How to paralyze a city with one easy EV “update”

By Jo Nova

Imagine giving an enemy the ability to track your VIPs movements and listen to their conversations in the car? Adversaries could learn national secrets, play mayhem on the markets with insider tips or just figure out who was having an affair with a view to blackmail and extortion. Worse, what if your adversaries could electronically upload software to your vehicles and shut down even 1 car in 100 on the major national highways — bringing the road network to a grinding halt?

Where is James Bond when you need him? This would have been a great script.

Thanks to NetZeroWatch:

China To Crash EV Market and Paralyse Motorists in UK

Michael Curzon, European Conservative

A new report warns of a major impending security risk in handing Beijing the power to immobilise thousands of cars owned by Britons—and many others across Europe. Professor Jim Saker of the Institute of the Motor Industry, quoted in The Times, said “the threat of connected electric vehicles flooding the country could be the most effective Trojan horse that the Chinese establishment has.” There would, he added, be no way to prevent Chinese state-owned manufacturers from including technology in cars set to be exported which could bring them all to a halt.

This comes just months after reports of a Chinese tracking device being found in a UK government vehicle.

Even better, to make the national suicide voluntary and complete, the CCP probably wouldn’t even need to do anything so brazen as paralyzing the car fleet. China has just taken the top spot as global car exporter. Cars shipped grew by, wow, 76% for the year. One quarter of those cars are EV’s and they are   €10,000 (£8,600) cheaper than the cars made in Europe, Japan and America.

China, Lion statueAs long as the West forces EV’s on its own population, and then taxes them to subsidize all the charging stations and extra generation required, the put-upon and suffering customers will choose the cheapest car they can find.

And without cheap electricity from coal or slave labor in the factories, how could the Western car industry ever compete?

The CCP plugged in $100 billion in subsidies to get the EV industry up and running. They “pressured foreign firms into forming joint ventures with Chinese counterparts ” and learnt their trade secrets.

Of course, that’s a big punt for China. If the West decided to let the free market rule instead of forcing EV’s on everyone, then China will have cornered a market in nothing much. President Xi, presumably will be keen for Westerners to stay in the thrall of pagan weather-control via lithium batteries.

The alarming reality of cheap Chinese cars on British roads

   The Telegraph

Sources who spoke on condition of anonymity said these trials – which revealed “gaping holes” in security – were carried out at the request of sceptical car manufacturers who refused to believe such hacks were possible until they were demonstrated in front of them.

It’s just a software update…

Modern cars are increasingly dependent on “over the air” software updates, which they receive through a mobile phone-style SIM card that is built into the vehicle.

If a malicious actor gained access to these update systems, through servers known as “the backend”, they could beam out software that allows them to spy on vehicles and their driver remotely.

It’s already here:

This is the case for all new cars, wherever they are made in China, Europe or the US. A SIM card allows the car to receive updates, new features and security patches, just like a smartphone. In a crash a car will phone the emergency services. To do this, it needs a microphone and a link to the outside world. Cameras inside make sure you are not nodding off at the wheel.

All of this can be used to spy on you if security is lax, says Ken Munro, a security expert and ethical hacker at Pen Test Partners, a company that tests for security holes.

“We did a bunch of work on aftermarket car alarms. And we discovered that in many of them, you could actually remotely enable the microphones and listen to people in the cars.”

The Telegraph has a long feature on this, read it here.

Chinese Statue Photo by Serg Balak

 

9.8 out of 10 based on 98 ratings

101 comments to How to paralyze a city with one easy EV “update”

  • #
    James Murphy

    Surely there’s no need to hack software when all they need to do is maintain current quality control procedures on EV battery packs.

    Assuming battery QC is at the same level of other products made for export…

    230

    • #
      MrGrimNasty

      I’ve made the point before, in event of war or other malicious intent, surely the battery charging/management could be spiked and turn every car into a bomb.

      250

      • #
        Steve

        In the event of a war, an atmospheric nuclear bomb w/could disable all electronic devices. subtlety is not required.

