cattle leading to effluent overflow that is damaging waterways.

              The Chinese owners of Australia’s biggest and oldest dairy farming business are facing fresh scrutiny following claims of animal welfare abuse and overstocking of cattle that is causing effluent systems to fail and damaging nearby waterways.

              Confidential documents, photographs and accounts from employees and locals obtained by The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age reveal that conditions at Tasmania’s iconic Van Dairy farm have been deteriorating since its 2016 takeover by China’s Moon Lake investments.

              The business, which was founded in 1825 and today comprises 23 farms and 30,000 cows was sold to Moon Lake for $280 million in a deal approved by then-treasurer and current Prime Minister Scott Morrison. Its biggest customers include New Zealand dairy giant Fonterra, which makes the Mainland cheese and Western Star butter brands.

              Photographs obtained by this masthead, most of which were taken in December 2020, show farms in disrepair with effluent overflowing as drainage systems fail to cope with the number of cows on the properties. Other photos show skinny cows, dead cows and a 1000 litre cube container three-quarters full of dead calves.

              The images are in sharp contrast to Van Dairy’s website which spruiks its Van fresh milk product as “milk from healthy cows grazing on lush green pasture in the most pure place on earth”.

              WARNING: Graphic imagery

              The Foreign Investment Review Board (FIRB), which scrutinises international takeovers, attached undertakings to the 2016 deal including requirements that Moon Lake employ an additional 95 staff and invest $100 million into the business.

              However, five years on insiders say the conditions have not been met and many skilled staff have been replaced by foreign workers who haven’t been sufficiently trained. An update in May shows staff numbers are virtually stagnant at 145 full-time employees and 34 casuals, while capital investment disclosed since 2016 totals $20.1 million.

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              • #
                Tilba Tilba

                The business, which was founded in 1825 and today comprises 23 farms and 30,000 cows was sold to Moon Lake for $280 million in a deal approved by then-treasurer and current Prime Minister Scott Morrison.

                That is a really tragic story.

                I appreciate that Van Dairies wasn’t a little family cottage industry, but big business, and presumably its owners were happy to pocket $280 million. It’s also clear that Australia needs foreign investment – and in fact always has since European occupation – but selling off the farm (literally) always irks me.

                I wonder if anyone will have the strength and authority to make them fix it?

                And the FIRB Has always been a pretty toothless regulatory agency … the pressure from all sorts of vested interests (vendors, politicians) means that it hardly ever stops anything unless it is really strategic. And even so, the Chinese own the Port of Darwin.

                40

            • #
              Ross

              Fair enough TT- but don’t think by watching Landline you’re getting some up to date picture of Australian rural life or modern agriculture. This program has the same bias that occurs with most other ABC programming. I stopped watching it years ago as it was neither factual or current. The other favourite by some people is “Back roads” on the ABC. Again, token journalism which doesn’t give a real perspective on rural life.

              81

              • #
                Tilba Tilba

                I like Landline, Back Roads, and other rural stuff – I don’t watch to get a “real” view of Rural Australia, but they are informative and entertaining. I have known two Landline reporters pretty well (both from Territory days), and they were the real deal – grew up in farming communities far from cities – knew one end of a cow from the other.

                10

              • #
                Tilba Tilba

                But wait there’s more …

                … the Landline News reported that the crop-destroying frost that ravaged French vineyards last week was caused by climate change. The logic is that an above-average warm period for the last few months (of winter) has made the grape crop ripen too early, and this late but not unprecedented frost has wrecked the over-developed fruit.

                10

              • #
                el gordo

                The reason France enjoyed that warm spell was because the NAO was positive, nothing to do with global warming.

                https://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/precip/CWlink/pna/nao_index.html

                11

              • #
                el gordo

                The damage was caused by ‘unseasonably cold temperatures, especially at night.’

                This coming European summer, will it be cool and wet or warm and dry?

                01

        • #
          glen Michel

          Same said about Katherine/ Barkley and the Jardine system, but no – sort of. There are huge aquifer repositories which have a geologic connection to PNG limestone formations, but would like a definitive answer to this. There is a lot of artesian water whose sources need to be accounted for.

