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Australian virtue signaling peak: We can have a Labor Govt or an extra half trillion dollars

The next Australian election is coming mid year (the pollsters are calling)

The Labor opposition in Australia is doing its best to tempt us with promises they can improve the weather.  They say they’ll make us rich and popular too. But a former big-wig in the Australian bureaucracy thinks the bill for that will leave a third of a million people unemployed, and cost nearly half a trillion dollars.

The Labor opposition in Australia wants to make our hair-shirt 26% target into a bed of nails at 45%.

Carbon cut apocalypse: cost of ALP energy plan

by Simon Bensen, The Australian

Labor’s 45 per cent emissions-­reduction target would push electricity prices 50 per cent higher, cost workers up to $9000 a year in lower wages and wipe $472 billion from the economy over the next decade, according to the first independent modelling of the energy policies of both the government and opposition.

The Liberal (erstwhile conservative party) wants to spend $70bn on weather control.

The Coalition’s commitment to meeting a 26-28 per cent reduc­tion under the Paris Agreement would also come at a cost, with $70bn in cumulative economic losses by 2030 and a 2 per cent hit to real wage growth.

 The Labor plan will cost around 330,000 jobs, the Libs 80,000 jobs. Unless Australians manage to vote for another party entirely, or do an AusExit from our own government, that’s a whole lot of people sitting around watching cat videos.

Brian Fisher used to manage ABARE — The Australian Bureau of Agriculture and Resource Economics. He’s also been an IPCC reviewer. He’s frustrated at our dishonest debate (the one that implies we can do the weather changey plan for free as an add on like a Happy Meal). He estimates our GDP will be $144b smaller each year by 2030.

But hey, it’s only money.

And in fairness, the Labor policy will “only” cost $400 billion more than the Liberal Policy.

h/t Pat

 

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Australian virtue signaling peak: We can have a Labor Govt or an extra half trillion dollars , 9.6 out of 10 based on 82 ratings

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171 comments to Australian virtue signaling peak: We can have a Labor Govt or an extra half trillion dollars

  • #

    Come the election I’ll find a party with “family” or “conservative” in its name and vote for it, checking that the preferences will flow down to the Nats and on to Morrison.

    I understand those who say it’s better to let Labor get up and get it all over with. Then a new start can be made. Sure, the submarine deal, the concessions to Big Green, Uphill Snowy, the pop-up Great Barrier Reef Foundation etc have been disasters, and deliberate disasters. Turnbull, about as electable as a Gillard with advanced leprosy, was put there to make sure it all happened. (Thanks Rupert. Now you can go back to talking conservative.)

    However I’m not sure that a new start can be made. Labor is headed up by a grasping, social-climbing cynic who won’t need to be replaced. He’s Turnbull and Gillard rolled up in one. And he will have his hand on the debt tap, the energy tap, the water tap…and the migrant tap.

    Feeling lucky, punk?

    Me neither.

    511

    • #
      Dennis

      Labor is now controlled by the Unions, the GetUp organisation from the US was founded here using AWU membership funds when Bill Shorten was a senior AWU executive and he was later appointed a GetUp Director. The union movement donates to the Greens and to GetUp, when I checked GetUp’s website I noted a CFMEU donation for 2010/11 amounting to $1.2 million. According to Spectator Magazine and other sources foreign donors include George Soros and various related organisations.

      Writing in The Bulletin magazine in 2006 journalist Max Walsh reported that the union movement had taken control of Labor in a corporate-style takeover and had replaced Labor MPs in safe seats with union trained executives with a plan to control Australia’s governments.

      The Turnbull plan dating back to before he was elected to Parliament was to create a single governing party to replace the unofficial two party system we now have. He planned to merge his Liberal In Name Only MPs with Labor.

      Voters have lost faith in the two party system and support for them was traditionally 80 per cent of voters including swinging voters. It is now around 60 per cent.

      The socialist globalist side of politics is fielding candidates as Independents at the next federal election. Preferences from Labor and Green candidates will be directed to those Independents and they will received hidden support, and GetUp campaigning for them. One even has Tim Flannery as an advisor.

      I intend to place any Independent candidate last on the ballot paper, Greens above and Labor above Greens candidate. In my electorate I will place the National candidate above Labor but will consider a minor party candidate for primary vote. And in the Senate.

      Foreign influence and support for candidates who will support globalism objectives will continue, ever since PM Abbott was replaced in September 2015 the foreign influence has been working against our centre-right MPs.

      310

      • #
        yarpos

        CFMEU fights potential job losses if Adani doesnt go forward
        CFMEU donates to Getup
        Getup protests Adani mine and supports activists
        CFMEU fights potential job losses if Adani doesnt go forward
        Sort of like a circular cottage industry just designed to keep people busy and OPM circulating.

        260

        • #
          TdeF

          Unions have never acted in the interests of their members let alone the public they do not represent. Their communist core (now called socialist) wants revolution and government control by the Union leaders. Julia Gillard was their stooge. Bill Shorten is his own stooge. So they want Adani stopped but the few workers still in a Union want the jobs, so they protest the closure while fighting to make sure it was closed. Think of all the jobs at Hazelwood when Labor Premier Andrews tripled the cost of our coal and forced its closure. Electricity prices were supposed to rise ‘only’ 20%, but why should any rise be acceptable.

          It is a deceit. Unions are not democratic governments. They are the opponents of democracy and always have been. The violent thugs like John Setka who control the unions want to control everything and they want to be rich and powerful by posing as the friends of the workers.

          The only people still in unions are the teachers, the nurses, the fireman and the ambulance drivers and the endless government departments for doing nothing much. Factories are vanishing, thanks to the unions.

          As for Adani. The CFMEU wants it stopped. The Greens want it stopped. Malcolm and friends want it stopped. George Soros wants it stopped. And the CFMEU will shed crocodile tears when it is stopped and insist their members are compensated.

          241

          • #
            TdeF

            What is amazing at present is that Labor are so confident of victory that they are openly promising to take retirees superannuation as double taxation, reopen the borders for unlimited, uncontrolled migration and shut down coal mining to please their communist/socialist UN/EU overseas and their merchant banking friends. Like Corbyn and Sanders, they are openly racist anti semitic without apology and fascist while claiming to be anti Fascist. You have to have an enemy to blame for what they are doing to the country. Beware wolves crying wolf.

            This actually raises some hope that Morrison can win the unwinnable election, especially with perennial leaker and saboteur Julie Bishop out of the way and Christopher Pyne out of his ‘winner’s circle’ and the unions completely out of control. So many alleged conservatives are LINO, Liberals in name only. Like RINOs Flake and McConnell and Ryan in the US.

            231

          • #
            robert rosicka

            If the unions and labor were worried about jobs in the coal industry they wouldn’t be funding getup .

            170

          • #
            Dennis

            Years ago Julia Gillard founded the Socialist Forum, a Labor faction for communists and socialists. Her mentor in GB, a Lord and Communist, I forget his name, advised her to do it.

            Shortly before she became Deputy Leader of the Parliamentary Labor Party the Socialist Forum was merged into the socialist Australian Fabian Society.

            81

        • #
          Sambar

          Yes Yarpos and Tdef, Just like a sawmill in Heyfield. While many mills were deprived of access to timber, and therefore closed down, our state government invested $25MILLION in buying into a perfectly viable private business. This business just wanted a guarantee of timber supply to keep going. Remember that know matter what environmentalists tell you, every log harvested puts money into the public coffers as royalties paid , however a private business overnight became a $25 million public debt, still without a guarantee of timber supply. Oh, and which union has a vested interest in keeping this mill open?

          191

      • #
        Mark D.

        Labor is now controlled by the Unions,…….

        Really? This is news to you?

        That might be part of your problem.

        40

    • #
      joseph

      I came across this Aussie site a while back and I’m wondering if others here have come across it and what you make of it. Paints a very different picture of the government here than I’d had to consider prior to checking it out.

      http://www.truth-now.net

      20

    • #
      Brian the Engineer

      Wasn’t Rupert it was Michael

      30

    • #
      Geoff

      Only 500B for the ALP. I assume you are assuming just one term in government?

      10

    • #
      StephenP

      Is it correct that China is blocking imports of coal from Australia? It could have quite an effect on Australia’s export income.

      https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/w172w0q5p8f3j23

      10

      • #
        David-of-Cooyal-in-Oz

        G’day Stephen,
        Something is happening, but the motivation is unclear. The ABC news finance guy made it sound as if it’s a small percentage of our exports to China, at least at the moment.
        It’s definitely something to watch, carefully.
        Cheers,
        Dave B

        10

  • #
    ivan

    Decisions, decisions, the left is horrible and the right isn’t much better. That raises the question of ‘why are the majority of Australians so brainwashed. have they been drinking too much of the UN kool aide?’

    There are two things that need fixing.
    1) the electoral preferential voting system – at the moment it can be rigged without too much effort and does not necessarily reflect the wishes of the person voting.

    2) the true cost to every member of the public of the consequences of following the UN Church of Climatology directives slavishly should be spelled out in detail including a list of exactly where the money is going and why.

    Until those two things are fixed Australia will continue its dive into third world status.

    280

    • #
      Peter C

      The preferential voting system is here to stay, at least for the foreseeable future. It used to be explained as voting for theleast worst candidate.
      It may still offer a glimmer of hope, since a senator can be elected with fairly small numbers of votes.

      Australian Conservatives are running in the Senate only. Australain Conservatives are committed to blocking legislation which threatens the; Economy, Security and Australian values.

      It is a big ask, but getting one senator per state, is achievable and should be enough to stop the worst of this stuff getting through the Senate. That will buy time until the current madness passes.
      Kevin Bailey is standing in Victoria.
      The other candidates are here:
      https://www.conservatives.org.au/our_team

      190

      • #
        Yonniestone

        Urban Dictionary: Preferential Voting- meaning, Attempting to pick up a turd by the clean end.

        301

        • #
          ColA

          Brilliant Yonnie,

          I’d give you 10 thumbs up if I could!! :-) :-)

          91

          • #
            Curious George

            In an ideal world, you would vote for the best candidate. In the real world, you vote for the lesser evil. In Australia, that choice is not available.

            143

        • #
          Kinky Keith

          Be careful what you wish for.

          I suspect that your real complaint is that most voters can’t be bothered to do a bit of research to enable them to sort out the candidates in order of performance in the job.

          Preferential voting gives more people the chance of having a less offensive candidate elected.

          If we had first past the post we would all be stuck with a lible or a laba rep.

          Whichever system, it ain’t easy.

          KK

          110

      • #
        robert rosicka

        Peter C who are the ACP giving preference’s to ?

        40

        • #
          Peter C

          At this stage I do not know.

          I will ask.
          I recommend the people vote below the line and direct their own preferences.

          70

          • #
            Greg Cavanagh

            I’ve been doing that ever since the Rudd/Gillard extravaganza. I continue to put Labor Last and Green second last. Just to hurt Labor as much as possible.

            22

        • #
          Salome

          As I read it, the Conservatives (I irreverently and affectionately call them the Cories) are NOT doing preference deals. To the extent that they direct preferences, it will be on the basis of policy. I think they also encourage voters to think for themselves.

          00

    • #
      Environment Skeptic

      “2) the true cost to every member of the public”…

      The real value of a carbon/climate conflict is not in solar panel sales, energy sales, government spending etc…the real money is in the debt that the climate conflict produces. …control the debt, …control everything.

