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Greens, Russia, Renewables industry forces UK government to “go Nuclear”

The irony — the renewables propaganda was so overdone that the EU and UK got caught with their pants down without enough stable fossil fuel powered electricity. European investors were so afraid gas and coal would be stranded assets that they stopped building reliable power generators. Russia supported the “anti-frack” movement in the West in order to sabotage competition, and now wants to squeeze a hot deal on its Big New Pipeline, so it has reduced the gas supply, so gas prices are headed for record highs and businesses are collapsing, food shortages are predicted.  In the short run coal is being reinstated — Drax is thinking of keeping coal plants running. But the only long term path out of the Green-Energy-Quicksand without breaking the sacred “anti-carbon-dioxide” jinx is with nuclear power.

So thus, the greedy power grab and profiteering by the renewables industry, the globalists, the Chinese, the Russians and the Greens may force out cheap coal in the long run, but accelerate the dawn of a new era of nuclear power.

Suddenly government love nuclear

Here come the Small Modular Reactors:

Dawning of Britain’s ‘new nuclear age’: Gas crisis prompts ministers to ‘change focus’ with Kwasi Kwarteng poised to approve 16 mini-reactors 

Daily Mail

Rolls Royce, Nuclear Power, UK.

….

According to the Sunday Times, a consortium led by the engineering firm has secured the necessary £210million to get matching funding from the taxpayer.

A planned new generation of mini nuclear reactors could protect Britain from future energy crises.

Business Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng is poised to approve funding for British engineering giant Rolls-Royce to create a fleet of mini-reactors.

Ministers are understood to have adopted a ‘change of focus’ towards nuclear power amid the current crisis caused by rocketing global wholesale gas prices.

It comes amid news that Chinese investment in Britain’s next generation of nuclear power stations is set to be banned on security grounds.

Mini reactors, known as Small Modular Reactors (SMRs), generate around 450 megawatts of power – around a seventh of what a conventional power station such as Hinkley Point produces.

 

ADDENDUM:  Maybe Russia doesn’t have the gas to spare?

At least one commentator thinks there is more to it:

Bloomberg

[Ben] Luckock said he was skeptical that Russia, the biggest gas supplier to Europe, was intentionally tightening the market for political gain, suggesting that Moscow was already pumping as much gas as it could right now.  “It’s easy to say that’s politically motivated, but I think it’s simpler than that: Russia is facing maintenance in many gas fields, very low domestic inventories, substantially increased flows to Turkey, and Gazprom is struggling to increase production,” he said.

Luckock is head of Oil Trading at Trafigura Group.

Gas price. Sept 2021

h/t Jim Simpson

9.9 out of 10 based on 81 ratings

89 comments to Greens, Russia, Renewables industry forces UK government to “go Nuclear”

  • #
    Bozotheclown

    There we go! Finally some sense (uncommon these days) in the UK energy future. Lets hope this catches on in a few other places.

    450

    • #

      It should catch on in Australia. I worked for RR as an Engineer in England in the early 1970s. Great Engineers. We have the Uranium here so here we go, here we go, here we go………..

      300

      • #
        Broadie

        And we can cut down the costs of transmission. The cost of distribution network with line loss and potential failures due to storms means these 450 megwatt plants will bring a considerable saving in the cost of our power. Not to mention the quality and reliability of supply.

        The mug punters do not know they are caught in what looks like the start of a baseball game with their rooftop solar. I remember they used to toss the bat in the air and depending where it was grabbed, the opposing captain placed his hand towards the top of the bat and then vice versa until the last hand at the top was the winner of the toss. That is what is going on at a power pole in front of you. Each installer ups the voltage of the ‘back to grid’ inverter to pump more current back to the pole. Maximum feed in and damn the consequences.
        The resulting voltage rise is followed by brownouts when a cloud passes over.

        For RR engineers of our future and I mean the practical ones working away trying to weld their next invention, need clean, reliable and cheap power, not the splatter and chook sh*t that results from the current political system and its clean green energy.

        300

      • #
        el+gordo

        Not on my watch.

        The Australian government is going for gas as a transition fuel to back up renewables.

        125

      • #
        M Allinson

        Yes, it should catch on in Australia, but it won’t be allowed to do so.