          51

        • #
          bobn

          Tilba, Are you off your medication again? No hope for your lack of reason, sense of humour, satire or irony though.

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        • #
          robert rosicka

          Tilba reckons Alice Springs water is “ Beautiful “ , have you ever lived in these areas at all .

          https://water.australianmap.net/2004-5-alice-springs-northern-territory-hardness/

          01

    • #
      glen Michel

      You didn’t mention the Koch brothers.

      52

    • #
      Dave

      Tilba

      “and in other news, farming productivity worldwide (and in Australia) has dropped 20-25% because of global warming over the last six decades”

      This is totally wrong!

      In the last six decades productivity has increased in just about all sectors!
      https://www.agriculture.gov.au/abares/products/insights/snapshot-of-australian-agriculture-2021#economic-performance-is-driven-by-the-most-productive-farms
      https://www.pc.gov.au/research/completed/agriculture/agriculture.pdf

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      • #

        Dave
        You have to realise that poor Tilba Tilba obviously only sources his news from falsehood ridden alarmist websites.

        Problem is that so many of our fellow Australians rely on the ABC, which has, in complete defiance of its Charter, informed me that it will not give any publicity to anything other than the catastrophist view.

        Thanks for pointing out the reality.

        Tony Heller also showed this recently.

        https://realclimatescience.com/2021/04/down-the-rabbit-hole/

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        • #
          Tilba Tilba

          You have to realise that poor Tilba Tilba obviously only sources his news from falsehood ridden alarmist websites.

          I am actually sceptical, sometimes cynical, and always have the antennae tuned to read all the ideology and agendas going on – who gains from what is being said? What are the subtexts and the contexts?

          As a result, I accept the reality of Global Warming, caused by greenhouse gases, and caused by human activity – call me mainstream, but it’s not alarmist or catastrophist … the reverse in fact. The alarmists to me are those who demand coal & gas fired power, that investment in renewables will lead to the entire collapse of Western Civilisation and Our Way of Life.

          13

      • #
        Tilba Tilba

        Landline said it – so it must be true. I trust my ABC!

        25

    • #
      wal1957

      The media, and official spokespeople, do not want to sully or besmirch his reputation, by pointing out that he was a global warming sceptic-denier. And didn’t like wind turbines on the landscape much either.

      Good for him I say. Rather than going with the flow he formed his own opinion.

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    • #
      Peter C

      Saying he admired Ian Plimer’s book wouldn’t be seen as very complimentary either, given Plimer’s global warming denialism

      Hopeless TT.

      Plimer explains Global Warming for what it is. A really silly idea. Prince Phillip understood that.

      Just for you; https://clintel.org/the-imaginary-climate-crisis-how-can-we-change-the-message-a-talk-by-richard-lindzen/

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      • #
        Tilba Tilba

        What is clintel.org?

        Yeah well – this is what I dislike about these random climate-denier websites that get posted here fairly regularly. Its mission statement uses weasel-words like “climate realists” and so on. It claims to be “independent”, but a quick search reveals this:

        “The [European] campaign is being spearheaded by a new Netherlands-based climate science denial group called the Climate Intelligence Foundation (CLINTEL), launched in April 2019 with funding from Niek Sandmann, a multimillionaire real estate developer.”

        Colour me very sceptical!

        21

        • #
          Peter C

          Climate Realist is not weasel words. It is actually a meaningful and accurate description of people who take a careful look at the Climates around the world and the recent changes and conclude that there is no Climate Emergency.

          The debate would be easier if people understood the meaning of the words they use:
          Weasel Word: n. An equivocal word used to deprive a statement of its force or to evade a direct commitment.

          What is Clintel?

          Climate Intelligence (CLINTEL) is an independent foundation that operates in the fields of climate change and climate policy. CLINTEL was founded in 2019 by emeritus professor of geophysics Guus Berkhout and science journalist Marcel Crok. CLINTEL’s main objective is to generate knowledge and understanding of the causes and effects of climate change as well as the effects of climate policy. To this end:

          1. The Foundation tries to communicate objectively and transparently to the general public what facts are available about climate change and climate policy and also where facts turn into assumptions and predictions.

