JoNova

A science presenter, writer, speaker & former TV host; author of The Skeptic's Handbook (over 200,000 copies distributed & available in 15 languages).


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Unthreaded Weekend

Kalbarri, Western Australia, about 600km North of Perth….(Click to enlarge)

The colors are glorious in the land of iron oxide.

Though I pitied any poor shipwrecked soul staggering ashore here at the wrong time of year. How forbidding, dry and vast that landscape.

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Unthreaded Weekend, 8.5 out of 10 based on 35 ratings

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177 comments to Unthreaded Weekend

  • #
    Gee Aye

    Chile bean pizza today. It will look a bit like the landscape above.

    91

    • #
      Graeme No.3

      Before or after you’ve eaten it?

      61

    • #
      Santa Baby

      Why is every solution from the eco leftist one and only giving away Democracy and Your property and Money?

      50

      • #

        Yes. That is so. Why oh why, whatever you meant.

        10

        • #
          James Bradley

          Gee Aye,

          Sounds more like an analogy to me – perhaps Santa Baby is a pizza purist.

          10

          • #

            The affirmation of post-capitalist hegemony works toward the authentication of representational familiarity.

            I’ve read Santas post a few times and can’t understand it from any angle? Maybe Santa uses one of the random sentence generators that, many moons ago on this blog and before you were born, I used when replying to exasperating replies. I did in the above paragraph.

            btw Jimmy B, are you stalking me?

            10

  • #
    bemused

    And while the ‘science is settled’, there are still so many mysteries: http://scitechdaily.com/new-image-shows-the-advance-of-hubbard-glacier/.

    Since measurements began in 1895, Alaska’s Hubbard Glacier has been thickening and steadily advancing into Disenchantment Bay. The advance runs counter to so many thinning and retreating glaciers nearby in Alaska and around the world.

    211

    • #

      Please stop! JoAnn’s photograph indicates a cloud at least a 1km x 1kms by 0.1km high. If only O2 and N2 this cloud would have a mass of 10^8 kg! Instead that that cloud mass because of water condensate it has increased in mass by (408,233 kg). The mass of a 747. Why oh why is that cloud still floating rather than being compressed and on the surface? These Climate Clowns know, but will never tell the Serfs. They all prefer nonsense for profit!

      11

  • #
    aussieguy

    Left leaning media news outlets from around the world are preparing themselves for United Nations Climate Change Summit. (11th December)

    Global news organisations agree to share climate change content
    http://www.theguardian.com/media/2015/may/21/news-organisations-climate-change-content-guardian

    The Age, The Sydney Morning Herald join climate change media network
    http://www.theage.com.au/business/media-and-marketing/the-age-the-sydney-morning-herald-join-climate-change-media-network-20150521-gh6zon.html


    Which outlets are going to be part of this “Climate Publishing Network“?

    The Age, Australia
    Al Ahram, Egypt
    China Daily, China
    Clarin, Argentina
    Der Standard, Austria
    De Standaard, Belgium
    El Comercio, Peru
    El Deber, Bolivia
    El Pais, Spain
    El Watan, Algeria
    Fairfax Media, New Zealand
    Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Germany
    Gazeta Wyborcza​, Poland
    The Guardian, UK
    India Today, India
    The Irish Times, Ireland
    La Presse, Canada
    La Repubblica, Italy
    Le Monde, France
    Le Quotidien de Nouakchott, Mauritania
    Politiken, Denmark
    The Seattle Times, US
    The Straits Times, Singapore
    The Sydney Morning Herald, Australia
    To Vima​, Greece

    …Kind of ironic that they proudly publish their list of International members. They just outed themselves!

    No surprise that Fairfax is on the list!

    260

    • #
      Rereke Whakaaro

      Hmm, Representing the whole of the USA … The Seattle Times. Say, what?

      Notice there is only one news paper per country (with the exception of Australia – who is very naughty, in insisting on being skeptical).

      There is nothing spontaneous about this. Be prepared for some coordinated, and intensive, lock-step propaganda. I would bet dollars to donuts, that these newspapers will indulge in some mutual cross-quoting in order to demonstrate just how much solidarity there is, courtesy of Party Central.

      340

    • #

      I’m just waiting for The ABC to start producing a newspaper, they have their mitts in everything else and already compete head to head with the private media in every other respect. When you think about it, it kind of makes sense.

      The Age is just about on its death’s door, so a multitude of journalists (I use that term loosely) would have the perfect place to rest their enquiring minds in The ABC print media. Hell, they won’t even need to change their mindset, it’s pretty much square pegs into square holes from the outset.

      140

    • #
      tom0mason

      The Toronto Sun today has Lorrie Goldstein running the story ‘Cold worse than heat’. Basically the same as Jo’s story earlier in the week but given a Canadian spin.

      I can take it that the Toronto Sun is not part of the ‘UN Approved Ministry of Truth International Network’, er I mean “Climate Publishing Network“.

      160

    • #
      C.J.Richards

      What happened to Le Monde. It used to be a quality daily. Has the Government bought it or something ?

      00

  • #

    As a follow on from yesterday’s discussions:

    Labor vacated the arena of argument. The sceptics and deniers have turned the 70 per cent-plus belief in climate change into a minority because no one has engaged them.

    And some further thought, I wonder if Richardson meant that because the likes of politicians, universities, government funded climate scientists etc have refused to openly and publicly debate sceptics, that they have lost the high ground and the people’s faith? Maybe he’s being pragmatic (and he often is) and he’s admitting that you can’t win over people by ever increasing hysteria, personal attacks, scary bedtime stories and making a mockery of universities (UWA) etc.

    It would be interesting to know what he really meant by his statement. I would hate to fall into the same mindset that climate worriers do, where they automatically attack anyone who is not of the clan.

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    • #
      bobl

      Trust me, had they engaged the warmies support would have fallen through the floor years ago, avoiding debate was the only way forward, but even that is only temporary, the truth will out…

      The history of global warming is plain, it was an environmental whimsy, an ambit claim that somehow accidentally got public traction, since then it’s been ruthlessly ridden by the political arm of the environmental movement to seek power. Global warming is an accident of history, just like Eugenics was.

      This is a religion of the self absorbed, those so well off they can afford to think about “saving the planet” rather than protecting their own hiney.

      The problem is that the bulk of these bored people believe “it couldn’t hurt” entirely unaware that action on this non-issue does hurt, just not them, it hurts those who aren’t self absorbed in their ecological fantasy land.

      250

      • #
        bemused

        Of course their arguments would have fallen in a heap. But that’s not what I’m discussing here, I’m interested in what Richardson actually meant by what he said and how he thought that it could have changed things. Maybe he’s thinking along the same lines as Lomborg, who knows. But again, I would rather not instantly disparage him without knowing the exact meaning of his words.

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        • #

          I really don’t know what Richardson meant. Perhaps he doesn’t either?

          I phrased “engaged” both as just putting out press releases to push the message, or “engaged” meaning a real debate.

          Probably Richardson genuinely thinks if the profs debated us that they would win and produce all the answers. If that’s so, then he is doing everyone a service by asking the question.

          240

          • #

            That’s what I was getting at. Language often gets so skewed, and skewered, at times that it’s all too easy to go off on the wrong track. And who knows what happened between Richardson putting his thoughts to words and it being transcribed into a press release.

            My view is that I don’t want to sink to the same level as the warming worriers and automatically despise and attack the messenger, despite their background. All that does it place us in the gutter with the worst of them.

            I would rather give Richardson the benefit of the doubt and see if more can be fleshed out. If it turns out to be crap, then full on retaliation.

            40

            • #
              Slywolfe

              Language can be ambiguous intentionally or carelessly. I try to listen to (or read) what is not said (or written) as carefully as what is said (or written), and to evaluate the language proficiency of the source. A proficient author can be assumed to make no careless ambiguous statements, and any ambiguities are intentional and strategic.

              60

              • #

                But also, what if Richardson is having an epiphany regarding global warming, but because of his position has to be somewhat circumspect as to how he expresses himself? There are a number of ways that you could have interpreted what was written; so to immediately take the absolute negative view, because of his past affiliations, is a Leftist trait that I don’t think should be fostered or encouraged.

                20

            • #
              bobl

              That’s hardly fair, I did not instantly disparage Richo at all, I just made the point that.

              A. The warmist argument is so weak and has so many scientific and even more importantly economic holes, an ETS is the economic equivalent of the golgafrinchams declaring the leaf a currency
              /obligatory_hhgttg_reference

              B. I made the point that the bulk of this nonsense is supported by unnamed latte sipping inner city intellectuals in the west who are so well off they can afford to flush money down the toilet in order to “feel good” by telling everyone else how they should live. Frankly I dont care what they do with their money, but I do care when they start spending MY money on their addiction and try to tell ME how I should live. I don’t throw money to drug addicts to pay for their habit or for them to buy a tyre lever to break into my house with either.

              I have no opinion about Richo other than he is an idealogue, which means to say that if he thinks CAGW is horse hooey, he is not likely to say so in public. In fact Richo is a clever bloke, he undoubtably knows that CAGW is a divisive loser of a policy that has already taken down 11 governments in Australia and that Labor needs to distance themselves… must be distressing for him frankly.

              00

              • #

                See how language and context can affect understanding. I was making a point about what Richardson had said and perhaps may have been implying, and you made a general comment encompassing all warming worriers. To that end, I naturally assumed that you included Richardson in that group, as well as his views, comments etc, as you were replying to my post where I suggested that perhaps he deserved a bit of slack.

                Sometimes we sceptics can be just as passionate and ready to jump the gun as the worriers. Or appear to do so and as the old saying goes, ‘perception is often reality’.

                00

    • #
      Rereke Whakaaro

      For the record, I have never made a mockery of universities, especially UWA. They do a perfectly adequate job, on their own, without my feeble involvement.

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    • #
      ScotsmaninUtah

      bemused,
      you make an excellent point .. two points in fact !

      “….they have lost the high ground and the people’s faith?”

      “… I would hate to fall into the same mindset that climate worriers do, where they automatically attack anyone who is not of the clan.”

      It is a bad situation when the integrity of the Science community is being questioned.
      But as professor lindzen has stated “the science has become corrupted”. I think many people feel a sense of being deceived.