      You control the debt, you control everything…” (From The International)
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C-Fq228lR2A

      60

      • #
        Graeme No.3

        Environment Skeptic:

        It’s not just the cost of announced policies. You have Senator Butler’s hydrogen idea. Turn coal into hydrogen which you then liquify and ship to Japan. Not really new, the British were doing it in 1878 (coal gas) but they weren’t stupid enough to try and separate the hydrogen from the carbon monoxide and dioxide. Apparently the poisonous monoxide would be converted into dangerous CO2 but then they could be sequested underground. Then there is the energy required to liquify the hydrogen and keep it there (at minus 270℃) as it is transported over the tropics. And did I mention that the conversion is highly ENDOTHERMIC i.e. needs lots of energy input to proceed. Added to that is the question of the safety of large amounts of hydrogen, it has the widest explosion range of any gas in air.
        In one giant stumble for mankind Butler has designed a scheme more expensive than the NBN and potentially far more lethal than the pink bats scheme.
        And there is also the bubble (I can’t use the word thought) about getting rid of carbon from the economy by 2030. Mass unemployment but at least those Greenies who have been dumped from government employment because of a lack of funds will be able to sit around in the dark (of the latest blackout) and keep warm by the thought that “they are saving the planet”.

        80

        • #
          Environment Skeptic

          Graeme No.3
          The Carbon Green commitments to increase debt with their partner banking industry will see a fantastic credit rating as long as the borrowed money is spent on Carbon Green Schemes.

          The more incredibly explosively debt producing, the better. It’s a win win for governments looking for partnerships with money lenders.

          My favourite is CO2 sequestration. I am sure Hydrogen will be an even greater borrowing success. And with the recent cold weather, the cold Hydrogen gas will keep well lol.

          If the penny did not drop when human intelligence was being sequestered for future generations to figure all of that out, it left the door open for even more outrageous Carbon Green Energy Borrowing Schemes.

          70

        • #
          Environment Skeptic

          I wonder if we could leverage the recent ban on Australian coal to china??
          Au might get a windfall carbon credit for keeping its coal in the ground??
          :)

          30

    • #
      David-of-Cooyal-in-Oz

      G’day Ivan,
      I think our system could be improved quite easily, simply, and quickly by making it optional preferential in the Reps. At the moment we cannot exclude someone ( for whatever.reason). That’s an option I’d like to have, as I do in our state (NSW).
      Cheers,
      Dave B

      72

      • #
        ivan

        Hi David,

        I agree there are several simple things that would make the system actually work as it is supposed to. Things like having each candidate state on the voting paper who they are giving their preference to. Another thing would be the ability to remove from a candidate any chance of receiving a vote preference. There are others like only passing on 3 or 4 preferential steps.

        30

        • #
          Sceptical Sam

          Things like having each candidate state on the voting paper who they are giving their preference to.

          Ivan, candidates don’t give their preferences to anybody. They don’t have preferences to give.

          What they do is advise their rusted on supporters how they would like their (the supporters’) preferences to be used.

          30

        • #
          Kinky Keith

          Hi Ivan,

          What you have written suggests that you aren’t sure of the details of preferential voting.
          When criticizing something it’s best to know the facts.

          The thing is that candidates do not allocate preferences.

          Those voting do that.

          All a candidate can do is indicate to voters how they, the candidate, would like preferences allocated.

          The voters can allocate preferences how they wish.

          KK

          20

          • #
            ivan

            Hi KK,

            You could be correct that I’m not sure of the details after all I left Australia over 40 years ago and my memory of the time from Menzies to whitlam is rather hazy now.

            What annoyed me then was the necessity to fill in every box even when we had no idea who the candidates were – basically we were expected to vote for the party, not a good idea.

            The first-past-the-post system isn’t much better mainly because there is no compulsion for anyone to vote so far too many don’t.

            A good system is the Swiss one with everyone taking part in major decisions.

            10

    • #

      How is first past the post better? UKIP changed politics in the UK but got barely anything even though they had a lot of supporters.

      Our preferential system is better — and it would be better still if the ABC did what it is paid to do and gave the minor parties (other than The Greens)
      some air time.

      Any sensible conservative parties get de-platformed by the ABC. One Nation, and Palmer only get some air time because ABC Editors like to make fun of them. The Lib Dems, Family First, ALA, Cory Bernardi were lucky if they even get mentioned.

      If the two big parties are the problem, the best way to get something else is with preferences.

      183

      • #
        Annie

        The trouble is, Jo, that few people bother to work out their preferences. You then end up with the likes of Jacquie Lambie and Kerryn Phelps.

        102

      • #
        Bill in Oz

        But here in SA my local member is Rebekha Sharkie.
        Theoretically she is in Center Alliance ( Formerly Nick Xenophon. )

        She gets lots of media & ABC attention.. Almost every week she pops up somewhere on Radio, TV, or the local papers.

        Why?

        Because she is in reality a Greenist in Independent colours. It is the CULT Belief of the day and she plays up to it.

        52

    • #
      greggg

      Voters should be able to give preferences if they want to. Parties should not be able to give preferences. The results would more accurately show the voters wishes.

      80

      • #
        Peter C

        Voters should be able to give preferences if they want to. Parties should not be able to give preferences.

        Voters can give preferences if they want to. That is called; Voting Below The Line.

        If a Voter does not know how to give their own preference, or cannot be bothered they can assist their party of choice by placing a 1 in the box above the line and their preference is then distributed as directed by the party.

        60

        • #
          Peter C

          My answer applies to the senate voting paper.

          For the House of reps, voters are required in fill in every box. That means they have given their preferences.

          40

        • #
          greggg

          I’m just saying that parties should not be allowed to distribute any preferences at all. All preferences should be determined by the voter. There would be no preferences at all when the voter votes above the line. Maybe preferential voting should be made compulsory for the senate but that would result in more donkey votes and informal votes because of the number of candidates.

          30

  • #
    Another Ian

    Maybe the saw that cuts the base of both parties planks?

    “Delingpole: Trump’s New Skeptic-Led Climate Security Committee Triggers Greenies”

    https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2019/02/21/delingpole-trumps-new-skeptic-led-climate-security-committee-triggers-greenies/

    80

  • #

    I’m beginning to wonder whether all of our politicians are actually Socialists and this is how they intend to seize absolute power over everyone.

    190

    • #
      Spetzer86

      Your best hint is going to be when they start building a high speed rail to Taz in order to replace airplanes.

      80

    • #
      PeterS

      Australia’s MSM as a whole prefers socialism. That’s why people like Abbott are so hated by them. As for the voters it’s not very clear. Socialism of the new ALP+Greens is economic death. Socialism of the LNP is not as pronounced. We will have to wait for the election results to see if Australia as a whole prefers the socialism of the ALP+Greens or not. If we do we deserve to crash and burn in quick time.

      151

      • #
        el gordo

        If both majors go to the election reading from the same hymn book on climate change mitigation, then they are not socialists. Its a one party fascist state.

        ‘Fascism (/ˈfæʃɪzəm/) is a form of radical authoritarian ultranationalism, characterized by dictatorial power, forcible suppression of opposition and strong regimentation of society and of the economy, which came to prominence in early 20th-century Europe.’ wiki

        Beijing is enjoying this.

        123

        • #
          PeterS

          Valid to a degree but we still have a democratic system so we are far from being a dictatorial regime despite the similarities of the two major parties. Voters still have a choice and if they were really aware of the seriousness of the situation they would be voting en mass against both major parties to send a loud and clear message they hate socialism and globalism. The best way for that to happen is to vote for a candidate as close as possible to conservative/centre-right. That includes ACP and ON. I am sort of holding my breath to see if that is in fact what will happen, at least to a degree and we end up with a hung parliament. If we don’t and we end up with a strong ALP+Greens victory then as far as I’m concerned this nation can crash and burn as fast as possible.

          110

          • #
            Environment Skeptic

            It’s a debtocratic system.

            81

            • #
              Environment Skeptic

              It is only democratic in the sense that we all get to collectively sign the national climate mortgage, or any other democratically elected mortgage contract.

              81

            • #
              PeterS

              Yes debt is the name of the game these days in all Western nations not just us. It will eventually end in blood and tears. Meanwhile we do have the opportunity under our democratic system to reverse things but of course we won’t. Too many are asleep, fools, or just plain clueless. We will learn the hard way.

              50

              • #
                Environment Skeptic

                It should be interesting to see what the nameplate debt generating capacity of the Carbon Green Debtocracy ….probably measured in Gigadollars lol

                60

              • #
              • #
                PeterS

                That’s one of those generalised statements that makes no sense. In reality it depends on who the independent is. Most are useless but there are some really good ones. Voting for one of the majors is a waste of time regardless of whether the candidate is good or not since the major party is worthless. Better to have good independents holding the balance of power but that predicates voters know who they are, which they don’t either because they are clueless or don’t give a damn. We are in a no win situation so sit back and watch the crash and burn.

                10

              • #
                el gordo

                Too few get elected, but if you like the candidate then its your prerogative.

                It seems pressure is being applied to aunty, to be fair and balanced, Gerard Henderson in the Oz

                ‘Aunty needs to be transparent about where it sits on the political spectrum; The Drum bores on; Probyn’s bob each way on Labor and borders.’

                Morrison can win this election.

                00

              • #
                Bill in Oz

                Anthony Green has drunk the Koolaid since becoming the ABC’s election guru.

                The ABC has an agenda.

                Many of it’s important employees work to achieve that agenda

                10

          • #

            Civilizations may seem robust, well able to withstand the clean slate experiments that they sometimes undergo. But like yr broken glass syndrome this is a fallacy. How long did it take before the principles of open investigation of the Greek Revolution came around a second time? How long did it take, after the before the growth of towns, fostering innovation came around after the collapse of Rome?

            How long it must have seemed in those intervening dismal ages during long winter days and nights, when summer harvests seemed so far away, waiting for signs of Springtime…

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7UvesKl8_W8

            60

        • #
          PeterS

          Of course if we do crash and burn (and I tend to believe we will) Beijing will be extremely happy.

          70

          • #
            el gordo

            Ah yes, we’ll morph into crony capitalism with Chinese characteristics.

            I’m still hopeful that the Coalition platform going into the election will be centre right.

            40

          • #
            el gordo

            Beijing plays hard ball, must be time to quit the Alliance.

            ‘China has banned Australian coal exports from entering five ports, in a provoc­ative strike at our top expor­t earner.’ Oz

            50

            • #
              robert rosicka

              Actually heard an explanation for the coal being held up that could also be plausible.
              Apparently if the shipments are slow or erratic it drives up the price of local coal so it may just be nothing sinister other than local corruption.

              70

            • #
              sophocles

              China isn’t silly.
              How much of Australia’s debt do they hold?

              If Australia looks to be on the brink and coal is a significant foreign exchange earner and that earner was blocked for a year or two, the teetering on the brink may turn into a fall over the brink or economic collapse to a greater or lesser degree. Then, with the first loan repayment default, you are owned. They get to plunder your resources and reserves, — asset strip whatever they want — maybe mine and transport your their coal with their labour, not yours,

              Just a thought. Zambia is learning all about the joys and delights of borrowing from that source. They defaulted and China owns their butt.

              00

          • #
            OriginalSteve

            I think people need to plan to start leaving Oz for say 10 years if this green socialist Venezualan-copying nonsense continues……

            Let it crash, but dont be here when it does.