          2. The Foundation conducts and stimulates a public debate about this and carries out investigative reporting in this field.

          3. The Foundation wants to function as an international meeting place for scientists with different views on climate change and climate policy.

          4. The Foundation will also carry out or finance its own scientific research into climate change and climate policy.

          CLINTEL wants to take the role of independent ‘climate watchdog’, both in the field of climate science and climate policy.

          World Climate Declaration
          The climate view of CLINTEL can be easily summarized as: There is no climate emergency. Guus Berkhout therefore initiated the World Climate Declaration, a one-page summary of the view of many climate realists in the world. The Declaration is a living document that is frequently changed based on input from all its ambassadors and other experts. The most up-to-date version of both the Declaration and the list of signatories can be found on http://www.clintel.org.

          20

    • #
      David Maddison

      De mortuis nil nisi bonum dicendum est.

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      • #
        Peter C

        ‘Say nothing ill of the dead’

        Fair enough. But in the case of Prince Phillip I think we can at least discuss his various controversial comments and respond to those who think they might have reflected negatively on him.

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    • #
      GD

      .. because of global warming over the last six decades…

      Cold, windy, wet, and wintry in Melbourne today … summer may be over.

      But, but, global warming over six decades, surely cold, windy, wet, and wintry are a thing of the past in Melbourne?

      Sixty years of ‘global warming’ must have some effect.

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      • #
        Tilba Tilba

        But, but, global warming over six decades, surely cold, windy, wet, and wintry are a thing of the past in Melbourne?

        Oh dear – another Global Warming denier who confuses weather and climate.

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        • #
          el gordo

          According to the AGW doomsayers the impact of global warming should be obvious in 2021, but it hasn’t happened. Also, as you are a johnny come lately, all of us here are aware that climate is 30 years.

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          • #
            Peter Fitzroy

            huh? Greenland? Fires (worldwide) Cyclones (tornado etc) droughts. Unusual temps, floods – what will it take?

            And don’t give the standard ‘once a long time ago it was hotter, wetter, drier windyer… it is the frequency of these events which is the fingerprint, not any one isolated incidence

            25

            • #
              el gordo

              The fingerprints of global cooling are quite evident in the Australian bushfires and American wildfires. Blocking high pressure exacerbated the situation, hot north westerlies in Australia after a long drought, while in the US the strong south easterlies did the damage.

              Blocking is caused by meandering jet streams in both hemispheres, a quiet sun is behind this.

              12

            • #
              el gordo

              ‘ … what will it take?’

              If world temperatures increase over the next five years, without El Nino, then I’ll accept that CO2 is in the frame.

              01

          • #
            Tilba Tilba

            According to the AGW doomsayers the impact of global warming should be obvious in 2021, but it hasn’t happened.

            We could talk about the ten hottest recorded years are since 2005, and the seven hottest since 2014. We could talk about the decline of Arctic sea-ice, and the melting of huge areas of permafrost, and much else. We could also talk about the speed at which these things are occurring.

            Also, as you are a johnny come lately, all of us here are aware that climate is 30 years.

            I know that, but every time there’s a cold snap somewhere lasting a day or two, all sorts start scoffing about “global warming” being a myth … with the more extreme invoking “global cooling” based on one season’s temps.

            13

            • #
              el gordo

              The ten hottest recorded years since 1900 AD, I accept that, but its irrelevant. Climate change is cyclic and the linear model is defunct, CO2 does not cause global warming.

              Let us look forward to forecasting the next five years, I believe the hiatus in world temperatures will continue. What do you think?

              12

        • #

          ” another Global Warming denier who confuses weather and climate.”
          Indubitably. When climate is neither more nor less than trends of weather, to think they are not intrinsically related is to misunderstand the basics of language. Mind, that is no real difference than claiming people who require proofs and examples are ‘deniers.’ You cannot ‘deny’ that which is not demonstrated. Lack of proof makes it unreasonable to require refutation.

          00

    • #
      David Maddison

      Tilba Tilba, you talk about the denial of the anthropogenic global warming fraud and complaints of the horrific visual pollution and uselessness of windmills as if it were a bad thing.

