JoNova

A science presenter, writer, speaker & former TV host; author of The Skeptic's Handbook (over 200,000 copies distributed & available in 15 languages).


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Weekend Unthreaded

8.8 out of 10 based on 9 ratings

264 comments to Weekend Unthreaded

  • #

    So. Vaccine induced AIDS then. Sounds pretty serious.

    Oh, and God Save the Queen.

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    • #
      tonyb

      I see your new govt has just appointed an ” assistant minister for the republic” so I guess you will be appointing your own head of State in the next couple of years. Anyone got any thoughts as to who that is likely to be? Presumably someone from the ruling party? Will they have any real powers or be ceremonial?

      50

      • #

        The unvaxed English would prefer Dame Edna or Tony Abbot as heir to the throne rather than the Eco-fascist, Prince of Wales. King Charles III would probably want me exterminated for my support for rebel Atmospheric Physicists, in opposition to brainwashed schoolgirls. King Charles III would also regard me as an unvaxed Untermensch third class subject.

        180

        • #
          Forrest Gardener

          If King Charles III conducts himself as you suggest his fate may well be the same as King Charles I.

          70

      • #
        b.nice

        “Anyone got any thoughts as to who that is likely to be?”

        I said yesterday that it should never be a past politician.

        I can just see Kevin07 or Turncoat champing at the bit, thinking that this is where they really belong……. No thanks!

        110

      • #
        R.B.

        They’ll dig up Gough.

        60

        • #
          Sambar

          Seem to remember somewhere when Gough was travelling overseas that he was introduced as ” and now the president of Australia, Mr. Goof Whitelaw”.
          Still raises a chuckle in a certain circles

          60

      • #
        GlenM

        I hope to be nominated in the event Australia goes republic. Attempts to get the Yarralumla gig failed on many occasions. I would have loved to have invited you all over for a few cocktails and a 15 course degustation.

        60

      • #
        RickWill

        Unlikely to be a career politician. Unlikely to be by popular vote. More likely to be appointed by Parliament.

        The present role of Governor General is a Prime Ministerial recommendation appointed by the Queen. Remove the Queen from the equation and the Parliament will likely be the appointing body. Still likely to be nominated by the PM of the day. May set a fixed term of say 5 years. That timing would avoid aligning with Federal election cycle of 4 years.

        The current urgency is likely due to the frailty of the Queen. Her death would be a good time to change the arrangement. I think China would give Australia support for sovereignty over any claim the UK/Charlie might wish to hold. China would probably back Australia’s right to self-govern and sovereignty to reduce the complexity of any eventual take-over plans they are making.

        41

      • #
        Ross

        Oh god no! Another, even more useless member of government. We already have too many layers of government in this country. Local municipal, state, federal is quite enough for only a population of 25m (nearly 26m). Lizzy via an appointed GG will do me. Its worked so far.

        82

        • #
          Hanrahan

          We pick up the tab for Royal visits, apart from that our Monarch is free carried, the Poms pay and house her.

          20

      • #
        Strop

        The republicans here cant even agree on what type of republic Australia should be. Let alone the country agreeing on whether to become a republic.

        00

  • #
    tonyb

    When my sister used to live in Adelaide she would send me postcards showing the vast size of Australia with the UK juxtaposed on it to demonstrate how tiny it was. I used to joke with her that when it came to the habitable area then the difference between the countries was much smaller.

    Joking aside, a lot of Oz is uninhabitable, whilst large swathes are taken up with cattle or vines etc. Its population tends to be confined to the coastal fringes

    Has anyone in Govt ever come up with a figure as to the population that Oz is expected to support by say 2050??

    i suspect that your powers that be are hoping to cram people into Residential blocks whilst locals want a bungalow surrounded by a bit of land and greenery so the official estimate might be different to the desirable number.

    121

    • #
      James

      There is a lot of subdivision of traditional blocks going on. Build in the back yard of a traditional suburban block or know the existing house down and build 2 or 3 semi detached houses.

      90

      • #
        tonyb

        James

        your answer seems to infer that future development will take place in existing residential areas so the cities and their suburbs will become larger and less green and spacious.

        50

        • #
          Graeme No.3

          tonyb:
          Australian cities sprawl because everybody wants some space. As they spread out in most directions the authorities became alarmed at the cost of adding services. They worked on a central system so extending powerlines, sewerage and water became more and more costly (roughly going up as the cube vs the square of area) so there was a push towards smaller house blocks and high rise units. Then other authorities decided that we needed more immigration. Back in the 1970’s “decentralisation” was the fad, but the increasing population wanted to be in the main cities where employment and services were available.
          But the various State governments also control land development so they started charging more (supposedly for the new services like school, hospitals etc) and became “hooked” on the extra revenue. So land developers reduced the size of the new house blocks from the traditional ‘Quarter acre’ (1,000 sq. metres) to half or less that.
          Where I live in the Adelaide Hills the town of Mount Barker was designated for development. The population has more than doubled (14,000 to 37,000) and houses are being built on 400 sq.metres (and on a flood plain). The hospital wasn’t enlarged, the new roads weren’t built and public schools weren’t increased anywhere near enough to cope (but a number of private colleges were).
          At the last State election the ‘traditional’ party got less than a quarter of the vote.
          The new State government has announced a new hospital will be built and some (belated) plans for improving the roads. This later may be difficult as the local Council allowed development right up to existing (rural) roadways so widening them may be difficult. Improved public transport has been put in the “too hard” basket. But the ‘plans’ are for more people.
          Still it is better than living in the main city.

          61

        • #
          RickWill

          Covid has changed the dynamic somewhat. Most government employees prefer to work from home and there is no way they can be forced back to offices. Unemployment is now under 4%. That means employees hold the trump card.

          People are looking for larger homes with separate office spaces. However they are generally on smaller blocks. This trend will likely continue until a whole block goes up in flames. The houses often have brick veneers but there is enough combustible material to fuel an intense fire.

          This will give you an idea of outer suburban living:
          https://www.google.com.au/maps/place/Clyde+North+VIC+3978/@-38.1109849,145.3312054,289m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m5!3m4!1s0x6ad61b27e16a6a6f:0x5045675218cfc20!8m2!3d-38.1108098!4d145.3287992
          No longer the wide open spaces. Five years ago, this was all market gardens; now affordable housing starting around AUD600k.

          Train lines tend to be the attractors. Pakenham is the last suburban stop on my line:
          https://www.google.com.au/maps/dir/-38.0716115,145.4770492/Melbourne+VIC/@-37.9505916,145.08108,43349m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m8!4m7!1m0!1m5!1m1!1s0x6ad642af0f11fd81:0x5045675218ce7e0!2m2!1d144.9639607!2d-37.8161708
          It is 61km by road to the city. It shows the travel time for train as well.

          Australians usually fare well in swimming competitions for a reason. Most live within a days outing of a decent beach and the weather is conducive to being at the beach. Backyard swimming pools are less common now than a couple of decades back because they involve physical work to maintain and take up space. Modern housing blocks do not have space for a swimming pool.

          52

          • #
            tonyb

            Rick

            very surprised at your first link. It is very similar to numerous estates of ‘executive detached houses’ that have sprung up in the Uk. We have limited space but I would have thought there would be more kick back in Oz to being herded into small p-lots when the dream is surely for good sized properties nestled in large gardens. in a huge country like oz i wouldn’t have though land costs would be such a factor although access to infrastructure would be

            00

          • #
            Strop

            That google image is dated 2022 but it looks like it’s about 4 years old given the amount of development that’s occurred along Thompsons and Pattersons Roads, east of Clyde Rd.

            In the Clyde area developers are paying circa $2.5 – $3mil per ha and getting 18 to 20 lots per ha. Paying nearly $150k per lot just for the vacant broadacre land. Spending about $120k per lot developing.

            Council is charging developers about $420k per ha for contributions to build infrastructure, State Govt charging $120k per ha, and the drainage authority charges about another $230k per ha. The Water authority charges developers about $5k per lot.

            Lot size is averaging about 350 m2.

            00

    • #
      b.nice

      “Its population tends to be confined to the coastal fringes”

      Don’t worry, there is still one heck of a lot of habitable land available outside city regions. Just needs facilities like water, power etc.

      70

      • #
        robert rosicka

        Need a big Bradfield scheme but we also need a PM and a party with vision .

        81

        • #
          b.nice

          Yep, The Bradfield Scheme, or some variant of it, would open up vast areas of NSW for habitation.

          Water is the only real limit to growth at the moment. Land certainly isn’t.

          61

          • #
            Hanrahan

            Yep, The Bradfield Scheme, or some variant of it, would open up vast areas of NSW for habitation.

            Ya gotta be jokin. Bradfield’s dream was to irrigate the black soil plains in Nth Qld. Next you’ll be saying Cubby Station is stealing NSW/Vic’s water.

            11

        • #
          Hanrahan

          Bradfield is dead, please inter his brain explosion with him.

          12

          • #
          • #
            • #
              Hanrahan

              What I find surprising is that everyone here [well nearly everyone] believes intermittent power generation adds costs and complexity to the grid but you don’t run the same ruler over intermittent water.

              Bradfield dreamed of diverting the east flowing rivers in the north, inland. Well this summer you would have gotten zero water even if you had all the northern rivers dammed. Intermittent and hardly cost effective. You realise that these rivers only flood for a few days each year. The rest of the time it’s the locals’ water.

              Hells Gate is not what Bradfield envisaged. FWIW I am in favour of it and Burdekin Falls II but only the Burdekin has regular enough water in the quantities needed for any scheme to be viable.

              20

              • #
                KP

                “Intermittent and hardly cost effective. ”

                Well, ‘seasonal’, as usual. Isn’t their season the opposite of NSW, so they get rain and fill the inland in summer, and the inland gets rain in winter?

                Any fresh water hitting the sea in OZ is a waste, all plants need to grow is water & sunshine on the soil and we have the sunshine.

                22

              • #
                Hanrahan

                Any fresh water hitting the sea in OZ is a waste, all plants need to grow is water & sunshine on the soil and we have the sunshine.

                Rivers MUST run into the sea. The estuaries are the nurseries of marine life and much Australian soil is badly depleted of phosphorus. Or it’s clay, or rock, or sand. It is only the flood plains of the rivers that are genuinely fertile, on the coast at least. Stop the floods, the soil will deplete over the years.

                31

        • #
          RickWill

          Greening begets greening.