            60

            • #
              PeterS

              It will have to be a non-Western nation. Switzerland would be nice but unless you have citizenship there it’s almost impossible to move there. That’s assuming the NWO doesn’t spread its tentacles there as well. Some say Switzerland is run by the Illuminati so it might already be related to the NWO. I don’t really know. All I know is the world will be very different no matter where one lives.

              30

    • #
      Environment Skeptic

      The Politicians are simply debt brokers for their financiers.
      They cannot seize power as they are not there long enough, ever.
      It is the financiers/banks who seize power when they/politicians are gone or after a political short stay.
      The debt remains after labour, liberal or green.

      100

  • #
    Latus Dextro

    Just pause for a second.
    If the MSM were freed from their incarcerating Rainbow ideology, low intellectual wattage and enslavement to globalist propaganda, the Paris Discord would be shredded within weeks if not days. The whole charade is a teetering house of cards reliant on multiple deceptions and screeching Watermelons, proclaiming the end is nigh. It’s as tiresome as it is stupid, as predictable as it is repetitive, and as ignorant as it is stupid. It’s also as korrupt as it is greedy and evil, ruining prosperity, health and the promise of a viable future.

    Were the MSM to point the critical bone at rodent politicians and their funded climafiction scientivism from the swathe of institutions locked to the funding teat, they would topple this insane house of cards in an instant.

    From the record cold winter and snow fall in Europe, to Arabs skiing down sand dues in Saudi, to
    Snow falls in Vegas for the second time in a week

    From 2017, but no less valid today, the point is well made.
    Expert Software Engineer Calls Level Of Frawd In Leaked US Gov Climate Report “Sickening”

    Meanwhile, Nationalist Populists Poised to Storm Brussels in Upcoming EU Election, and sanity will begin to sweep the World. Macron will go, as will his globalist machine. Germany is already going. A New Conservative Age Is Rising!

    The Downunder Left will find themselves behind the curve yet again, and quite likely, eventually buried down under where they belong.

    120

    • #
      Tom R. Hammer

      “…they would topple this insane house of cards in an instant.” I disagree.
      Politicians of all shapes and sizes keep breathing life into this movement by tolerating it. The entire population of Canberra is infatuated with the “green” agenda. It’s a competition there as to who can be more “green”. It’s ingrained through all levels of government. Local, federal and state governments have sustainability departments. Their tentacles extend over every other department. No one department can act independently of their “Office of Sustainability”. To be employed in those departments involves a never-ending over-reach of power. They can never be “green” enough. Dismantle those government departments. Put some science curriculum into schools that require emphasis on empirical evidence and stop tolerating this climate change propaganda and those who push it unless they have observational evidence. It’s a big ask.
      Oh! And sell off the ABC. A huge waste of taxpayer dollars st present. The USA’s PBS might be an appropriate model.

      100

    • #
      OriginalSteve

      Yeah but who globally is goiing to care of we rapidly slide into Keating Banana ( Socialist ) Republic land?

      No one, except coal buyers, and they wont care as long as the coal keeps flowing….

      50

    • #

      Latus, totally. If we had better media we would get better politicians. The non-answers would be exposed, the hard questions asked, and sensible opinions would get air time instead of being shut out or worse, treated with derision.

      160

    • #
      el gordo

      We need to get the ABC newsroom to present balance and the people will see the king has no clothes.

      41

      • #
        David-of-Cooyal-in-Oz

        How?

        20

        • #
          el gordo

          It will likely come about through the effort of Sky News presenting a different reality and the people in the bush are already listening.

          If aunty runs a biased campaign against the government and they win anyway, then the newsroom would need to consider its collective future.

          Of course if a Labor/Green coalition win then its crash and burn for us, but the propaganda wing of the Klimatariat will go from strength to strength.

          30

  • #

    >
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    ❶①❶①
    ❶①❶① . . . Global Warming Travel Warning . . .
    ❶①❶①
    ❶①❶①❶①❶①❶①❶①❶①❶①❶①❶①❶
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    The IPCC has issued an urgent travel warning.

    Many people are foolishly travelling to countries, which have an average temperature which is more than 2 degrees Celsius warmer than their home country.

    This activity is highly dangerous, and could result in the deaths of millions of people.

    The IPCC suggests that people limit their travel, to countries which have an average temperature which is less than 1.5 degrees Celsius warmer than their home country.

    Humans evolved in Africa, many millions of years ago. Climate scientists use the abbreviation “BT”, when they refer to this time (“BT” stands for “Before Thermometers”).

    In the early days, early humans never travelled more than a few miles, over their entire lifetime. They never travelled more than a few miles, because kilometres had not yet been invented.

    Humans, therefore, became adapted to a very narrow temperature range. Going outside of that narrow temperature range, could be deadly. Many early humans were eaten by lions, because they went outside of their normal temperature range.

    But early humans had one advantage, that the other animals didn’t have. Because they never washed, early humans tasted horrible, and they didn’t smell very nice. So the other animals left early humans alone. And humans were able to travel all over the Earth.

    ====================

    Scientists have proved that travel and temperatures, are more dangerous than smoking 60 cigarettes a day, for 50 years.

    It is safer to stay at home, and take up smoking, than to go travelling in warmer countries.

    Don’t worry. We understand that humans have an “urge” to travel. It comes from our early ancestry, when we had to find large herds of animals to eat.

    Here at the IPCC, we want what is best for YOU. And we have had our top scientists work out a “safe” way of travelling.

    To ensure your personal temperature safety, the IPCC has emitted the following travel regulations.

    Travel will be limited to “safe” country groups. This means that travel may only take place between a country, and the other countries that are in the same temperature safety group.

    For further details, please click the following link:

    https://agree-to-disagree.com/global-warming-travel-warning

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    Sambar

    Meanwhile, here in the low part of the high country, combustion heaters are firing up. As the long hot summer appears to have been limited to a 2 week period in January and with morning temperatures running in the single figure range, it’s looking like high wood useage this winter.

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      yarpos

      I was think that last night. Here we are still in Feb with day temps in the 20s and quite cool mornings. Suddenly the media isnt interested in talking about weather and the summer outbeak of extreme mildness.

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      You’re not wrong. We’ve contemplated firing up our wood heater a couple of times just recently, but have held off to conserve wood. These summer temperatures are nothing like ‘normal’ summers that we’ve been used to having 10-20 years ago.

      Many in our township have already been lighting their fires because of the cold. Even now the BOM keeps revising down the weekly forecast temperatures on a daily basis as the ‘horror’ 30s are looking unlikely.

      It looks like being a very cold winter this year.

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        robert rosicka

        Feels like late Autumn weather here in northeast Victoriastan, this month is below average for day time temps and yes tempting to light the fire .

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        Annie

        We’ve had our woodstove on a couple of times. There have been mornings down to 3/5/6/8/9C here over the last couple of weeks and it was down to 7C this morning, 18C now at 1044.
        It’s been quite autumnal lately.

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          Wearing a cardie on morning walks by the Yarra River. Been lots of cloud cover for this 2nd final week of the Summer season. What is BOM to make of this? …We know don’t we?

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            OriginalSteve

            Only if the temps have been homogenized, Rutherglen-ized and completly neutralized ( with ragrds to accuracy )…..

            “He who votes counts for nothing,
            he who counts the votes counts for everything”
            -Josef Stalin.

            Communists were very good at re-writing history books to suit themselves….
            Just sayin’…..

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            Sceptical Sam

            What is BOM to make of this? …We know don’t we?

            Yep. We do. It’ll homogenize them up, to fit with the models.

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      Graeme No.3

      As I posted yesterday, I noticed distinct signs of autumn leaves in some of the trees in the main street of Woodside. Then I drove down to Hahndorf and the entrance road was lined on one side by tress that had already changed colour.

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        Graeme No.3

        trees. tresses change colour with fashion.

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        Bill in Oz

        Graeme I think the leaves turning color has more to do with lack of moisture.

        None of my watered fruit trees or ornamental trees have started changing colour yet.

        But it was cool this morning.

        Perhaps we need to pray to the Great Green Goddess for some more ‘Ole time global warming’ ..
        :-)

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          Greg in NZ

          Ooh, cold weather, one of my favourite subjects, especially in summer (or what’s left of it). D’ya know it’s freezing and snowing on equatorial Papua New Guinea / Irian Jaya’s highest peak today? And will be for the next few days –

          https://www.snow-forecast.com/resorts/Carstensz-Pyramid/6day/top

          All thanks to this, as yet, unnamed Blizzard of February storming up the Tassie, shunting Grandma ‘Cat 1′ O(ba)ma back to the tropics, as cool southerlies reach as far north as Puncak Jaya in PNG, hence the (predicted) snow on their highlands and our high country, all weekend and longer –

          https://www.metservice.com/mountain/canterbury-high-country

          But what do I know, when mann-made-media here is pushing the Klimatariat-speak Konsensus™ that it’s evil CCC/AGW/CO₂ causing this wet, wild, windy, wonderful, weekend weather. I thought they’d be pleased the drought was over…

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            Sambar

            Hey Greg I hope you manage a bit of snow boarding as well as water boarding ( oops probably a bad turn of phrase there ). Wild weather means good surf somewhere, I hope it’s where you catch a break.

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              Greg in NZ

              Sambar, celebrated my 30th year snowboarding this week at an indoor ski slope just up the road, a lovely -3˚C inside the big freezer, a muggy 27˚C outside. Has been my annual summer birthday pilgrimage for a few years now – a novel way to kick-off the season early – hoot! Young groms can’t figure me out as I wear ice-climbing hard-boots, on hard-plate bindings, on a hard, carving, race board – they don’t know if I’m a mono-skier or clueless freak until I lay down my first turns… vrooom! “That’s CRAZY!” I heard one of ‘em say as I blurred past. I love compliments.

              We scored an epic swell last week which fired up a bunch of breaks which only work once in a blue moon, nothing YUGE but perfect, peeling, head-high walls made for 9′ 2″ longboards and old fellas who like to cruise. This weekend’s blow is just messy, stormy, wet muck, yet next week has a Fiji troppo pushing some swell down our way while ANOTHER snow storm hits the South Island… glad I left and headed north, gobull freezing and all that. Chur!

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          Bill in Oz

          Somebody is prejudiced and does not like praying to the ‘Great Green Goddess for more ol’ time global warming’

          Well mate I hope she freezes your balls off !

          :-) !

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            Greg in NZ

            Bill in Oz, not quite brass monkey weather yet, but thanks for your best wishes none-the-less! Having been brought up, and schooled, in ye olde Roman cult of the Virgin Goddess Mother – y’know the one where that tribe strung up a half-naked, bearded, hippy dude, and blood, lots of blood and pain and guilt – and having walked away from it all at the age of 14, you could say I’m somewhat prejudiced against organised religion, insurance salesmen in women’s clothing, and folk who want to save [something] yet need my money to do it.

            One of the greatest modern philosophers, George Carlin – yeah, he died too – summed it up best with his ever-hilarious and witty ‘Saving The Planet’ –

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VNxNgfVzAvo

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              Bill in Oz

              Agree entirely Greg.

              I have the same background.

              But there are quite a number of Greenists who do seriously believe in the great green goddess. !

              So my comment was intended to poke a stick at them

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              Bill in Oz

              Wonderfull video of George Carlin !

              Thanks for the link !

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        Len

        Is the Army still at Woodside?

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          Bill in Oz

          Yes. A regiment still is based there.But the family quarters area has been privatised.