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      • #
        Tilba Tilba

        T

        ilba Tilba, you talk about the denial of the anthropogenic global warming fraud and complaints of the horrific visual pollution and uselessness of windmills as if it were a bad thing.

        Not my view – I said that the mainstream media and various authorities and commentators might think that those features are a bit unseemly or distasteful to mention on the late Prince’s CV.

        Remember – the Australian Women’s Weekly and Woman’s Day hid for 50 years the fact that the Queen owned racehorses and went to the track. Not what well-bred people from polite society did in the 50s and 60s – not in the colonies anyway – and certainly not something you could let the unwashed masses know about! 🙂

        04

  • #
    Geoffrey Williams

    ‘Like father like son’ not always so . . .
    GeoffW

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  • #
    Peter Fitzroy

    Reading that letter to Pilmer, it does not say what you think it does. The first paragraph is merely politeness. The second paragraph can be taken at least 3 ways.

    Far from being a climate sceptic, he is being diplomatic.

    And this letter written in 2018 a year after he retired from royal duties.

    The points I made yesterday stand and are noted here
    https://www.naa.gov.au/learn/learning-resources/learning-resource-themes/environment-and-nature/conservation/letter-prince-philip-prime-minister-gough-whitlam-about-environmental-issues
    and here
    https://www.independent.co.uk/climate-change/news/prince-philip-conservation-climate-change-b1829227.html

    Cherry pick all you want, but if an anodyne thankyou note is all you have for the case against the late Prince’s commitment to the environment, why did you bother?

    534

    • #
      TdeF

      Really? Try reading it again without the Green colored glasses.

      Of course 96 year old Prince Phillip did not have to write such a letter.
      Or say thank you for another book. I am sure the castle is stuffed with books.

      “Dear Professor Plimer” in his own hand. Words used to mean something and the effort.

      So dictated and personally signed on Windsor Castle letterhead with a personal signature and no formality at all,
      it was real thank you note and shows real affection and appreciation. He is a man who says what he means, as
      if that isn’t his whole life story.

      Anodyne means not likely to cause offence, but clearly you disagree with him. I doubt he would apologise for giving offence by
      expressing his clear opinion.

      How you can read it any other way is beyond belief.

      “When will good science and common sense prevail?” Try to misinterpret that.

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      • #
        TdeF

        And I think the word you were looking for was perfunctory. Such a note would have come from the receptionist, if at all. The palace is a business with hundreds of staff. You do not get to the Queen or Prince by sending an unsolicited book in the mail.

        “I very much enjoyed the last book and I am very much enjoying this one”. That says the Prince reads these books and enjoys them and is prepared to put it in writing. Do you really think he reads every book sent to the palace? He has rooms full of minders.

        How can you possibly not have read this? How clear can he be?

        This was a very personal and well constructed and clear note from the Prince himself. Nothing perfunctory about it, especially as it expresses very strong personal opinions. Which is why Prince Phillip was always admired by sensible, no nonsense people.

        Man made Global Warming is complete rubbish and Climate Change was born on the wrong side of the bed.

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        • #
          Peter C

          How can you possibly not have read this? How clear can he be?

          Poor old [Snip] No understanding. No idea.

          00

        • #
          Peter Fitzroy

          That is one way to interpret what was said – but is it true? You saying so does not make it so. I am making the point, that of the various ways that the letter could be read.

          FYI – the Prince was involved in 992 groups of which some of the notable ones war ths ZSL (london Zoo), WWF and the ACF

          I a nutter sent me a book, this is exactly the response I would give.

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          • #
            el gordo

            He was an individual thinker, supporting ZSL, WWF and the ACF, but conscious that CO2 doesn’t cause global warming. I think the Phil was sincere in his letter to Plimer.

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          • #
            Richard Owen No.3

            “I a nutter” may we quote you Peter?

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          • #
            TdeF

            If I take the trouble to respond to your comment, you could at least read. And you might read Prince Phillip’s letter too.
            You are wasting everyone’s time with your silly comments.