          Something that I was not aware of until recently is that most of the Amazon is low lying. The forest give rise to the extended wet season:
          https://climate.nasa.gov/news/2608/new-study-shows-the-amazon-makes-its-own-rainy-season/

          A new study gives the first observational evidence that the southern Amazon rainforest triggers its own rainy season using water vapor from plant leaves. The finding helps explain why deforestation in this region is linked with reduced rainfall.

          The current La Nina conditions in Australia have created wetlands in central Australia that contributed to flooding this year. If these wetlands could be sustained from year-to-year there is a chance of them becoming self-sustaining.

          Imagine the benefit of turning central Australia into wetlands.

          Once there is enough surface water to sustain a water column of 45mm, the region becomes a convergence zones that will draw in water from the oceans as occurs in the Amazon.

          If climate models were based on physics then they would be useful to examine this possibility.

          Spending money on securing reliable water sources in Australia would be FAR more valuable than installing weather energy extractors. There is a good prospect of making the Australian climate much more conducive to supporting all forms of life.

          20

          • #
            Hanrahan

            A quick search shows L. Eyre to be 9,500 km2 and 15 m BSL.

            A salt water canal would make the water body you speak of. I DO NOT advocate this, just sayin’. 🙂

            The locals say the Burdekin Falls Dam [224 km²] effected the micro climate.

            20

            • #
              Graeme No.3

              Hanrahan:
              That’s the maximum depth below sea level. The average is more like 6 metres. Not the base for a long lasting hydro scheme.

              And the salt water canal was rejected in 1947 (I think) when Hartnett wanted to use up surplus munitions.

              01

      • #
        el+gordo

        A high speed rail network would help to overcome the tyranny of distance.

        27

        • #
          robert rosicka

          Of the two projects I think water should win out over high speed rail .

          100

          • #
            RickWill

            Me too.

            31

            • #
              el+gordo

              The climate has to change before we can have wetlands across the country, it must become cool and wet.

              For example, when humans first arrived at Lake Mungo it was full to the brim with fresh clean water, the same for Lake Eyre and with huge numbers of megafauna.

              That was roughly 50,000 years ago and the cool atmosphere meant less evaporation. ponds were created everywhere.

              Turning central Australia into wetlands appears somewhat remote, China has been working on schemes to stop the desert moving towards civilisation.

              22

              • #
                RickWill

                The climate has to change before we can have wetlands across the country,

                The climate is always changing. One of the best ways to create a more inhabitable climate is to grow trees. They spawn the life, moisture and soil richness that is self-perpetuating.

                Central Australia has shown this year that it is possible to be a zone of deep convection that brings in ocean moisture from all sides. The island is not that big to prevent mid level moisture convergence over the entire land mass.

                Australian summers already have reducing solar intensity and that is reducing the rate of evaporation. Forests retain that moisture and limit maximum temperature to the 30s rather than 40s and 50s.

                22

              • #
                el+gordo

                Native vegetation: mulga, spinifex and hummock grasslands. open woodlands.

                What sort of trees did you have in mind?

                20

            • #
              el+gordo

              The propaganda wing says they are winning the war against nature.

              http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/global/2019-09/25/content_37512262.htm

              00

        • #
          ozfred

          Some people would think that living a four hour drive from a capital city (and without fast train service) would be an advantage.

          51

          • #
            el+gordo

            Its a matter of perspective, bush towns are struggling to be relevant as the young move to capital cities.

            Decentralisation is worthwhile, to relieve pressure on the cities.

            13

            • #
              yarpos

              You obviously dont live in a booming regional town growing everyday. All our kids both in Sydney and Melbourne have gone regional.

              20

              • #
                el+gordo

                I live four hours west of Sydney on the Tablelands. Importantly, more people are leaving the region every year.

                The villages scattered round about are not booming and won’t revive until middle manages can get to Sydney in less than one hour.

                00

              • #
                yarpos

                Yep some areas have it and some areas dont for people in the younger life stages. Regional success is probably patchy. My area would be destroyed if we ever had a fast road into Melbourne. 15km of narrow winding climbing road through a forest is all that protects us or at least keeps a lid on it.

                30

      • #
        yarpos

        If he took a momemnt to think about , there is and awful lot of coastal “fringe”

        21

      • #
        yarpos

        Have a look at a map of the UK. Where are most of the major cities?

        21

      • #
        yarpos

        depends what you call a “fringe” I suppose. If you live in a country where its hard to be more than an hour or two from the water, you have a very different idea what a fringe might be and probably what habital or not.

        21

    • #
      Ian Hill

      tonyb asked:

      Has anyone in Govt ever come up with a figure as to the population that Oz is expected to support by say 2050??

      The ABS has a projected figure for Australia of nearly 34 million by 2041.

      https://www.abs.gov.au/statistics/people/population/household-and-family-projections-australia/2016-2041

      10

      • #
        KP

        Well, that was a large project for some statistician who couldn’t get a job in the private sector.. Lots about possible living arrangements for more people, but nothing at all about where those people are going to come from!

        Are we expected to support 10 or 12million 3rd-world immigrants and boat people in the next 20years? All the white countries exampled are losing population, so I expect we will be the same. With over 1/3 of the country having a different culture, I expect their assertations are quite incorrect.

        11

    • #
      Ronin

      Just to give an idea, the area of England is about 133,000 km2, and the state of Victoria, a small southern state of OZ is 227,444km2, but you beat us hands down for carrying capacity.

      20

      • #
        yarpos

        might have something to do with the resources just 20k or so across the water in Europe and what the populace has been conditioned to put up with and think normal.

        10

  • #
    John Hultquist

    Those big towers that extract energy from wind can be used to pump water and chill it. The plan is to have thousands of these on the ocean and the salty water can be moved and slowly chilled. Near the freezing point the salt will separate from the water producing two useful products.
    The ice/water can be moved inland to an appropriate place, now non-habitable, where it can both cool the air and moisten the soil and provide much water for reasons too numerous to list. The center of the OZ donut can be filled with many millions of people.
    And the salt: Sea salt on crisp snacks is the future.

    21

  • #
    red edwards

    Here is a MedCram podcast on 4 different vaccines. Detailed, and at 6 months post-vax. (It also has naturl infection immunity for comparison.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LBXdVhbFuLU

    00

    • #
      mawm

      Funded by Fauci!

      The problem with all those vaccines is that they are against the spike protein of the Wuhan strain. None of them result in IgE antibodies either – become sterilising.

      Natural infection will produce antibodies to the spike (S) and IgE, and antibodies to the nucleocapsid (N). As far as I’m aware the mutations have all, or mostly, occurred on the spike protein

      51

  • #
    Tonyb

    John

    Your scenario sounds extremely unlikely to me and impossibly expensive. Oz is already one of the most urbanized places on earth and my guess is that it will become even more so.water is always likely to be a problem

    10

    • #
      b.nice

      “water is always likely to be a problem”

      No, not if dams are allowed to be built, or desal plants (we already have 3 unused ones Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne).

      Water is an engineering problem, solvable if allowed. As is transport, electricity etc.

      Yes Australia is “urbanized”, but there is still vast habitable lands available away from the main cities.

      91

      • #
        Sambar

        Melbourne currently does use its desalination plant, whether we need it or not. Nothing like apply unnessecary costs to the plebs. The last “water delivery order” has just been completed this month and production of the next order will start in Sept / Oct according to the Melbourne Water web site.
        While last year natural rain fall was well above average and the BoM is predicting another above average winter our “well managed ” state government continues to fail miserably. Somehow using energy to convert sea water to fresh is “good” while the rest of Melbourne faces gas shortages because home consumtion is “bad”

        90

        • #
          b.nice

          Don’t they use it in “maintenance” mode.. ie just ticking over?

          Thomson Reservoir is at 88%, so they certainly don’t need to use the much more expensive desal.

          Must be another Dan Andrews political idiocy. !

          51

          • #
            Sambar

            From the 5th of May to shutdown 3rd of June the desal has produced 7300,000,000 litres, thats right seven thousand three hundred million litres. On rough average around the 300ML per day, so hardly ticking over. As they say its only other peoples money, and of course the environment is so important only when it fits the narrative

            30

          • #
            yarpos

            I thought it was a take or pay deal anyway , must have that wrong

            30

            • #
              Sambar

              I think your right Yarpos. Cant find the detail now but memory suggests that the maintenance fee was smaller than the production fee.
              It is of course the “add ons” that just keep building up. The more water produced the more “environmental impact”
              Then again it really comes down to politics. So the desal plant was build by labour at huge expense and closed shop employees. Liberals get into power and don’t run the plant ( for genuine reasons, it simply wasn’t required ). Labour gets back in and says we built it we will run it whether its needed or not. (remember closed shop ). It just fits with other decisions that cost taxpayers money and achieves little. Remember the scrapped east west link, wasn’t going to cost a cent. It didn’t, it cost over a billion dollars in compensation, but, hey nothing to see here.

              30

              • #
                Hanrahan

                Can you run the desal when the wind is blowing and switch it off when it ain’t? Vic and SA are in neg pricing ATM.

                30

            • #
              yarpos

              sounds about right, pay to keep it available and pay a bit more if it actually produces

              the petulance of both parties on the large long term projects is quite incredible, childish at our expense

              20

          • #
            Stuart

            the builders union have investments in the desal plants, gotta keep the money flowing

            00

        • #
          Chris

          Perth now has suburbs with 300sqm blocks, the houses are more like apartments at ground level. Many of the people who have moved into these new suburbs are immigrants. As for water we have 2 desalination plants along the coast which operate full time and water restrictions are mild but permanent. Such as you are only able to use sprinklers on the garden twice a week in summer, three times if you have your own bore and not after 9am or before 6pm. Hand watering is OK at any time . Our soils are hydrophobic and we are encouraged to use wetting agents to reduce the amount water we use.

          40

          • #
            yarpos

            same in Melbourne in some of the more ridiculous developments

            I guess it a return to terrace houses basically, just flakey ones rather than bricks and wrought iron

            40

          • #
            ozfred

            You can have a real garden (not just herbs) on a 300 sqm block?

            20

          • #
            KP

            There is a big market for those tiny houses on a small block in the millenials.

            Close-ish to Sydney the developers are taking over the poor area of town, knocking a couple of walls out and polishing the wooden floors and on-selling a trendy-looking small house with no usable garage to young single people who intend to stay single.

            These days unattached people don’t want to share a house with flatmates and a typical 3-bed/dble garage on 750sqM is too big and too much work.