      Not everything that the “CO2ers” say is wrong, certainly clean energy is a noble cause.
      and we should explore ways to reduce pollutants . but the attack on humans which permeates their discourse is both disrespectful and down right ignorant. This has to be rebuked in the strongest way possible!

      and finally it takes a person of immense courage and strength of character to stand up in a group of warmists and say I disagree with ALL of you.
      The good news is that in the past there have been situations where the “whole” of the science community have been wrong. (Plate Tectonics to name one example)

      The struggle continues….

      80

      • #
        el gordo

        ‘Not everything that the “CO2ers” say is wrong, certainly clean energy is a noble cause.
        and we should explore ways to reduce pollutants…’

        The Klimatariat and their warmist running dogs are wrong on every point, CO2 is not a pollutant and the Scots are bonkers going in so deep with wind farms.

        00

      • #
        GMac

        As far as I know water would have to be the cleanest energy,the others require far too much carbon dioxide and carbon based fuels and plastics alloys to function,wind power would be clean if it was used by the old windmills(Tower Post Smock Mills).

        10

  • #
    Robert O

    I refer to an article in the Aust. on May 19, page 7. “Burning ambition rewarded with Carbon cash”. The Olkala people on Cape York have won a 7 seven contract to capture 65,000 tonnes of carbon each year by early burning and help reduce wildfires across the Cape. As well the Pompuraaw shire has a seven year 30,000 carbon contract.

    I am having a little difficulty to understand the logic of this. At the beginning of the dry season there is a lot of grass which slowly dries and tends to burn at some stage before the next “wet”. This grass was the basis of the cattle industry which is mainly defunct on the Cape. Controlled burning per se is one way of reducing fire intensity with reduced fuel loads and is practised in WA for example, but tends to be opposed by the greens in the eastern states. There have been some pretty severe fires with considerable death and destruction thinking back to the Gippsland fire.

    The chemistry of it is straight forward, if you burn dry grass you end up with some solid ash and a lot of CO2 which goes into the atmosphere; why should you get a carbon credit for what is probably inevitable?

    160

    • #
      Peter C

      I am having a little difficulty to understand the logic of this

      So am I!

      40

    • #
      Griffo

      If you light fires in savannah grasslands early in the dry season one can achieve a “cooler” burn with a mosaic effect of burnt and unburnt patches ,as opposed to letting wildfires go later on in the dry season. These late fires make a clean sweep of the tree canopy,all shrubs and grass go up, the idea of paying aborigines to light fires earlier in the fire season has some merit in my opinion. The savannah woodland does seem to do a bit better with this traditional type burn practise.

      80

      • #

        Those early grass fires encourage new green growth immediately, leaving fodder for livestock and wildlife, without the grasses sending out a mass of flowering and seeding stems. It also allows trees and larger shrubs to complete the seeding cycle in spring and summer where they can get scorched if burnt late, usually from lightning. I am actually cool burning some bush this week, but without carbon money.

        20

    • #
      James Bradley

      You Guys,

      It’s simple, see:

      If you get a grant to start a bushfire it’s carbon capture and storage.

      If you start a bushfire accidentally it’s man made carbon pollution.

      If lightning starts the bushfire it’s natural CO2.

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    • #
      el gordo

      ‘…if you burn dry grass you end up with some solid ash and a lot of CO2 which goes into the atmosphere; why should you get a carbon credit for what is probably inevitable?’

      They shouldn’t, in essence its noble cause corruption.

      Anyway, CO2 is a harmless trace gas and here is a study on the Cape York grass.

      ‘Fire both removes and releases nutrients for plant growth, with some nutrients being lost to the atmosphere and water-courses. Nutrients released from fires may be important for many tropical ecosystems. There is little evidence that present fire regimes are causing long term soil degradation, and carbon dioxide, the main atmospheric emission, is rapidly reabsorbed by regrowth after fire.’

      G M Crowley (1995) Cyplus

      10

  • #
    el gordo

    To my knowledge all previous interglacial epochs were different to the Holocene, which has the appearance of a modern day hiatus.

    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_cHhMa7ARDDg/SmDoZBIkB3I/AAAAAAAABAc/KkUzrz2abwI/s1600-h/Vostok-140Kc.jpg

    I pose the question: would we be sitting here talking if not for the Younger Dryas?

    70

    • #
      Rick Will

      The risk of the globe going cold is considerably more concerning than warming. While ever there is a water interface the global temperature is self regulating. Once the oceans freeze, which has happened at least once, the planet essentially shuts down. Oceans are covered in ice up to 1100m thick and the only heat coming into the remaining water is geothermal. It is not readily apparent how the earth recovers from the snowball condition but it has and life on Earth is fortunate it remains so.

      41

      • #
        el gordo

        ‘It is not readily apparent how the earth recovers from the snowball condition’

        Volcanic eruptions may have acted as a trigger.

        10

    • #
      GMac

      as do you want -
      1)Dryas, son of Orion, a chieftain from Tanagra. He brought 1000 archers with him to defend Thebes against the Seven.[20] Ares made use of the fact that Dryas shared his father’s hate of Artemis and her followers, and turned him against Parthenopaeus and his Arcadian contingent. Upon killing Parthenopaeus, Dryas was himself felled by an unknown hand.

      2)Dryas was the son of King Lycurgus, king of the Edoni in Thrace. He was killed when Lycurgus went insane and mistook him for a mature trunk of ivy, a plant holy to the god Dionysus, whose cult Lycurgus was attempting to extirpate.

      3)Dryas, father of the aforementioned Lycurgus, and thus grandfather of Dryas .

      Those ancient Greeks have a lot to answer for.

      20

  • #
    Rereke Whakaaro

    It is only Dryas in Australia. It has been chucking it down, here in NZ.

    150

  • #
    tom0mason

    Interesting looking clouds coming off the sea in the picture there. A few tight bundles of water vapor, and soluble gases/chemicals all packaged up, ready for nature to process.
    Those clouds have obvious edges, volume, and form, why? Apart from the initial convection that got them up there, why are those clouds so visible, showing us that the mix of gases and chemicals within is very different from without. How and why do they hold their shape, their volume and form, despite the prevailing wind blowing about? What are all the physical laws at play to make this so?

    As Joni Mitchell sang — “I really don’t know clouds at all”

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    • #
      Graeme No.3

      tom0mason:

      “have obvious edges, volume, and form, why? Apart from the initial convection that got them up there, why are those clouds so visible, showing us that the mix of gases and chemicals within is very different from without”

      The same could be said of Aussie Rules Supporters on their way to the game. Rising hope and beer intake?

      60

      • #
        tom0mason

        Graeme No.3

        “… Aussie Rules Supporters on their way to the game. Rising hope and beer intake?”

        Hopefully the supporters are like those clouds and hang around for a while, and unlike smoke clouds of similar dimensions that seems to quickly dissipate in a gust of wind.

        40

    • #
      Peter C

      A few challenges there tomOmason.

      I have been giving some thought to the vastly different radiative differences between a cloud and the adjacent air. Reflection, absorbtion and emmision.

      My assumption was that the mixture of gases within and outside the cloud were very much the same, with the exception of H2O, and even that I thought might be similar.

      Shape and form of clouds indicates motion of the air, in which the cloud forms or decays. I had not previously thought about why the edges of a cloud are so well defined.

      30

      • #
        tom0mason

        Peter C

        Yes, it is something that usually distracts me. I have over the years collected quite a few papers about clouds; I find the ones by RD Cess et al., (the decades of work that he has done) are the most interesting and informative.
        His 1999 paper of the interpretation of actual measurements made from planes reveals –

        These extended interpretations use the 500 nm (10 nm bandwidth) measurements to minimize sampling errors in the broadband measurements. It is indicated that the clouds present during this experiment absorb more shortwave radiation than predicted by clear skies and thus by theoretical models, that at least some (≤20%) of this enhanced cloud absorption occurs at wavelengths <680 nm, and that the observed cloud absorption does not appear to be an artifact of sampling errors nor of instrument calibration errors.

        I do not find much follow-up on this except theorizing.
        He (RD Cess) also tries very hard to marry measurements with theorized energy budgets and climate models but…

        The thing I find peculiar is that moist clouds (like warm air) is less dense and therefore more buoyant, and has more movement in it, than the surrounding relatively drier colder air. I would have thought that this would aid the mixing of gases around clouds but as clouds can hold their structure for quite some time this can not be the case. I’ll have to look harder into turbulent mixing.

        I thought there would be paper or text somewhere giving a thorough and solid understanding into the physics of clouds — apparently not.
        I’m left asking, “Can we properly understand weather and climate without this knowledge?”

        40

    • #
      Peter C

      I had a few more thoughts tomOmason,

      Stratus clouds are likely confined by two layers:
      1. the condensation level defines the lower boundary and an atmospheric inversion defines the upper boundary.

      2. cumulus clouds (as shown in Jo’s photograph are dynamic phenomena, which form and decay quite quickly; their continued existence depends in the inflow of moist surface air raised by convection ( a thermal). A thermal can persist for quite a while (20 minutes in some cases).

      The bottom surface of a cumulus cloud is defined by the condensation level, same as the stratus cloud. While the thermal is active the bottom is fairly flat and even.

      The top and the sides are well defined but the cloud tends to assume the shape of a cotton wool ball. I am thinking that the margins of the cloud might have something to do with the dynamics of evaporation. Once one droplet of water evaporates it cools the air locally. That might affect the neighboring droplet, which likes wise evaporates. The actual mechanism here I have not yet worked out, but when seen up close the top of the cloud is often seen to curl over and descend.

      Cirrus clouds are different again, being composed of ice crystals. Cirrus often forms long wispy trails and the margins are not well defined.

      Maybe we might have further thoughts during the week and continue next weekend.

      20

      • #
        tom0mason

        Peter C,

        I have similar thoughts but different. In particular –

        ” I am thinking that the margins of the cloud might have something to do with the dynamics of evaporation. Once one droplet of water evaporates it cools the air locally.”

        I imagined that at the cloud edge almost as a skin of condensing or near condensing water vapor (WV). The action of going from WV to micro-droplets liberates energy (latent heat) as the molecules change state. This energy radiates in all directions.
        Within the cloud this influx of energy into its bulk stimulate further air movement, sort of mini-convections that pull in some dryer colder air near the margins but mostly also assists with warming the interior bulk, helping to retain the cloud shape.
        Energy that radiates out of the cloud surface is lost (from the cloud) to the denser clear air.
        The micro-droplets may get re-vaporized if struck with enough IR energy, or just move within the flow of the cloud.
        Over time the losses outweigh the retention and the cloud dissipates as it assumes the same temperature as the surrounding air and the water vapor either precipitates out or is vaporized into the mass of surrounding air.