        Those who think the UN/Greens are honest in their desire to “reduce emissions” can’t see why they wouldn’t support it.

        But “climate change” and all the emission nonsense is just a cover to force a reduction of production and consumption in Western nations, and going nuclear would allow for even more industry and more consumption.

        So the UN/NWO/Greens will simply not allow it – you watch.

        320

      • #
        Ronin

        If we can build a submarine or two here, why can’t we weld up a pressure vessel for a SMR.

        140

        • #

          There I was, in the middle of a crucial weld of my nuclear submarine hull, when the wind dropped, and a cloud obscured the sun, following it up with rain!

          70

          • #
            Dennis

            I was interested to learn that as part of the new, now cancelled, submarine manufacturing in Adelaide SA were diesel generator back up on site.

            Another example of a perfectly good electricity grid with power stations supplying electricity turned into an unreliable mix of energy sources and reliant on the interconnector with VIC and building another to NSW.

            I wonder what the transition to so called renewables has cost that State’s taxpayers and Australians generally?

            30

    • #
      yarpos

      If sense is finally acting the last available option then yes I guess its sense. The would also spin it as flexibility and “future proofing”

      50

    • #
      exsteelworker

      If the punters kick out the only political party talking nuclear power stations,LNP…and its most likely to happen,for the ALPBC/GREENS/UNIONS forget about nuclear power. Instead all out renewables from just over the dividing range when it flattens out, sun mirrors all the way to Perth and windmills on every hill, mountain ridge and 1000s off our coast. I keep on asking this question to the lefty msm, still no answers…How is covering millions of sq kms in ruinables good for the environment? Oh, and 1000s of concrete slabs on the ocean floor with millions of kms of cabling? Someone answer me this riddle!

      270

    • #
      Serge Wright

      Unfortunately, it only catches on when the shelves are empty, the bowser’s are dry and the lights are out. Our situation is also a bit more complicated because we need an act of parliament in order to legalise nuclear power before we can place an order and the Greens and Labor will block this regardless of how many bodies are lying in the streets

      120

  • #
    clarence.t

    Something had to break sooner or later.

    No country can continue down the “unreliables” anti-science anti-CO2 path, destroying their fossil fuel infrastructure, without considering nuclear in some sort of format.

    As an aside… “Kwasi Kwarteng” … seriously cool sounding name 🙂

    Sort of 007 super-villain style.

    Anyone know what country it originates from ?

    210

  • #
    PeterS

    They are not the only ones to start using nuclear or expand their existing nuclear power generation. Below are just a few examples. It’s clear the push for net zero emissions is going to be tackled mostly with nuclear energy. So, if we can’t beat them we should join them. Let’s start building nuclear power plants and be done with the endless and pointless arguments.

    NuScale has signed a second agreement to consider its small reactors as a general replacement for coal units in Poland. The US small reactor vendor will support two energy firms, Poland-based Unimot and USA-based Getka, in their joint work to explore the possibility.

    Global nuclear industry leaders have agreed to work together with the head of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as the Group of Vienna to apply nuclear energy to addressing climate change and advancing sustainable development.

    Local elected officials from the region around the Penly nuclear power plant in Normandy, northern France, have reiterated their support for the construction of two EPR2 reactors at the site. In a manifesto expressing their support, they say such a project – representing an investment of about EUR15 billion (USD17 billion) – would have a significant positive socio-economic impact on the region.

    Westinghouse Electric Company and Ukrainian company NT-Engineering LLC have signed a Memorandum of Cooperation (MoC) to implement maintenance optimisation and system repair projects for VVER reactors. They said the work will increase the safety levels and performance of Ukrainian VVERs, improving annual power output and reducing operational costs.

    South Africa plans to issue a Request for Proposal for 2500 MWe of new nuclear capacity at the end of March 2022 and complete the procurement process in 2024, Deputy Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy Nobuhle Pamela Nkabane told the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) 65th General Conference. The country is also finalising its ratification of the amended Convention on Physical Protection of Nuclear Material.

    190

    • #
      MP

      Check out the photo.

      03

      • #
      • #
        Graeme No.3

        Are you referring to the one in the Drax link? That of the 6 cooling towers emitting water vapour (backlit of course to make it look evil).