            00

      • #
        Graeme No.3

        b.nice
        South Australia also has an unused desalination plant (on the site of a shutdown oil refinery). It was built by politicians frightened by Tim Flannery saying “in 2007: ‘Brisbane and Adelaide – home to a combined total of three million people – could run out of water by year’s end.’

        But we are going to have a hydrogen plant in Whyalla, so we will also need another desalination plant.

        60

        • #
          b.nice

          Adelaide used to have to rely on the dregs at the end of the Murray River. (Not much storage dam capacity or rainfall.)

          In drought periods that can be very low flows, and the salt water estuary works its way up to the extraction point. Very awkward for drinking water.

          The desal plant may actually be needed at some stage.

          30

          • #
            yarpos

            Tend to agree. Just a form of very very expensive insurance. Especially in an era where we dont build dams.
            Droughts will come.

            00

    • #
      John Hultquist

      OZ can export expensive sea salt to the rest of the world, replacing the coal and wine — both CO2 evils.
      In the USA, one gets the feeling that regular salt is bad while Sea Salt is good. I’m somewhat confused about this.
      However, I think throwing a trillion USDs at the plan I propose is no worse than most government spending, and better than any that are to save the climate.

      40

      • #
        Sambar

        Used to be involved with salt production and what various qualities are used for. Back a long long time ago the cheapest salt available was inland salt. Tainted with iron it was not viable to clean up to “pure white”. Today this very same salt is marketed as Pink salt. Quite expensive in what is a really niche market.
        Top marks to the people that thought up the marketing blurb. Not so top marks to the people that buy industrial grade salt and think its somehow better than any other salt.

        50

        • #
          yarpos

          personally I prefer a light sprinkle of Pink Himalayan Rock Salt

          40

          • #
            Sambar

            But doesn’t just taste like, well, salt?

            30

          • #
            Annie

            Ditto! Have we succumbed to hype there?!

            30

          • #
            yarpos

            yeah but jeez it makes me feel posh

            we unearthed a container having a pantry clean out, probably came in a hamper or something.

            40

            • #
              Annie

              Oh dear! You have reminded me that our pantry needs a good dust and spider clear-out! Not to mention seeing what goodies or otherwise are lurking out of sight. Last time I found a variety of various types of salt and we have worked our way through most of it, I think.

              10

    • #
      el+gordo

      ‘ … water is always likely to be a problem.’

      With La Nina like conditions hanging around we can look forward to a decade of plenty.

      21

  • #
    Lance

    “Unsafe At Any Speed? Electric Cars Keep Catching Fire”

    https://issuesinsights.com/2022/06/02/unsafe-at-any-speed-electric-cars-keep-catching-fire/

    A good read.

    60

    • #
      yarpos

      The bit that surprises me is that there arent more fires. When you think of the production complexity of what they are building and all the things that have to be done right and operate correctly to avoid issues , its quite an achievement.

      With the current technology set I think its not going to go away. Just an automotive production fault with severe consequences.

      30

  • #

    I finally figured out who in our US Federal Government is responsible for grid reliability.

    https://www.cfact.org/2022/06/02/silence-of-the-power-engineers-nerc-does-nothing/

    Need to lean on them a bit. I bet other countries have similar responsible offices.

    52

    • #
      Ken

      David, is there an equivalent body in Australia?
      If so, please tell us its name so we can pursue it.

      11

  • #
    Gerry

    Can someone help me understand something about weather forecasts ? Why do we hear a temperature given as say “today was 18 degrees, with the wind chill factor making it feel like 12 degrees” ? Is this a sneaky way of keeping a higher temperature on the charts or is the BOM trying to look complicated, complex and therefore more “scientific” or what ?
    Btw, thanks to all you who helped me with input on generators in the ground. Much appreciated.

    50

    • #
      Lance

      Gerry, you are seeing “Ambient Temperature” and “Wind chill effective temperature”.

      As wind speed increases, there is greater heat loss from a human body. So the “effective wind chill temperature” is the still air temperature that would have to exist to cause an equivalent heat loss.

      UK, CAN and US use one equation and AU uses a different one. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wind_chill

      Wind chill only applies to things that internally generate heat and had a model created to simulate that heat loss at various wind speeds.

      50

    • #
      cadger

      I’m assuming degrees fahrenheit.

      Environment Canada’s windchill calculator starts at below zero celsius.

      https://weather.gc.ca/windchill/wind_chill_e.html

      10

    • #
      Earl

      Guess I’m too black and white which is why I don’t have the scientific skills necessary to measure something to prove it is not there and then use this measurement as the foundation for a conclusion to support a (better) distinction between two conditions. Wiki (thanks Lance) gives the following insight regarding the basis for working out wind chill:

      “He redefined the absence of wind to be an air speed of 1.8 metres per second (6.5 km/h; 4.0 mph), which was about as low a wind speed as a cup anemometer could measure. This led to more realistic (warmer-sounding) values of equivalent temperature.”

      So, X – in this case wind – is considered to not be present if it can be measured and found to be travelling at 1.8 metres per second or less. Then the speed measurement of X (which isn’t there because its travelling at 1.8 mps) forms the starting point to measure the difference between actual temperature and wind chill. And I thought the old question “if a tree falls over in a forest and no-one hears does it make a sound?” was a no brainer. Don’t argue the science is settled.

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      Gerry

      So when the “temperature” is 13degrees C and the wind chill factor is eight degrees C, when I walk outside am I feeling 13degrees C or eight degrees C or five degrees C …… ??

      00

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    another ian

    Bumped from Thursday thread

    Anti-wind industry litigation handbook

    “The website clearinghouse DeFrock offers a current report on the state of litigation by victimized landowners against industrial wind turbines in Australia, a Net Zero hotspot. “A Guide to Seeking Damages From Wind Energy Project Owners/Operators,” is reproduced below. And more than this, plaintiffs are winning in court against Big Wind. [1]”

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2022/06/03/defrock-wind-litigation-central-in-australia-global-insight-provided/

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    another ian

    “Climate Change Weekly #436: Woke Investing Gets Well-Deserved Pushback”

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2022/06/03/climate-change-weekly-436-woke-investing-gets-well-deserved-pushback/

    21

  • #
    OldOzzie

    Spectator Australia

    The quiet radicalism of Elizabeth II

    Luckily for us, the Queen has always trusted her instincts

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    • #
      mawm

      Her not abdicating sooner to hand the throne to Charles might be one of her better instincts.

      70

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    OldOzzie

    Bayer Head Admits COVID-19 Vaccine is Gene Therapy

    Stefan Oelrich, head of Bayer’s pharmaceuticals department, admitted at the World Health Summit that the COVID-19 vaccine is gene therapy. He smugly stated that the drug companies knew people would reject the vaccine if they knew it was in fact a gene-altering injectable. They lied to us for profits as the vaccine certainly did not prevent anyone from contracting or transmitting the virus.

    “If we had surveyed two years ago if people were willing to take gene or cell therapy and inject it into your body we would have probably had a 95% refusal rate,” Oelrich admits while forgetting many took the “gene therapy” through force.

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      Ross

      In the agricultural industry there has been a debate ( war?) waging for the best part of 30 years. That is, opposition to genetically modified crops, or GM or GMO’s. The argument for those opposed being that they didn’t want to be ingesting foreign nucleotides like DNA into their bodies via foodstuffs. You know, the old Frankenfoods theory. There’s all sorts of reasons why that argument is dumb, but I wont go into it here. Then with the mRNA vaccines people couldn’t wait to be injected with foreign genetic material ( in the form of mRNA) – this happened virtually overnight. It was quite incredible to watch.

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    OldOzzie

    So the Washington Post’s pooh-poohing of ‘2000 Mules’ gets a little comeuppance in Arizona

    Election fraud is real. And there was a lot of it in the 2020 election.

    But the mainstream media in general, and the Washington Post in particular, would have you think that angry, Trump-deranged, radical Democrats, steeped in a “by any means necessary” revolutionary ideology, as well as long entrenched machine politics, would never dream of such a thing.

    Unfortunately, (for them) yesterday’s news from Arizona tells a different story:

    Arizona woman admits guilt in ballot collection scheme

    PHOENIX — An Arizona woman accused of illegally collecting early ballots in the 2020 primary election pleaded guilty Thursday in an agreement with state prosecutors that saw the more serious forgery and conspiracy charges dismissed and limited any potential for a lengthy prison sentence.

    Guillermina Fuentes, 66, could get probation for running what Arizona attorney general’s office investigators said was a sophisticated operation using her status as a well-known Democratic operative in the border city of San Luis to persuade voters to let her gather and in some cases fill out their ballots.

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    OldOzzie

    The fall of Piers Morgan

    It’s been over a month since Piers Morgan Uncensored was launched.[i] Rupert Murdoch reportedly signed Morgan to a $63-million three-year deal and left no stone unturned in promoting the show. There were billboards and newspaper advertisements. Morgan appeared on Fox News and on all major shows in the U.K. It was looking promising.

    Then Morgan leaped straight into the gutter, pulling a cheap publicity stunt ably supported by his employers. Morgan claimed that Donald Trump had walked out of his “explosive” interview because of his tough questions. He even wrote an exaggerated piece about it in the N.Y. Post.

    The claim of the walkout turned out to be a complete falsehood, but the stunt enabled Morgan to gain momentary attention as he rode on Trump’s coattails.

    The interview fetched him a respectable 400,000 viewers in the U.K., beating all his competition.

    A con man may be able to fool a large number of people the first time, but once the deception is discovered, people seldom return.

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    • #
      Dennis

      I have not watched one of his Sky News Australia shows, his manner and comments on publicity advertising turned me off him, and maybe my prejudices having had much exposure to British business people and pompous attitude displayed more often than not.

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      • #
        another ian

        Anyone heard a comment from Clarkson?

        00

      • #
        Strop

        I watched the Trump show and found myself getting annoyed with Morgan showing parts of the interview broken up by his wanting to commentate in between showing segments, instead of just playing the darn interview. Have only seen bits of subsequent shows.

        From what I’ve seen Rupert should’ve just given Paul Murray two hours in Aus instead of having Morgan.

        10

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    OldOzzie

    Labor backs coal to fix power crisis

    Resources Minister Madeleine King has said coal-fired power generation must step up to help reduce soaring energy prices, as she cast doubt on pulling the so-called “trigger” to force export gas into the domestic market.

    Describing the energy price spike as a “perfect storm”, Ms King said big gas producers were doing as much as they could to maximise supply, and it was important that coal fill the void to push energy prices down.