          Gillard turned that area into a boat people detention center from 2011-2014

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    NB

    Dennis, February 22, 2019 at 7:07 am, says:
    The socialist globalist side of politics is fielding candidates as Independents at the next federal election. Preferences from Labor and Green candidates will be directed to those Independents and they will received hidden support, and GetUp campaigning for them. One even has Tim Flannery as an advisor.
    I intend to place any Independent candidate last on the ballot paper, Greens above and Labor above Greens candidate. In my electorate I will place the National candidate above Labor but will consider a minor party candidate for primary vote. And in the Senate.

    Good strategy.
    Sheldon Walker, February 22, 2019 at 7:32 am, says:
    Many early humans were eaten by lions, because they went outside of their normal temperature range.
    Hilarious. But I know it to be true, as I also read it in an academic, peer-reviewed, journal.

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      Destroyer D69

      We need right of recall in Australia…Recall means that the sovereign power lies with the people and they have the right to recall their representatives, whether the representatives are legislators or high officials, if they fail to perform their functions in a proper manner.

      Foreman writes, “Where the recall is in use, the voters upon the complaint or petition of a certain number of citizens, vote upon the question whether a certain officer shall be deprived of (recalled from) his office before his term expires and if the vote is in favour of the officer’s removal, he must give up his office before the end of his term”.

      According to Leacock, “The system means that all persons who hold office must do so only as long as their tenure of office is sanctioned by the will of the people. At any time when a majority of the voters desire it, the office-holder is removed from his office”.

      Prevalence of this System:

      This system is prevalent in some of the American States like Arkansas, Kikhoma, Montana. North Dakota, Oregon, Arezona, Louisiana, Nevada, California and Washington. In Washington, judges cannot be removed in this manner but in Oregon even the judges are recalled. In six states of America both the judges and the officials can be recalled and in ten states only officials can be recalled.

      This system is also seen in Communist China. In China, Deputies to the Local People’s Congress are elected by the people of the age of 18 years or above. The voters can recall the members of the Local People’s Congress at will. This system is not in practice in India and there is no mention of it in the Constitution.
      Advantages of the System of Recall:

      (1) Real Control of the masses over the officials and representatives:

      The people can exercise their sovereign power only when they are given the right to recall their elected representatives or the official, if they fail to perform their responsibilities in a proper manner. If the people are not given the right to recall their representatives, they are apt to act arbitrarily and the people will have no control whatsoever over their elected representatives.

      (2) An important method to end bribery and corruption:

      The officials will not indulge in corrupt practices because of the fear of recall.

      (3) This system is a symbol of direct democracy:

      Recall is the best system of the preservation of direct democracy. If the people have no control over their elected representatives or officials, democracy will become meaningless and the representatives and the officials will act arbitrarily.

      (4) A good method to root out political corruption:

      In democracy it is generally seen that the ministers become corrupt and they favour their relatives and friends. Through the system of recall, they will be under the control of the people. For fear of recall, they will hesitate to do any undesirable thing. The ministers indulge in corrupt practices because the people have no control over them.

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        Bill in Oz

        If we had it in Oz the Greenists would use it against all non greenists elected.

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          I like this idea Destroyer, if we had the right of recall Rob Oakshott and Tony Windsor would not have picked Gillard to be PM in 2010.

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            Bill in Oz

            But Jo, would we really want to put folks like Cory Bernardi, or Tony Abbott in the gun for sticking to principles ?

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              Destroyer D69

              Right of Recall would make all parties think twice and consider the possible outcomes for their actions before they foist them on us. Sure ,it is a double edged sword but it at least makes it POSSIBLE to remove the assurance of no repercussions for actions untill the next election.

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                Greg Cavanagh

                That’s the thing. They promise the world, and as soon as they get elected forget everything that came before that fateful day. They then do whatever they want with complete disregard to promises and consequences, and there is nothing we can do for four years. And most of the electorate’s memory doesn’t last four years. So they promise stuff again and the circus continues.

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            Destroyer D69

            I think the last para says it all A Plea for the Right of Recall
            A Plea for the Right of Recall
            by

            AMICUS appeared in the Columbian Herald, August 28, 1788.

            See also Federalist No. 53

            Some time before a Convention of the United States was held, I mentioned in a paragraph which was published in one of the Charlestown papers, that it would be acting wisely in the formation of a constitution for a free government, to enact, that the electors should recall their representatives when they thought proper, although they should be chosen for a certain term of years; as a right to appoint (where the right of appointing originates with the appointees) implies a right to recall. As the persons appointed are meant to act for the benefit of the appointees, as well as themselves, they, if they mean to act for their mutual benefit, can have no objection to a proposal of this kind. But if they have any sinister designs, they will certainly oppose it, foreseeing that their electors will displace them as soon as they begin to act contrary to their interest. I am therefore glad to find that the state of New York has proposed an amendment of this kind to the federal constitution, viz: That the legislatures of the respective states may recall their senators, or either of them, and elect others in their stead, to serve the remainder of the time for which the senators so recalled were appointed. I wish this had been extended to the representatives in both houses, as it is as prudent to have a check over the members of one house as of the other.

            Some persons as object to this amendment, in fact say, that it is safer to give a man an irrevocable power of attorney, than a revocable one; and that it is right to let a representative ruin us, rather than recall him and put a real friend of his country, and a truly honest man in his place, who would rather suffer ten thousand deaths than injure his country, or sully his honor and reputation. Such persons seem to say, that power ought not to originate with the people (which is the wish, I fear, of some among us); and also that we are not safe in trusting our own legislature with the power of recalling such senators as will not abide by such instructions—as shall be either given them, when chosen, or sent to them afterwards, by the legislature of this or any other state, or by the electors that chose them, although they should have met together in a body for the purpose of instructing or sending them instructions on a matter on which the salvation of the state depends. That we should insist on the amendment respecting this matter taking place, which the state of New York has proposed, appears to me to be absolutely necessary, the security of each state may be almost said to rest on it. For my own part, I would rather that this amendment should take place and give the new government unlimited powers to act for the public good, than give them limited powers, and at the same time put it out of our power, for a certain term of years, to recall our representatives, although we saw they were exceeding their powers, and were bent on making us miserable and themselves, by means of a standing army—a perpetual and absolute government. For power is a very intoxicating thing, and has made many a man do unwarrantable actions, which before he was invested with it, he had no thoughts of doing. I hope by what I have said I shall not be thought to cast even the shadow of a reflection on the principles of either of the members of the federal convention—it is far from being my intention. I wish for nothing more than a good government and a constitution under which our liberties will be perfectly safe. To preserve which, I think the wisest conduct will be to keep the staff of power in our own hands as much as possible, and not wantonly and inconsiderately give up a greater share of our liberties with a view of contributing to the public good, than what the necessity of the case requires.

            For our own sakes we shall keep in power those persons whose conduct pleases us as long as we can, and shall perhaps sometimes wish (when we meet with a person of an extra worthy character and abilities) that we could keep him in power for life. On the other hand, we shall dismiss from our employ as soon as possible, such persons as do not consult our interest and will not follow our instructions. For there are, I fear, a few persons among us, so wise in their own eyes, that they would if they could, pursue their own will and inclinations, in opposition to the instructions of their constituents. In so doing, they may perhaps, once in a hundred times, act for the interest of those they represent, more than if they followed the instructions given them. But I wish that we would never suffer any person to continue our representative that obeyed not our instructions, unless something unforeseen and unknown by us turned up, which he knew would alter our sentiments, if we were made acquainted with it; and which would make his complying with our will highly imprudent. In every government matter, on which our representatives were not instructed, we should leave them to act agreeable to their own judgment; on which account we should always choose men of integrity, honor and abilities to represent us. But when we did instruct them, as they are our representatives and agents, we should insist on their acting and voting conformable to our directions. But as they would each of them be a member of the community, they should have a right to deliver to the houses of representatives of which they were members, their own private sentiments so that if their private sentiments contained cogent reasons for acting contrary to the instructions given them—the other members of said houses who would not be bound by said instructions, would be guided by them; in which case, that would take place which would be most for the public good, which ought to be the wish of all of us.

            AMICUS
            On the Guarantee of Congressional Biennial Elections
            Part XIV. Various Authors
            Apportionment and Slavery: Northern and Southern Views
            See also:ter LogoFact Monster Games

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        Environment Skeptic

        My two bob’s worth at no extra cost :) .
        And any debt contracts that were negotiated during the political tenure could be rescinded on the basis that the contracts were signed under duress, and that the signatory was not of sound mind or even representative of the Australian people as a whole.
        This would help protect governments from being taken advantage of by unscrupulous financiers.

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      Bill in Oz

      Well, well, well ! I’m proud tom categorically state we use toilet paper from SA’s plantation grown pine forests which greenists want to eliminate because they replaced native bush…

      I wonder why the Hawkesbury gazette need to peddle this trashy propaganda from overseas ?

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    Serge Wright

    This ‘ecoonomy wrecking’ ALP renewables policy that will remove us from the 1st world and take us to the 3rd world, needs a name.

    I suggest REXIT !!!

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    Peter Fitzroy

    At present, a parliamentarian is beholden to their party, and by extension, the party donors. This is a far cry from what was expected of representatives in the early days of federation, where party allegiance was more fluid, and individual parliamentarians were expected to put their electorates first. This points to a systemic problem more than a simple centre right vs centre left politics we are seeing now. Too many unelected, and unaccountable lobbyists, are having way to much power in the current system.

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      Kinky Keith

      Yes, and besides the lobbyists there is the Public Service which is a major force at work in the system.

      There’s a continuity of influence in the hired help that may overwhelm the input of parliament from time to time. This needs defusing.

      KK

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        Sceptical Sam

        there is the Public Service which is a major force at work in the system

        Yes. And in my experience it is, like their ABC, predominately staffed by socialists and greens.

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      el gordo

      The Westminster system is operating normally, but its fair to say that allegiance to the Party line is paramount if you want to be the government.

      Abbott and Kelly broke ranks with the Turnbull government on energy and climate change, and the PM was rolled in a coup. So there is still flexibility in the system.

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      Good comment Peter Fitzroy.

      I’ve lost count of the number of times I have heard interviews from schools on election day asking voters in that electorate who they will be voting for, and in at least eight cases out of ten, the person being asked gives the name of the current party leader of the party they will be voting for. See signs at those schools on election day, and nearly every one has the image of the party leader.

      It’s gotten down to image politics now.

      When I was in Capricornia, I would often hear people when asked who the local Federal member was respond with, umm, you know, whatsername. Very few could name Michelle Landry, who was from the LNP, but sat with The Nationals in Canberra.

      Almost the same in every electorate I have ever been in, currently Forde and Bert Van Manen ….. who? and I’ve only been here for six Months.

      I would wager very few people would know the name of their local Federal MP, and in fact, most would be hard pressed to name their electorate for that fact.

      Tony.

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        Funny really, as the last three electorates I have been in are linked in one manner or another.

        I was in Fadden for six years (Stuart Robert now) and that was named after former PM Arthur Fadden, who served the fourth shortest term as PM, only 39 days.

        Then I was in Capricornia (Michelle Landry now) for eight years, and that was one of the original electorates in Australia, named after the Region.

        I’m in Forde now, (Bert Van Manen now) and that was named after a former PM Frank Forde, who served the shortest term as PM, only seven days.

        The link between Forde and Fadden, both PM’s, both short timers as PM, and the link between Forde and Capricornia is that Frank Forde was the local member for Capricornia for 24 years.

        Tony.