        As Drax converted 4 of their 6 units to burning imported wood chips (gaining subsidies, freedom from carbon tax on the emissions from those units despite an overall 32% increase in CO2, and a boost to profits) we are supposed to be fooled by their great reset.
        I thought that Drax were going to shut down the last 2 units as they were denied permission to convert them to burning gas (which would have reduced emissions) but now they are going “to save the country” with coal. Imported of course because the coal mine directly underneath Drax has been abandoned and may well be recoverable. An opportunity for Australia ? (to replace exports to China?

        150

    • #
      John Hultquist

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NuScale_Power

      In August 2020, the NRC issued a final safety evaluation report for NuScale’s small modular reactor design, certifying the design as having met the NRC’s safety requirements.[9] NuScale plans to apply for a standard design approval of a 60-megawatt-per-module version of the design in 2022, which if accepted will allow the company to pursue its first reactor deployment in the mid-2020s

      Some predict that this winter is going to be cold.
      Nuclear power isn’t going to be much help, because things that don’t exist can’t be trundled around and parked in an empty lot.
      Coal has the edge, for now.

      190

    • #
      Ted1

      How long before our grandchildren start cussing us for selling our uranium too cheaply?

      131

  • #
    GlenM

    10 years or so down the track the penny will drop. All of those who were duped by this climate scare and the inane responses to it will say “how did this happen?” I hope Scott Morrison is taking note about what is unfolding.

    350

    • #
      yarpos

      I wish you were right, but I don’t there will be much questioning. Usually these things just fade away in a sort of embarrassed silence. The 70’s Ice Age, world famine by the 80s, Peak Oil by assorted dates, NYC being underwater , disappearing Arctic Ice etc all just fade away in the MSM and general public perspective and the next new scare topic inserted. At least with the Interwebs they are providing a library record of deceit, lies and failed predictions of doom. Maybe something will be learnt.

      190

    • #
      Dennis

      I have no doubt that the Federal Government, Prime Minister and Cabinet know that the climate scare hoax is all about international politics and money, wealth creation activities.

      Their problems are pressure to cooperate from UN organisations, nations that are our allies and globalism generally but Australia must tread carefully because there are trade and other implications threatened for failing to cooperate.

      20

  • #
    Gerry,+England

    Unfortunately this is too late to save us and unless the government stands up to the eco-marxists who will be squealing like mad, is likely to take at least a decade.

    With regard to the Gazprom Nord Stream 2 pipeline, the problem is not the Russians but the EU who having let the construction start, changed the rules on pipelines to effectively steal the section within the EU. Gazprom are required either to share the pipeline with an EU gas supplier or hand it over to an EU company. How strange that Gazprom are not happy with this EU snatch and are taking revenge – good for them I say.

    220

  • #
    Kalm Keith

    All things considered this is an interesting development.

    Britain has had a finger in the nuclear pie for some time and so already has a good start.

    First there was Modular; after a while there’ll be “Imodular” and later, Large.

    Can Australia now make a start?

    It’s time; coal is still cheaper but we need to get started because in the long term it’s an obvious contributor to the power supply.

    280

    • #
      KP

      Australia IS making a start… The best use for those nuclear subs will be tied up at the wharf while connected to the National Grid.

      220

    • #
      Ted1

      It was always the logical long term solution, with the only reason for not investing in it being that there might be a vastly better nuclear solution just around the corner. It has been just around the corner for all of the 61 years since I left school, so maybe it’s time to give up on it.

      120

    • #

      It would be sad to leave our natural advantage, abundant coal, in the ground, because of groundless fear monger if.
      4810

      10

  • #
    Mikky

    The Green Blob deployed thugs to intimidate fracking out of the UK, “fierce local opposition” being mainly from London and other nests of thugs. I suspect something similar, and quite likely worse, for these nuclear reactors.

    Will that happen with the Aussie nuclear subs?

    100

    • #
      Binny Pegler

      Re the Subs. Read a very article not long ago about the sub.
      Bottom line is they don’t exist (yet, or any time soon) either diesel or nuke.
      What does exist (right now) is a clear message to China that Australia is not alone.

      111

      • #
        Dennis

        I agree with that summary, at least in part because there is a lot more involved in the deterrents, and one is the excuse for UK and US nuclear submarines to support the RAN more openly than in the past, and no doubt they will train RAN personnel ready for the first RAN nuclear submarine commissioning.