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          • #
            GD

            I a nutter sent me a book, this is exactly the response I would give

            So, if a ‘nutter’ sent you a book that you disagreed with, you’d send him a thank you letter with the salutation and signature hand-written?

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          • #
            bobn

            Prince Philip resigned from WWF in disgust as it went of the rails to become the extreme left terrorist group it now is.

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            • #
              Tilba Tilba

              Prince Philip resigned from WWF in disgust as it went of the rails to become the extreme left terrorist group it now is.

              That’s pretty provocative language – not sure it’s that accurate or useful. I don’t recall the WWF hijacking aeroplanes or sending out suicide bombers in the name of saving koalas or snow leopards. It’s silly language.

              Anyway, Prince Philip was a very conservative member of a very conservative (hereditary) ruling class … so what else would one expect if an NGO changed from his definition of “conservation” – big game for hunting, or cute animals in zoos?

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            • #
              el gordo

              bobn

              ‘As president of WWF-UK (1961 to 1982) and as president of WWF International (1981 to 1996), following which he became president emeritus, a position he held to the day of his passing.’ (Independent)

              32

        • #
          Lucky

          A letter written by hand conveys gravitas, sincerity.
          This is what Australia’s prime minister Morrison would have thought when he sent his hand written letter to the Queen expressing condolences.

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    • #
      Robert Austin

      Peter,
      Your feats of verbal contortion to “prove” that Prince Philip was not a climate “denialist” are a wonder. Face the fact that being a climate skeptic and an environmentalist are not mutually exclusive positions in the real world.

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      • #
        Peter Fitzroy

        Robert, All I posted was that the letter was a diplomatic copy and paste. You can read into it anything you like, which is what you are doing.

        The late prince was involved with 992 groups, or roughly 3 a day, plus all the letters, royal engagements etc etc. Are you beginning to see? Most of what he did was being a public figurehead. In this area diplomacy is important.

        What he really thought we will never know.

        But 1 letter, to 1 nutcase, does not make him a climate sceptic, or a believer in anything else for that matter

        I know that you climate d’s must take your crumbs where you find them, so I hope this post gives you comfort

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        • #
          Robert Austin

          Peter,
          It is quite evident that Prince Philip was a climate catastrophe skeptic but also had concerns with man’s effects on the environment. The evidence of Philip’s climate catastrophe skepticism is evidenced in other anecdotes, not just his letter to Plimer. You lost this one, get over it. Be content that you still have Greta and many other celebrities championing your cause.

          10

  • #
    Peter C

    WHY WE DON’T NEED TWITTER

    Some pretty nasty stuff on twitter written by a few people who don’t know what restraint means, nor respect.
    https://www.breitbart.com/europe/2021/04/10/woke-blue-tick-twitter-expresses-delight-after-death-of-prince-philip/

    I would not go so far as to call it Hate Speech, because I don’t like the term and because it was the focus of a recent Jo post featuring Pat Condell.
    But people who write such stuff deserve to be exposed and condemned.

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    David-of-Cooyal-in-Oz

    Evening all,
    I knew of then Princess Elizabeth’s work during WW II, but not of Prince Philip’s. And nothing of his visit to Sydney in 1940, so I’ve done some chasing which may be of interest.
    An ABC report mentions his first visit to Australia:
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-04-10/prince-philip-visits-to-australia/13206732
    In particular:
    ” When the British battleship HMS Ramillies sailed into Sydney Harbour on March 14, 1940, the crew included an 18-year-old midshipman, Philip Mountbatten (also known as Philip, Prince of Greece).
    It would be first of more than 20 visits to these shores for Prince Philip — who died on Friday — with or without his wife, the Queen.
    The Ramillies stayed in the Garden Island dockyards for a couple of weeks while the high-profile young sailor enjoyed the hospitality of posh Sydney families and a welter of dances, parties and outdoor sports. ”
    HMS Ramillies, battleship, was built during WW I, but didn’t see action in that one. Its visit to Sydney was for repairs, consistent with its war duties and not a royal visit. It’s official naval record is:
    http://www.naval-history.net/xGM-Chrono-01BB-Ramillies.htm
    I’ve not yet tried to find the Prince’s service record to see whether he remained on that ship throughout the war.
    Cheers
    Dave B

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    • #
      Peter C

      The article by Jane Connors (ABC) starts well and is even fair in the middle, BUT she reverts to form at the end with some carping criticisms which have already been discussed here. It would never do for Jane to write an admiring article. Yet that is what she essentially does, reverting at the last moment to ABC orthodox negativity about our Royal family.