    “It’s equally important for the coal industry to resolve its issues to get coal production back online as soon as we can, so it can continue to participate in power generation during this cold snap,” Ms King said in an interview with AFR Weekend.

    “There are important issues with coal supply that have to be resolved because a great deal of the power generated for consumers in NSW and Victoria is from coal-fired power stations.”

    Ms King’s immediate backing for coal was complemented by her support for the development of more renewables and storage technology over the medium term to achieve Labor’s emissions reduction targets of 43 per cent by 2030 and net-zero by 2050.

    “It’s a whole power generation mix to get to a net-zero position,” she said.

    “It demonstrates we do need a solid energy plan that is bipartisan, so there is greater investment in new technologies in both storage, renewables and gas supply to firm up the whole system.”

    Multiple disruptions

    The new Labor minister’s comments follow the chief executive of Australia’s biggest coal-fired generator, Origin Energy’s Frank Calabria, calling on government and industry to fix the problems impeding coal-generated power.

    Coal supply for power generation on the east coast has been disrupted by a combination of scheduled shutdowns and unplanned outages.

    Rain and floods in NSW and Queensland have disrupted open-cut coal mines.

    Skills shortages and worker absenteeism because of COVID-19 are also slowing down coal production and coal-fired power stations.

    Minor accidents have also shut down some coal mines, exacerbating a lack of maintenance during COVID-19 lockdowns.

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      OldOzzie

      GOODBYE TO COAL? HARDLY

      The United States has reduced its carbon dioxide emissions more than any other country, primarily by shifting from coal to natural gas as a source of electricity. Our government has applied considerable pressure to kill America’s coal industry, ostensibly to preserve the Earth’s climate.

      But other countries haven’t gotten the memo. Energy expert Robert Bryce explains:

      [O]ver the past few weeks, China and India have announced plans to increase their domestic coal production by a combined total of 700 million tons per year. For perspective, US coal production this year will total about 600 million tons.

      Adding the 700 million tons of new coal that China and India will be mining to the amount they are now producing leads to some staggering numbers. By the end of next year, China will be producing about 4.4 billion tons of coal per year and India will be mining about 1.2 billion tons. Add those together and you get 5.6 billion tons of coal, which is more than 9 times the amount of coal that will be mined in the U.S. this year.

      When it comes to the Earth’s climate, if you believe the global warming models, the U.S. is becoming a relatively minor player.

      And coal isn’t going away, because it is plentiful and affordable:

      30

      • #
        RickWill

        And coal isn’t going away, because it is plentiful and affordable:

        The spot price for thermal coal is now AUD450/tonne. There are not many places selling coal for household use in Australia. I can buy firewood for AUD450/tonne delivered. But I can get wood in exchange for a bit of exercise to collect it from the back yard and local State Forests. Just slightly less heat value then coal and cleaner to handle – maybe not as clean burning but less objectionable odour from the flue.

        Coal price for household use in the UK is selling for GBP500/tonne. So roughly double the spot price of coal.

        So wood is rapidly becoming the more affordable option. In Australia, whole forests go to waste in firestorms rather than allowing the forests to be harvested to manage the fire risk and protect wildlife from devastating loss of habitat.

        30

      • #

        OldOzzie mentions the move from coal fired power to gas fired power.

        That move from coal fired power to natural gas fired power was more accidental than planned, the accident here being the reduction of CO2 emissions.

        in 2008, when I started doing what I do, coal fired power had just come off its zenith in the U.S. and (while now decreasing) was still delivering 51% of all the generated power in the US, and that was just under 2,000TWH.

        However, (and I want you to think about this very carefully) the AVERAGE age of ….. ALL the coal fired Units in the U.S. was just one month short of ….. FIFTY years. That’s the average of a Nameplate of 350,000MW, and an innumerable number of Units of differing sizes.

        In the 60s through to the 80s, the U.S. built huge Plants with four large scale Units (500MW to 660MW) so large scale plants of a Nameplate over 2000MW.

        The idea of that was to replace many thousands (literally) of those ‘midget’ Units, as each large tow had a small Unit to deliver its power, built from the early 20s onwards. Those midget Units were all sized from 2MW up to 20MW for the small cities.

        Now, roll forwards to 2008, when I started out, and all of those old Units started to close, now being replaced by plants that took a lot less time to construct, with larger Units now operating gas turbines run by the now much more readily available Natural Gas.

        in 2008, some of those operational coal fired Units had now been delivering power since the mid 1920s, a lot of them now 70 and 80 years old.

        Those smaller Units were now being replaced en masse, to the point that Units now between 20MW and 100MW were also included.

        All of this MASS replacement of coal fired power had ….. NOTHING whatsoever to do with lowering the emissions of CO2 from coal fired power. That was just the accident that fell into its lap.

        “Hey, look at us, getting rid of all those coal fired power plants, us already lowering CO2 emissions.”

        Again, consider this.

        The AVERAGE age of the whole US coal fired power fleet was just a month shy of FIFTY YEARS.

        Tony.

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    OldOzzie

    The proudly Australian puffer jacket turns 100 years old

    Just as a major cold snap hits Australia and the first days of winter are upon us, the humble puffer jacket – the first of which was made from hot air balloon fabric and goose down by an Australian – turns 100 years old this year.

    Puffer jackets have gone from being widely mocked and only worn by hardcore mountaineers and adventurers, to closet staples donned by everyone from New York City rappers to Sydney investment bankers.

    In winter, the puffer jacket (otherwise known as the down jacket) becomes critical for both outdoor activity and everyday style, according to Kathmandu head of product Robert Fry.

    The down was the light and fluffy undercoating clustered beneath the feathers of waterfowl, Mr Fry said. The jacket keeps the wearer warm by trapping body heat and preventing its escape.

    The higher the “fill power” (fluffiness of the down), the higher the down’s ability to trap more air and provide better warmth. Kathmandu’s down jackets range in fill power from 500 to 800.

    A surprise to many, George Finch, an Australian mountaineer, scientist and inventor, popularised the use of down. He used his “eiderdown jacket” as a member of the 1922 British Mount Everest expedition.

    Mr Finch wore a down-lined jacket made of bright-green fabric intended for use on a hot air balloon, according to Snowshoe Magazine.

    Despite the success wearing the jacket at the world’s highest peak, his version of a puffer jacket did not gain traction in the outdoor adventure wear category in the United States.

    It was Eddie Bauer and his namesake brand that designed the Skyliner jacket made from quilted down in 1939, which is credited for the puffer getting wider use.

    In the 1940s, Mr Bauer adapted his jacket for the military by creating a flight jacket for the US Air Force.

    In the 1970s, Norma Kamali created the “sleeping bag coat”, which was initially made from actual sleeping bags.

    There have since been many iterations of the puffer, but it all comes back to Australian ingenuity.

    11

    • #
      RickWill

      The jacket keeps the wearer warm by trapping body heat and preventing its escape.

      I wonder if it is as good as CO2.

      Given that the globe is warming so spectacularly, the puffer jacket is no doubt passing into history. A relic of cooler times.

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        Annie

        Thanks for the laugh!

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      • #
        Graeme No.3

        RickWill:
        Should encourage the experiment, preferably with ardent Greenies in Antarctica. They believe CO2 “traps heat”.
        But it doesn’t do so in double glazing, in fact it is worse than plain air.

        12

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        Strop

        I was at Daylesford and Trentham recently. Seems the puffer jacket is almost a uniform in that area and they’re looking forward to global warming reaching above 600m.

        00

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      Annie

      We have English ‘Puffa’ jackets (sleeveless). I’m wearing mine a lot atm; it helps to keep me warm in this age of ‘global warming’. 🙂

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        Sambar

        More snow on the big hill again today Annie, took the hound up yesterday for a run, he really seems to enjoy it, me not so much these days.
        Just to nark him I made snowballs and threw them. He would charge away to get it but when they landed they just “vanished”
        I think he is learning to not trust the bloke that feeds him.

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        • #
          Annie

          We can see it if the cloud clears but unfortunately, lately, the cloud has been down too much.
          The sky was beautifully clear yesterday evening when we returned from a car-collecting exercise plus shopping; the temperature dropping, then it started to go up again as cloud came over.
          We saw some beautiful snow-topped mountains in Tasmania recently and kicked some snow and slush on the board walk at Pine Lake.
          We’ve had very little wind; what happened (twice) to all those ferocious wind warnings?

          31

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            Annie

            A friend said that Marysville had snow this last week.

            31

            • #
              yarpos

              Yep, we had a car club run on Wednesday and stopped for coffee in Marysville on the way to the Yarra Valley. It was fully white.

              41

              • #
                yarpos

                wooo hooo! a red thumb for a weather report! you would have to have an IQ close to the temp that day, seriously facepalm stuff

                30

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    RickWill

    Have not seen Tdef comments on this blog for a long time. Anyone know why?

    42

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    KP

    Hang on! What RNA?? I reckon its doubtful, but if true it takes the whole shebang to a new level.

    https://www.naturalnews.com/2022-05-31-electron-microscope-images-show-carbon-nanotech-aluminum-thulium-in-covid-vaccines.html

    A Canadian researcher and ER doctor recently put the Pfizer and Moderna covid-19 vaccines under the microscope to see what they are made of. The electron microscope images show no sign of biological material, not DNA nor the glorified mRNA that the experimental injection was supposed to deliver.

    “…X-ray spectroscopy didn’t detect any nitrogen or phosphorus. So, if those complex shapes – that rectangle with all the dots arranged in a grid – were the result of some kind of biological process … then there should be nitrogen and phosphorus there in addition to carbon and oxygen. Because every living thing, whether it’s a virus, plant or animal, is made up of proteins that contain nitrogen, carbon, oxygen, and phosphorus,” he said.

    Dr. Nagase found some very interesting shapes inside the contents of the so-called vaccines. One of the non-biological life forms (in the Moderna vaccine) contained neurotoxic aluminum and looked like a “ball with the legs growing out of it.” The object was not a biological contaminant because it did not contain nitrogen or phosphorous. “So, this thing that’s growing is non-biological,” Nagase concluded.

    He found no mRNA in the samples, either. Dr. Nagase asks, “Are countries around the world being given different injections, and we’re being observed to see, ‘well, who dies the fastest, who gets the sickest or what kind of illnesses result’ from experimental ingredients being indiscriminately and without disclosure being given to people?”