        Note I’m not saying that clouds generate energy I’m saying that clouds lose energy very dynamically but only from their surface margins. Also IMO this is only true (as in the picture above) during relatively calm conditions. Note also it is well known that clouds will contain (retain?) soluble chemicals within their bulk altering the energy/kenetic dynamics.

        20

  • #

    It’s amazing how (some) things you learn in Primary School seem to stick with you over the years, and this refers to Joanne’s image above.

    Remember in Primary School, you had to (virtually rote) learn all the early navigators and explorers and the dates that they achieved these early feats.

    During discussions centred especially around James Cook in 1770, and I suppose it might even have been part of the curriculum in those days back in the early 60′s, some other early navigators were also discussed, and even some of the non English mariners, like Dirk Hartog, Abel Tasman et all, and all of those previous to James Cook.

    One of the ‘stories’ that stayed with me across the years was the wreck of the Batavia in 1629.

    That was at a group of Islands, coral reefs, and rocks not far from where Joanne’s image was taken, about 50 or so miles away.

    That group of Islands were (and the evocative name stayed with me across all the years) the Houtman Abrolhos, just that, as there was no need to add the word ‘Islands’ after it. (Side note. It’s always the odd sounding names which stay with you)

    Many years later in life, (and each time I hear of the Batavia, I automatically think of the Houtman Abrolhos) I went and looked for some information.

    Although somewhat known from early navigators, they were not officially named as the Abrolhos until the Dutch navigator Houtman named them in the early 1600′s.

    It seems a little odd that a Dutch navigator would name something with a Portuguese name, one of very few Portuguese named places in Australia.

    The word ….. Abrolhos was the single word shortening of three words (abre os olhos) used by lookouts atop the mast to warn of impending danger ahead. Roughly translated it means keep you eyes open, in other words, rocks or shoals ahead.

    The saying was a Portuguese one and had been adopted and used for many years by the many Countries which were navigating the World’s oceans at the time.

    Tony.

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    • #
      Richard111

      Gosh. Are they still teaching history Oz? Seems to be off the radar here in the UK.

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    • #
      Victor Ranirez

      Whilst I don’t agree with his political opinions, I really enjoyed Peter Fitzsimons’ book ‘Batavia’. If anyone likes historical adventure stories, it is well worth a read.

      30

      • #
        John of Cloverdale, WA, Australia.

        Read “Islands of Angry Ghosts” by West Australian Hugh Edwards, the discoverer of the wreck of the Batavia rather than unoriginal Christmas works by Red Bandana-head. Edwards won Thomas White Memorial Prize for the best book written by an Australian in 1966. Edwards is often on Perth radio discussing marine life particularly the “shark problem” along WA coastlines.

        10

    • #
      toorightmate

      The Kalbarri pub would have provided a drink and a meal for those who were shipwrecked. Maybe they couldn’t find the pub. Kalbarri area (Murchison) hosts one of the best wildflower displays you could ever wish to see – about September, each year – man made global warming permitting, of course.

      By the way,”kendewe” is one way of unthreading weekend. “kneewed” is another.

      50

    • #
      ScotsmaninUtah

      TonyfromOz,
      A very nice recollection indeed.
      “Batavia” sounds like a word one would find in a DC comic :o

      10

      • #
        Peter C

        Possibly!

        Batavia was the name of the Dutch settlelement on the island of Java, now known as Jakata.
        It was also the name of a ship from the Dutch East India Compnany, which was wrecked on the Houtman Albrolos.

        A terrible mutiny and massacre occurred amongst the survivors of the shipwreck.
        http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Batavia_(ship)

        There is a lot of interesting material in a museum at Fremantle, WA.

        30

  • #
    Dennis

    Environmentalism as viewed through the eyes of a Japanese child tourist at Daintree, Far North Queensland. As his small tour group of family and other Japanese people gathered alongside their tour bus the excited child ran waving his phone-camera and shouted something in Japanese followed by “there is a bloody green Frog in the toilet”.

    100

    • #
      bobl

      I can tell you with some certainty that green frogs just Looooove toilets. Took me a year and a half to evict one I had.

      10

  • #
    handjive

    21 May 2015, the telegraph:
    Dogs have been man’s best friend ‘for 40,000 years’

    “The findings, published in the journal Current Biology, come from genomic analysis of an ancient Taimyr wolf bone.

    Earlier genome-based estimates have suggested that the ancestors of modern-day dogs diverged from wolves no more than 16,000 years ago, after the last Ice Age.

    The genome from this ancient specimen, which has been radiocarbon dated to 35,000 years ago, reveals that the Taimyr wolf represents the most recent common ancestor of modern wolves and dogs.”
    ~ ~ ~
    23 December, 2009, abcnews:
    Taking the dog for a walk to the store would seem like a more environmentally-friendly option than piling into the SUV.

    Not so, say two New Zealand scientists whose new book claims pets have a carbon footprint that is about twice the size of the gas guzzling vehicles that have long been a bane of environmentalism.

    In “Time to Eat the Dog, the Real Guide to Sustainable Living,” Robert and Brenda Vale charge that a medium-size dog has a footprint of 2.1 acres compared with slightly more than one acre for a standard sport utility vehicle.
    . . .
    The green madness continues …

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    • #

      Since I own both a 4WD and two large hounds, my carbon footprint must encapsulate a significant portion of the town where I live. Add to that our wood fire and my love of cooking, I dread to think where I stand in the green scale of acceptable humanity.

      60

      • #
        Dave

        You’re OK

        Compared to CLIVE PALMER yours is ZIP
        Here today

        * Gold Coast
        * Brisbane
        * Karratha
        * Sydney
        * Brisbane
        * Gold Coast

        Just quick jaunt in the jet
        Sign a few Chinese Cheques
        Back home and phone Al Gore

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    • #
      Yonniestone

      A bigger “carbon footprint” than an SUV eh?, unless the dog was built in a fossil fuel powered factory using mined iron ore and oil products then I’d have to disagree, unless the dog is mistaken slang for a Mack Truck, well with all that life giving CO2 it proves the dog is still our best friend. ;)

      70

    • #
      James Bradley

      Never mind the dog, the SUV or the burning off

      Those lefty /green acolytes of global warming are making their own contributions to man made CO2:

      200 million people world wide smoke marijuana at an average of about 5 joints daily.

      1.75 million joints per tonne of marijuana = 208,571.4 tonnes of cannabis smoked per year.

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    King Geo

    Nice photo of the Palaeozoic Tumblagooda Sandstone. If you ever get the chance walk further inland [Murchison House Station - with permission of the owners] and you will find rolling hills of chalk (Late Cretaceous Toolonga calcilutite).

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  • #
    Ursus Augustus

    Memories of Kalbarri. I could survive there for a long time. Fresh water in the Murchison, I can swim and the cray’s are always hiding under the ledges in shallow water.

    Can someone kindly shipwreck me there!

    Please!

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  • #
    tom0mason

    Jo, David Evans may be interested to see this paper on solar lagging affecting the NAO. Called “A simulated lagged response of the North Atlantic Oscillation to the solar cycle over the period 1960–2009″. It postulates an intriguing method of solar amplification. Hopefully they’ll find away to show the validity of this theory.

    We diagnose the source of the NAO lag in the model by examining its surface and sub-surface solar responses in the North Atlantic Ocean. We find evidence for amplification of ‘top-down’ solar-related NAO changes via an ocean feedback over a period of several years, as suggested by Scaife et al (2013). This feedback is analysed by examining solar cycle responses in the different nodes of the North Atlantic tripole SST pattern, as this pattern reflects NAO–ocean coupling. The Northern and Middle nodes of the tripole show temperature responses in the surface and sub-subsurface ocean with a similar lag to the NAO. The Southern node, however, does not show any lag …

    Available at http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-9326/10/5/054022/article
    with a link to the (free) PDF file.

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      el gordo

      Good catch Tommo, ‘the North Atlantic Ocean provides the memory of the solar forcing required to produce the lagged NAO response.’

      We have known for years that there is a connection, but seeing the lag is wondrous.

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  • #
    Dariusz

    Jo
    The photo is of the Ordovician (450Ma) fluvio-deltaic Toomblagooda Sandstone. This section was deposited during the time when the trees have not evolved yet and huge tracks of sand were deposited in vast quantities just like we are discovering on Mars now. Similarity between these two planets would have been quite eerie back then, although by 450Ma Mars was already dead. What saved us is the size of our planet that allowed plate tectonics to exist. This mechanism caused continuous volcanism that replenished our athmosphere with huge amounts of CO2 that was at least 10 times more than today. The co2 allowed the trees to finally develop in the Carboniferous when the first deposits of coal were formed.
    In fact through a natural movement of our planet and the continuous solar bombardment we continuously loose our athmosphare into space. Thank nature that earth,s plate tectonics will continue with thousands of volcanoes active every day, otherwise we would never exist.

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      Farmer Gez

      “And you try and tell the young people of today that….they won’t believe you”.

      Should be said in a Yorkshire accent.

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      • #
        Dariusz

        Sorry to disappoint, the polish accent on offer only.

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      • #
        King Geo

        The photo is of the Ordovician (450Ma) fluvio-deltaic Toomblagooda Sandstone.

        Dariusz a “Freudian Slip” – it is the “Tumblagooda Sandstone”.

        However we will save your name in memory of the “Warmists” – their theories to be buried in “Sandstone Toombs” with inscriptions like “the names of those listed herein promoted the Theory of AGW & cost planet Earth US$trillions for zero benefit to Mankind”.

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    • #

      Mars vs Earth also has something to do with Earth having a continuous and strong magnetic field that prevented e.g. solar winds from rapidly (in geological terms) stripping the lighter molecules such as water from our atmosphere.

      As you note; and I hadn’t thought about it this way before; plate tectonics were (probably) made possible by Earth’s larger dimension; and by the same factor let our “little” magnetic field generator to run freely. For comparison, Mars’ magnetic fields are small and many-poled.