        10

        • #
          Dennis

          I forgot to add do not forget the RAN Collins Class conventional submarines, custom redesigned for the RAN Swedish submarine design that received bad publicity when first launched because of technical problems, but as The Weekend Australian reported months ago the Collins Class became and remain one of the best conventional submarines operating today.

          The Australian Government has indicated that the six of them will now be upgraded and prepared for a longer period of service until the nuclear powered submarines are commissioned.

          00

      • #
        bobn

        All depends on what strings Aus wants to add to the sub contract.
        They could buy off the shelf Astute class nuclear subs from Uk that are coming off the production line for the Royal navy at the moment, 2 in service and 4 more in Production at the moment. So modern, trialled and de-bugged, ready to buy. Of course the politicos wont buy them. They’ll mess around with made in Aus by teams not yet employed or trained, and then demand local content that doesnt fit the design, and end with something less functional at 3 times the cost of buying proven off the shelf.
        But all govts mess about like that.
        UK and US Subs exist that are ready to buy, but Aus Govt will insist on something ‘local’ that doesnt exist and is unproven.

        20

  • #
    Hasbeen

    It would be so much quicker, cheaper & practical to drill a few holes frack them, & supply not only their own power & industry, but then some of the EU, at exorbitant prices of course. I doubt there will be less disruption of nuclear plants building than fracking, & the building will go on for a lot longer

    130

  • #
    Raving

    Meanwhile there is a coal shortage in China

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-58704221

    51

  • #
    LloydW

    This development in the UK probably couldn’t have happened without Brexit. Neither could AUKUS (or as I prefer to call it USUKA – hey France USUKA). I hope my Remainer friends are starting to see how stupid they were to oppose Brexit.

    160

    • #
      yarpos

      I would have thought they would lay the current chaos squarely at the feet of Brexit, logical or not. Any problems the UK has for a decade at least will be Brexit even if they cant explain the mechanism.

      70

  • #

    Is that ‘Rolls Royce’ of Nuclear Power Plants, (in the photo) built above, or below the high tide mark?

    60

    • #
      Graeme No.3

      Russia has 2 modular reactors in operation on a ship supplying electricity and water (from melted ice).

      The floating power unit Akademik Lomonosov has arrived at the port of its permanent location in Pevek, Chukotka, in Russia’s Far East, where it is being docked to start operations by the end of this year (that in 2019).

      70

  • #
    Lance

    Looks like Rolls-Royce plans to make delivery of first SMR by 2030.

    ” Phase 2 will be under way in about May of this year, with a view to completing GDA in about 2024, and power on grid in about 2030 for the first SMR”

    https://www.world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Rolls-Royce-on-track-for-2030-delivery-of-UK-SMR

    The question is what will the UK do for 8.25 years?

    Lots of potential troubles between now and then.

    50

  • #
    Beta Blocker

    Using nuclear for the decarbonization of the UK’s electricity supply is a twenty year proposition. Maybe even a twenty-five year proposition.

    Getting regulatory approval for the oncoming SMRs and creating the industrial base required to manufacture them cost effectively will take seven to ten years. Another ten years — maybe fifteen — will be needed to manufacture and install enough of these SMRs to cover the bulk of the UK’s power needs.

    What does the UK do in the meantime if gas fracking is still forbidden?

    Rolls Royce will not only sell the UK its SMRs, it will also supply its aero-derivative gas turbine generators for ultra-quick response peaking use. Where will the fuel for those gas turbine peakers come from? My prediction is that it will be LNG imported from Russia and from the Middle East.

    100

    • #
      LloydW

      I wonder how much LNG an Astute class sub is worth.

      60

    • #
      TdeF

      Real studies of the world temperatures with mathematical models which fit the data perfectly showed the peak at 2010-2020 and that we will cool rapidly now. As in the last ten years, it will be obvious even to the most stubborn Greens that CO2 is totally disconnected from temperature. The demand for heating in winter will soar as Europe, the US and Russia head back into the little ice age conditions and even colder. 60% of humanity lives in the top third of the world. It is already happening, which is the basis of this demand for nuclear. The refusal to use perfectly natural plant matter for electricity is nuts, but three decades of Green propaganda has created the situation.

