JoNova

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Killing eagles is fine, just get your permit first

Dead birds save the world kids!

Welcome to Your Green Dystopia. The wind turbines at ESI Energy killed 150 eagles in the last ten years and last week the company was fined $8 million dollars “or $53,300 per carcass”. Which sounds someone cares about these birds. But don’t think the The Fisheries and Wildlife Service (FWS) are outraged at the deaths of eagles.  The real problem was not the slaughter, but that ESI didn’t fill out the paperwork first. If they had only got their permits to kill, it would have been fine.

The new FWS  permitted “take” limits of bald eagles has just been increased to 15,800 a year.

Do Eagles Lives Matter? It depends on who kills them.

As Gregory Whitestone says: The government is funding this knowing the birds are dying in the name of Clean Energy

The DOJ press release further stated: “ESI and its affiliates received hundreds of millions of dollars in federal tax credits for generating electricity from wind power at facilities that it operated, knowing that multiple eagles would be killed and wounded without legal authorization.

The legalized slaughter of eagles and other large birds of prey was legitimized under the Obama administration and continues today. At the time, it was estimated that nearly 600,000 birds of all types were killed by the much smaller wind footprint at that time, including 83,000 hunting birds such as hawks, falcons and eagles.

Unknown to most citizens is the fact that the FWS has established a “take limit” for wind energy companies to kill bald eagles. This would be similar to a bag limit for a hunter. However, hunters dare not as they are not of the protected class and would be subject to a maximum fine of $250,000 or two years of imprisonment for a felony conviction. FWS regularly imposes fines on oil companies and electric transmission firms for inadvertent deaths of bald eagles, all the while giving its seal of approval to green-induced eagle carnage of a grand scale from turbines.

The FWS bald eagle take limits were revised February 2022 to allow a more than four-fold increase in the legalized slaughter.

who is a geologist and author of the bestselling book, Inconvenient Facts: The Science that Al Gore Doesn’t Want You to Know.

File this story away next time you meet someone who thinks wind farms are good for the environment. Also handy for children in schools where they need to explain the pros and cons of renewables.

h/t ClimateDepot

10 out of 10 based on 62 ratings

21 comments to Killing eagles is fine, just get your permit first

  • #
    DD

    And let’s not forget the birds that are incinerated in mid-flight by solar concentrators.

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    Dave of Gold Coast, Qld.

    Very dangerous for our food to allow the top predator birds and bats to be killed off. They are critically important to help keep the pests in check. Here in Australia it is the same thing, we actually saw a massive Wedgetail eagle taken out by a wind turbine between Inverell and Glen Innes in 2020. One never hears a word about it in Australia.

    10

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    Graeme No.3

    When I was in Tasmania in 2015 there was some agitation about wedgetail eagles being killed by wind turbines in the North West. I thought, that will be the start of a crusade by that local inhabitant Bob Brown. Haven’t seen a Tassie newspaper since.

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    • #
      hillbilly33

      Hi Graeme No.3. The link below will give you all the background to part of earlier “agitation about wedgetail eagles being killed by wind turbines”, but this time in the North East of Tasmania. It sparked world-wide interest and attracted a great number of thoughtful and insightful comments. Our own Tony from Oz was a major contributor who provided all the technical expertise. IMHO, those who bother will find it well worthwhile to read through the 10-yr old comments which cover most aspects still troubling us today.

      https://jennifermarohasy.com/2012/01/the-musselroe-wind-farm-travesty-keith-h/

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        Graeme No.3

        Thanks K. Must have bypassed it when I drove Gladstone to Bridport in 2015.
        I see it is 75% owned by the Chinese.

        80

  • #
    Annie

    Hypocrisy writ large: how you ‘save’ the environment by wrecking it.

    210

  • #
    b.nice

    When are people going to realise, that “greenies” don’t give two hoots about the environment.

    Most are inner-city yuppies that would go absolutely berserk if you tried to install a wind turbine anywhere near them.

    330

    • #
      Joao Martins

      Yes, b. And I would add:

      When are people going to realise that the “greenies” have no soud scientific knowledge of ecology and biology, and only act upon opportunistic “ideas” created at the moment in order to try to justify their political decisions?

      (And I could go on asking further what could be the interests behind that justification of idiotic, unscientific ideas; but I stop here for now)

      60

  • #
    Mal

    Ballina eagle lives matter!
    Defund the Green’s.

    200

  • #
    phielmon

    Bald Eagle? Is that the U.S.? It is rather symbolic.

    Mind you, I don’t think the Wreckafellers care if it’s oil or stupid, wasteful, inefficient wind-monstrosities. All their oil trust-fund babies are into the Malthusian Green Thing. Instead of guilt that they’ve inherited lots of money when others are not so fortunate, they’re trying to justify it.

    John, Senior,. Wreckafeller, stuck to his homeopathic medicine man, even after Junior was setting up the AMA.