        00

  • #
    red edwards

    It’s enough to buy an old ICE and rebuild it. It’s a bit of a hobby in the US.

    360

    • #
      GreatAuntJanet

      I’m thinking of hiring out my elderly diesel Hilux with its elderly ‘chauffeur’ to any VIPs who want to have meetings in our outback town. Safe as houses, esp at 40kph…

      100

    • #
      Bones

      It’s a big hobby,all around the world,especially in country areas.

      51

    • #
      yarpos

      Our local country car club has 100 members and 62 club cars that have to be a minimum of 25 years old (oldest 100 years old) That is just around a small town of about 4000 people and surrounding area.

      40

    • #
      Gerry, England

      It is a national tradition in Cuba.

      70

    • #
      Tel

      I bought I second hand Hilux in the hope that I wouldn’t need to rebuild it … there’s a chance the ute might outlive me!

      30

  • #

    I’m going to stick with my ICE motor vehicle (1967 Ford Mustang V8) and abacus. Computers are everywhere.

    210

  • #
    Fran

    This applies to every electronic product made in China, even the I phones.

    251

  • #
    David Maddison

    It’s fair to assume every digital cloud-connected or wireless- or wired-connectable electronic product from China has a built-in ability to spy or sabotage.

    Examples include:

    Drones

    https://australianaviation.com.au/2023/05/border-force-joins-defence-in-grounding-china-linked-drones/

    BORDER FORCE JOINS DEFENCE IN GROUNDING ‘CHINA-LINKED’ DRONES

    written by Jake Nelson
    May 24, 2023

    Australian Border Force has grounded a fleet of 41 drones it had acquired since 2017 from a manufacturer accused of having links to the Chinese military.

    The agency has suspended the use of its DJI drones, which have been blacklisted by the US military and have also been suspended by Australia’s Department of Defence, as confirmed in Senate estimates this week by Home ­Affairs chief operating officer Justine Saunders.

    SEE LINK FOR REST

    Trojans/malware in silicon die

    This is a theoretical attack strategy, not yet known to have happened but military procurement requires traceability of origin of all chips used.

    https://www.itnews.com.au/news/chips-can-be-built-with-undetectable-malware-researchers-420030

    Chips can be built with undetectable malware: researchers

    By Juha Saarinen May 25 2016 2:22PM

    Near-impossible to spot, defend against hardware Trojan.

    Researchers have devised an analogue hardware attack that can be injected into chip components during production time, which places circuit designers relying on third-party fabrication plants at risk of shipping electronics with undetectable malware.

    Such an attack would mean companies like Apple, which designs its own processors but outsources production to chip fabrication plants, could unwittingly sell Trojanised iDevices with hardware malware that cannot be removed.

    SEE LINK FOR REST

    Utility-scale power transformers

    President Trump banned utility scale power transformers from China because malware was detected in them but Chicomm client Biden reversed the ban.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/llewellynking/2021/01/28/how-the-supply-chain-in-heavy-bulk-power-equipment-is-vulnerable-to-undetected-cyberattack/

    How America’s Power Grid Is Vulnerable To Undetected Cyberattack

    Llewellyn King

    Sometime in 2019, something extraordinary happened at the Port of Houston. A huge electrical transformer, weighing between 250 and 500 tons, which was destined for the Washington Area Power Administration’s Ault, Colorado substation, was seized by the Department of Energy and the Department of Homeland Security.

    The transformer was taken to the Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, and nothing has been heard of it since then. It would have been a companion to one already in service on the WAPA system.

    It is believed that the transformer was grabbed because of fears of “backdoor” electronics which could be activated, or which were timed by its Chinese manufacturer to change the operation and affect the electric grid.

    On May 1, 2020, President Donald Trump signed Executive Order 13920 which directed utilities not to purchase bulk power systems from “adversaries.” It is believed this order was the result of what was found in a WAPA transformer at the Ault substation outside Denver in the summer of 2019.