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        Peter Fitzroy

        Thanks TonyformOz,
        I would suggest that a representative could abstain from voting on the party line if a quorum of the electorate was against it. Implementation of such a policy would require the services of MyGov, to manage voter ID’s, and since they already have that info from the electoral rolls, it should be simple to implement. Mind you I know I’m dreaming, still, it was a thought

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      Antoine D'Arche

      Completely agree. The recent NSW Liberal Party experience validates this especially well. Abbott, Molan and others tried to change the system to get rank and file members to control preselections etc, but were ultimately stymied by the factions/ powerbrokers namely one Michael Photios. This guy should have been shown the door long ago, but unfortunately I think he had too much ideology in common with Turnbull. I’m never in favour of more government regulation, but couldn’t this be fixed with commonwealth legislation specifically empowering members?

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        beowulf

        Yes Photios and his wife are both untouchable renewables lobbyists who also hold king-making powers over the NSW Libs. NSW state Energy Minister Don Harwin is part of the Photios clan and probably owes his position to them as well. Not surprisingly, he is full steam ahead for more renewables.

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          OriginalSteve

          No one stays politically untouchable forever…give it time…

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          OriginalSteve

          We need to point out to family and friends that a vite for renewables os a vite for ling term unemployment and trashed economy.

          As such, what do they call it when you deluberately undermine the stability of a country and its people?

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      jack

      Yes, a major problem is party politics. -Yoda.

      From Arthur A Chresby’s book, YOUR WILL BE DONE.
      Chapter Two -WHAT IS THE LEGAL FUNCTION AND DUTY OF A PARLIAMENTARIAN?

      More than ninety years of party political control over our seven Australian Parliaments reveal that It
      Is only on very rare occasions that Parliamentary party leaders agree to allow their back-bench
      Members to have a free, or “conscience”, vote. On all other occasions’ party leaders and party controllers,
      DEMAND ABSOLUTE LOYALTY to the party, and INSIST on voting BEING ON PARTY LINES.

      This raises the further crucial question of whether, under State Criminal Codes and the
      Commonwealth Crimes Act, Parliamentary party leaders, and controllers, are not severally and individually
      guilty of deliberately breaching those codes and statutes, i.e., of being guilty of conspiring to prevent
      back-bench Members of Parliament from fulfilling their judicially defined legal function and duty in their
      Houses of Parliament?

      It also raises the basic question, touched on page 4, of whether or not back-bench Members of
      Parliament themselves violated their legal duty to the People by freely allowing themselves to be coerced by
      their leaders and party into not correctly fulfilling their judicially defined legal function and duty and, of a
      consequence, thereby rendering their Parliamentary Seat vacant by an act of overt or covert conspiracy.

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    pat

    NSW election coming; Federal election soon after. theirABC busy for months pushing Big Govt is better than the free market:

    AUDIO: 21 Feb: ABC: Big Ideas: Time for the state to be entrepreneurial?
    The prevailing view is that the state should stop interfering in the economy and let the market decide.
    Economist Mariana Mazzucato takes the opposite approach.
    She says we need an entrepreneurial state with ambitious goals to shape the economy and solve wicked problems like climate change.

    Can the State deliver : Centre for Policy Development John Menadue Oration
    Recorded 11 December 2018
    Speakers
    Professor Mariana Mazzucato Director Institute for Innovation and Public Purpose University College London
    Laura Tingle interviewer ABC TV 7.30 chief political correspondent
    https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/do-we-need-an-entreprenurial-public-sector/10821852

    paraphrasing:

    around 2 minutes: Mariana: things are quite scary in terms of – and i don’t like to use the word “scary” because many of these things that are worrying, like climate change, could actually be seen as an opportunity. but it is quite scary.
    if you’ve read the IPCC report, APPARENTLY WE HAVE JUST TWELVE YEARS LEFT in terms of when things are going to get extremely bad, and we’ve already seen across the world and Australia is, of course, very concerned about this because of the geography of the country.
    but, instead of thinking of it as scary, what could this present to us in terms of new investment opportunities. seeing these problems, and just think of all the sustainable development goals – 17 of them – underneath them about 169 targets – how are we going to get there?

    Tingle interview begins at 43min. Mariana: looking at green Germany makes you feel good.

    46min39 in: Laura Tingle: Is China actually the most successful country in addressing climate change partly because it is, basically, still a centrally-run society? …
    Mariana: China is spending 1.7 trillion in greening its economy. 49min: NYC/California acting against Trump’s denial of climate change.

    Tingle says it strikes her that the concept of state is much stronger still in (continental) europe than it is in anglo saxon countries! Mariana says only in Italy. state intervention stronger in US, except for welfare. go to San Francisco – the homeless – it’s a crime.

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      pat

      VIDEO: 10 Dec 2018: ABC 7.30 Report: Are we overlooking the role of the public sector in the economy?
      Mariana Mazzucato is something of a rockstar in the world of global economics. She’s written two best-sellers arguing that it’s actually the public sector which has made the crucial investments that have transformed the world economy. In Australia for a series of public lectures, she sat down to talk with Laura Tingle…
      Should the public sector just be there to clean up the mess, or should it play a more active role in economic decisions?
      TRANSCRIPT:
      LEIGH SALES: The rise of China, the stagnation of wages globally and the tax evasion of some major corporations and the violation of public trust by banks, has some people questioning the future of the free market model. This year in a poll by the Lowy institute for international policy, fewer than half of people aged between 18 and 45 agreed that democracy was preferable to any other kind of government – a staggering figure when you think of it…

      LAURA TINGLE: The China example is an interesting one because nobody really sort of says, look at the impact of government investment…

      MARIANA MAZZUCATO: That is very interesting because I think China has learnt what happened in Silicon Valley and Trump is unlearning it. China’s very adaptable. It kind of learns the lessons. I feel like it is looking around the world and trying to better understand how the West, particular Western countries actually achieved competitiveness and I think what China is doing today or is trying to do around green is providing the long-term finance through different types of institutions, including the China Development Bank which is a public bank, which unlike the private financial sector around the world is actually providing that patient long-term finance…
      https://www.abc.net.au/7.30/are-we-overlooking-the-role-of-the-public-sector/10603210

      Geraldine gets to talk to Mariana before she arrives in Australia:

      AUDIO: 16min43sec: 8 Dec: 2018: ABC Saturday Extra: Geraldine Doogue: Mariana Mazzucato discusses how to improve our economy
      Mariana Mazzucato, an Italian-American economist is in Australia to deliver the John Menadue oration for the Centre for Policy Development…
      https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/saturdayextra/redirecting-the-economy/10585900

      2 Feb: ABC The Science Show: Innovative success from sharing risks and rewards amongst public and private research
      Mariana Mazzucato at University College London
      TRANSCRIPT:
      Mariana Mazzucato: And how can we also get our treasuries, the ministries of finance which unfortunately around the world tend to be part of this depression problem to actually also have different evaluation metrics. Instead of static cost benefit analysis and net present value and asking the ABC or the BBC what is your economic value, to actually really be able to also capture the great spill-overs that happen when you have an ambitious ABC in terms of…even the BBC in the 1980s they had a learning program where they wanted all the kids to code, they invested actually in the technology, the BBC microcomputer. They had to procure the parts that allowed some of the start-ups to scale up, which later became the big high-tech companies in the UK, ARM and Acorn. So even at that level having ambition really matters in terms of also helping the business community. But neither NASA nor the BBC nor ABC would have produced anything had they worried about economic value in the beginning. And this is the irony; you produce more economic value by not worrying about it.
      Robyn Williams: The remarkable Professor Mariana Mazzucato from the University College in London where she directs the Institute for Innovation and Public Purpose. She was in Australia as a guest of the University of Technology in Sydney
      https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/scienceshow/innovative-success-from-sharing-risks-and-rewards-amongst-publi/10771196

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        pat

        on RN Big Ideas, theirABC could have told their audience much more about the “remarkable” “rock star” Mariana:

        Wikipedia: Mariana Mazzucato
        In 2016, Mazzucato co-edited a book, Rethinking Capitalism: Economics and Policy for Sustainable and Inclusive Growth with Michael Jacobs. In 2013 The New Republic called her one of “the three most important thinkers about innovation”…
        Mazzucato obtained a Bachelor of Arts in history and international relations from Tufts University in 1990, a Masters in economics from the New School for Social Research in 1994, and a PhD in economics, also from the New School in 1999…

        She is a member of the Scottish Government’s Council of Economic Advisors; a member of the World Economic Forum’s Council on the Economics of Innovation, a member of the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network Leadership Council and SITRA’s Advisory Panel in Finland and, until 2015, she was a member of the European Commission’s expert group on Innovation for Growth (RISE)…
        On September 27, 2015, it was announced that she had been appointed to the British Labour Party’s Economic Advisory Committee, convened by Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell and reporting to Labour Party Leader Jeremy Corbyn…
        She is also a regular contributor to Project Syndicate since 2015…
        She is currently a Special Advisor for the EC Commissioner for Research, Science and Innovation, Carlos Moedas, and has recently authored a high impact EC report Mission-Oriented Research & Innovation in the European Union. She is also a Special Advisor to the Secretary General of the OECD, Angel Gurría, for the OECD’s New Growth Narrative…

        In 2013 Mazzucato published The Entrepreneurial State: debunking public vs. private sector myths (Anthem)…
        Two chapters in the book are dedicated to the emerging ‘green technology’ revolution. She details the public funds that she argues are laying the groundwork for this revolution in a similar way that the state invested in the most high-risk areas of biotech and nanotech. The book concludes with the author’s contention that in all these examples, the risks were socialized while the rewards were privatized, and considers different ways to change this dynamic to produce more ‘inclusive growth’…

        Martin Wolf (Financial Times) wrote that The Entrepreneurial State offers “a controversial thesis,” but “it is basically right,”[41] and warns that the “failure to recognise the role of the government in driving innovation may well be the greatest threat to rising prosperity.”…
        In 2015, John Thornhill, deputy editor of the Financial Times, interviewed Mazzucato for ‘Lunch with the FT’…
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mariana_Mazzucato

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          pat

          Mariana on : China is spending 1.7 trillion in greening its economy

          it’s not only Mariana on ABC Big Ideas pushing that figure. Nicholas Reece was on Sky Australia last nite, repeatedly stating that China was investing $1.7 trillion to green its economy…and even said China wouldn’t need coal in 30 years’ time!

          here he is promoting the kids protesting. watch both short videos:

          TWEET: Nicholas Reece, Principal Fellow @Unimelb • Anchor #PoliticsHQ on @SkyNewsAust • Councillor @cityofmelbourne:
          #PoliticsHQ: Should school kids be allowed to strike for climate action?
          Tune in and vote this Friday 8pm (AEDT) @SkyNewsAust #auspol
          VIDEO PROMO 15SECS
          20 Feb 2019
          https://twitter.com/Nicholas_Reece/status/1098337634839977984

          TWEET” Sky News Australia:
          .@RitaPanahi: Australia is doing far more on climate change than just about any country in the world – we are meeting our Paris targets.

          @Nicholas_Reece: On a per capita basis, Australia has close to the highest emissions of any country.
          VIDEO: 1min13sec
          18 Feb 2019
          https://twitter.com/SkyNewsAust/status/1097410086052327424

          Uni Melb Bio: Nicholas Reece is Principal Fellow with the Melbourne School of Government, and Director of Strategy, Policy and Projects at the University of Melbourne. Nick has considerable of experience in both politics and policy making at the highest levels of government including for Prime Minister Julia Gillard and Victorian Premiers Steve Bracks and John Brumby. Key roles during this period include Deputy Chief of Staff, Head of Policy, and Director of Strategy. He was also Secretary and Campaign Director of the Australian Labor Party in Victoria.
          Nick currently serves as a Councillor for the City of Melbourne where he is the Chair of the Planning portfolio. Nick hosts a TV show, Politics HQ, on Sky News and is a specialist commentator for the network. He is also a regular columnist with the Herald Sun.