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      • #
        Dariusz

        Bernd
        Venus has no magnetosphere and yet the thickest atmosphere except the giant planets. Closer to the sun than the earth. Volcanoes galore that appear dormant. Why atmosphere at all if bombarded by the solar wind?
        I think magnetosphere is overrated. It holds only charged particles anyway with most of the earthly gases being neutral. Gravity is not strong enough to keep it in balance (you have to also account for angular momentum of the planet) hence our active volcanoes have to top it up. In fact the new planet hunter generation wants to see methane trails on distant planets to look for signs of life.
        If my reasoning is correct then the earth is not a closed system and laboratory greenhouse experiments cannot be applied. This is why there is no hot spot as most of the heat gets out through the simplest possible process, convention.
        What works with the house heat escape works exactly the same at the earth scale. The heat dissipates from 273 kelvin to 3 in outer space over distance some 50kms, my daily work travel distance to and fro.
        This also explains why periodically we have more co2 which gets reworked into biomass that cleans the atmosphere. If we did not have the biomass to clean and continuous loss of the air into space life would not be possible in the ever dense and co2 (like Venus) dominated atmosphere.

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        • #

          It’s the solar winds, etc that are the charged particles. Their impact with the molecules of the atmosphere can impart the extra kinetic energy to those molecules allowing them to escape more rapidly than by diffusion. I haven’t done the maths, lacking basic information on solar wind intensity, etc, but that’s the theory behind it.

          Any Mechanical Engineer worth their salt, having studied the fundamental thermodynamics and fluid mechanics, understands that heat transfer in a fluid is predominately by convection. For the most part, especially for Engineering purposes; where close enough is good enough and no better in practice than the detailed analysis; one can ignore radiative and conductive heat transfer within fluids. It’s only at the solid surface where conduction becomes significant.

          That harks back to principles of least action represented in various forms: It is the nature of the universe to find the easiest way. The steepest gradient to entropy. The path with least constraint.

          Roy Spencer shared a photo on Facebook that illustrated least action in the way that clouds (and air) moved around an island.

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          • #
            Dariusz

            The path of least astonishment, the occam,s razor . This is what I get paid for in the petroleum industry. I am the destroyer of special cases which leads to simpler interpretation.
            This little theory of mine needs some basic calculations, like you suggest, to see if this is even possible. One other thing I would like to have is a satellite behind earth measuring loss of the atmosphere.
            Since I am a sequence stratigrapher (a branch in geology) that reconstructs relative sea curves, over the years I started suspecting that a balance between the rate of oceanic crust formation and it’s destruction at the subduction zones is possibly one of the major reasons for rapid sea level variations. Geologists constructed global sea level curve that goes back 650mln years with the last 5mln years well studied showing huge variations in the order of 150m or even more. This appears to correspond to the oceanic crust formation rate changes, new spreading ridges and direction change causing the sea bed to buckle. Now that we have detailed maps of the oceanic crust age of we can reconstruct the shape and location of the continents and oceans with great accuracy particularly in the last 5 mln years. This work I will eventually do when I retire or when they kick me out (price of oil not too flash at the moment and lots of my mates are loosing jobs now) but at the same time I need a smart engineer to help me to calculate water volume displacement and convert this to a seal level change.
            Having said that I do recognise that the sea level is dependent on (geology 101 now):
            1. Subsidence (tectonics)
            2. Sediment input
            3. Climate (replacing eustacy in my book)
            In geology eustacy or absolute sea level variations was always thrown in for a good measure but no one really knows how to measure it.

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            • #
              ianl8888


              This appears to correspond to the oceanic crust formation rate changes, new spreading ridges and direction change causing the sea bed to buckle

              Not an unreasonable hypothesis

              Recognising where one is within the tectonic cycles is at least half the battle

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            • #
              Andrew McRae

              Another (stellar) hypothesis:

              Exceptionally close supernovae account for short-lived falls in sea-level during the past 500 million years, long-known to geophysicists but never convincingly explained.

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          • #
            tom0mason

            The other important confounding factor for our planet is the matter of that over large moon.
            Unlike Venus or Mars, our moon giving us tides, by its regular periodic stirring-up the liquid water and the gaseous atmosphere, these movements assist in spreading the charged particles about, and it also helped early life to get a toe-hold on this very wet rock.

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      Roy Hogue

      I note the rather obvious terracing along the water line. It’s evidence that sea level has changed by leaps and bounds at that particular location. If you were measuring sea level 50 years ago and found it was changing, whether in great or small increments, what would you think about the cause?

      I’d bet that whatever else you thought about it, you would think it was natural. You wouldn’t look for a bogyman named homosapien to blame for it.

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    Andrew McRae

    School curriculum may be updated to include lessons on how to identify possible jihadis:
    http://www.9news.com.au/National/2015/05/24/10/08/School-curriculum-may-be-updated-to-include-lessons-on-how-to-identify-possible-Jihadis
    Australian Multicultural Foundation director Hass Dellal said the scheme would address all kinds of anti-social behaviour.

    Whether climate skeptics end up on the watch list too is anyone’s guess. Probably not any time soon as the PM’s view on gay marriage would earn him a place on such an “anti-social” watch list. Oddly, nobody has any trouble seeing the sinister implications of such lists when Putin takes the same idea to its logical conclusion.

    On more positive news, irate nutcases with ideological motives using guns to end lives on a massive scale for no reason do get prosecuted and found guilty, though only a fine for their state-sponsored organisation in this case…

    RSPCA forced to cough up $1.4m after farmers’ prize herd wrongfully culled:
    http://www.9news.com.au/national/2015/05/24/11/44/farmers-sue-after-rspca-cull-herd
    County Court Judge John Bowman found that while the cattle were lean to very lean, they would have recovered.

    How unlucky to be given the royal order the day the Chickens in Choppers were on vacation.

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    pat

    24 May: AFP: Cannes closer is call to arms on climate change
    The Cannes Film Festival’s closing film on Saturday was a call to arms to tackle climate change featuring the scientific pioneer who spent decades in Antarctica proving the existence of global warming.
    “I used to be pessimistic, but I think people are changing,” said Claude Lorius, the 91-year-old French scientist whose groundbreaking research on ice cores proved the link between greenhouse gases and global temperatures.
    His story is told in the documentary “Ice and the Sky”, featuring footage from his earliest missions in the 1950s through to the present day…
    One of his key insights, described in the film, came from drinking whisky one day with colleagues. Watching ice crack in the glass made him realise he could extract ancient air bubbles from the ice samples they were collecting.
    “I’d already had a bit to drink, otherwise I wouldn’t have had this brilliant idea, this brainstorm,” Lorius told reporters after the screening. “It took many years to put the ideas into practice.”…
    Director Luc Jacquet (writer/director March of the Penguins) said the world had made “fundamental progress” in understanding the problem of climate change.
    “When Claude published his paper 30 years ago, the concept didn’t even exist, it was hard to drum this idea into people’s minds,” said Jacquet.
    “But people are now aware of the problem and impatient to see results.”
    Lorius said he was looking forward to progress at the next global climate conference being held in Paris in December…
    https://au.news.yahoo.com/entertainment/a/28208448/cannes-closer-is-call-to-arms-on-climate-change/

    on jo’s Graham Richardson thread, comments #44, #49 & #50 look at another CAGW documentary/propaganda piece(?), “Thin Ice”, a NZ/British collaboration that will be shown on US TV in July & some of the people connected to it. (i posted the later comments on the thread because #44 had been in moderation & i wanted all the links on the same thread.)

    not exactly a booming market!

    24 May: WaPo: Jack Chang/AP: China readies national carbon market to fight climate change
    At first, the numbers and company names flashing on a big board in Beijing’s financial district suggest a booming market.
    A closer look indicates otherwise: The scrolling list rotates the same dozen or so trades, all from last year…
    A successful carbon offset, or “cap-and-trade,” market could play a big part in cutting China’s emissions — and help the world tackle global warming…
    So far, the pilots have failed to make a noticeable dent in carbon emissions, with about 978 million yuan, or $158 million, traded since their launch in 2013, compared to the 7.2 billion euros, or about $8 billion, of carbon offsets that were traded in the European market in its first year of operation, 2006. Many companies required to buy carbon credits have waited until the last minute of compliance periods to make their trades, which has raised concerns about low liquidity in the market. Some observers question the reliability of data recording how much companies are emitting.
    Chinese officials, however, say the pilot markets aren’t meant to significantly cut the country’s carbon profile yet. Instead, they say they are learning important lessons from their experiments and will use them in what will soon become the world’s biggest carbon offset market.
    “China is taking this step to accept its responsibility in stopping climate change,” said Zhou Cheng, the Beijing exchange’s vice president. “This affects industry in a legal, ***scientific way, and it lets them form their business plans while looking at carbon emissions too.”…
    For some Chinese companies, selling excess carbon offset credits could bring in millions of dollars a year…
    The past decade, however, has been a spotty one for carbon credit experiments in China.
    Five years ago, European Union officials ended a carbon offset plan that paid Chinese companies to destroy the greenhouse gas HFC-23 after learning that the companies were producing the gas only to be paid to destroy it.
    Kathy Kong, CEO of Beijing-based trading firm Timing Carbon, said the pilot markets still have a lot of room to grow. For example, the markets still offer only spot trading with no futures markets, which greatly limits the potential market size. Regulators must also step in to prop up falling carbon offset prices and keep prices at other times from reaching unsustainable highs.
    “This is still a market created by policy,” Kong said. “The policy needs to follow the market at some time.”…
    By design, each market has set up its own rules, with an eye for testing approaches for a national market…
    Antung Anthony Liu, an economics professor at the Cheung Kong Graduate School of Business in Beijing, said that if done right, the markets could turn China’s epic climate change fight into an international ***investment opportunity.
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/europe/china-readies-national-carbon-market-to-fight-climate-change/2015/05/24/85a33a32-01d7-11e5-8c77-bf274685e1df_story.html

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    Carbon500

    For once, I’d like to post on something other than the climate.
    It concerns small businesses.
    From what I’ve seen, a young person with some ‘get up and go’ couldn’t fail, because so many haven’t a clue on how to interact with people. The words ‘leave it with me’ usually mean a tradesman won’t be contacting you again, for example.
    I’m baffled as to why someone should spend two years or more training to be, say, an electrician and then effectively throw away all these skills because they’re clueless when it it comes to organising themselves, and developing a professional attitude. A friend once telephoned his electrician to ask why said electrician was an hour late. The reason? He was still in bed!
    Then there’s the failure to communicate. An unexpected problem might be found when doing a car body repair. Telephone the customer to discuss it? No, just bodge it instead of doing a bit more work to do a good job.
    Do a good job and people tell each other. Ditto a bad job – except there won’t be new customers.
    So many don’t appreciate that it’s the people who are important, yet some business types seem to see it as a point of macho pride if they can (to put it crudely) screw a customer for as much money as possible for a second rate service or job.
    Do any college or university courses teach how important the customer is and how to run a business properly I wonder?