    SEE LINK FOR REST

    https://www.instituteforenergyresearch.org/the-grid/biden-rescinds-trump-order-banning-chinese-involvement-in-the-u-s-power-grid/

    Biden Rescinds Trump Order Banning Chinese Involvement in the U.S. Power Grid

    Software in general

    E.g President Trump banned software from various Chinese companies.

    https://www.npr.org/2021/01/06/953783462/trump-orders-ban-on-chinese-software-apps-citing-potential-espionage

    Trump Orders Ban On Chinese Software Apps, Citing Potential Espionage

    January 6, 2021

    President Trump has signed an executive order banning business with several leading Chinese technology companies, claiming apps run by the companies have the ability to spy on Americans, including federal employees.

    Trump’s order seeks to prohibit transactions with eight companies including Alipay, owned by Chinese billionaire Jack Ma; the payment platform on the popular app WeChat; and a Chinese messaging service called QQ owned by the Chinese tech giant Tencent.

    Other software apps included in the order are CamScanner, QQ Wallet, SHAREit, VMate and WPS Office.

    It’s the latest push by the administration to clamp down on ascendant Chinese technology companies over fears that authorities in China could use the apps to spy on Americans.

    Trump also banned TikTok on US Government devices.

    Presumably the White House resident rescinded the above bans.

    321

    • #
      Bruce

      The Defence Drone fiasco i just one more indicator, as if one were needed, of the terminal decay in Defence in general and the Oz p0litical scene in particular.

      Defence procurement has to be one of the sickest jokes in Oz.

      100

  • #
    Lawrie

    How many more examples of China waging war on the West do we need before we take steps at the Government level to build defences? The fact that Biden is on board with all things Chinese is a given but now we have the Albanese government doing all in his power to weaken Australia. Chinese made solar and wind products, Chinese EVs and government policies which encourage or mandate such equipment is more than dangerous, it is potentially treasonous. Add in the love affair with China by Andrews and we have a huge problem.

    331

    • #
      Steve

      Reality check: China Vs Australia. Wake up, diplomacy, respect and working together is the only rational way for intelligent life on this planet.
      By getting into bed with the yanks, Oz has now become a target in the event of a war.

      00

      • #

        Tibet tried diplomacy and respect, and look how that worked.

        30

        • #
          Steve

          Maybe, but i cannot see why jumping into bed with the USA is such a good thing for Australia. Surely being independent and nuclear free is better than losing sovereignty and funding the MIC ?

          20

  • #
    Neville

    EVs are a TOXIC disaster and when the battery dies you have a car that is close to being worthless and ready for the junk yard.
    Who wants to buy a worthless S/H small car when you have to install an expensive new battery?
    Even if these tiny junk cars are 10 K $ cheaper to buy than better quality Western cars they are still a TOXIC disaster.
    And I’ll be driving only ICE cars for the rest of my life and I’ll definitely never buy a Chinese made ICE car.

    480

    • #
      Ronin

      Nev, the battery doesn’t even have to die to reduce the value of your shiny new EV, I think you would be obliged to trade your battery on wheels after about 2-3 years to get anything back on it.

      200

      • #
        Neville

        I agree Ronin and I suppose if you’re lucky enough to judge the right time to sell it then becomes some other persons problem.
        But I still feel sorry for new chums who are talked into buying an expensive new EV and live to regret it.

        130

      • #
        yarpos

        I’m out of that world now but I would love to see some of the leasing arrangements for corporate types taking up EVs. The expected depreciation would be informative.

        20

    • #
      Steve

      I’m with you on this.
      My worry is that we might have an old, perfectly functioning, ICE car but what about the availability of fuel ?
      If EVs were mandated then fuel would be restricted for the plebs.

      30

  • #
    David Maddison

    Imagine if the Chicomms sent a command to all the 3.5 million of Chinese made solar inverters attached to domestic solar in Australia commanding them to turn on when they were meant to be turned off at midday due to oversupply. I imagine bad things would happen to the grid.