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          • #
            Annie

            Nick Reece didn’t mention that China is reducing support for renewables…I felt like shouting at the screen whenever he came out with that nonsense about China finishing with coal power in the future.

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              pat

              for the record:

              AUDIO ONLY: Sky News: Paul Murray Live, Thursday 21st February
              http://more.skynews.com.au/podcasts/paul-murray-live-podcast/

              PARAPHRASING:

              segment begins 12min50sec: Nicholas Reece, Bronwyn Bishop & James Campbell (Herald Sun). China/retaliation coal etc.
              Nick Reece first enters debate around 17min.
              says China, in the short-term, will continue to buy our coal – which is high quality coal – for years to come BUT, in the medium- & long-term China spending $1.7tn – to get off dependency on oil and coal.

              Adani: James Campbell says Qld Govt doesn’t want it built now. if Shorten gets in, it won’t get built.

              Reece: Adani a bad move for Australia – first because of its impact on Great Barrier Reef. China doing everything in medium-to long-term etc $1.7trillion etc.

              Reece: in 30 years from now China won’t be burning coal. they will have transitioned…
              ENDS 24min15sec.

              promo by Reece for Children’s climate strike prog. comments by panellists.

              followed by discussion on this thread’s topic – Brian Fisher – cost of CAGW policies.
              Bishop: we should get out of Paris etc. propagandists muddy the truth about the costs.

              Reece: doesn’t want to say anything uncharitable about Brian Fisher BUT it’s not a peer-reviewed report etc. wild numbers. China is investing $1.7 trillion in green economy. RE cheaper than coal.

              James Campbell: Labor is in the driving seat on this issue.

              Reece: cost of living is important to voters, but Victorian election has shown voters love subsidies for rooftop solar etc. Coalition talked about opening new coal-fired station in LaTrobe Valley and they got killed.

              Bishop: we were successful with Abbott and campaigning against the carbon tax. we had the facts. Turnbull came in – he wanted emisssions trading scheme. we can’t rely on solar and wind.

              James Campbell on whether readers engage in topics like the cost of CAGW policies: readers don’t understand big numbers. ENDS 38MINUTES.

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              robert rosicka

              Reece is a Dastyari wanna be mouth piece for the socialists , up is down , black is white and he is always right .
              At least sky allows an alternative opinion unlike the ABC .

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            truth

            Reece is absolutely clueless on the special position of Australia in this Global Socialist ‘leap forward’ posing as environmentalism and care for ‘the planet’.IMO he couldn’t care less about Australia.

            He compares Australia unfavorably to other countries in the ‘obedience to PARIS’ stakes…apparently not knowing or caring that Australia’s situation is unique…as the only 1st world nation without the alternative energy of massive run-of-river hydro or nuclear power…or interconnectors to neighbouring countries…the only country whose government ..especially should Labor be the government after May…is doing the country’s people and the next and following generations very deliberate harm….by forcing Australia to relinquish its biggest export income-earner and cheapest most reliable power…its only competitive edge…to be 100% dependent on 100% weather-dependent intermittent electricity propped up by 100% weather-dependent batteries and pumped hydro….and therefore forever precarious.

            Reece is a hard LEFT Socialist and as such makes all kinds of assertions with no supporting facts…pays court to kids…leads them to believe they already know without having to learn …more than adults…even scientists…. because that’s how Socialists groom the next generation of compliant airhead Marxist activists …their capacity for critical thinking and analysis stunted because …hey they don’t need to think…they’ve already been told they know better than parents or other adults.

            It’s the sort of grooming that spawned the Baader Meinhof murderous terrorist group in post-war Germany…and the later heinous Kinderladen movement…into the 1980s… that even had amongst its evil partakers some of Germany’s most prominent Green politicians.

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              robert rosicka

              I loved the bit last night when he was questioned about his support for school kids protesting and was given the counter if kids wanted to go on strike in support of coal would that be ok .

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    Speedy

    By the way – you can sing bits of this to the tune of the Australian National Anthem. Think of Bill Shorten gazing lovingly into the mirror as he breaks into song…
    Cheers,
    Speedy

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    Ruairi

    Australians in full zany mode,
    Who imagine their new Green abode,
    Is a garden in Oz,
    Won’t find it because,
    Renewables are the end of the road.

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    pat

    21 Feb: LA Times: Snow comes to L.A., with powder in Malibu, Pasadena, West Hollywood
    By Hannah Fry and Alejandra Reyes-Velarde
    It was that kind of day in some parts of Southern California, where snow dropped at extremely low elevation levels, creating a winter wonderland for a short while. Snow fell in Malibu, Pasadena, West Hollywood, Northridge, San Bernardino, Thousand Oaks and other unexpected places.
    Snow level hit the 1,000-foot mark, bringing tiny bits of the white stuff into neighborhoods that had not seen snow in decades…

    An unusually chilly storm system that originated in Alberta, Canada, was lingering over Nevada and had already blanketed Las Vegas with snow early Thursday. Before daybreak, snow was falling in parts of the Southland, dusting Palmdale and the Lucerne Valley. By the early afternoon, it was snowing across Southern California and winter weather had forced the closure of the 5 Freeway through the Grapevine.
    “This is probably the coldest storm system I’ve seen in my time in California,” said David Sweet, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Oxnard. “We’ve had cold mornings and freeze conditions, but I don’t remember seeing anything quite this cold.”

    Forecasters predict that up to 6 inches of powder could fall in the eastern San Gabriel Mountains. Sweet said snow could fall in the Santa Monica Mountains and even some sections of the Hollywood Hills.
    By around noon, the predictions were proving to be true…
    The last time it snowed in downtown Los Angeles was in January 1962, according to Los Angeles Public Library archives…

    Falling snow levels prompted Bear Valley, Morongo, Snowline and Rim of the World school districts in San Bernardino County to close schools Thursday for a rare snow day.
    “It’s going to be a fairly unusual day,” Sweet said, “to say the least.”
    With the snow also comes the potential for significant road closures and travel delays…
    The storm is expected to move out of the region overnight, but the chilly weather that has Angelenos bundling up will linger a bit longer. Overnight lows will drop into the high 20s in some areas…
    This week’s cold snap has dropped temperatures low enough to break at least one record. The Santa Barbara Airport recorded a low of 33 degrees Tuesday, edging out the previous record of 34 degrees set in 1990, Sweet said…
    http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-california-snow-20190221-story.html

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      Greg in NZ

      Pat, that one’s a keeper… snowing at The ‘Bu! As it did back in 1949… great B/W photo of 40s-era cars stuck in snow-bound Benedict Canyon. Other headings: L.A. was blanketed by snow 70 years ago. Could history repeat itself today? Rhetorical question, methinks. Snow Valley has the best snow it’s had in years. But you can’t get there. Damn climate done gone get changed again, Brandine, cussed Cletus.

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    truth

    Many Australians seem to be nonchalant at best ..or gung-ho for the apocalypse at worst …on the electricity issue .
    They don’t seem to factor in at all that electricity underpins absolutely everything we depend on-do-what we can afford to buy..to experience…where we can go…what sort of lives our kids will have…how much education they’ll have…how healthy a life they can have…their safety…their country’s security…absolutely everything.
    Now…at one minute to midnight… even AFR has written a bit of a last minute ‘hang on we really can’t do without coal’ editorial.
    In my experience people are militantly clueless and resistant to even thinking about ..what they’re actually signing up to… if/when either side signs up to grovelling compliance with the PARIS/IPCC demands.
    They seem to have no realization ..and couldn’t care less anyway…that there’s almost certainly no going back once Australia succumbs and relinquishes our sovereignty to comply with the Global Socialsm diktat.
    It’s ‘no worries’ for most people that the demands made of Australia are more draconian than are made on any other first world country…nothing less than demands for our descent into a third world backwater…all the good things our parents worked for so we could have a better life….gone.
    No one seems to realize or want to think about the fact that Australia is the absolutely only 1st world country without huge hydro or nuclear power …whose government is forcing it to give up coal to be forever dependent 100% on 100% weather-dependent intermittent electricity propped up by weather-dependent batteries and weather-dependent pumped hydro…ie forcing Australia to commit economic and social suicide for an hypothesis that has been ‘science closed’…no questions permitted…for decades ….since the ‘consensus’ was declared before most of the science was even done.
    Many Australians seem gung ho for…
    ..unreliable weather-dependent electricity with all the horrors that can bring
    …decimated agriculture & therefore less food security
    ..huge kill of millions of the Australian cattle herd
    …inevitable loss of industry therefore of export income ..therefore of jobs and tax take ..therefore of fundng for safety nets eg Medicare..PBS…NDIS..pensions ..welfare
    …no subs/frigate build…no military to speak of…therefore inevitable loss of national and border security…and loss of alliances…Australia alone and defenceless
    …compulsory smart meters so domestic electricity use can be tightly-controlled & rationed via ACCC’s ‘cost-reflective tariffs’ which will send prices stratospheric..all ’orchestrated’ remotely by central authorities
    …the massive prices driving us all into rooftop solar whence we’re all to be herded into collectives they call Virtual Power Plants for even tighter control….the ‘herd’ more amenable to ‘demand response’ aka switching off.
    …EVS all round or no private cars at all
    …curtailment of travel..even domestic
    …collapse of tourism & general degradation of the North
    …living dangerously and precariously with respect to water treatment…sewerage…waste collection—already the economics of recycling are not stacking up with the massive hikes in electricity prices
    Under Labor Australia will pay half a trillion dollars…at least…for the privilege of descending into third world chaos and poverty…and for an initial pat on the head from the Global Socialists of PARIS/IPCC.
    The pat of approval won’t last long though …as with all blackmail situations, the payout is neverending and so once Labor forces Australia to obey the Global Socialists..’for the planet’…we’ll be obeying Europe and our kids and grandkids will be…forever…for the planet. The Global Socialists’ planet will be insatiable.

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    • #
      Maptram

      EV like everything else rely on reliable electricity. If there power outages because the unreliable renewable energy systems do what can easily happen and provide no electricity, and the fossil fuels generation can’t cope with the extra demand, then EVs can’t be recharged, therefore anyone whose only means of transport is an EV, will have no transport. I suspect the well off Greens, and fellow travellers, would have two cars, an EV so that they can be seen to be seen to be doing the right (right being what they believe) thing for the environment and a vehicle that runs on fossil fuel for when the system fails and they can still travel.

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      OriginalSteve

      The reality is that australian politicians will willingly empty our countries bank accounts and give it to the occult communust UN under the lie of climate change.

      It could be argued its theft and tr****on.