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    OldOzzie

    Joe Biden Begins Using FBI to Arrest Political Opposition from Prior Administration

    June 3, 2022 – Sundance

    Attorney General Merrick Garland, acting on the authority of Joe Biden, instructed the FBI to arrest Peter Navarro and bring him to federal incarceration.

    Put in more clear terms, Joe Biden is arresting his political opposition for failing to reveal confidential and privileged communication with the former President.

    Democrats are using the FBI as the federal police agency to arrest their political opposition. This is happening right now.

    This is happening in the United States of America.

    Think about it.

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      OldOzzie

      Former Trump Official Peter Navarro Handcuffed and Put in Leg Irons by FBI, Joe Biden State Police Force

      Plus

      FBI Placed Peter Navarro in John Hinckley’s Cell after Arrest for Contempt of Congress

      The FBI placed former White House economic adviser Peter Navarro in attempted assassin John Hinckley Jr.’s jail cell after they arrested him for being in contempt of Congress.

      Federal authorities arrested Navarro on Friday after a grand jury indicted him for contempt of Congress. Navarro told reporters outside the courthouse that the arresting officers put him in Hinckley’s old cell. Hinckley was recently released after serving more than four decades in prison following his failed assassination attempt on former President Ronald Reagan.

      Navarro blasted the FBI for waiting to arrest him until he attempted to board a plane.

      “Instead of coming to my door, where I live — which by the way is right next to the FBI — instead of calling me and saying, ‘Hey, we need you down in court, we’ve got a warrant for you.’ I would have gladly come,” Navarro said. “What did they do? They intercepted me getting on the plane. They put me in handcuffs. They bring me here. They put me in leg irons.”

      He then explained that the arresting officers made it a point to place him in Hinckley’s cell.

      “They stick me in a cell — by the way, just a historical note, I was in John Hinckley’s cell. They seemed to think that that was like an important historical note. That’s punitive. What they did to me today violated the Constitution.”

      Navarro plans to represent himself on the contempt charges instead of hiring an attorney to do the job for him. He is also suing the January 6 committee in federal court, arguing that the committee is encouraging him to violate executive privilege and Constitutional separation of powers.

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      Hanrahan

      The US dodged a bullet when Garland was never promoted to SCOTUS. Do we thank The Turtle for that?

      But leftists revel in this asymmetric application of the law. They crow about it on chat sites.

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    OldOzzie

    Zulu Kilo Two Alphasays:
    June 4, 2022 at 11:27 am

    Epidemic of violence’ plagues women, says judge Judith Kelly

    Amos Aikman
    Northern Correspondent
    @amosaikman
    10:00PM June 3, 2022

    Justice Kelly, one of the Territory’s nine top judicial officers, shared her observations after handling scores of such cases since 2009. Sitting judges rarely give ­interviews. She broke down during hers. “I just want people to know what’s happening to Aboriginal women,” Justice Kelly said.

    21

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      yarpos

      Something Lydia Thorpe could get actively involved in and improve the lot of generations of women. I wont hold my breathe.

      41

    • #
      Gerry

      I had some correspondence a couple of years ago with a lady, an anthropologist, who said the violence towards women has been part of aboriginal culture for at least many centuries …..

      51

      • #
        yarpos

        We havent been too flash ourselves but some culture improve, however slowly, and some remain stuck

        Its not 2022 in a hell of a lot of places

        10

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    OldOzzie

    European Union will drop its mask mandate for flights and airports

    When is Australia going to do the Same?

    The E.U.’s Aviation Safety Agency recommends people who are coughing to mask to reassure fellow travelers

    A multicountry mask mandate for European airplanes and airports will lift next week, the European Union Aviation Safety Agency and the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control announced Wednesday. The policy begins Monday.

    “From next week, face masks will no longer need to be mandatory in air travel in all cases, broadly aligning with the changing
    requirements of national authorities across Europe for public transport,” EASA executive director Patrick Ky said in a news release.

    “For passengers and aircrews, this is a big step forward in the normalisation of air travel.”

    Many European countries have eased their coronavirus restrictions in recent months. Greece and Italy recently scrapped proof-of-vaccination requirements, along with other rules, while nearby destinations such as the United Kingdom and Norway have dropped their pandemic travel rules entirely.

    The news follows a similar change in the United States, after a Florida judge struck down the federal mask mandate for planes and other public transportation settings last month, earning mixed reaction from travelers. Some were elated by the decision, while it has been a source of anxiety for others. The Justice Department said it would appeal the ruling.

    12

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    another ian

    “Biden’s Most Preposterous Lie Is Too Much Even for The Washington Post”

    That “low cost ruinable energy”

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2022/06/03/bidens-most-preposterous-lie-is-too-much-even-for-the-washington-post/

    And Oz gets a graph

    41

    • #
      David-of-Cooyal-in-Oz

      Thanks a i,
      Great graphs.

      But I found this bit rather terrifying:
      ” And as with California, Australia’s generation from the intermittent renewables remains well below 50% of electricity generation, meaning that again the vast cost increases inherent in phasing out fossil fuel backup have not yet begun to hit to any significant degree. ”

      Probably a vain question for this forum, but does anyone have access to our new energy minister’s listening ear to pass on this message?

      Cheers
      Dave B

      11

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    John Connor II

    California court rules that bees are a type of fish in order to protect them under the state’s endangered-species act


    A trio of judges in California said on Tuesday that bees could be legally classified as a type of fish as part of a ruling that gave added conservation protections to the endangered species.

    “The issue presented here is whether the bumble bee, a terrestrial invertebrate, falls within the definition of fish,” the judges wrote in their ruling. And, they concluded, it does.

    Formerly, the problem for bee lovers — and lovers of all Californian terrestrial invertebrates — was down to the way protected animals had been classified in the state’s laws.

    https://www.insider.com/bees-officially-type-of-fish-california-judges-ruling-endangered-species-2022-6

    Trust the “science”.😅😅😅
    Now we see the idiocy if the transgender movement…

    I’m safe from Monkeypox. I’ve had my 3 bananas.

    41

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    John Connor II

    Poland Cancels COVID Vaccines Contract With Pfizer Citing Ukraine War

    Poland has unilaterally backed out of its contract to buy the BioNTech/Pfizer coronavirus vaccine, claiming oversupply and financial difficulties brought on by the flood of millions of migrants fleeing the Ukraine conflict, according to Health Minister Adam Niedzielski.

    Niedzielski told TVN24 that the Warsaw administration had notified the European Commission and vaccine providers late last week that it was activating a force majeure clause in the procurement contract and would refuse to pay for or accept delivery of any additional doses.

    https://greatgameindia.com/poland-cancel-vaccine-contract-pfizer/

    Interesting though. What constitutes a “force majeure”?
    Looking through an Austlii resource I found this:

    The speech of Lord Reid in that case called for a
    comparison between the situation as contemplated by the parties
    (ascertained by construing the contract) and the situation in fact resulting
    from the allegedly frustrating event. If the promisor’s obligation has
    become something fundamentally different, the contract is said to be
    frustrated unless the frustrating event has been caused by the fault of the
    party seeking to rely on the doctrine. It is not the change in
    circumstances which frustrates the contract but the change in obligation
    created by changed circumstances.
    By contrast, Lord Radcliffe’s approach in Davis Contractors was to
    suggest that frustration occurs:
    “whenever the law recognises that without default of either party a
    contractual obligation has become incapable of being performed
    because the circumstances in which performance is called for would
    render it a thing radically different from that which was undertaken
    by the contractor.
    Non haec in foedera veni. It was not this that I
    promised to do.”

    Doesn’t the bolded text describe the nature and ramifications of the fake vaxxes? 😷

    Grounds for Albo to scrap the Pfizer contract?

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    John Connor II

    New compound destroys hard-to-treat cancers, targets previously undiscovered weakness

    A protein that destroys hard-to-treat cancers has been discovered by scientists, offering hope of effective new treatments. A team from UT Health San Antonio says experiments on mice and human tissue found it is effective against the most aggressive tumors and exploits a previously undiscovered weakness in the disease.

    The compound, called ERX-41, leaves healthy tissue unscathed, while targeting typically hard-to-treat tumors in the breast, pancreas, ovaries, and brain. It is one of the most promising breakthroughs to date, according to the researchers, offering hope of a “one size fits all” cancer treatment in the future.

    Results were so encouraging clinical trials are expected to begin in the next few months.

    https://news.uthscsa.edu/promising-compound-kills-range-of-hard-to-treat-cancers-by-targeting-a-previously-undiscovered-vulnerability/

    The sooner “dark ages medicine” like chemo is gone the better.

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    John Connor II

    Older adults who regularly drink alcohol have a better quality of life before and after surgery

    Older patients who drink alcohol regularly have a better quality of life before and after surgery, according to new research. Researchers in Germany found that people over 60 who enjoy drinking experience improved mobility, self-care, and fewer problems undertaking daily activities compared to those who don’t drink or only have an occasional beverage.
    Health officials generally advise men and women to drink no more than 14 units of alcohol a week — which equates to six pints of beer or 10 small glasses of wine.

    https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/954596

    Define “small” glass of wine 😉😅

    60

    • #
      yarpos

      Its the standard drink size, that almost nobody drinks.

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    • #
      Hanrahan

      which equates to six pints of beer or 10 small glasses of wine.

      OK. So what do I do on Tuesday? But my glass is half full of ice 🙂

      21

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    Zane

    They are going after coal like nobody’s business. The world’s largest private coal producer is Peabody, headquartered in St Louis, Missouri. It mines 190 million tonnes of coal annually. The company changed its name from Peabody Coal to Peabody Energy Corp but this was not enough to appease the climate lobby. It has been sued in court for allegedly causing global warming and climate events. On its Wikipedia page it is accused of organizing ” climate change denial ” and the way things are going this will soon be a capital offence.

    Poor old Peabody.

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    • #
      David-of-Cooyal-in-Oz

      I hope they actively defend their position, with strong evidence to prove that “climate change denial” is actually good science. And claim reverse damages for Greens disruption of their business, punitively.

      But I doubt the US legal system is adequate to defend truth these days.