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    • #
      Yonniestone

      Being a tradesman myself I’ve seen this unprofessionalism from the inside also, while I take personal pride in doing the best (above standard) job I can for the customer 3 other tradesmen in the same workshop simply couldn’t care less as long as the customer doesn’t know any better, I find this quite infuriating for many reasons.

      - The best service will get you repeat or new customers thus keeping you in work.
      - An above standard job will cover you against any failures that could lead to litigation or worse.
      - Life’s hard enough without becoming another hurdle for someone who approached you in good faith to provide a service they simply couldn’t do.
      - Show some empathy as guaranteed those same bad tradesmen will bitch and moan the loudest if they were on the receiving end of a crap job.
      - Mostly have some self respect, many go through years of training and learning often becoming quite good at their profession only to become lazy cutting corners when the easy money comes or life alters their perspectives, if you get tired of the job try another as losing self worth isn’t healthy in the long run, and pedants like me have to keep fixing up their stuff up’s!

      It all really comes down to different strokes for different folks, a tip for finding the best tradesman is often word of mouth, ask people of like minds their experiences and you’ll soon filter out the worst ones, this is the original form of Google without the annoying ads.

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    • #

      The old trade culture is, for the most part, dead and buried.

      Bureaucracy, if it didn’t directly kill it, has certainly anaesthetised any remnant instinct to strive for excellence. The scramble is towards mediocrity in this regulation-stifled business environment.

      Excellence only gets you into trouble if things go wrong. If you’re mediocre and things don’t go well, you’re legally covered as long as you’ve acted according to regulations. (Exception is deliberate action/inaction) Regulations are used to specify the level of work to be done; not the minimum standards of work.

      So why bother to be more than mediocre? Activity and turnover are more important than productivity and profitability.

      After all; socialists hate people who have an advantage through offering a better product/service. It could lead to some being profitable and prosperous; not dependent on government for handouts and “commercial” favours. And not being dependent on government also riles the totalitarian soul.

      Only the regulatory, leaning-to-totalitarian government contracts a quasi-autonomous, sheltered workshop that can’t be trusted to build a canoe; to build ships and submarines for the defence of the nation.

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      • #
        Carbon500

        Bernd Felsche: Talking of bureaucracy – much of my working life was spent in medical science and technology. At one stage, the great and the good decreed that ‘safety data sheets’ should accompany all chemicals, and that these should be provided by the manufacturers. The result was that even simple innocuous substances such as sodium chloride had to have a hazard data sheet. The result was much time, effort and expense down the supply chain producing and filing this data.
        However, at least one company protested in a very entertaining way by producing the data sheet which follows. I won’t name them – suffice it to say that this is an internationally known company. I’ve reproduced the sheet we received in our laboratory verbatim.
        Now retired, I still occasionally show this to friends if over dinner or at a party the subject under discussion comes round to idiotic bureaucracy.
        Perhaps the USA’s Environmental Protection Agency be aware of the dangers of this material, and regulate to save the planet as required?

        Here we go:

        Material safety data sheet for distilled water – synonym: dihydrogen oxide.
        First aid measures:
        If swallowed, wash out mouth with water provided person is conscious. Call a physician.
        If inhaled, remove to fresh air. If breathing becomes difficult, call a physician.
        In case of contact, immediately wash skin with soap and copious amounts of water.
        In case of contact with eyes, flush with copious amounts of water for at least 15 minutes. Assure adequate flushing by separating the eyelids with fingers. Call a physician
        Extinguishing media:
        Water spray, carbon dioxide, dry chemical powder or appropriate foam. Special firefighting procedures: wear self-contained breathing apparatus and protective clothing to prevent contact with skin and eyes. Emits toxic fumes under fire conditions.
        Accidental release measures:
        Wear respirator, chemical safety goggles, rubber boots and heavy rubber gloves. Absorb on sand or vermiculite and place in closed containers for disposal. Ventilate area and wash spill site after material pickup is complete.
        Exposure controls/personal protection:
        Safety shower and eye bath. Mechanical exhaust required. Wash thoroughly after handling. Avoid inhalation. Avoid contact with eyes, skin, and clothing.

        All this brings a new meaning to the phrase ‘the dangers of drink’ doesn’t it?

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          Graeme No.3

          As one who has issued hundreds of MSDS’s, might I say I am envious of how simple yours is. Most are so complex and lengthy that they never get read by those who need to. (The record length of those supplied for incoming raw materials was 17 pages).

          It reminds me of the one issued in the seventies when this started. It listed 17 different warnings – Hazardous, irritating to skin, eyes, respiratory tract, abrasive to skin, avoid contact with skin, eyes, lungs etc. do not swallow etc. on and on. The chemical? Beach sand, used to mop up spills in laboratories.
          I would hate to see what it would need these days.

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            Carbon500

            I think that here in a nutshell is a widespread problem.
            The bureaucrats go home thinking that by implementing ever more layers of regulations they’ve performed a service – even perhaps saved a life. What they’ve really done is inconvenienced people, often hugely, and introduced unnecessary costs. However, they’ve created more work for themselves. Here in Nottingham in the English Midlands, our city council has for example seen fit to introduce 20mph speed limits in several neighbourhoods where 30mph was the previous norm. This isn’t going to stop the idiots roaring down the road, and has just wasted money.
            How much did all the new signs cost, I wonder?
            Then of course there’s the whole carbon obsession, where the possibilities for regulation are limitless!

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        • #

          Remember the guy who listed the chemicals in all-natural bananas?
          There’s no stopping him.

          I started building a compendium of MSDS for the listed chemical components of bananas. I stopped at about 100 pages. None of them mentioned the radiation exposure from ⁴⁰K.

          Imagine all of that just to supply a banana?

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        Another Ian

        Bernd

        As in the transition of meaning of “Good enough for government work”

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        tom0mason

        Bernd Felsche
        “After all; socialists hate people who have an advantage through offering a better product/service. It could lead to some being profitable and prosperous; not dependent on government for handouts and “commercial” favours. And not being dependent on government also riles the totalitarian soul.”

        Part of the problem is the foolish premise that the socialist left live under — that if someone gets richer (by either luck or labor) then others must get poorer, and so government action is required to restore some form of artificial balance. This is at the root of all illogical Marxist thinking.

        The idea that the action of the free market can assert corrections to allow efficient and useful quasi-stability to human endeavors, is an anathema to the left. Markets in all things, including services, are volatile places and that volatility is what the socialist left hate.

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    el gordo

    When Australia’s FTA with China goes ahead in a few months I can see a transcontinental railway coming our way.

    http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/world/2015livistsa/2015-05/23/content_20799387.htm

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      Roy Hogue

      It was good for the U.S. in the 19th century. It could be very good for South America in the 21st. It’s the Chinese involvement that bothers me.

      It looks like one gigantic nightmare of an engineering problem though. Perhaps the august head of the IPCC should be called in to consult. They’d solve two problems with one solution — get the best possible route and the smallest possible carbon footprint all at the same time. Win win all around! :-)

      20

      • #
        el gordo

        ‘It’s the Chinese involvement that bothers me.’

        The yanks are worried, its the end of empire, but Australia has decided to embrace the new world order. We joined the China infrastructure bank, brushing off the concerns of the Obama Administration.

        The Chinese are settling here in large numbers, so in a couple of generations they will be legitimately running the place.

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  • #
    Ursus Augustus

    The Age!! May 24, 2015 – 7:38PM

    “Cost of household solar has outweighed benefits: Grattan Institute report”

    Deniers!! People get run out of UWA for less than that!

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    • #

      Ursus Augustus, thanks for this, and here’s the link:

      Cost of household solar has outweighed benefits: Grattan Institute report (only 90 minutes ago now) It’s posted at 7 media sites so far, and, none of them are ABC.

      Oh dear!

      Makes Pink Batts look like a raging success!

      Tony.

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        Eighteen billion dollars spent.

        No additional generating capacity to show for it.

        You could easily get 3 GW of “carbon-free” nuclear power for that sort of money. Or about 9 GW in modern, USC steam coal burning power plants, halving emissions of CO2 for the same power generated.

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      • #
        Ursus Augustus

        Tony,

        doesn’t it make the Lomborg progrom look utterly [snip]? This is precisely the sort of exercise he is on about.

        UWA, you are looking like complete and utter [snip] and have two choices. One is to apologise to Lomborg and reverse your decision, the other is to BAN Grattan Institute people from your campus on the same ‘logic’ you used for Lomborg.

        40

        • #
          Ursus Augustus

          Gee whiz mod man/woman. You’ve given me two snips – that’s a full vasectomy and no anaesthetic!

          90

          • #
            Roy Hogue

            You’ve given me two snips – that’s a full vasectomy and no anaesthetic!

            Forgive me but I broke up laughing over this. My first thought was, hey, rejoice, at least it was free. ;-)

            60

            • #
              Yonniestone

              A two for one deal there Roy, you’d be nuts to pass it up…..

              60

            • #
              Ursus Augustus

              I was happy to pay for the drugs when I had it done for real. Would have been happy to have one done at a time the drugs were so good. :)

              What are the grrrls thinking about this conversation, I wonder?

              10

              • #
                Another Ian

                Ursus Augustus

                There is that description of how Shakespeare might have described a bow legged man walking down a road, which goes

                “Forsooth what manner of man is this
                That walks with his balls in parenthesis”

                Which (in my experience) is a pretty good description of the first day or so after the drugs wear off.

                (Mods – snip if beyond the pale)

                10

              • #
                Roy Hogue

                What are the grrrls thinking about this conversation, I wonder?

                I don’t know but I’ll bet they talk about similar subjects a whole lot. :-)

                10

      • #
        Roy Hogue

        And by the time generous federal and state government subsidies run out, households without solar will have subsidised those that have made the switch to the tune of $14 billion.

        Anyone ticked off beside me?

        The zealots forge ahead full steam, “Damn the torpedos…” as Admiral Farragut once said. But he had a pressing need. Who needs solar?

        More solutions without a problem have used up our money than you could count with an army of CPAs. :-(

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        • #
          ianl8888

          Note that the Grattan Institute (a leftoid “think-tank”) recommends higher power pricing during peak demand

          Freezing to death in the dark is their solution for controlling demand

          10

        • #

          Absolutely. But note that no one complains about this or the other costs associated with wind power etc. Yet as soon as the government does something to change say welfare rules, ACOSS and all sundry of rents seekers come out of the woodwork to decry this heartless action. Green initiatives have hit low income families far more and worse than anything else this last decade, yet no one wishes to point out this elephant in the room.