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    Another Ian

    BOM has company

    “The Government Of Canada’s Department Of Wrong”

    http://www.smalldeadanimals.com/index.php/2019/02/21/the-government-of-canadas-department-of-wrong/#comments

    Jo gets quoted

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    pat

    ABC spruiks for CAGW litigation:

    22 Feb: ABC: Climate change-related litigation was once seen as a joke, but it could soon become business reality
    By business reporter Nassim Khadem
    CEOs of Australia’s largest companies are hearing the message and realising that on issues from climate change to gender diversity the need to act is not just a moral one.
    On Wednesday, Australia’s largest coal miner, Glencore, joined a growing list of global companies that have succumbed to shareholder pressure to act on climate change.
    The Swiss-based resources giant, headed by billionaire Ivan Glasenberg, recognised there is a business case for freezing its global coal production at current levels…

    The announcement was made after the company held talks with the Climate Action 100+ initiative, whose global members collectively manage more than $US32 trillion in assets.
    The group includes a number of major Australian superannuation funds such as AMP Capital, AustralianSuper, Cbus, IFM Investors, QSuper and BT Financial Group…
    In recent months the group has worked with other companies, including Shell, BP and Maersk, and convinced them to take steps that show they are serious about meeting the Paris climate agreement goals.

    ***Emma Herd, chief executive of the Investor Group on Climate Change and member of the global Steering Committee for the Climate Action 100+, said the change in sentiment was because of greater recognition by CEOs that climate change is not just an ethical issue.
    “This is about financial risk, as well a company’s social licence to operate,” she said.
    “Super funds were first onto the issue because they take a 30-year investment horizon. These are very big mainstream funds asking very big mainstream companies to have a business plan on climate change.”…

    Climate change-related litigation on the rise
    Climate change-related litigation is no longer a joke…
    In a speech in June, ASIC Commissioner John Price said directors “would do well” to carefully consider a 2016 legal opinion by Noel Hutley SC and Sebastien Hartford-Davis that they could face lawsuits for failing to consider risks related to climate change.
    Meanwhile, the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority (APRA) has been pushing ASX200 companies to run “stress tests” on potential climate risk scenarios…READ ON
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-02-22/how-investors-regulators-and-litigators-are-moving-australia/10834648

    ***never forget Emma Herd apparently sees “carbon” as a bit like a currency!

    9 Nov 2011: SMH: Carbon tax just another cost – so get used to it
    By Elizabeth Knight
    ***The director of emissions and environment at Westpac, Emma Herd, describes carbon as a bit like a currency. Each country has a different carbon currency and Australia will soon join the ranks.
    Most can also trade in the international carbon currency, the CER…
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/carbon-tax-just-another-cost-so-get-used-to-it-20111108-1n5k6.html

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      OriginalSteve

      Good…lets take it to court and expose the climate lie publically….

      00

      • #
        philthegeek

        Start a go fund me and go for it.

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        • #
          OriginalSteve

          Bit of a problem….once the climate virus takes hold in legal circles, it creates climate “zombies”…..

          Once again, I find it troubling that this couldn’t have got this far without collaboration of large companies, govt and the powers that be.

          “***Emma Herd, chief executive of the Investor Group on Climate Change and member of the global Steering Committee for the Climate Action 100+, said the change in sentiment was because of greater recognition by CEOs that climate change is not just an ethical issue.
          “This is about financial risk, as well a company’s social licence to operate,” she said.
          “Super funds were first onto the issue because they take a 30-year investment horizon. These are very big mainstream funds asking very big mainstream companies to have a business plan on climate change.”…”

          “this is a new bluff :”as well a company’s social licence to operate” – like, maybe I’m a bit jaded about all this , but what the heck is a “social licence” ( and frankly who cares…. ) and also who died and made a “social licence” king? Since when do greenies dictate social policy? Tell them to go jump.

          Maybe a social upheaval might be good – the useless portion of the population may be cowed ( or removed from influence ) and the pragmatists get back to running things, instead of the fluffy bunny “sharing economy” based on hot air and trendy greeny nonsense….I wonder how the urban hipsters lumberjack look-a-likes will cope without electricity?

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  • #
    TdeF

    Hundreds of thousands of giant windmills are working!

    Snow in Los Angeles. Hollywood take note, Trump is doing a great job. Global Warming is over.

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    pat

    Bloomberg, Reuters & ABC are still pushing the China banning our coal narrative. here’s ABC:

    22 Feb: ABC: China defends Australian coal block, Parliament cyber attack calling hacking claims ‘baseless’
    By Erin Handley & Xiaoning Mo
    China has responded to reports of an indefinite ban on Australian coal imports, saying the move is to protect the interests of Chinese importers and the environment…
    “China’s customs assesses the safety and quality of imported coal, analyses possible risks, and conducts corresponding examination and inspection compliant with laws and regulations,” Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said.
    “By doing so, it can better safeguard the legitimate rights and interests of Chinese importers and protect the environment.”…

    When asked why Australian coal was targeted, he said the risk assessments followed regulations and inspection measures.
    “I believe this is normal practice,” Mr Geng said.
    The spokesman also appeared to make light of the questioning by saying: “You were saying ‘coal’, not ‘cow’, right?”, prompting laughter from the reporter…
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-02-22/chinese-mofa-responds-on-coal-cyber-attack/10836402

    SMH has a different take:

    22 Feb: SMH: Local factors, not bad blood, could be to blame for China’s coal ‘ban’
    By Kirsty Needham
    Beijing: For all the jittery chatter in Australia about coal being banned from Chinese ports as political payback, the view from regional China is likely to be starkly different.
    Jobs and stability are high on the agenda for local Chinese officials right now as China experiences an economic slowdown amid a trade war with the United States.
    So the alternate theory as to why Dalian Customs may have capped coal imports, and reportedly vetoed Australian imports – because Chinese authorities want to give the local, dirtier, coal industry a leg-up – is entirely credible.

    Slowing the import of coal from overseas, despite the higher quality of the product, will drive up demand for local coal…

    Government stimulus has flowed back into the system, with plans for big infrastructure projects, and state banks have been told to lend, lend, lend to private companies, in particular…
    Over winter, curbs on coal mining were reportedly relaxed, a departure from recent years when strict environmental curfews stopped coal activity and steel making for months to ensure clean air during the heating season.
    Energy analyst Wood Mackenzie says a long-term ban on Australian coking coal would have “enormous implications for both countries,” and this is why it probably won’t happen.
    The prices Chinese steel mills would have to pay for coal would spike, and they would be forced to use lower-quality Mongolian coking coal…

    A similar slow-down of coal imports was experienced at Chinese ports last year, which hit a range of countries not just Australia.
    After it ended, Australian sales rose.
    https://www.smh.com.au/world/asia/local-factors-not-bad-blood-could-be-to-blame-for-china-s-coal-ban-20190222-p50zgw.html

    ***worth noting:

    21 Feb: ABC: Dollar tumbles as Chinese officials ban Australian coal imports; analysts say move ‘crystallises fears’ about possible crackdown
    By business reporter Stephen Letts
    Updated about 5 hours ago
    Last year, around 7 million tonnes of Australian coal went through the Dalian ports, so the threatened 12 million tonne quota may not stifle trade in the longer term…

    BHP chief executive Andrew Mackenzie said while delays had been experienced in getting both metallurgical coal and thermal coal into China recently, he did not believe it was political.
    Mr Mackenzie told an analyst and investor briefing earlier this week that all suppliers had been hit by delays at Chinese ports.
    “There are a number of things happening in China relating to, how they plan, and moderate, if you like, imports versus their own domestic production,” Mr Mackenzie said.
    “I don’t believe for one moment this is linked to some of the higher level issues of relationships between China and the rest of the world, and including with us.”…

    NAB chief market economist Ivan Colhoun said while details remain “somewhat hazy”, the initial drop in Australian dollar may be an over-reaction.
    “The reported ban would impact a relatively small proportion of Australia’s coal exports — imports through Dalian comprise ***only 1.8 per cent of Australia’s total coal exports”…
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-02-21/china-bans-coal-import-and-send-dollar-tumbling/10835136

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    pat

    21 Feb: US News & World Report: Snowfall in Arizona Mountain Town Breaks Century-Old Record
    By FELICIA FONSECA, Associated Press; Paul Davenport, Astrid Galvan and Terry Tang in Phoenix contributed to this report.
    Schools, public libraries and businesses were expected to be closed for a second day Friday amid a major, record-breaking storm in north-central Arizona…
    Snowfall at the Flagstaff airport broke an all-time daily record set more than a century ago. The airport had 31.6 inches (80.3 centimeters) of snow as of Thursday evening, a figure that was expected to climb before the day’s end. The record set in 1915 was 31 inches (78.7 centimeters)…
    Farther north, snow plows struggled to keep roadways clear, and officials in Flagstaff and Coconino County said there is “significant concern” about the weight of the snow on rooftops…
    Cold temperatures that accompanied the storm meant the snow was light and fluffy, a welcoming sight for anyone tasked with removing it from around homes and businesses…
    https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/arizona/articles/2019-02-21/snow-from-arizona-storm-just-getting-started-shuts-schools

    21 Feb: Forbes: Rare Southwest Snowfall Bewilders Southern California And Closes Schools In Las Vegas
    by Dennis Mersereau
    Wintry precipitation is so uncommon at lower elevations in southern California that the National Weather Service in Los Angeles had to explain the difference between different types of icy precipitation. Las Vegas saw measurable snow for a second day in a row on Thursday and the threat for icy roads on Friday morning will give students in the area a rare snow day. Nearly three feet of snow fell in Flagstaff, Arizona, today, which is an all-time record for the most snow the city’s airport has ever measured in one day…

    It’s a bit of an understatement to say that it’s unusual to see snow at lower elevations in parts of the southwestern United States. Those of us in the rest of the country are well-acquainted with how hard it can be to see pure snow outside of the northern snow belts…
    It’s unusual for such a cold upper-level low to make it this far south and west, as evidenced by the snow that fell today in areas that don’t typically see much snowfall. Today’s weather pattern allowed for the atmosphere to grow cold enough for snow to form at elevations as low as 1,000 feet in southern California and down to the surface in Las Vegas…
    Las Vegas has seen snow five times so far this month…
    Prior to this week, Las Vegas had only officially recorded measurable snow (amounting to one-tenth of an inch or more) 29 times since records began at the city’s airport back in September 1948, and only five of those measurable snowfalls occurred within the last 30 years…
    https://www.forbes.com/sites/dennismersereau/2019/02/21/rare-southwest-snowfall-bewilders-southern-california-and-closes-schools-in-las-vegas/

    bad timing, ABC!

    VIDEO: 2min49sec: 20 Feb: ABC7: SoCal megastorm affected by global warming could cause $725B in damage, USGS report says
    By Rob Hayes
    According to the U.S. Geological Survey, the odds of a megastorm that could wipe out the Whittier Narrows Dam, as well as the Santa Fe Dam, are increasing as a result of global warming.
    A so-called ARKstorm, the report said, could be more devastating than a major earthquake and cause roughly $725 billion in damage…
    https://abc7news.com/weather/socal-megastorm-could-cause-$725b-in-damage-report/5146895/

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      Greg in NZ

      “The outermost part of our planet’s atmosphere extends well beyond the lunar orbit – almost twice the distance to the Moon.” I ain’t no interstellar cosmonaut nor string-theory physicist, but if the European Space Agency says it’s so –

      http://sci.esa.int/soho/61130-earth-atmosphere-stretches-out-to-the-moon-and-beyond/

      “‘SWAN/SOHO Lyman-α mapping: the Hydrogen Geocorona extends well beyond the Moon’ by I. Baliukin et al. is accepted in Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics”. Algoricle-Mann will soon be shouting it’s our fault.

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      Bill in Oz

      That article had this paragraph:
      “economic modelling results are not predictions. They are based on hypothetical future worlds. Economists try to capture the dynamics of economic systems in their models to understand the relative impact of different policy options. This means they are always wrong because economists can’t predict the future. Economic modellers are not the crystal ball gazers we read about in fantasy books.