      Cheers
      Dave B

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    John Connor II

    Your liver stays just three years old on average throughout your life

    The liver can regenerate itself after taking damage, but whether that ability fades as we age has long been unknown. A new study has found that age doesn’t slow down the liver’s regeneration, and whether you’re 20 or 80, your liver is on average just three years old.

    the team analyzed the radiocarbon levels of the livers of 33 deceased people between the ages of 20 and 84 years. And sure enough, they found that the organ was roughly the same age – a little under three years old on average – no matter the age of the person. But not all cells in a given liver were the same age – some were found to regenerate every year or so, while others could stick around for as long as a decade. Intriguingly, the longer-living cells were those that had accumulated more sets of chromosomes.

    https://www.cell.com/cell-systems/fulltext/S2405-4712(22)00171-5

    There you go little fella. I know you feel like 200 but you’re only 3. 😉

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  • #
    John Connor II

    We are “FED UP”. Epic speech by Wyoming congressional candidate Harriet Hageman

    https://www.bitchute.com/video/S6EbK43DIzds/

    Applause ☺

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    John Connor II

    Fort Bragg Deaths STATESIDE Spike (1 Every 3 days) So They Stopped Announcing Soldier Deaths

    Mcinerney says 83 Fort Bragg paratroopers died in their sleep after being vaccinated.

    https://gellerreport.com/2022/06/fort-bragg-deaths-stateside-spike-1-every-3-days-so-they-stopped-announcing-soldier-deaths.html/

    Must be all that gunfire causing heart attacks…

    41

  • #
    John Connor II

    Genetic data indicate at least two separate monkeypox outbreaks underway, suggesting wider spread

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday that new genetic sequencing data indicate there are at least two distinct monkeypox outbreaks underway outside Africa — a surprise finding that one official said suggests international spread is wider, and has been occurring for longer than has been previously realized.

    Three of 10 viruses the CDC has sequenced from recent U.S. monkeypox cases — two from 2021 and eight from 2022 — are different from the viruses that have been sequenced by several countries involved in the large outbreak that is spreading in and from Europe. That outbreak is currently being driven by infections in gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men.
    “What we think that this indicates is that there are likely multiple introductions out of Nigeria at points in the recent past, and there are likely additional transmission events occurring globally,” Damon said.

    “It does raise the question … are there reservoirs and human infections occurring in a wider area? And I think it’s really a further understanding of the Middle East and East Africa as potential areas where the virus was introduced.”

    Damon said it is unlikely that the three divergent sequences indicate that there was undetected domestic transmission in the U.S. after the Texas case last July. “We don’t have any evidence to support that at this point in time. The illness onset of these individuals was really associated with [their] travel event.”

    https://www.statnews.com/2022/06/03/genetic-data-indicate-at-least-two-separate-monkeypox-outbreaks-underway-suggesting-wider-spread/

    I watched a video the other day which changed the whole game.
    Interestingly, the author seems to be blacklisted here (no search results)…

    11

  • #
    John Connor II

    Senator Ron Johnson has interesting data on vaccines

    https://64.media.tumblr.com/6165f576b9cd37daadcb603d5bed5525/4fd22c9b67c105d3-fd/s1280x1920/0bb48438fed4cf68eb15440ef022999667f39cc6.jpg

    Might want to rethink that flu shot…and Dexa..and Tylenol…

    51

  • #
    John Connor II

    Groomers Vow to Expose Kids to ‘Nudity and Kink’ at Pride Parades

    Groomers have vowed to expose themselves to young children who attend “Pride” parades this month under the guise of building “tolerance” for the LGBTQ community.

    https://newspunch.com/groomers-vow-to-expose-kids-to-nudity-and-kink-at-pride-parades/

    The kid’s face says it all in the first photo.

    Pink Floyd – “leave them kids alone”
    Hallelujah…

    42

    • #
      Annie

      Disgusting behaviour. I hope all decent parents become aware of this sick stuff.

      21

      • #
        John Connor II

        Yep. It’s the typical human hypocrisy though.

        Punch someone repeatedly in a street setting and you get arrested and jailed.
        Punch someone in a boxing ring and you get cheered and paid.

        Flash your junk at someone in the street and you’re arrested and labelled a pervert UNLESS it’s part of a “pride” event…

        31

  • #
    Zane

    The immense financial firepower of the oil & gas lobby vs. the coal industry is beyond belief. It would be like sending Mike Tyson into the ring against Justin Bieber.

    Ignoring the world’s largest listed company, oil titan Saudi Aramco with its $2.36 trillion claimed stock market capitalization, the big players line up as follows by market capitalization ie. value:- (USD unless indicated otherwise)

    ExxonMobil $417 billion
    Chevron $348 bn
    Shell $222 bn
    ConocoPhillips $152 bn
    Total $151 bn
    BP $106 bn
    Gazprom $112 bn

    That’s $1.5 trillion of corporate muscle pushing oil & gas.

    Now we have the coal industry. World’s biggest private producer at 190 million tonnes p.a., US-based Peabody Energy. Which has a stock market capitalization of – wait for it – all of $3.6 billion. It had cash flow from operations last year of $420 million. ExxonMobil had cash flows from operations in 2021 of $48 billion.

    Australia’s biggest coal company is Yancoal, majority owned by Chinese interests. It produces 38 million tonnes of coal a year and has a market capitalization of A$7.2 billion. Currently the Chinese are thinking about buying out the few Australian minority shareholders left on the register at a 20% DISCOUNT to the last traded price! Oh boy. The biggest independent Aussie coal company is Whitehaven. 20 million tonnes annual production and a market capitalization of A$5.5 billion. Share price has tripled this year.

    So, to sum up: the coal industry, at least in the West, is on the ropes and being pounded mercilessly by the guys who want to replace all coal-fired generation with their natural gas.

    It’s nothing personal. It’s just business. When you spend $30 billion on an LNG project, you need a return on investment. Wall Street loves winners.

    Capice? Now have a nice day, everyone. 😅

    21

    • #
      Broadie

      Question.
      Do you make steel using coal or gas?
      Maybe coal competes in another market as well.

      10

      • #
        Zane

        Steel is made with either coking coal in a blast furnace (most of China’s steel) or with high voltage in an electric arc furnace, using mostly scrap steel as input (70% of US steel is made this way; the company Nucor is a major player).

        Coking (AKA metallurgical) coal is different from thermal coal used for power generation. It usually costs more.

        10

        • #
          ozfred

          I keep seeing rumors about direct reduction steel with hydrogen rather than coking coal. Might actually be useful if the hydrogen is “cheap enough”.

          00

  • #
    John Connor II

    Fauci Says the Bush Administration Wanted to Vaccinate the U.S. for Smallpox, But Couldn’t Justify ‘Toxic Side Effects’

    https://lorphicweb.com/fauci-says-the-bush-administration-wanted-to-vaccinate-the-u-s-for-smallpox-but-couldnt-justify-toxic-side-effects/

    Remember that when the time comes…

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  • #
    OldOzzie

    “Is This Real?”: Biden Gives Bizarre Inflation Speech Full Of Obvious Lies

    On Friday, President Joe Biden stood in front of the world and regurgitated so many lies that one has to wonder if his speechwriter borrowed Hunter’s pipe.

    [email protected] H.😯 Enough hot air in that speech to service a balloon festival.🙄

    21

  • #
  • #
    Zane

    A newish orangey VW Transporter van passed me on the street today. In the side window hung a large visible plastic sign: CLIMATE ACTION NOW! Then a climate website.

    It’s a challenge, folks. 😃

    21

  • #
    OldOzzie

    Biden’s inner Trudeau: On guns, he seems to be operating under the wrong Constitution

    BY JONATHAN TURLEY, OPINION CONTRIBUTOR

    Such calls are not limited to the United States. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced that his government is introducing legislation to “implement a national freeze on handgun ownership.” He said Canadians would no longer be able “to buy, sell, transfer or import handguns anywhere in Canada,” adding that “there is no reason anyone in Canada should need guns in their everyday lives.”

    The difference between the push in the two countries is the existence of the Second Amendment in the United States — a constitutionally mandated “reason” why Americans are allowed to have guns; they don’t have to prove it to the government.

    While the White House subsequently tried to walk back his comments, Biden saying there’s “no rational basis” to own 9mms and AR-15s sounds like he’s channeling his inner Canadian.

    There is now a strong majority for gun control reforms. However, politicians are once again ignoring what is constitutionally possible by focusing on what is politically popular with their voting base.

    In the past, politicians in cities like New York, Chicago and Washington, D.C., have proven to be the gun lobby’s greatest asset. They have pushed ill-considered legislation and litigation that only served to create precedent against gun control. The same pattern seems to be playing out as leaders like Biden and Harris voice sweeping, unsupportable statements about guns and constitutional protections. For example, despite being repeatedly corrected, President Biden continues to repeat the same false statements about bans on weapons when the Second Amendment was ratified.

    While making these dubious claims, President Biden stressed that “I can’t dictate this stuff … I can’t outlaw a weapon.” He added: “I think things have gotten so bad that everybody is getting more rational about it. At least, that’s my hope and prayer.”

    There is room for rational reforms, ranging from better funding of mental illness treatment to “red flag” laws. However, a “hope and prayer” is unlikely to succeed if the president continues to inject hype and politics into our national debate over gun control.

    Jonathan Turley is the Shapiro Professor of Public Interest Law at George Washington University

    11

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    OldOzzie

    PETER NAVARRO ARRESTED

    Former Trump economic adviser Peter Navarro was arrested today for refusing to comply with a subpoena from the Democrats’ committee investigating the protests of January 6, 2021:

    Former White House economic adviser Peter Navarro contested the charges against him in federal court in Washington, DC, on Friday, after he was arrested by the FBI on two counts of contempt of Congress for defying the January 6 committee.

    …He confirmed that he had been arrested while boarding a domestic flight, and placed into “handcuffs” and “leg irons.”

    Navarro had offered to cooperate with the investigation, but is challenging the legality of the committee’s actions in court:

    Outside the courthouse, he told reporters that he had offered the FBI a “modus vivendi” of cooperation last week, but that they had arrested him at the airport instead, in the manner of “Stalinist Russia or the Chinese Communist Party.” He described his treatment by the FBI as “terrorism” and “coercion” and as a form of punishment and intimidation.

    Navarro also outlined his constitutional arguments against the legitimacy of the January 6 committee, which he is suing in federal court, arguing that it is asking him to violate executive privilege and violating the Constitution’s separation of powers.

    Actually, refusing to comply with congressional subpoenas is rather common. Remember when Eric Holder, Barack Obama’s “wing man,” did the same thing?

    The House has voted to hold Attorney General Eric Holderin contempt of Congress over his failure to turn over documents related to the Fast and Furious scandal, the first time Congress has taken such a dramatic move against a sitting Cabinet official.

    The vote was 255-67, with 17 Democrats voting in support of a criminal contempt resolution, which authorizes Republicans leaders to seek criminal charges against Holder.