      The windmills and solar panels will go the way of the windmills of the 12-17th centuries. Near useless things. Not commandable any more than King Canute’s waves. You cannot turn up wind or solar when you need it and it turns off when it likes.

      However none of this resolves the problem of the inadequacy of nuclear without breeder reactors. There is simply not enough uranium any more than there is enough oil or gas or coal. Fracking is a temporary solution and a good one, so it will be brought back very quickly. There is no choice.

      And the only future for mankind is fusion, which has made great strides this year with the first exothermic fission reaction. You just have to wonder what would have been the case if the last 33 years at $1.5Trillion a year had been spent chasing a fission? That’s what happens when you let druids take over science with Climate Scientology.

      231

      • #
        GlenM

        If you look at “The Conversation” ( scientific rigor with journalistic flair) there is a projective modelling of planet Earth in 2500. A bunch of kid academics playing with computers it seems. Complete nonsense so don’t waste your time looking at it.

        50

      • #
        Peter C

        There is simply not enough uranium

        Plenty of Thorium though.

        60

    • #
      Ronin

      A lot of cold winters inbetween.

      40

  • #
    Richard+Ilfeld

    Yeah, well, I’m sure shocked.
    Did any of you ever notice how good the greens are at the part where “we have to make fossil fuels more expensive, so people will move away from them!” and how bad they are at the part “we have to provide efficient, clean, cost effective, dispatch reliable alternatives”?
    Me too.
    Is there anybody who has ever talked to modern young greens…you know, the kind that march ‘for the planet’ in jackets made of petroleum derivatives and tennis shoes made by slave labor, where more than one in ten could answer the question “where does electrical power come from?” with an answer better that “the socket in the wall”.
    Looks like the luck of the draw make it the UK’s turn in the barrel to face reality; with green-gov cock-ups the norm it’s been a close
    race but the Brits seem first to the Post; no wind, gas and petrol both in short supply, and a dark winter of discontent on the horizon.

    Mind you, they’ll stand fast and push through somehow, firm and resolute as always; at least I hope theyll grasp the coal nettle, get their plants up and running; get some petrol shipped in, and don’t actually let the politicians kill folks.

    But (and I hate wishing anyone ill) I hope the suffering is sufficient to demonstrate the folly of green policy; if the answer is to build more windmills one can only despair.

    The decision for nukes would be nice; for the Subjects of the Queen it is too late. Yes, by all means, start the process, but if you aren’t willing to dig, drill, and frack for a decade while you build winter life won’t be fun.

    220

    • #
      OldOzzie

      Is there anybody who has ever talked to modern young greens…you know, the kind that march ‘for the planet’ in jackets made of petroleum derivatives and tennis shoes made by slave labor, where more than one in ten could answer the question “where does electrical power come from?” with an answer better that “the socket in the wall”.

      Wait till blackouts mean they can’t charge their mobile phones

      120

    • #
      Ronin

      Yes, it needs to be a deep sharp shock, really belt them for a six, otherwise they’ll just continue down the same path when the sun shines and the breezes blow next spring.

      00

  • #
    Geoffrey+Williams

    Have to laugh; Notice in the illustration how the Rolls Royce mini reactors (SMR’s) are carefully located adjacent to the ocean . . perfect for rising sea levels or a Tsunami!
    UK energy supply/mix is in trouble now after years of renewable miss-management and oportunistic profiteering. They’re not going to solve this problem in the short term and meanwhile it’s getting colder and Russian gas is getting more costly.
    Good luck with the SMR by the sea . .
    GeoffW

    130

    • #
      yarpos

      Billion dollar investment in desal plants also seem to be immune from accelerated tipping point catastrophic sea level rise.

      100

  • #
    el+gordo

    The idea of small reactors is worth discussing.

    ‘Small modular reactors, however, with almost no risk of meltdown or explosion, may be with us faster than we think. If the cost can be driven down through mass production, they could become a competitive source of energy in Australia. Small, locally based generators help reduce grid costs, an important advantage in a nation as large as ours.’ (Nick Cater)

    141

  • #
    Binny Pegler

    I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again.
    I’ll believe, that the priests believe. When they embrace nuclear.