    And unlike Trump when he banned Chinese made utility transformers, we have no politicians in power with such wisdom in Australia.

    The Australian Government has been warned, but did they do anything? Doubtful. But the following story is PAYWALLED.

    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/government-warned-on-chinese-state-involvement-in-australian-power-grid-20200801-p55hje.html

    Government warned on Chinese state involvement in Australian power grid

    By Richard Baker
    August 1, 2020

    The federal government is being urged to conduct a review of Chinese state involvement in Australia’s electricity grid and consider the removal of some equipment amid fears of remote sabotage.

    PAYWALLED

    ALSO SEE PAYWALLED ARTICLE

    https://www.theaustralian.com.au/nation/politics/chinas-spy-threat-to-our-solar-energy-grid/news-story/92eb1e9558c86d8eb3cd214ee640c89a

    China’s spy threat to our solar energy grid

    By CAMERON STEWART
    9:11AM JULY 21, 2023

    Australia’s fast-growing solar energy grid is being dominated by Chinese firms with links to the Chinese Communist Party, raising fears of the potential for ­Beijing to sabotage, surveil or disrupt solar energy supplies.

    PAYWALLED

    AUSTRALIA AND MOST WESTERN COUNTRIES ARE SITTING TARGETS. THE NEXT WAR WILL BE WON WITHOUT THE CHICOMMS FIRING A SHOT. THEY WILL JUST TURN THE POWER OFF (WHAT LITTLE REMAINS AFTER OUR TRAITOROUS POLITICIANS HAVE SHUT DOWN THE FEW REMAINING POWER STATIONS).

    210

  • #
    David Maddison

    This is also why I won’t automate my house with any system served from the Cloud via the Internet.

    Hubitat is one such privacy-oriented example. All local control and processing.

    Also, Rob Braxman has developed phones and other technologies that don’t spy on you. Check him out on YouTube.

    https://youtube.com/@robbraxmantech

    100

    • #
      John Connor II

      Like I said, “the cloud” is just someone else’s computer. Go backup your company data to the cloud because it’s the in thing to do. Thousands of businesses for each business accounting suite. Or your home security. Or your doctor booking service. Then the cloud gets hacked…

      70

    • #
      Tel

      I have found it isn’t all that difficult to reach up and flick the light switch … can’t see a lot of value in home automation.

      30

    • #
      Forrest Gardener

      Open the pod bay doors Hal. I’m afraid I can’t do that Dave.

      10

  • #
    David Maddison

    This was just posted on Farcebook.

    Australia is being warned about the potential threat of a cyber attack through Chinese solar panel technology. The federal government is being urged to act immediately or risk a targeted takedown by Beijing that could result in major blackouts. youtu.be/CMOSU8KaxOs #7NEWS

    Clickable link: https://youtu.be/CMOSU8KaxOs

    60

  • #
    Ronin

    You would have to ask yourself, if it was at all possible would the chinese do it, the answer, YESSSS.
    Also if the chinese are smart enough to put this spyware in stuff, why are we not smart enough to find it and call them out on it and disable it, can’t be that hard for a hacker.

    70

    • #
      John Connor II

      We are smart enough to find it!
      I use Ida Pro and GHIDRA for pc work, but you can also use a program called Binwalk (Github, open source, now cloud enterprised) to extract and reverse engineer firmware in routers, modems, and other firmware and check for backdoors or unwanted behaviour code.
      So checking for CCP (or those ever pesky Russians 😁) influence isn’t a problem…

      30

  • #
    Mike Borgelt

    There won’t be a war before 2030 with Australia and the USA against China. The Chinese have already won.

    130

  • #
    Old Goat

    I would wager that all electronic devices have backdoors . Makes fixing them possible when software (or hardware) gets bugged . Microsoft is a prime example . Weaponizing this is easy . Windows reports issues with its software back to microsoft and probably that allows them to see who is modifying it . Cyber attacks are effective but EMP weapons kill most electronics and are getting used in Ukraine . I wonder what a EMP “gun” would do to a Tesla ?