    In a statement released by his office, Holder blasted the contempt votes as “politically motivated” and “misguided”…

    And, of course, you remember when the FBI arrested Holder and put him in leg irons on the same charge that is being brought against Navarro. No, wait…

    Navarro told the court today that he would represent himself rather than hiring a lawyer. But the biggest problem he faces is not the absence of counsel, it is the fact that his case will go before a jury of D.C. Democrats.

    From the Comments

    – The US Capital should be moved to somewhere like Nebraska, with DC absorbed into neighboring Maryland. It will solve a lot of problems.

    Unfortunately, the problem will follow the capital city if it’s permanent.

    I’d prefer a rotating capital city (only small cities, 1 per state, 4 years per city) so the hundreds of thousands of swamp bureaucrats cannot get entrenched.

    – The problem is that the Dems are playing nasty little games, secure in the knowledge that the Republicans won’t retaliate in kind. Which needs to change. Drag a few dozen Democrats before Congress (preferably feet-first and face-down) and the Left will start to back off. Mutually Assured Destruction keeps the peace.

    – The FBI doesn’t work for the USA. They work for the DNC.

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    John Connor II

    Diamond-based quantum computer paired with supercomputers for first time

    Quantum computing may have just taken a major step forward, as a supercomputer facility in Australia becomes the first to have a quantum computer integrated into it. The quantum processor, developed by German-Australian start-up Quantum Brilliance, runs at room temperature, and will now work in tandem with classical supercomputers at the Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre.

    https://pawsey.org.au/pawsey-installs-first-room-temperature-on-premises-quantum-computer-in-a-supercomputing-centre/

    One step closer to having the computing power to understand women 😅

    51

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    John Connor II

    Study claims most Australians support lockdowns: Are we really that retarded?

    Two-thirds of Australians felt the severity and duration of COVID-19 lockdowns were “just right”, a new study claims, although Victorians were most likely to view emergency pandemic orders as too restrictive.

    The University of Tasmania study, which surveyed 1162 people, revealed just 8 per cent of Aussies thought lockdowns were “definitely too restrictive”.

    Another 11 per cent of people thought the lockdowns, which often required people to stay at home, comply with mask mandates and the drastic curtailment of access to non-essential services, were “probably” too restrictive.

    Coalition voters were three times as likely as Labor supporters to view the lockdowns as too heavy handed, while attitude differences between men and women also emerged in the peer-reviewed paper, published in the Australian Journal of Social Issues on Tuesday.

    https://xyz.net.au/2022/05/study-claims-most-australians-support-lockdowns-are-we-really-that-retarded/

    No doubt the majority of those surveyed got their “facts” from the nightly news too…

    Govern me harder, daddy 😈

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    Zane

    It seems YouTube has banned the Aussie Cossack. Not for his pro-Russia views, but for supposedly spreading Covid ” disinformation “.

    Shame on g00ggle.

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    John Connor II

    Florida State Health Agency Issues Report Challenging Science of Transgenderism

    Breitbart News exclusively obtained a 45-page report on Thursday completed by Florida Medicaid and requested by the Secretary of the Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA), which oversees Florida’s Medicaid program.

    In consultation with several experts, the report concludes that sex reassignment surgeries, puberty blockers, and cross sex hormone treatments for people with gender dysphoria are not proven as “safe or effective” treatments and are “experimental and investigational.”

    “Studies presenting the benefits to mental health, including those claiming that the services prevent suicide, are either low or very low quality and rely on unreliable methods such as surveys and retrospective analyses, both of which are cross-sectional and highly biased,” according to the document.

    https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2022/06/02/exclusive-florida-state-health-agency-issues-report-challenging-science-of-transgenderism/

    You can download the report below (direct link, not via Scribd):

    https://ahca.myflorida.com/LetKidsBeKids/docs/AHCA_GAPMS_June_2022_Report.pdf

    No wonder Florida is the USA’s new “place to be”. A government with functioning brains, not WEF puppets and who live in the real world…

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    • #
      Kalm Keith

      Good stuff.
      The so called “science” of transgenderism is very real but has been either ignored or not considered politically correct for woke requirements.

      Anyone with a proper understanding of the issue would know that early surgical and hormonal interventions are a very dangerous thing.

      The broad spectrum of potential damage during pregnancy means that most hormonal and surgical procedures adopted are borderline in usefulness and often dangerous.

      The correct emphasis in solving this problem should occur during pregnancy, not after.
      “Carrying” mothers to be need to avoid stress during pregnancy and avoid alcohol.

      Denying reality is now the new control mechanism; it worked very well for global warming and trans issues and reached its peak with the total domination of the Covid19 crisis.

      With reality hidden, politicians can write their own interpretation of anything and charge you what they like.

      I want out of this nuthouse.

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  • #
    Graeme No.3

    I notice that a SCHEME for generating Green Hydrogen in northern Tasmania from solar power and fueling a fleet of 26 trucks has been mentioned in The Australian, based on Crowd Funding.
    I am sure that most readers here won’t be drawn in but to summarise:
    Option 1: After trials fail at various stages YOU WON’T GET YOUR MONEY BACK.
    Option 2: It is a scam and YOU WON’T GET YOUR MONEY BACK.

    52

    • #
      Ronin

      “I notice that a SCAM for generating Green Hydrogen in northern Tasmania from solar power and fueling a fleet of 26 trucks has been mentioned in The Australian, based on Crowd Funding.”

      There, fixed it for you.

      21

    • #
      Graeme No.3

      I notice that we have at least ONE person who thinks that the above is a good investment. So put your money where you red thumb is. Just don’t expect (or advocate) wasting taxpayers money on it.

      32

    • #
      yarpos

      Seems like Tassie like every other State is also going to be a Global Hydrogen Hub / Powerhouse.

      00

  • #
    another ian

    Attention Tony in Oz et al – you might have a look at this supposed costing item over at WUWT in comments

    “Nick Stokes
    June 3, 2022 6:45 pm
    “After declining gradually for decades, Australia’s consumer electricity prices have about doubled since 2005. The doubling coincides with the rapid addition of new wind and solar generation facilities since that time”

    Australia’s states have varied uptake of renewables. South Australia famously is at about 50% renewable, while Qld remains mainly coal. Here is a plot from AER of wholesale prices (annual average 30 min) in the various states:”

    Graphs supposedly showing

    “The yellow line is SA. It used to be the highest. But starting about 2017, declined rapidly to lower mid-range. The blue line is Qld. Now with high export prices, local electricity is the most expensive.

    SA, with no useful local fossil fuel supplies, is now a big exporter of power.”

    10

    • #
      Hanrahan

      SA, with no useful local fossil fuel supplies, is now a big exporter of power.”

      Occasionally.

      Problem is, when they can export so can Vic and Tas. If NSW got their act together and basically met their own demand SA would have no market for their wind on the “good” days.

      ATM NSW is importing max from Vic and some from Qld.

      40

      • #
        Chad

        Because NSW is the biggest consumer state, it is easy for the AEMO to use it as a “ soak”. for surplus RE generation and maximise the cheapest QLD coal production, whilst turning down NSWs Gas generators
        AEMO are trying to optimise the use of all assets.

        20

        • #
          b.nice

          Also, The towns in northern NSW are probably closer to the SEQ coal stations than the Hunter coal powered stations.

          And Wagga, and other NSW towns along the Murray and NSW far south coast are probably better powered from Victoria.

          00

      • #
        b.nice

        “is now a big exporter of power.”

        No, its not.. The maximum it exports is 200-300Mw, this is a pittance compared to the rest of the NEM.

        31

    • #
      Robber

      SA over last 12 months: imports 1496 GWhr, exports 774 GWhr.
      But some weeks imports provide over 15% of demand.
      And some days over 30% of demand.
      And last Wed at 7pm, solar zero, wind 0.1%, battery 1.1%, distillate 9.9%, imports 16.8%, and gas 72%.
      Ah yes, those wonderful “free” unreliables need 100% backup to keep the lights on.

      61

    • #
      robert rosicka

      Prices doubled in Victoriastan just after Hazelwood closed .

      10

    • #
      yarpos

      “SA, with no useful local fossil fuel supplies, is now a big exporter of power.”

      Doesnt a fair bit of the Cooper Eromanga Basin sit under SA? Isnt there a direct pipeline to Adelaide ?

      00

  • #
    Earl

    Just heard a certain work place here in Brisbane has had their Saturday night shift roster decimated with 9 of the 10 rostered phoning in sick due to covid. And yes this workplace is mandated so all staff have to be up to date with their shots otherwise they would not be working there.

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  • #
    Hanrahan

    It’s Saturday night and look what I found:

    Ella Fitzgerald & Louis Armstrong: It Ain’t Necessarily So.

    Rather topical if one thinks about it or maybe it’s just nothing changes.

    20

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    Broadie

    In the latest NSW weekly Covid 19 (now respiratory illness) report, all the deaths ‘with Covid’ were vaccinated except one, an infant whose Mum may or may not have been vaccinated. A small percentage of those did not survive long enough to get their 3rd vaccination. Most of those who died ‘with Covid’ had received their 3rd dose.

    NSW Respiratory Surveillance Report – week ending 28 May 2022

    There were 98 COVID-19 deaths reported this week. Of these, 97 were eligible for a third dose of a COVID-19
    vaccine but only 64 (66%) had received a third dose. Five of the deaths reported were in people aged under 65
    years. Deaths may not have occurred in the week in which they were reported.

    Is this a killer of a cure or what?

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  • #
    Kim

    Policymaker Push Against Fossil Fuels Means “Will Never Be Another Refinery Built In US”; Chevron CEO Says. If the fossil fuel industry is destroyed the energy sector will be crashed and truckies will be driving milk floats. It’s sheer madness.

    31

    • #
      yarpos

      Give it a couple of years, much will change. Still, as you point out the stupid knows no bounds.

      21

  • #
    another ian

    Welcome to another unreliable

    “Pfizer mRNA Vexxine Reverse Transcribed To DNA in Human Liver”

    https://chiefio.wordpress.com/2022/06/04/pfizer-mrna-vexxine-reverse-transcribed-to-dna-in-human-liver/

    “Safe and Effective ™” /s

    11

  • #
    Broadie

    According to the Weekly Report John.

    how many unvaccinated people are dying of this virus?

    The answer is ‘one’ and this case an ‘ineligible infant’.

    If you read the reports from the Pfizer documents as referenced by Naomi Wolf.