    40

  • #
    Robber

    AUstralia is not far behind, with decline in Bass Strait production and no fracking allowed. Wholesale prices now $8/GJ, up from $4.
    And yet: Australia exports around 80 million tonnes of LNG per year from WA and Qld. Australian exports of liquefied natural gas to China hit a new record for the full year ending June 2021 despite increased trade tensions between the two nations.

    40

  • #
    GlenM

    Go NUKE LE ARRRR Morrison. Best advice I can give you. When you give that the thumbs up you can start by fixing up this Federation mess.

    50

    • #
      Dennis

      I believe that the PM agrees already but don’t forget that there is a parliamentary ban on nuclear energy (exception Lucas Heights Sydney reactor producing radio isotopes) since about 2005 and the State Governments refuse to permit new uranium mines to be opened.

      On the other hand the Morrison Coalition Government has organised an inquiry into nuclear energy for electricity generation and favours modular generators which were first recommended in a commissioned report to the Howard Coalition Government that left office in 2007

      00

  • #
    Ross

    You could propose the discussion in BoJo’s political spin department from here. “Guys, we’re going to be having a gas shortage soon and a lot of Brits are going to get really cold and really angry- what should we do?” One millennial looks up from his iPad and says” There’s those modular reactor thingys that Rolls Royce say they can build. Let’s put out a press release with some socials and announce how this traditional British company will save the energy sector”. Someone else says ” Yes, that will work, the people are really proud of themselves with Astra Zeneca saving us from COVID with their British vaccine. Make sure we put out that media prior to COP 26- it will work a treat”. Original person questions ” But what about the next few winters?” Another person says ” Lets just burn a bit of coal- no- one will notice”.

    70

  • #

    Gas is the answer to all issues.
    We have plenty of it, we just need to bypass those few obsticles objecting to its use.
    The technology is prooven, mature and established here also.
    It also has the benefit of being scaleable for a better distributed generation base.
    The only problem is it results in LESS CO2 emissions to boost plant growth !
    PS. Modular , safe, Thorium salt , nuclear reactors have been available since the 1960’s.
    They just were not big enough or “dirty” enough to be adopted .!

    110

  • #
    Ronin

    The chaos in Europe and especially the UK is what you get when politicians and not engineers design the electricity network.
    It was entirely avoidable but no, the pollies had their way and we can see the result.

    100

    • #
      Kalm Keith

      Nuclear power “disasters” have been almost exclusively associated with financial pressures.

      Short cuts initiated by non engineers during construction, extending the life of the plant and “saving” on required maintenance have been the major reasons for the “disasters”.

      The truth is easily hidden by chanting grettas chanting green, green, green as they walk to the social security collection point of the day.

      The world has gone mad when the unemployed and unemployable are the most powerful voices in the nation because they have the power to vote.

      100

      • #
        Geoffrey+Williams

        Agreed Keith, in the west there’s a large block of young voters who want the perfect world but are not prepared to soil their hands. Reality is rapidly catching up . .
        GeoffW

        60

        • #
          Tilba+Tilba

          Judging by our extended families, there is a still a fair percentage of the next generation (aged about 30-35) who have real and valuable jobs – teachers, tilers, plumbers, carpenters, etc – but there are a fair few luvvies too … whose lives and jobs revolve around the Internet and social media.

          If I were young again and weren’t an engineer or something similar, I think I’d get a trade – or some industrial production expertise.

          00

    • #
      Ross

      It was the over-capacity and triple back up, that the engineers built in 50-70 years ago, that the likes of the electricity grid is surviving on right now. It was the overcapacity of the dam designers back 50 years ago that got Victoria through the last drought. Without the Upper Thomson dam the taps would have run dry in Melbourne back in 2011. When they turn the Wonthaggi de-sal plant on next time the lights will dim in Victoria.

      50

      • #
        Dennis

        Unfortunately when State Governments decided to close down or sell coal fired power stations there were plans in NSW to add new generator units to existing power stations and recondition the old units but those plans were apparently abandoned with privatisation and the transition to renewable energy unreliable installations.

        10

  • #
    Doc

    The level of brainpower and self-interest in their own power amongst our politicians is sadly on total display. They naively believed the activists with their doomsday forecasts and told professional scientists that disagreed with their decision on CO2 theory of AGW that they didn’t know what they were talking about and virtually commanded them to shut up.