      ECONOMICS IS NO SETTLED SCIENCE

      That is not news. I knew it studying Economics at Monash uni in the 1960′s.

      But Climatology is no settled science either. So let’s rewrite that paragraph for Climate :

      “CLIMATE modelling results are not predictions. They are based on hypothetical future worlds. CLIMATOLOGISTS try to capture the dynamics of CLIMATE systems in their models to understand the relative impact of different policy options. This means they are always wrong because CLIMATOLOGISTS can’t predict the future. CLIMATE modellers are not the crystal ball gazers we read about in fantasy books.”

      Makes perfect sense doesn’t it !!

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    pat

    The media smears of Happer continue today – none more laughable than that from partly-foundation-funded Democracy Now (good luck finding out which foundations these days):

    videos will start at the appropriate mark: https://www.democracynow.org/2019/2/21/climate_denier_to_head_new_trump

    VIDEO: 21 Feb: Democracy Now: Climate Denier to Head New Trump Panel Despite Once Comparing Climate Scientists to Nazis
    William Happer is a National Security Council senior director who has long claimed increasing the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere will actually benefit humans. He has compared the fight against climate change to the Holocaust, saying, “The demonization of carbon dioxide is just like the demonization of the poor Jews under Hitler.” We speak with journalist David Wallace-Wells, deputy editor and climate columnist for New York magazine. His new book is titled “The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming.”
    Transcript

    DAVID WALLACE-WELLS: If we get to 2 degrees of warming, predictions are that we will have killed 150 million people from the small-particulate pollution alone.

    AMY GOODMAN: How do you know that?

    DAVID WALLACE-WELLS: It’s a paper by a scientist named Drew Shindell. It just looked at the difference between air pollution at 1.5 degrees and air pollution at 2 degrees. So, just in that gap, we’d be killing 150 million people. That’s the equivalent of 25 Holocausts. And 2 degrees is functionally our best-case scenario for global warming, which means that our absolute best-case scenario is suffering of the scale of 25 Holocausts, which puts this guy’s comments about—you know, his comparison in context, yeah…

    DAVID WALLACE-WELLS: Yeah. Climate change is an all-encompassing threat. It touches every aspect of life on the planet. And many of those impacts are going to be damaging, so there’s a cost to economic growth. Economists believe that if we don’t change course on climate change, we’ll have a global GDP that’s at least 20 percent smaller, and maybe 30 percent smaller, than we would without climate change. There’s the cost of public health. There’s the impact of drought and agricultural yields. Again, if we get to 4 degrees by the end of the century, we might have grain yields that are half as bountiful as we would without them, which means we’d have to feed 50 percent more people and have half as much grain to give them…

    2ND VIDEO: The Uninhabitable Earth: Unflinching New Book Lays Out Dire Consequences of Climate Chaos
    NERMEEN SHAIKH: Earlier today, Greta Thunberg, the 16-year-old Swedish climate activist, addressed European Union leaders in Brussels. Greta has garnered global attention for carrying out a weekly school strike against climate change in her home country of Sweden…
    [snip]
    AMY GOODMAN: Talk about U.S. military and what the U.S. military understands about the threat of global warming to national security.

    DAVID WALLACE-WELLS: Well, it destabilizes absolutely everything about geopolitics, so states are destabilized, the rivalries between states are destabilized. It changes the calculus of where resources are that are valuable. It transforms shipping routes. It transforms the front lines of battle. So, for instance, the Arctic is melting. That means that there’s new territory to fight over. There’s already rivalry there between the U.S. and Russia. China is involved…

    So, Russia was a country that a few years ago we thought of as a kind of—you know, a second-rate power. But climate change actually promises to benefit them in a couple of ways, in part because they benefit from the burning of fossil fuels—they’re a petrostate—and in part because their economy is one of the few in the world that’s far enough north that it will actually benefit from some additional warming. The relationship of temperature and economic growth is complicated, but there are some countries that will benefit, and most who will suffer, as a result of warming. And Russia is poised to benefit, which means that, along with everything else we’re seeing, Russia could play a bigger, more dynamic role of rival in the future.
    And the same is true of China…

    AMY GOODMAN: And understanding the effects of, for example, climate migration, the pressures people will feel leaving their countries to go to others to save themselves. So, Trump has to discredit all of this, if he wants to succeed in denying climate change. He has to discredit his entire government…

    [snip]

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    pat

    if you wade through all the RE spruiking, you will eventually get to the following:

    22 Feb: RenewEconomy: Giles Parkinson: Is this the day that solar and wind changed the W.A. grid forever?
    But that rapid switch to rooftop solar is creating a very big “duck” curve that the grid operator is having to learn how to manage, as are others around the world where solar is a growing share of production…

    The operator says that on October 18 last year (LINK), it was forced, for the first time, to call in “backup load following ancillary services” – broadly the equivalent of the directions that AEMO has grown accustomed to issuing in South Australia and more recently Victoria.
    The operator said this was the result of volatile wind output, which delivered swings of up to 50MW in short time periods during the morning, compounded by variations of up to 100MW in the output from rooftop solar in the late morning as cloud cover moving across the south-west corner and Perth in particular.

    At 11.30am, local time, the operator called on 50MW of Backup LFAS Down and 50MW of Backup LFAS Up, for a period of 3.5 hours to meet what it expected to be a volatile load profile. (More details can be found through the links here) (LINK).
    AEMO says it was justified because – as the arrow is pointing to in the above graph – a band of clouds around 1pm reduced solar PV output and caused a 300MW increase in demand, and its passing caused a 250MW reduction in demand in the next time interval (1.30pm).

    The back-up call was not costly – around $36,000 – although a second back-up call, on December 26, at 1am, caused on this occasion by rapid changes in wind output, was imposed for 8.5 hours (35.5MW) and cost around $81,000.
    AEMO says the increasing level of penetration of rooftop PV and other renewable generation is going to increase the amount of volatility experienced on the power system going forward, and the number of directions.

    AEMO boss Audrey Zibelman addressed this issue at a symposium at UNSW this week, when she said that in Western Australia there is sometimes “too much rooftop solar that is not managed”, causing voltage to drop at a distribution level, and leading to curtailment of rooftop solar output.
    “We have to start introducing the solutions now to make sure it works – otherwise we will be in the unenviable position of saying we can’t do any more,” Zibelman said.

    Those solutions include a shift to “orchestration”, which will allow networks owners and grid operators to use smart inverters to help manage distributed solar output. Battery storage, demand management and aggregated systems through smart controls of devices such as pool pumps could also do the trick.
    “We want to be able to use all these investment, in a way to provide a private benefit and a public benefit and integrate then into the system,” Zibelman said. “It’s important for markets to be able to reward people to do that so that they are getting payments for the service. We have to get cracking.”
    https://reneweconomy.com.au/is-this-the-day-that-solar-and-wind-changed-the-w-a-grid-forever-63484/

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    PeterS

    Move on – climate change is no longer a concern. It’s now climate grief: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9FFyAMgYXzI

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    pat

    behind paywall; can’t find anything else:

    City Beat: Brisbane Valley flare up over solar farm
    Courier Mail-21 Feb 2019
    A big bun fight is brewing out in the Brisbane Valley between local residents and proponents of a $US2.5 billion ($A3.5 billion) solar farm.

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    pat

    saw a few minutes of Credlin/Sky tonite, but got fed up and turned off.

    Peta was talking to Sky correspondent in North Qld – Matt Cunningham – about Adani, who made the usual point that Qld is divided over Adani. in the north they want it, in Brisbane they don’t (try telling that to all the CAGW sceptics in Brisbane that I know, who are in favour of Adani going ahead).

    anyway, Sky showed a Vox Pop on Brisbane streets (was it near a Uni campus?) and every single person was against coal & Adani, and pro-solar/RE.

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    philthegeek

    in the north they want it, in Brisbane they don’t

    Ye Gads! Regional differences of opinion on an issue?? Must be a conspiracy from the media! Burn them, they are witches!!!

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  • #
    Roy Hogue

    But hey, it’s only money. — Joanne Nova

    …until the bill comes due.

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    pat

    saw five seconds of Nick Reece’s program tonite. so sad – watch the short video, check the replies:

    TWEET: Sky News Australia: Alessandra Baggio Ward: It’s important that everyone gets involved. Not only students but adults too. Climate change is potentially the biggest problem of our generation. It wasn’t a problem we created but one we’ve been given the burden of solving.
    22 Feb 2019
    VIDEO 48secs
    https://twitter.com/SkyNewsAust/status/1098881493051498496

    22 Feb: Guardian: Greta Thunberg tells EU: your climate targets need doubling
    Swede, 16, says EU cannot just ‘wait for us to grow up and become the ones in charge’
    by Jennifer Rankin in Brussels
    The EU should double its climate change reduction targets to do its fair share in keeping the planet below a dangerous level of global warming, the Swedish activist Greta Thunberg has told political and business leaders in Brussels.
    Flanked by students from the Belgian and German school strike movements, the Swedish teenager said it was not enough to hope that young people were going to save the world…

    LOL:

    ***why not say Greenpeace’s Unearthed, Vice?

    21 Feb: Vice: SOME LIKE IT HOT: The Pathetic New Tactic Replacing Climate Change Denial
    You can’t really deny climate change is a thing anymore, but you can be a dick about the people trying to stop it.
    by Joe Sandler Clarke
    (Joe Sandler Clarke is a reporter for ***Unearthed)
    Climate change denialism has shifted in recent years. As the climate crisis has become more apparent, those who flat out deny that it’s happening have lost credibility; it’s hard to say that it’s not getting a lot warmer when Tasmania is on fire…
    Groups that for years have sludged all over our TV screens touting the benefits of carbon dioxide are now reduced to complaining about the BBC and indulging in strange conspiracy theories about Greta Thunberg.

    The new form of climate denial is more insidious, and for the moment more acceptable in polite society. Rather than rubbishing the science that tells us climate change is happening, these new deniers rubbish solutions and mock those fighting for a better world…
    https://www.vice.com/en_au/article/xwb48a/the-pathetic-new-tactic-of-climate-change-deniers

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    pat

    21 Feb: UK Telegraph: First our woodburners, now our hobs…we are losing our small comforts that make daily life bearable
    By Ysenda Maxtone Graham
    PIC CAPTION: Ysenda Maxtone Graham says she loves her gas hob and has little intention of giving it up.

    We felt it coming, didn’t we? One week they banned our woodburning stoves, then it was our diesel cars – and now it’s our gas hobs. Yesterday, the Government’s climate-change advisory body advised that gas hobs and boilers must be banned in all new homes by 2025 so that the UK meets its legally binding environmental targets. I do see that advisors need to keep coming up with virtue-signalling initiatives to justify their salaries and long commutes, but it does seem particularly cruel that at this time, when we’re all sleepless from political uncertainty, we’re being made to feel guilty about the small comforts that make daily life bearable, like the age-old pleasure of cooking over a flame…
    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/interiors/home/never-give-gas-hob/

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    Robber

    Was channel flicking last night when I heard the words climate change on Media Watch on the ABC. Sure enough, there was host Paul Barry trying to discredit Brian Fisher and The Australian for their analysis of the costs of Labor’s 45% emissions reduction target. He criticized the lack of peer review, but had very few “alternative facts” to present. And then who did he turn to for a “scientific” opinion? Why Giles from Renew Economy with a fact-free podcast. Yet another reason to clean out the ABC.

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