    The Volunteers found that while pregnant women were excluded from the internal studies, and thus from the EUA on which basis all pregnant women were assured the vaccine was “safe and effective”, nonetheless about 270 women got pregnant during the study. More than 230 of them were lost somehow to history. But of the 36 pregnant women whose outcomes were followed – 28 lost their babies.

    The Volunteers found that a baby died after nursing from a vaccinated lactating mother, and was found to have had an inflamed liver. Many babies nursing from vaccinated mothers showed agitation, gastrointestinal distress, and failure to thrive (to grow), and were inconsolable.

    The answer may well be ‘Zero’ unvaccinated died with Covid 19. Remember unvaccinated in NSW is ‘No Effective Dose’ so this includes those who have recently been jabbed.

    So yes I agree, there should be some report where only those (or their Mothers) who had not been vaccinated at all are reported. This category should not be muddied with those dropping dead shortly after the vaccination.

    31

  • #
    another ian

    “Neil Oliver, When You Accept That Modern Western Government Considers Citizens Their Enemy, Then All the Outcomes Make Sense
    June 4, 2022 | Sundance | 41 Comments”

    https://theconservativetreehouse.com/blog/2022/06/04/neil-oliver-when-you-accept-that-modern-western-government-considers-citizens-their-enemy-then-all-the-outcomes-make-sense/

    31

  • #
    another ian

    “Common Sense”

    “”It’s time for common sense gun control” – Any politician, anywhere, every time.

    Is that so? We now think that law should be applied to what someone — anyone or some group of people — call “common sense.”

    Perhaps you’d like to square this with a few other common sense facts.

    First, all manner of things related to sex.

    It is common sense that one’s sex is determined at conception and at any time beyond that point is immutable. One either has “XY” or “XX” sex chromosomes and in a very, very small percentage of cases has a disorder in that you have some other combination (e.g. XXY, etc.) Therefore there are exactly two sexes and any attempt to claim otherwise, especially when it produces an obligation of others, ought to be prohibited by law — right?”

    More at

    https://market-ticker.org/akcs-www?post=246039

    11

  • #
    RossP

    This a good video to watch. It highlights the ESG idea behind how you “should” be evaluating companies to invest in and how it is all linked to the climate wars. It explains what is going on so well.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IwvGlF9_fpw

    00

  • #
    Kim

    The State Government invites you to enjoy the Foundation Day holiday weekend with speed cameras and police sirens to disturb the rural tranquil.

    11

  • #
  • #
    another ian

    Compare and contrast

    “Great story from one of Her Majesty’s former police protection detectives Richard Griffin”

    https://www.michaelsmithnews.com/2022/06/great-story-from-one-of-her-majestys-former-police-protection-detectives-richard-griffin.html

    21

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    OldOzzie

    An American Perspective – Even after 70 years on the throne, Queen Elizabeth is still the GOAT

    Queen Elizabeth II has one of the weirdest jobs on earth — the mega-posh version of being a Walmart greeter. Seven full decades of smiling and waving and hat-wearing with no actual power, not even the ability to chop off her enemies’ heads on Tower Hill — gotta be exhausting. Oh, and keeping her mouth shut. That must be the hardest part of all. Just look at how difficult Gnarly Prince Charlie finds it, with his dull lectures on architecture and global warming.

    Roughly 97 percent of people now alive are too young to remember when Elizabeth became Queen, and she’s gone the distance without a single misplaced step. For her Diamond Jubilee, a decade ago, she spent eight hours on her feet watching the Thames regatta in her honor, grinning in the rain. What other elderly woman would be asked to remain on her feet all day? As her loyal subject Sir Elton John, whom she knighted and with whom she once danced to “Rock Around the Clock,” put it, “I’m still standing, better than I ever did.”

    This week, during four days of Platinum Jubilee overload, Elizabeth still managed to look delighted at the pomp and pageantry when she probably just wanted to rest her feet, crack a bottle of Chardonnay and watch “Bridgerton” like the rest of us. “You are perfect,” Ed Sheeran warbled to the Queen, and who could disagree?

    It’s the greatest and longest public performance of all time: 70 years of sticking to her weird feudal script. She endured having a jug-eared dope of a philanderer for her heir, a [email protected] predator for another son, a lush for a sister, and a dizzy self-absorbed twit for a daughter-in-law. She survived Diana’s death, Harry’s public gelding by a third-rate soap star, Charles’s “I wish I were your tampon” tape, Andrew’s slow-motion disgrace, the [email protected] Pistols, Boris Johnson’s haircut, COVID, the IRA and her castle getting roasted in a $70 million blaze.

    Even when things grew sordid and terrible, did she say, “This sucks and I want out?” No, she mildly observed that things were less than ideal in the classy way: “1992 is not a year on which I shall look back with undiluted pleasure…it has turned out to be an ‘Annus Horribilis,’” she said at the time. The guy who writes “Downton Abbey” couldn’t have scripted it any finer. During the war, she fixed pickup trucks, and 30 years ago, she even volunteered to start paying income tax, the first British monarch to do so.

    In an age when nobody seems to understand his job anymore

    The Queen reminds us every day of the meaning of duty. On her 21st birthday — the age of a college junior! — she told the world, “I declare before you all that my whole life — whether it be long or short — shall be devoted to your service.” Seventy-five years later, she is the rock of our times. Queen E, you’re the Queen Bee. You rule. Literally.

    41

  • #
    yarpos

    Being the sad energy dweeb that I am one of the first sites I look at each day is NEM Dispatch (and the again at dinner time) The last couple of mornings:

    SA going gangbusters with 90% windpower with some required gas + interconnect if needed negative $90 ish

    next morning…..

    SA still going gangbusters with 90% windpower with some required gas + interconnect if needed positive $90 ish

    Deep in the bowels of the AEMO, there is a program that works out how this makes sense

    31

  • #
  • #

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GC4xEuD6B1M
    Douglas Murray: Why conservatives will win the war on the West

    01

  • #
    robert rosicka

    Big thunderstorm brewing around 6pm tonight so looked at the Radar site for my area which confirmed a long line of storms heading our way so checked Boms warning page but nothing for our area and was updated at 4.34pm . Storm hit at about 6pm with a few big downpours, thunder and wind etc . Bom issued a warning for our area at 7.14pm , they really can’t forecast the weather too far in advance . And they want me to believe their predictions of weather and temps to the nearest hundredth of a degree in 100 years , yeah right.

    21

    • #
      Annie

      A bit of a storm and some heavy rain here earlier this evening with a short power outage. I had just lit an array of candles as the lights came on again.

      10

  • #
    el+gordo

    Barnaby Joyce is shadow minister for veterans affairs! and Michael McCormack (outer ministry) international development and the Pacific.

    00

  • #
    Hanrahan

    What’s with this Chinese fighter harassing an RAAF P8?

    It was all the news on SKY and sounded pretty damn provocative to me. Before posting I did the mandatory search to check accuracy.

    Well waddayano! A broad search yielded nothing. Only after some more direct searches did I find anything.

    The most common reports quote that the CCP fighter, after passing, crossed the path of the P8 and released flares in the path of the RAAF AC. A lot was said that this endangered the AC but my limited knowledge would say “Only if an engine ingested a flare”. But however you cut that it is reckless and WAY outside protocols for military aircraft.

    But Moylen, on Sky, said he released “chaff”. Moylen is no mug on military matters so I believe the distinction in terms to be relevant.

    Flares are a decoy heat source to deflect heat-seeking missiles, chaff OTOH is tinsel cut to a half or qtr wavelength [forget which] of the search radar which give strong reflected signals swamping the receiver.

    Now if a jet engine ingested a kilo of tinsel, how is that different from a birdstrike? Ask Sully about that.

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      Hanrahan

      On reflection chaff will be half wave, Qtr wave is an insulator. That takes some understanding so don’t worry.

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    THE TEXAS SHOOTING JUST GOT WEIRDER, SOMETHING DOESN’T ADD UP
    https://www.bitchute.com/video/LOcoefibGgiD/
    The Red Elephants – Vincent James

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      Hanrahan

      Talk about toxic masculinity! Some redneck grabs a shotgun from his barber [why does a barber need a shotgun? Even in westerns they leave the barber and piano player alone.] Drives 40 mins and takes out some poor soul armed only with an AR15 [style] rifle.

      The world needs more Whoppi Goldbergs to control these dangerous MEN.

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        Thanks for watching, It’s an amazing story like a Bruce Willis movie. Red Elephants has some great videos.
        19 cops stood out the front of the school because they were scared?

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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpeDHZ-ZVwM
    (Apr, 2021) The Most Dangerous City in Every Single US State. It’s Very Alarming

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    el+gordo

    This polar outbreak is not unprecedented in Melbourne.

    ‘A few days ago, between May 30th and June 2nd, the city stayed colder than 12 degrees for three consecutive days (maximum temperatures of 11.7, 11.4 and 11.9 degrees), cold not achieved this early in the year since 1913. In that year, the Victorian capital stayed colder than 12 degrees for four consecutive days from 27th May to 30th May.

    ‘Despite the city now warming up, it has still stayed colder than 15 degrees for seven consecutive days and is on target to extend the run an additional 10 days.

    ‘The last time the city stayed colder than 15 degrees for 17 consecutive days this early in the year was also in 1913 when it managed a 19-day run to June 13th.’ (Weatherzone)

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    another ian

    This looks like a “Watch this space and question when wind and solar do their thing”

    “Woolworths moves to 100pc renewable energy in SA business”

    https://www.beefcentral.com/news/203893/

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      yarpos

      all the big supermarkets lie on this topic

      they confuse playing paper games with what actually powers their supermarkets, deliberately I think

      they use words like “powered by” rather we have contracted for

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    robert rosicka

    Gerard Rennick in senate estimates causing a bit of trouble for the luvvies .

    https://www.gerardrennick.com.au/senator-rennick-questions-csiro-in-additional-senate-estimates/

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      Thanks for the link. Senator Rennick is the only Senator asking real questions.

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        robert rosicka

        Can’t find the one where he pressed BOM over the 40 climate models they use but it’s brilliant viewing .

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          Yes, Yes I have seen, Brilliant statement! makes the BOM look like the fake idiots they are. The CO2 curtain is very thin, Which model you have 40 ?

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    Hanrahan

    Ain’t it marvellous. A month has gone and those who are smarter than I are talking about another 0.4% interest rate rise.

    Please Mr ANZ, Qld Country, can I get the LAST rate rise on my deposits?

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