JoNova

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The tenth translation – Balkans (Bosnian-Serbo-Croatian)

Thanks to Dr. Mensur Omerbashich for translating the Handbook into the common languages* of most of the Balkans: Bosnian and Serbo-Croatian. Mensur is a theoretical geophysicist from USA with PhD from Canada, who also is a certified court interpreter in Bosnia.

COVER Balkans Translation

Send this link to your friends in the former Yugoslav republics. This translation will be understandable to Bosnians, Croatians, Serbians, Montenegrins, including most of Slovenians, Macedonians and Kosovars. Around 25-30 million people.

Mensur suggested that ideally someone could volunteer to do localizations into Croatian proper, or Serbian proper.

There is a larger 5Mb version for better printing here.

* I use the term “common language” loosely. There is so little agreement about it, I gather there is not even a proper name of this “language”. It’s more a overlapping common collection of several languages, sometimes referred to just as BCS or Bosnian/Serbo-Croatian. (Correct me if I’m wrong).

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Tiny Url for this post: http://tinyurl.com/2dhw4sv

16 comments to The tenth translation – Balkans (Bosnian-Serbo-Croatian)

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    [...] congratulations to Joanne Nova for her excellent site and the tenth translation of the skeptics handbook – well done Joanne – you can visit her here and wish her all [...]

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    papertiger

    I never actually read your skeptic’s handbook. I appreciate that it exists, it’s just that to me it would be like reviewing for a pop quiz.

    I don’t know. There might be some oblique angle in there that I haven’t thought about before.
    The occasional post of a page from the handbook makes for an interesting read.

    Maybe I should make it a New Year’s resolution.
    #1 Reading Jono’s handbook.
    #2 the other stuff I need to improve on. (Losing that extra ten pounds. Pay last years parking fines. Send a thank you note to Aunt Lea… exetera)

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    sqeecoo

    Hi, just a minor point. Serbs, Bosnians and Croatians don’t officially have a “common language” – no more than Swedes and Norwegians do. And it’s a touchy subject due to the recent war there. Not a big deal, just giving you a heads-up on that.

    The translation is understandable to all three though, although Serbs would probably write it in cyrillics.

    Oh, and I spotted a typo on the first page, paragraph 2. The sentence

    “Sve visi o tom jednom, jedinom pitanju. Ako ugljen dioksid nije jedan od zna

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    Brian G Valentine

    Thanks to the many wonderful friends for all of these translations – obviously worthy material as the point of departure, or no one would expend the effort!

    It is a touchy subject related to who reads what in the former Jugoslav republics – even worse for any suggestion for many of them to be identified as Balkan (to some, only Latvian, Lithuanian, Estonian have the right to identify themselves as that)

    Thankfully, many of the people are not the least impressed with “global warming” or whatever it is. Thanks in large measure to the great Czech President I suppose –

    from what I hear, it is quite patriotic for Russian to support their academy view of an certain ice age and bewildering for the rest over what the West is fussing about!

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    Thanks for the feedback.

    Update: * I use the term “common language” loosely. There is so little agreement about it, I gather there is not even a proper name of this “language”. It’s more a overlapping common collection of several languages, sometimes referred to just as BCS or Bosnian/Serbo-Croatian. (Correct me if I’m wrong).

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    Brian G Valentine

    The Croatian use an alphabet that is nearly the Czech alphabet.

    The Serbian use an alphabet that is 80% the Cyrillic alphabet.

    The Bosnian use an alphabet that is 70% maybe of the formal Arabic alphabet + about 8 other modifications of these letters that reporduce their sounds.

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    Mike Fox

    Well, maybe the Kosovars who speak Serbo-Croatian will understand it, but most Kosovars are ethnic Albanians, who speak Shqip (which is what Albanians call their language). ;-)

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    Brian G Valentine

    True enough, I guess, “shkip” is Indo-European, whereas, what is written as Serbo-Croat, is truly Slavic.

    I would guess, that any one who reads Russian in a Latin alphabet, or Czech, or probably Polish for that matter, would readily read this translation.

    Soviet hegemony in the region for so long forced everyone who attended a State school (attended school) to learn Russian which most of the people all do speak and this does not necessarily mean they admit it

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    Mark D.

    And with respect to each language: The value is in the content not that the translation is perfect. In otherwords: are you anle to understand the information?

    Peace

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    Mark D.

    That should read ABLE not anle (damn keyboards)

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    To Mark D.
    “anle” instead of “able” does not really matter for the reader. It is a strange fact that most readers are able to understand a sentence with many letters wrong provided the first and last letters of each word are correct !… try it here :

    “Mast riadors ate ahle to undahsterd a sertasnce wirh maly letilrs wrarg prohoded the faert and lest lattirs of earh worsd are cortact”

    Merry Christmas to all, and especially to Joanne with many thanks for her wonderfull work !

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    Brian G Valentine

    somewhat surprisingly (?) more than half the world’s speakers of the Serbo-Croatian (Bosnian, Montenegrin, et al) Slavic language are here in the USA! Thanks to very large ethnic communities of some cities.

    I hope this Translation has a positive influence on these US residents, especially those who are also voters in the USA.

    I very much doubt any tracts related to “an inconvenient truth” etc have been translated into the language these people know – and the thought behind such translations as Joanne’s work means a lot to people

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    Sebaneau

    This is Bosnian. So what? I would really be surprised if anyone felt the need to make a Serb or Croat version.
    But of course, he would need an editable version (I hate .pdfs)

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    Henry chance

    Forrest fires. The greenies claim the land will dry and forrest fires will increase.

    Can ross explain this? Why did this happen 100 years ago and not recently?

    It was the largest forest fire in American history. Maybe even the largest forest fire ever. No one knows for sure, but even now, it is hard to put into words what it did.
    For two terrifying days and night’s – August 20 and 21, 1910 – the

    fire raged across three million acres

    of virgin timberland in northern Idaho and western Montana.

    Lot of CO2.

    The carbon crisis cartel makes all these claims of record fires, droughts, floods and they can’t compare them with previous events because there were no cameras or newspapers.

    Joe romm on Climate Progress was blaiming a flood in SE America 3 months ago on global warming. He got very angry when I asked why this record flood was due to global warming and the previous record flood level that was within a couple inches and in 1919 was not also due to global warming.

    He got angry when exposed to contradicting his own claims.

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    [...] The tenth translation – Balkans (Bosnian-Serbo-Croatian) « JoNova [...]

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    [...] by NATO (“Why volcanoes go off (I mean really”, 04/27/2010), global warming ‘conspiracy’ (http://joannenova.com.au/2009/12/th&#8230 ;) … He claims that one of his ideas has been stolen by the U.S. government (see “Den of [...]

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