    Pollies then went full bore into destroying the name of fossil fuels, except gas, refused to consider nuclear in Australia and shut it down in Germany. They never learned from Germany years ago where it ran short of reliable energy sources with renewables and Germany turned to building again, modern coal powered plants.

    The EU still didn’t learn. For the last several years it has depended on Russian supplied ff. Of all the nations wanting to get into Russian ff’s, nobody even considered the matter of available supply. Now they have the hangman’s noose around their necks either way, with Russia, regardless of whether its a supply problem or a Russian manipulation to get very high gas prices. Still they persist with zero emissions promises even it seems if they have totally failing renewable energy dependency.

    In Britain, there is a fuel shortage as winter approaches, due to few truck drivers. Britain is also suffering the gas supply shortage and is talking small nuclear plants. When is Boris going to say enough is enough, ignore the radicals and get on with building coal burners again? probably when the Brits say no to nuclear plants no matter how small, near my front door.

    Surely the current position with a famine of reliable energy in the wind, the Glasgow meeting must be turned on its
    head! Somebody has to begin by stating there is no way to promise zero emissions as more experience is gained showing how totally unreal and destructive even the current arrangements have become. There is no guarantee the EU will escape this winter without a disaster such as shook Texas a month or two ago, only on a much bigger scale.

    Politicians learning? No! Can’t see it. They will look to do everything to save face first, or retire asap and leave the disaster they have provided the world, due to pure, unthinking lunacy, to somebody – anybody – else to fix.

    30

    • #

      In Britain, there is a fuel shortage as winter approaches, due to few truck drivers. Britain is also suffering the gas supply shortage and is talking small nuclear plants. When is Boris going to say enough is enough, ignore the radicals and get on with building coal burners again? probably when the Brits say no to nuclear plants no matter how small, near my front door.

      I doubt they will have issues with new Nuclear plants ?
      They are already building several and planning more.

      00

    • #
      Graeme No.3

      Doc:
      I don’t think your politicians will change.
      I have been re-reading WHEN WILL THE LIGHTS GO OUT? by Derek Birkett
      A retired Grid Controller (and Electrical Engineer)
      It is all there, the problems with renewables, the reckless determination to get rid of coal-fired stations and the dangers of relying on gas and interconnectors.
      Published in 2010 (Independent Minds – who also did books by Andrew Montford (The hockey Stick Illusion), Robert Carter etc.

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    Phil O'Sophical

    Er, the illustration shows the reactor right on the beach. Clearly they do not believe their own propaganda of rising sea levels.

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    Tilba+Tilba

    Malcolm Turnbull (National Press Club today) was really talking up the need for more Pumped Hydro in Australia – back-up durable power when the wind don’t blow and the sun don’t shine.

    I don’t understand the logistics of it myself (sounds like an inefficient perpetual-motion machine to me). But Malcolm was pretty gung-ho about it (especially his baby, Snowy Hydro 2.0).

    He’s off to Glasgow as well.

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      Pumped hydro is a useful addition to any grid system…..if geography allows.
      It is the most effective high capacity (100’s of GWHs ) available and enables generation plants to be fun closer to optimum output and efficiency.
      That is good for both intermittent , unpredictable, RE type generation, and the high capacity Coal, Nuclear, etc thermal plants.
      Unfortunately , Australia does not have an abundance of suitable locations for PH and of those we do have, the best have already been exploited.

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        ..That should have read as….

        It is the most effective high capacity STORAGE (100’s of GWHs ) available

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        Graeme No.3

        If they are to operate profitably pumped storage has to buy cheap electricity and sell it for more (to make up for losses, operating expenses and above all repayment of capital costs).
        In the Green fantasy of cheap electricity from wind the idea has switched to storage and stability of supply, yet in Germany a number of pumped storage operators have gone out of business. These were plants that were installed (like Snowy one) to use cheap (because lower demand) energy from coal-fired plants which wanted to run continuously reducing their operating costs. Faced with unpredictable supply (and forced to buy at unfavourable rates) they shut down, and now Germany has a problem as excess generation has been blocked by most neighbouring countries, and even those with largish hydro schemes find pumped storage doesn’t pay.

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