          10

      • #

        thoroughly covered by ABC but later than fairfax. About the same as News.

        00

        • #

          Gee Aye.

          What, no link to verify what you say here.

          The ABC News site is pretty careful about the way they time stamp all their articles.

          It’s mow 1.45PM Monday, and the ABC News site still has no article about this whatsoever at their site.

          Perhaps you might direct us poor clueless cretins to this, umm, thoroughly covered article at the ABC News site.

          There is one article at the RN breakfast radio show, and while most other media outlets have it at their home page, nothing at the ABC. (and how thoroughly broadcast is this with just RN Breakfast from 6AM – a monumentally huge listener base there)

          Tony.

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          • #
            Peter C

            Did Gee Aye just make that up about the ABC featuring the Grattan Institute story.

            How Shocking!

            01

          • #

            RN Breakfast broadcast it at 8.14AM to virtually every listener across ALL of Australia, (/sarc) and besides someone from Grattan, Fran got in one of the usual suspects (the Chief Executive of the Australian Solar Council) who push back against the (insert stocking thread count term here) who waffled on about how rooftop solar is what will kill off the huge money grubbing, power hungry, gouging, thieving bathplugs power generating corporations when batteries are used for rooftop solar.

            What they didn’t mention is how when matched up with the batteries, so people can go off grid, of course, further subsidised by the taxpayer, then this wonderfully exciting new off grid residential plan will cover 0.03% of power generation, thereby making it uneconomical for those plants supplying the remaining 99.97% of power to remain in operation, thus forcing them all out of business.

            Of course.

            I wonder why I didn’t see that.

            Tony.

            Link to interview

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            • #

              correct. Was also on newsradio earlier. No link.

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            • #
              Peter C

              ALCOA at Geelong had a whole brown coal fired power station (Anglesea )just to themselves. That seemed quite viable at the time until it got killed off. I am not sure why. Did government taxes and carbon taxes play a significant part.

              Now Geelong has lost another industry and a large employer.

              No one even wants the power station, which is connected to the grid, so Anglesea looses an employer as well.

              Kenneth Davidson, writing in the Age today, wants the Andrews government to shut down Hazlewood power station. How crazy is that?

              Davidson cannot distinguish between CO2 and pollution, hence he conflates the two and invents apparently huge environmental and health costs which he estimates at 30 billion dollars per year.

              Heaven help us if the government listens to him!

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        tom0mason

        TonyFromOz,

        I presume you mean this Pink Batts

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    ScotsmaninUtah

    Kalbarri, Western Australia – looks very bleak and forbidding.

    No trees … aaggh :(

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      Ursus Augustus

      There are some trees up the river (creek).

      What more do you want? Trees everywhere? You just bump into the bloody things.

      Besides there are crayfish (lobster). You only need one tree to sit under to eat your crayfish.

      :)

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      Roy Hogue

      Surely you’re familiar with some of the most bleak and forbidding landscape in the country, since it’s right there in Utah.

      Or you could go west a bit and take in Death Valley. But go in the winter. ;-)

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    Len

    I noticed that the Griss has commented on the Andrew Bolt blog today. He was followed by Winston. So the Griss is still around.

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    • #
      Tanner

      Good news Len, I have always enjoyed his comments and banter with Silly Filly. They have not commented much lately so I thought that after all their “flirting” they may have eloped together ;)

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      Peter C

      From comments to The Bolt Report 24 May 2015

      the Griss replied to For Refugees
      Sun 24 May 15 (01:21pm)

      See also #26.1

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    Richard

    Hi guys, I’m wondering if anyone here has any good information on the Bern model and what physcial mechanisms underpin it? Apart from its equation it’s hard to find much information about it.

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      • #
        Richard

        Thanks. I did read those articles. They seem to be just as confused as me and I didn’t see anyone give an actual reason for the atmospheric CO2 lifetime given by the Bern model. I think I know the main reason though, at least according to the IPCC the “main” reason for the long lifetime is the limited removal rate for CO2 from the surface-ocean to the deep-ocean combined with the Revelle Factor. It is difficult making sense of this stuff – I’m sure it’s kept deliberately vague and ambiguous to avoid people trying to fact-check it. At least, that’s the impression I get.

        Thanks again anyhow.

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          Peter C

          I could not understand the Bern model either

          The estimated half life of CO2 in the atmosphere seems to range from 2 years, out to several hundred years.

          The Nuclear bomb test curve derived from atmospheric C14 levels after the cessation of Nuclear tests seem to me to give a half life of about 10 years for atmospheric CO2, which I consider to be the most reliable evidence available.

          The WUWT article also says

          the fourth IPCC assessment report argues that the removal of carbon dioxide emissions is adequately described by the ‘Bern model‘, a carbon cycle model designed by prominent climatologists at the Bern University. The Bern model is based on the presumption that the increasing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide derive exclusively from anthropogenic emissions. Tuned to fit the Keeling curve, the model prescribes that the relaxation of an emission pulse of carbon dioxide is multiphasic with slow components reflecting slow transfer of carbon dioxide from the oceanic surface to the deep-sea regions. The problem is that empirical observations tell us an entirely different story.

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    The European Song Contest; symbolic of the proletarian struggle for mediocrity; is done and dusted.

    Luboš Motl reports:

    But in 2015, they brought another fad popular among the stupidest consumers of the EU mass culture: the anti-CO2-flavored environmentalism.

    The organizers decided to minimize the carbon footprint of the event. So the electricity was supplied by a special “green grid”, whatever it exactly meant. The tickets to the concert could also be used as tickets for the Viennese public transportation. Special guards were hired to protect bicycles of those visitors who chose this kind of transportation. All food that was sold (plus included in catering) was organic food from nearby farms in Austria. All beverages were served in cups that are returned and reused. Only classical, non-trash knives and forks were allowed. And trash cans were separated for recycling, too.

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    TdeF

    It would be interesting to plot the frequency in the press of the silly marketing phrases “the science is in” and “the precautionary principle”. The political left think tanks keep churning these phrases out but I have not read these gems for six months. The big change in language is the attempt to reclaim the word skeptic, originally seen as insulting and now seen as complimentary and a sign of logical victory. Increasingly the warming advocates are the ones in denial of the total lack of warming for 18 years now.

    However nothing is certain until after the Paris Climatefest. You can only hope that Europe has one of those really awful winters, as in the 2009 Copenhagen Global Warming conference where supporters sang through chattering teeth about Global Warming. Of course the World Meteorological Society or the IPCC should be able to tell us what the weather will be in December in Paris, but no one would trust their predictions that far ahead.

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      Ron C.

      Hopes for Paris COP are riding on the Blob:

      Many have noticed the warm water anomaly in the Northern Pacific, which shows up as a weak El Nino, but somewhat unexpected and out of the ordinary pattern. The warm Pacific SST last year almost pushed 2014 to a new record average surface temperature, and fossil fuel activists are pinning their Paris hopes on this year.

      So it is timely for the Meteorologist who named this event to provide a clear explanation of the natural causes of the Blob phenomenon.

      https://rclutz.wordpress.com/2015/05/23/the-big-bad-blob/

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        Rick Will

        Greenland has been slow to start the melt this year:
        http://www.dmi.dk/uploads/tx_dmidatastore/webservice/e/n/i/b/m/Melt_combine.png
        It is now just outside the range of the 25 year record.

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          TdeF

          In Paris in December it would be great to have a repeat of the winters of 1812 (Napoleon at Moscow) or even 1941 (Hitler at Moscow). Natural variation of course. +5C and 3 hours of sunshine on a good day in Paris in December. It’s really hard to talk about global warming when you are freezing. Perhaps a repeat of Copenhagen 2009 where it was -4C and snowing for the first time in 14 years and just in time.

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    Roy Hogue

    What an absolutely stunning coastline. Jo, I hope you don’t mind that I saved the picture.

    I used to think California highway 1, perched high up on the cliff overlooking the Pacific Ocean between San Simeon and Carmel was a spectacular drive but this puts anything in the U.S. to shame. We’ve a lot of very colorful displays in Utah and Arizona. But none quite like this.

    I really must rearrange my priorities and try to get to Australia.

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      Peter C

      Great News, The Griss resurrected.

      However he might spend most of his time in moderation if he returns here.

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        Peter C

        Whoops,
        Last comment mis-filed.

        If you like coastal drives I reccomend the Great Ocean Rd, Victoria, Aistralia. It is better than the California Highway, although not as long.

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      GMac

      We have lots and lots of it,it goes on for miles and bloody miles the same landscape that goes on to the horizon -
      I love a sunburnt country
      I love her far horizons,
      I love her jewel-sea,
      Her beauty and her terror
      The wide brown land for me!

      The drive along the Nullarbor is quite unique and one I recommend if you like looking at short spindly scrub for 1100 kilometres.
      The West and South are great you can drive for days and the scenery will still be the same ,and you never know you can get up close and personal with the Australian marsupials called kangaroos or roos for short,one of them is bound to take a very close interest in your car’s radiator.
      Not all of Australia is as interesting as that.
      If you are travelling along the south/west coasts and it is a hot day and you decide to go for a swim at the nearest beach,see if there are any surfers out on the waves and then move 500 metres from them,where the surfies are is where the White Pointers are,and I don’t mean nubile young lasses sunbathing topless(unless you are into that sort of thing,which I definitely am not….what , why are you all looking at me like that,I’m not an old perv,I just have bad eyesight)

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        Roy Hogue

        I love a sunburnt country
        I love her far horizons,
        I love her jewel-sea,
        Her beauty and her terror
        The wide brown land for me!

        That tells me a whole bookshelf, a whole library about Australia and Aussies. Until I started reading Jo Nova, Australia was just a place in the geography book, far away, mostly unknown and out of mind. But you all have made Australia and yourselves come to life for me and I do appreciate that very much.

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          Rod Stuart

          Roy, if you are interested in the political landscape of what this grand egalitarian experiment has become, I recommend this book to you.

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            Roy Hogue

            Rod,

            From the description I could probably write such a book about the rise of the ruling class right here in America. And it’s happening all over the world. Between the influence of “international” unions, business and the UN it was almost destined to be.

            Local power tends to extend its tentacles. Encountering the tentacles of other powers it either tries to take over what it encounters or allies with it. Either way, power is consolidated in fewer and fewer hands as time goes by.