      61

      • #
        Tilba Tilba

        They’re not

        my

        royal family. I don’t want hereditary foreigners as the head of state – I would prefer independent sovereignty.

        210

        • #
          el gordo

          Independent sovereignty will come in due course, but until then we are stuck with them. I have it on good authority that Beijing would like us to throw off the old world order and make Malcom Turnbull the first president of the Republic.

          23

    • #
      • #
        TdeF

        Thanks. It would be difficult not to like the man. He always did his best and his duty. Straightforward, no nonsense. Soft but not weak. A great role model. I like Charles, but he is such a nincompoop, away with the pixies, harmless.

        71

      • #
        David-of-Cooyal-in-Oz

        Thanks Peter C,
        Glad I checked before beginning my search.
        Cheers
        Dave B

        21

    • #
      Tilba Tilba

      The Ramillies stayed in the Garden Island dockyards for a couple of weeks while the high-profile young sailor enjoyed the hospitality of posh Sydney families and a welter of dances, parties and outdoor sports. ”

      Certainly sounds like he had a really tough war.

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      • #
        GD

        The Ramillies stayed in the Garden Island dockyards for a couple of weeks… Certainly sounds like he had a really tough war.

        What a grubby comment.

        Prince Phillip was in service for the entirety of WW2.

        From the BBC:

        “And in 1943, he returned as part of the support for the Allied invasion of Sicily. But German dive bombers damaged the Wallace in a night-time attack. And the crew feared the enemy would return in greater numbers and finish them off.

        So Philip proposed launching a makeshift raft, equipped with smoke floats, which in the darkness fooled the German bomb aimers into thinking this was the damaged destroyer.

        “Philip saved our lives that night,” one of the Wallace’s crew, Harry Hargreaves, told the Observer in 2003.

        “He was always very courageous and resourceful, and thought very quickly.”

        In 1945, Philip was transferred to the destroyer HMS Whelp, supporting air raids on Japanese shore installations.

        He was involved in the rescue of British air crew shot down by Japanese fighters and was in Tokyo Bay to witness the surrender of the Japanese forces.

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        • #
          Tilba Tilba

          Prince Phillip was in service for the entirety of WW2.

          So? So was my father (and millions of others) – but he didn’t attend parties and dances hosted by “posh families” in Sydney’s Eastern Suburbs. Nor talk down to a Labour MP who worked for a trade union. The Old Duke never hid his sense of entitlement – one can say that about him.

          Speaking of which – was the title honorary or hereditary? Is there someone among his spawn who automatically assumes the title of Duke of Edinburgh, or does it die with Philip?

          14

      • #
        David-of-Cooyal-in-Oz

        T T,
        Ramillies was in Sydney for repairs, before returning to duty to escort our troop convoy to Aden, as you would have seen in my second link and March 1940.
        I’ve not seen it stated, but I suspect that the crew not needed in the repair work were given some very welcome shore leave.
        I also find your comment “grubby”.
        Dave B

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    […] can read a part of the tribute at Jo Nova’s site. He made the point that Prince Philip was a full-blooded climate skeptic and he would be spinning in […]

    21

  • #

    My favourite Phil The Greek story is when he was talking to a vacuous Labour MP. I cannot identify him, but the adjective will fit quite a few.

    ‘What did you do before you were an MP?’

    ‘I was a student, then a Trade Union Official’

    ‘Oh, so you haven’t had a job then?’

    (Cue huff and puff and radiation of grandiose self-importance)

    ‘So, what did you do before you became the Prince Consort?’

    ‘Fought in the Second World War.’

    Boom!