    80

  • #
    John Connor II

    On the topic of “blood energy”:

    Gravitas Plus: Blood The dark side of Electric Vehicles

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RFHvq-8np1o&feature=emb_logo

    90

    • #
      PeterPetrum

      That Indian lady presents so well. I have saved this video to show my grandchildren whose parents (one of them our daughter) run around in an electric Merc and a Mini.

      30

  • #

    the Totalitarian Green Dystopia is alive and well
    it has been with us for a long time, these people get an idea and nothing will stop them or get in there way
    even if it goes against their precious emotional fund making principles, they have to be right
    an example is the poisoning of New Zealand shown here in a Graf boys video “Poisoning Paradise”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yQRuOj96CRs
    in one of the Graff Boys videos they drive down a 40klm long road without seeing any wildlife, not one little bird
    nothing
    l have been told the same has been planned for Australia to rid us of the feral deer in our bush, when the government apparently last baited deer the wedge tailed eagles disappeared in the areas baited for years

    50

    • #
      Ronin

      The deer need to be lead poisoned instead of by 1080.

      60

    • #
      robert rosicka

      Marksman Deer won’t be poisoned here and are still listed as a game animal in Victoriastan and Tasmania . There have been culling programs but too little too late .

      00

  • #
    John Connor II

    Also handy for children in schools where they need to explain the pros and cons of renewables.

    Honestly Jo – little kiddies don’t have time to consider energy and birds. They’ve got important life choices to make like their upcoming gender reassignment surgeries and then watching The Wiggles 😁

    151

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    melbourne+resident

    I have questioned our current candidates about this (Indi) with no sensible answers – they just want to sweep it under the carpet like all politicians as it is too hard to be advocating for renewables then noticing the damage they do. I went to Tassie in 2016 and took a trip to look at the Cape Grim windfarm. The road was closed so couldn’t get close enough to see it close up. However, I did look at the information kiosk and was staggered to find that – due to concern about the Wedgetails nesting on the cliffs below the site of the windfarm – they put the towers back 100metres from the cliff edge. We are talking here about Wedgetails that have to come to the land in order to hunt, they are not Sea Eagles. So what were they thinking? The Eagles have to climb 300metres up just to get over the swingeing blades so they can get to their hunting grounds! No wonder that Bob Brown had concerns – even he had realised the damage these wind choppers can do, and lets not start on migrating Orange-bellied Parrots (critically endangered) when they try to cross the Bass Strait to breed – avoiding the offshore windfarms of course!

    180

  • #
    Ross

    For the last 12 months we have been besieged by virtue signalling power companies, phone companies, supermarkets etc telling us how they are sourcing “sustainable” electricity. Also, places like ACT. Whereas this is a complete lie and should by challenged as fraudulent advertising. It’s becoming ridiculous as the other day I received an email from Linkt (Transurban) advising me that Citylink in Melbourne was now powered by renewables. Someone had even drawn a sketch of a windtower up top of the West gate bridge. If those companies and other entities are hooked up to the AEMO grid we all know it is largely powered by electricity from coal and gas. If a group of bird lovers were to stage a protest at a Coles supermarket showing photos of dead wedge tailed eagles etc under wind towers, there should be a huge outcry from their customers. But, somehow this information gets “disappeared”.

    130

  • #
    Kevin T Kilty

    This thread is probably on its tail end at this point, but I will summarize a comment I made at WUWT a couple of days ago about process.

    I sat in a hearing for the proposed Rock Creek I and II projects a few weeks ago and one of the applicant’s wild life experts testified that in her opinion the project was not a hazard to eagles. The Albany County Conservancy who was a party to the hearing I had ask why the applicant had reduced the buffer for eagle nests from the advisory distance of 2 miles down to one mile when it was established that a turbine had struck a bald eagle 2.5 miles from a nest. The answer was that the data they collected shows that the one mile buffer is adequate — that’s it. The Industrial Siting Council was unmoved by any of this exchange, even though hazards to wildlife is a stipulated topic of their purview, and probably because they rely on the experts at the state game and fish department or the USFWS or the applicants experts — round and round this merry-go-round of responsibility goes.

    It is a somewhat broken process. Another large project for which I testified at two of its permit hearings a year ago, was passed easily through the permitting process, and it lies just 8 miles west of one of the ESI projects that has been wacking eagles. It will obviously present the same hazards to wildlife. It will ruin a beautiful viewscape, but a local judge just recently dismissed a complaint filed by residents of the area that the County Commissioners erred in granting the permit. That they did not consider their stipulated duties accurately.

    Part of the brokenness, if that is a word, of the process is that the officials involved are mesmerized by a belief they are moving us all forward into a better future and saving the environment — or that they are providing us with cheap electrical energy. Part of the mess, though, is that through past actions they have created a perverse incentive. To have obtained takings permits for all 50 of ESI’s plants would have cost the applicant perhaps five or six times as much as paying the fine and admiting to a misdemeanor. Killing an eagle for a solitary private citizen might have resulted in a felony charge and jail time. The financial incentive for big-shots is to run naked without a permit, let the birds provide proof testing, then obtain permits for just those plants that have proven to be problematic so far.

    There are too many other issues to bother describing here. Everyone knows them.

    20

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