            Isn’t that the lesson of history?

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    tom0mason

    All is as it must be. “Another weekend unthreaded for more Kaos in Ordnung.”

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    Another Ian

    Jo

    “European Biofuel Bubble Bursts”

    From http://www.smalldeadanimals.com/2015/05/we-dont-need-no-522.html

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    pat

    23 May: Fox News: George Russell: Foundations plan to pay news media to cover radical UN agenda
    EXCLUSIVE: The United Nations Foundation created by billionaire Ted Turner, along with a branch of media giant Thomson Reuters, is starting to train a squadron of journalists and subsidize media content in 33 countries—including the U.S. and Britain–in a planned $6 million effort to popularize the bulky and sweeping U.N.-sponsored Sustainable Development Goals, prior to a global U.N. summit this September. where U.N. organizers hope they will be endorsed by world leaders.
    The unprecedented media push is formally intended to start on May 25 but is already underway…
    “This is an important year or a robust decision on what the world and the U.N. will do in the next 15 years,” added Aaron Sherinian, the Foundation’s chief communications and marketing officer. “We thought we would do well to connect as many people to the conversation as possible.”…
    Under the plan, Villa’s foundation, Thomson Reuters’ non-profit arm, will carry out the training under contract from U.N. Foundation. (The Thomson Reuters Foundation, according to its website, also carries on for-profit training sessions.)
    Journalists from Australia to Peru, and from Britain to Zimbabwe will be given five-day training programs by instructors drawn largely from the ranks of former Reuters journalists…
    Training sessions for the journalists—whose parent organizations are as yet unnamed—are slated to run through August…
    At the same time as the U.N.-supporting foundations are boosting coverage of the “post-2015 development agenda,” an even bigger media coalition has just announced it will start lumping content for collective use in support of a new U.N.-sponsored treaty on greenhouse gases…
    The so-called Climate Publishers Network, a 25-member group that includes The Guardian as well as such high-profile newspaper as Le Monde in France and El Pais in Spain, as well as the China Daily, have agreed to drop their mutual licensing fees to allow all network members to share their coverage on the climate change issue prior to the December 11 summit.
    The network arrangement is slated to disband immediately afterward.
    The U.N. Foundation’s Sherinian said that the two programs “were not formally affiliated in a specific way,” and said he could not confirm “if or how the outlets involved in the Climate Publishers Network coincide with those involved in our program to date.”…
    http://www.foxnews.com/world/2015/05/23/foundations-plan-to-pay-news-media-to-cover-radical-un-agenda/

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    pat

    Emergy: Billions wasted on solar subsidy, says report
    The Age – ‎9 hours ago‎
    It ranks among the worst government decisions of all time, with as much as $9 billion of the estimated $14 billion spent installing rooftop solar systems over the part few years wasted. Subsidies to install the systems has meant renters and the less well-off households who … “Lavish government subsidies plus the structure of electricity network tariffs means the cost of solar PV take-up has outweighed the benefits by more than $9 billion.” Carbon emissions could have been reduced more cheaply and fairly, the study …

    more spin, it would seem, in the earlier Fairfax piece:

    Cost of household solar has outweighed benefits: Grattan Institute report
    Sydney Morning Herald – ‎14 hours ago‎
    The report finds that households that have installed rooftop solar have still benefited greatly in financial terms “because the incentives offered by state and federal governments have made an uneconomic decision financially viable.”

    25 May: Australian: Cost of rooftop solar systems outweigh benefits by $9bnm
    The report by Grattan energy program director Tony Wood and energy fellow David Blowers says while solar rooftop programs have cut emissions it has been expensive — the equivalent of a carbon price of $170 a tonne.
    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/cost-of-rooftop-solar-systems-outweigh-benefits-by-9bnm/story-fn59niix-1227367494904

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    pat

    25 May: SMH: Anne Davies: CSG industry hires well-connected staffers
    A HERALD INVESTIGATION
    Assisting the industry are an army of former political staff and former politicians, many of whom had a role in the regulation of the industry before jumping the fence to industry. A few have come back the other way, moving from senior jobs in the major gas companies to senior advising roles in ministers offices.
    The accompanying graphic reveals the extent of cross pollination between those who set policy at a state and federal level in the coal seam gas industry and those who seek to profit from it – as direct participants or as advocates for the companies…
    For instance Martin Ferguson, the former Labor resources minister, became chairman of the advisory committee for the peak oil and gas industry association, the Australian Petroleum Production and Exploration Association, six months after leaving politics.
    He has been a fierce advocate of CSG, arguing that NSW must forge ahead with development of CSG in order to achieve “energy security for NSW.”
    His colleagues, Greg Combet, the former Gillard government minister for Climate change and Craig Emerson, her minister for Trade, waited a year before penning an opinion article in support of the CSG industry in the Australian Financial Review.
    They are both working as economic consultants to AGL and Santos, the two biggest players in CSG in NSW.
    Former National party leaders, John Anderson and Mark Vaile also moved into high profile roles in mining and CSG companies after politics…READ ALL
    http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/csg-industry-hires-wellconnected-staffers-20150524-gh2rg3.html

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    pat

    just gone up…

    25 May: Australian: AAP: Senator lodges complaint on Greenpeace ad
    THE federal environment department has been asked to investigate whether a Greenpeace advertisement about the state of the Great Barrier Reef was misleading.
    NATIONALS senator Matthew Canavan says the ad compared the Great Barrier Reef with a devastated reef in the Philippines. It was an “egregious example” of misleading advertising, partly funded through taxpayer donations, because the devastated reef had been destroyed by a typhoon rather than government policy, he told a Senate estimates hearing in Canberra on Monday…
    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/latest-news/senator-lodges-complaint-on-greenpeace-ad/story-fn3dxiwe-1227367952051

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    el gordo

    My long range forecast for Europe this coming winter is incredibly chilling. I’m putting my faith in a very negative NAO and the mooted El Nino, along the lines of the 2009-10 event.

    The NAO is positive at the moment.

    http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/precip/CWlink/pna/nao_index.html

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    handjive

    The Texas drought ends; climate alarmists wrong again!

    Summary: The climate alarmists described the Texas drought in extreme terms, as the New Normal.

    Now we see what looks like the end of the story. A pleasant ending for everybody — excerpt for the alarmists (wrong, again).

    via fabiusmaximus.com

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      TdeF

      Too bad Pacahuri ignored the Precautionary Principle. Things are now heating quickly and with the Climate Changing quickly and Forcing from the ICC and the Police may soon reach a tipping point with catastropic consequences for the former guru.

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    handjive

    Hot off the Press SMH:

    Bureau of Meteorology rejects Maurice Newman’s climate claims

    - 95 per cent of the climate models we are told prove the link between human CO2 emissions and catastrophic global warming have been found…to be in error.”

    “That is incorrect,” Dr Vertessy said.

    - Dr Vertessy responded with a single word – “rejected” – to another claim in Mr Newman’s May 8 piece that “weather bureaus appear to have ‘homogenised’ data to suit narratives”

    He also said Mr Newman’s reference to record breaking cold weather in the northern hemisphere was “an old red herring that suggests that just because you’re getting cold weather in the northern hemisphere it somehow discredits the fact that there is global warming occurring”.
    >”Global warming means global? Not any more.
    . . .

    Here is the official UN link: http://www.unric.org/en/latest-un-buzz/29623-figueres-first-time-the-world-economy-is-transformed-intentionally

    “This is the first time in the history of mankind that we are setting ourselves the task of intentionally, within a defined period of time, to change the economic development model that has been reigning for at least 150 years, since the Industrial Revolution,” Christiana Figueres, executive secretary of U.N.’s Framework Convention on Climate Change, admitted.”

    And, here is The United Nation’s top official on climate change, Christiana Figueres, denying it -SMH:

    Maurice Newman’s climate conspiracy a joke: top UN climate official

    Christiana Figueres who is visiting Australia to discuss progress toward a global deal said Mr Newman’s claim that climate change was an UN “hoax” designed to lead to world domination, was a joke.

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      handjive

      BoM & CSIRO shill for the 97% UN-IPCC carbon(sic) tax:

      SMH Nov. 2014 – UN panel warns opportunity to stop climate change fading fast

      “Dr Scott Power, a researcher at the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, said the world would use up its “carbon budget” in the next two decades, and, if it overspent that budget, then the Earth would warm more than 2 degrees, leading to more severe impacts from climate change on people and ecosystems.

      “Limiting climate change requires substantial and sustained reductions in greenhouse gas emissions,” he said.”

      “CSIRO researcher Dr John Church from the University of Tasmania, an expert on rising sea levels, said the report’s central message – based on stronger and more authoritative science than ever – was that global warming was “unequivocal”, and it was very clear that humans had contributed.”

      And, of course, these words from UN-IPCC chairman and sexual predator, Rajendra Pachauri;

      “We have the means to limit climate change,” IPCC chairman Rajendra Pachaur said.
      “The solutions are many and allow for continued economic and human development.
      All we need is the will to change, which we trust will be motivated by knowledge and an understanding of the science of climate change.”

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        ROM

        The NCDC and GISS are still at it!

        From Paul Homewood’s blog, Not a Lot of People Know That

        Not only Iceland data which was carefully recorded for quite a number of generations is thoroughly corrupted and deliberately distorted by the NCDC, GISS and etc which has made the Icelandic Bureau good and mad about the NCDC, GISS and etc but now

        Cooling The Past In The Faroes.