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    • #
      David-of-Cooyal-in-Oz

      G’day Chris,
      ‘Fought in the Second World War.’
      True, but I think it’d be more accurate to say that he fought through the Second World War, from its declaration to the Japanese surrender.
      (The last bit is something I’ve only discovered in the last few days.)
      Cheers
      Dave B

      71

    • #
      Tilba Tilba

      ‘Oh, so you haven’t had a job then?’

      Hmmm … coming from someone born into a privileged royal family, who never had to work. I’m sure the Labour MP who had been a trade union official (not an easy job was anything but “vacuous” – compared to most members of the silver-spoon aristocracy.

      15

      • #
        Strop

        Tilba. The only thing difficult about being a trade union official is fighting of other back stabbing undermining wanna be trade union officials to defend your cushy over paid trade union job.

        As for Prince Philip’s privilege. His father was accused of treason and exiled from Greece. He spent most of his childhood separated from his parents and living with relatives or attending boarding schools. His mother was put in a Sanitorium when he was about 10 years old and he didn’t see her or receive any correspondence from her for 5 years or so.
        After he completed school he went into the Navy and active war duties.

        I don’t expect he went without too many meals or that his relatives lived in a cave. His supposed royal privilege and family connections perhaps afforded him a reasonable education but doesn’t spare him the realities of life.

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        TdeF

        So what job did Bill Shorten have? Anthony Albanese? Joe Biden? We are in the age of professional politicians and trade unionists who never picked up a trade. And they attack the privileged classes. And how did Joe Biden’s family get to all be multi millionaires when his salary was $140,000 a year? And only $400,000 a year as President?

        61

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          Tilba Tilba

          Please settle down … your “What-Aboutism” has gone into orbit! My goodness!

          The reality is that someone born into the royal families of Europe has no business talking down to a Labour MP who was a student and then a trade-union official – which is a real, proper job.

          In fact I would bet that everyone who writes on this forum (and their families) benefits either directly or indirectly from the fact that over the last century or more, trade union officials have struggled hard to get better wages and conditions for workers. Solidarity Forever!

          14

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            TdeF

            What nonsense. Most workers in Australia work in small companies. Plumbers, electricians, shopkeepers, restaurants, small business. Your vision of the 19th century UK factories and sweat shops has little relevance in a country where people work and always worked for themselves. It is self justifying Labor mythology. Labor activism has killed jobs and never created them.

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    […] h/t JoNova – In the age of flamboyant woke British Royals who demand climate sacrifices from the commoners, while they swan about in private jets, it is easy to overlook that not every royal is a pompous green hypocrite. […]

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    Prince Philip’s attitude to multi-MW windmills, expressed in old age when most have retired from public campaigning, was evidently dominated by his aesthetic reactions to these monstrosities. As a shareholder in the world’s best grid-connected windmill, I remain sure that our less monstrous half-MW (100′ prop) is a wiser compromise. The contribution to the NZ grid from the first hundred such machines is well proven. The fact that other generators on the grid are needed for low-wind weather is a fatuous distracting platitude; we hold back more water in dams when the wind is giving bulk MW, and then the load-following character of hydropower chimes in as needed. Addition of windpower on the order hundreds of MW to hydro/geothermal/fuel-fired grids has been justified, and implemented. The fact that HRH around age 90 didn’t look into windpower is regrettable, but no general reflection on his status as an eminent conservationist.

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      David Maddison

      NZ is an unusual case because of extensive hydropower and some geothermal and gas with lesser contributions from other methods.

      Why would you need to add expensive and useless windmills and solar to the mix? And with the tiny size of the NZ economy, how many degrees of supposed anthropogenic global warming do you think are going to be saved?

      Windmills are just useless and expensive virtue signalling and an eyesore no matter what the size. (A 100′ blade is still an eyesore.)

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        Tilba Tilba

        Windmills are just useless and expensive virtue signalling and an eyesore no matter what the size. (A 100′ blade is still an eyesore.)

        I actually think they look pretty nice – both land-based and offshore – they represent … civilisation.

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      Kalm Keith

      No.

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      Peter Fitzroy

      well said

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      David Maddison

      The only “legitimate” reason to invest in windmills is (in the US) to harvest tax credits as Warren Buffet freely admits. In Australia the Elites invest in them so they can sell renewable energy certificates which are, in essence, harvested from the high prices for electricity charged to consumers.