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    pat

    naturally this is in the main Fairfax newspapers, but just realised Farm Weekly is a Fairfax publication too.

    in fact a pile of farming publications at the bottom of this page are also part of the Fairfax stable, i just now realised. hardly a media house i associate with rural matters:

    2 pages: 25 May: Farm Weekly: Lisa Cox: BoM rejects ‘hoax’ climate claims
    CLAIMS by the Prime Minister’s chief business adviser about climate change have been rejected by the head of the Bureau of Meteorology as “incorrect”, not relevant and “old red herrings”…
    In a Senate estimates hearing on Monday, Greens climate spokeswoman Larissa Waters read through the opinion piece, paragraph by paragraph, asking the bureau’s director of meteorology and chief executive Rob Vertessy to respond to Mr Newman’s claims.
    “There are multiple statements which assert facts about climate science which I’m intrigued on the bureau’s view about,” Senator Waters said.
    “And given the invitation to do so, I shall go through them all.” …
    Dr Vertessy responded with a single word – “rejected” – to another claim in Mr Newman’s May 8 piece that “weather bureaus appear to have ‘homogenised’ data to suit narratives”.
    He also said Mr Newman’s reference to record breaking cold weather in the northern hemisphere was “an old red herring that suggests that just because you’re getting cold weather in the northern hemisphere it somehow discredits the fact that there is global warming occurring”.
    “The theory of global warming does not hold that there will be no cold weather anywhere,” Dr Vertessy said.
    “And in fact there’s evidence to suggest that global warming will actually intensify the onset of some cold weather.”…
    Senator Waters was prevented from asking Dr Vertessy to respond to Mr Newman’s claim that global warming was a “hook” being used by the UN to impose a new centralised political order.
    “If you want to ask him about the climate science that’s fine but not about the UN,” Liberal Senator Simon Birmingham said.
    “Ask DFAT if they think there’s a conspiracy operating in the UN or not.”…
    Mr Newman’s comments were described by the UN’s top climate official Christiana Figueres last month as joke… http://www.farmweekly.com.au/news/agriculture/general/weather/bom-rejects-hoax-climate-claims/2733222.aspx

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    pat

    it comes out this morning that solar is costing the Australian public billions of dollars, so Hannam comes out in the afternoon with a dodgy IPSOS report, much from 2013, and the ONLINE PHONE SURVEY not even dated, to tell us Aussies love solar!!!

    25 May: SMH: Peter Hannam: Anything but coal: solar the most popular energy source in Australia
    Solar energy is the most popular source of electricity in Australia with more than three times the backing of coal-fired or nuclear power, a survey by Ipsos has found.
    The poll of almost 1200 people around the country found that solar panels on roof tops were supported by 87 per cent of respondents, with large-scale solar farms “strongly” or “somewhat” backed by 78 per cent.
    Wind farms and hydro, at 72 per cent, also far eclipsed backing of just 23 per cent for coal and 26 per cent for nuclear energy…
    ***The survey, funded by the federal Australian Renewable Energy Agency, was aimed at identifying the potential barriers large-solar farms might encounter and how local communities might be won over…
    The Ipsos survey comes as a separate report released on Monday by the Grattan Institute found small-scale solar PV systems on households would cost $9 billion more than the benefits they generated…
    The Ipsos survey found that most respondents – at 60 per cent – back funding into large-scale solar research over non-renewable energy sources. Of the total, 38 per cent also said solar farms should get research priority over other clean energy sources.
    http://www.smh.com.au/environment/anything-but-coal-solar-the-most-popular-energy-source-in-australia-20150525-gh8u4h.html

    btw ARENA have $2.5 billion to waste in renewables. nowhere can i find the date of the report :

    35 pages: PDF: IPSOS: ARENA Australian Renewable Energy Agency (Australian Government)
    (ARENA was established by the Australian Government to make renewable energy technologies more affordable and increase the amount of renewable energy used in Australia. ARENA invests in renewable energy projects, supports research and development activities, boosts job creation and industry development, and increases knowledge about renewable energy.)

    REPORT: Establishing the social licence to operate large scale solar facilities in Australia: insights from social research for industry
    This project was commissioned by the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) and involved assistance and feedback from a number of renewable energy sector stakeholders…
    Methodology: The research consisted of three key components:
    *Quantitative phase: a survey of a representative sample of 1,197 Australians.
    *Qualitative phase: a series of 15 group discussions held in capital cities, regional centres and communities near large scale solar facilities.
    *Review phase: a review of the factors that influence social licence to operate solar facilities, conducted via in-depth interviews and covered in the group discussions with stakeholders in communities living near large scale solar facilities…
    p33: Qualitative methodology
    Fifteen group discussions were held across Australia in total. Groups were held in Sydney, Melbourne, Perth, Geraldton, Darwin and Brisbane in 2013.
    Groups conducted in Dubbo and Broken Hill were held in 2014…
    Each group lasted an hour and a half, participants were provided with an $80 EFTPOS card to reimburse them for
    any expenses incurred, as well as to thank them for their time and in so doing encourage participation from a range of members of the public. Participants were advised that the groups were on the topic of energy, not specifically about large scale solar energy, and along with the incentive, this helped to ensure not only those with a specific stance on large scale solar energy were encouraged to attend…
    http://www.ipsos.com.au/Ipsos_docs/Solar-Report_2015/Ipsos-ARENA_SolarReport.pdf

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    pat

    ARENA funding
    How much we invest
    ARENA has approximately $2.5 billion in funding, which is legislated and extends until 2022. More about our funding profile LINK
    http://arena.gov.au/about-arena/arena-funding/

    ARENA Board & CEO
    CEO: Ivor Frischknecht
    Ivor Frischknecht is a former Investment Director of Starfish Ventures Pty Ltd, a venture capital firm that manages $400 million, primarily on behalf of Australian superannuation funds. His key activities included responsibility for the firm’s clean tech investment activities in areas such as energy, water and environmental technologies.
    Ivor was previously Director, New Ventures, of Idealab, a company involved in developing and investing in technology start-up companies, including renewable energy companies. He was also previously the CEO of H2OnSite, a company involved in the commercialisation of clean energy generation technology, and a senior executive and adviser to a range of venture capital and energy companies…
    http://arena.gov.au/about-arena/arena-board/

    LINK TO NEWS & MEDIA RELEASES FOR THE FOLLOWING.
    (online survey not dated in the release either)

    25 May: ARENA: New community consultation guidelines for large scale solar projects
    Independent market research company Ipsos has produced best practice community consultation guidelines for proposed large scale solar projects.
    Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) CEO Ivor Frischknecht said the reports would be an invaluable resource for establishing and maintaining community support to operate solar projects in Australia…
    ARENA provided Ipsos with $153,000 funding towards the report…
    Ipsos also conducted an ***online survey, which found more than three quarters (78%) of Australians support large-scale solar energy projects…
    Methodology: 1,197 adults living across Australia participated in an online survey…

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    pat

    ABC was batting for ARENA as late as 12 May. Frischknecht focused on solar investments only:

    12 May: ABC PM: Soon-to-be-axed Australian Renewable Energy Agency speaks out
    MARK COLVIN: It’s emerged that in tomorrow’s budget one of 36 government agencies to be axed, on top of the 40 already slated for closure, is the Australian Renewable Energy Agency – also known as ARENA.
    It was set up two years ago with bipartisan support as an independent agency to improve the competitiveness of renewable energy technologies and their uptake. And it has a budget of $3.2 billion, to be spent over eight years.
    Ivor Frischknecht is the agency’s chief executive. He told Alexandra Kirk that scrapping the agency will reduce Australia’s ability to have lower cost energy in the longer term…
    IVOR FRISCHKNECHT: Well I think they can be the same thing. Abolishing the agency would require that the contracts – and we have something like 180 contracts with a variety of different renewable energy technologies – those would have to be continued, and they would be continued within the department…
    ALEXANDRA KIRK: Currently, the agency is independent of government. Do you think that that is the most important aspect of it, considering the renewable energy target is a bipartisan one?
    IVOR FRISCHKNECHT: It certainly has advantages. Some of the advantages are around objective decision making; focusing on what is the best pathway towards lower cost energy, and how do we integrate renewables better into our grid without disrupting the status-quo, and keeping all of those decisions free from political influence…
    ***IVOR FRISCHKNECHT: Across a variety of different areas, but some major ones in the solar field. So we have been able to save well over half a billion dollars of funding that may or may not have ever been spent. But either way, simply having projects on the books for years and years and years that somebody is managing that a proponent is trying to move forward, simply because politically they’re not able to be terminated, that also is not a good outcome for anyone…
    ALEXANDRA KIRK: So you think that you’ve more than paid your way already?
    IVOR FRISCHKNECHT: Well if you believe in the objective of developing the next generation of renewable energy technology, then I think the set up we currently have is a very good one…
    http://www.abc.net.au/pm/content/2014/s4002932.htm

    those with expertise might like to assess the value of ARENA’s various Projects listed at Wikipedia below:

    Wikipedia: ARENA Australian Renewable Energy Agency
    PROJECTS…
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_Renewable_Energy_Agency

    Giles Parkinson in RenewEconomy article dated 13 May titled “2015 Budget confirms closure for climate, clean energy institutions” states:

    “The Australian Renewable Energy Agency, which funds emerging technologies such as wave energy, solar and storage, and off-grid systems, will also be absorbed back into the department and defunded.”

    also check Tristan Edis/Business Spectator article of 13 May titled “ARENA hobbled via a budgetary backdoor”.

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    James Murphy

    “…Internal documents show BP would have to transport a containment response system 14,000km in the event of a spill in the Great Australian Bight…” says The Guardian

    As someone who works in the oil industry, and has some (limited so far) involvement with this BP project, I do not know why I read such things, it only causes mental anguish. Whilst the article itself does not contain comments, the Facebook equivalent has hundreds of ignorant, and pavlovian responses, with some people of lesser cognitive ability thinking that this spill has already happened…

    How on earth can anyone, or any organisation combat this ever-rising tide of stupidity and ignorance…?

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    Another Ian

    And this

    http://bishophill.squarespace.com/blog/2015/5/25/waste-pumps.html#comments

    “Good enough for government work” comes to mind!

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    john karajas

    Great photo of the Tumblagooda Sandstone which is a braided river deposit laid down on a broad floodplain during the Silurian. The formation contains some rather spectacular fossil trails.

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    Timboss

    Those hippie bastards at the UN are fudging graphs again.

    http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/OC5/3M_HEAT_CONTENT/

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    Annie

    I’ve just been looking at the WUWT sea ice page. There is a spectacular image from the South Pole webcam showing the Aurora Australis. Well, I think it is anyway. I guess it will go offline soon as it’s almost winter.

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    el gordo

    Southern Ontario gutted by unseasonal cold snap.

    ‘Some smaller wineries say their crop was practically gutted in the deep-freeze.26 May 2015 – Vineyard owners in Prince Edward County and the Niagara region are assessing the damage from record-breaking cold late Friday night and Saturday morning.

    ‘Farmers rented helicopters, turned on wind machines and set bales of hay on fire in an attempt to save what they could.

    ‘Clark Tyler, manager at Harwood Estate Vineyards in Prince Edward County, estimates that a mere five per cent of grapes at his four-hectare vineyard survived the frost.

    “It’s just complete and utter devastation,” said Tyler, who added that some of his friends lost nearly everything.

    http://www.am980.ca/2015/05/26/southern-ontario-vineyards-damaged-by-brutal-cold-snap/

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