      Making money from windmills is at the expense of the taxpayer in the US or the electricity consumer in Australia although they are really the same people.

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      el gordo

      Is this relevant to Phil?

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        Strop

        According to Jo’s article above, yes. Even though it may have been a jocular comment that he made I’m just showing that it’s a bit rich of the ABC to pretend it was inappropriate.

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      Tilba Tilba

      As for whether Australian Aborigines still throw spears at each other. It’s a valid question and apparently the answer is yes.

      There are still remnants of very traditional Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory, and it leads to some interesting legal questions. Aboriginal Freehold is inalienable and very strong – not quite Sovereign First Nations, but far more robust freehold title than you or I enjoy in the suburbs.

      I knew the NT Solicitor-General (Tom Pauling) well enough to have a beer with him. There is a de facto “two laws” system in place. Crimes committed on Aboriginal Lands were treated differently, and quite often a judge would not impose a “whitefella” punishment, on the basis that the defendant would face ritual punishment on his or her land at home.

      I don’t know if this was ever enshrined in NT law, but it worked that way in practice. Interesting stuff – that I expect a lot of city-dwellers don’t think about a whole lot.

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        robert rosicka

        That’s strange a ranger we know who has worked with indigenous folk for his whole career told us that the traditional lawmen were mostly in jail after dishing out traditional justice , this then left a vacuum and the young would run amok .
        This ranger worked in Kakadu and now keep river which last I looked were all NT , maybe the toffs you speak to have no idea of what goes on.

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            robert rosicka

            Tis a complex situation and from what I’ve learned a mix of the two laws work best , old men marrying under age girls may have been traditional but is unacceptable in this country and there may be a few other examples where our laws would be preferred and having two laws is a nightmare anyway .
            No one has come up with a workable solution and probably never will unfortunately.

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          Tilba Tilba

          This ranger worked in Kakadu and now keep river which last I looked were all NT , maybe the toffs you speak to have no idea of what goes on.

          Good grief you talk some gibberish. I had about 18 year in the Territory, and all of that working for and with Aboriginal People. You know nothing, and are just pushing your simplistic ultra-right agenda – as usual. Grow up.

          What – you had a week in Alice and a week in the Top End, and you’re an expert? Nonsense.

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            robert rosicka

            One day in either would be enough to know you have no idea what you’re talking about .

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            robert rosicka

            Well 18 years hey then you must have been adopted by a tribe working so close and all and even a skin name as well do you want to share what these are ?

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              Tilba Tilba

              You’re only demonstrating your complete lack of understanding of the NT – you’re just really embarrassing.

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                robert rosicka

                Oh please if you spend that amount of time with them as you claim a bond is formed unless of course you just lived in Darwin for a few years and never went anywhere near them which I suspect is the case .
                For someone who claims so much you seem to know very little .

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                robert rosicka

                Looks like Tilba is suddenly lost for words.

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    David Maddison

    The truth does not mind being questioned. A lie does not like being challenged.

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    Dave

    Hope this is late enough to not be OFF TOPIC!

    But a new bill from New York!

    Provides that one hundred percent of in-state sales of new passenger cars and trucks shall be zero-emissions by two thousand thirty-five, medium-duty and heavy-duty vehicles by two thousand forty-five and off-road vehicles and equipment by two thousand thirty-five.

    Look at this with the new 2035 Electricity usage!

    Green DREAMS again!

    The Funeral cars will have to be electric!
    Or will they use HORSES!

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      Klem

      I’d pay good money to see some city greenies cleaning a horses stall. They couldn’t do it for even one week.

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    CHRIS

    Good on Phillip. He was one who saw through the absolute stupidity of the current climate of CAGW (unlike people like Tilba, who couldn’t see through the looking glass). No wonder Phillip could not connect with his eldest son, that Environmental idiot Charles.

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    Philip

    2018. I was expecting much earlier. A great man. A greater generation. It’s all just so sad. The warriors amongst us, the wise ones, are dying off.

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