    130

    • #
      yarpos

      or any modern car really, they are basically controlled by a networked bunch of control modules aka computers

      wow, the above was enough to go to moderation

      [None of your comments are caught here though? – Jo]

      10

      • #
        paul courtney

        Mr. yarpos: your comment was flagged by the CCP, and they slowed the internet on ya. And if you ask “why would the CCP do that”, you’ll be secret double flagged.

        00

    • #
      PeterPetrum

      Not surprising really. When we lived in Sydney we had a local computer guru looking after our computers. Now that we are living 150km away, he still looks after them, from his home office! He just logs in using a legitimate program and fixes things, but I am sure that anyone with the know-how could do the same, and steal whatever they wanted from my files.

      20

  • #
    Rupert Ashford

    What really amazes me is that no-one seems to have any qualms about trusting communists and apparently teaching their kids that it’s ok to trust them as well. Was at a Uni open day over the weekend and got bombarded by some student body that opposes “Sexism, Transphobia and Capitalism” all lumped together. What can go wrong?

    140

    • #
      GreatAuntJanet

      I always wonder about the actual level of protection afforded by using a VPN (I use one because I baa). Anyone know?

      30

      • #
        John Connor II

        I always wonder about the actual level of protection afforded by using a VPN (I use one because I baa). Anyone know?

        Yes. Don’t bother with them.😎

        20

      • #
        yarpos

        Not so much protection in the sense of stopping you shooting yourself in the foot downloading something or hitting an infected site, but you do obscure your identity, IP address and location if that is useful. Many (most?) VPN providers maintain logs that can be accessed by assorted agencies. Some claim not to hold logs.

        I am often surprised by claims made on NordVPN adverts. It doesnt get challenged so perhaps there is more to what they offer than I realize.

        We used to use private VPN connections for work, but privately I have only dabbled with Proton. I dont really have the need for my level of nefarious activity.

        30

      • #
        Steve

        VPNs rely on the security of the VPN provider. Some may be security fronts.
        Your IP address may be protected but the VPN providers addresses will be known.
        If the big boys want to hack you, they will, and they can (Wikileaks !).
        VPNs help prevent tracking and enable bypassing of some commercial restrictions: eg. Netflix, Google.

        10

  • #
    nezysquared

    I remember a quote from James Burke in his Connections TV series many years ago when he said that the very links which make society strong also make it incredibly weak.

    80

    • #
      Rupert Ashford

      So true, many quotes about Democracy and per implication those entities/countries that champion that philosophy being a fragile thing that could lose all of it in one generation if not protected and nurtured. Seems the current generation(s) had it too comfy and forgot to teach their kids. Now the kids are floundering looking for “a cause” or “something to believe in” and Marxism seems very attractive – it always looks attractive on paper until it’s implemented and morphs into its siblings.

      70

  • #
    Ross

    Tough choice – do I want to be spied on/ monitored by the Chinese or the US? Talk about the lesser of 2 evils. Prior to 2020, even with the Snowden affair, I probably would have nominated US. But with the last 3 years of US interference with all things COVID, I’m not so sure. It’s a bit like the choice between Biden and Putin. TBH – I’m leaning towards Putin a bit these days.

    120

  • #
    R.B.

    I did the In The Know Quiz from News.com.au the other day, it went painfully slow despite good internet. Maybe a lot of users but l had stopped doing it before because my phone got hot when that happened.

    Pretty sure I could do something like this more smoothly in the nineties with dial up.

    25 to 30 years later and it’s harder to do simple things on a computer because of all things going on in the background, on a tablet barely 4 years old, with more RAM than my hard drive back then.

    80

    • #
      RexAlan

      I don’t know which computer OS you use but I gave up on Windows about 7 years ago. I now run a Linux computer with no complaints and no daily telemetry reports. Couldn’t be happier. Linux has come a long way since the early days. I don’t need to use the terminal as there is a GUI for just about everything these day.

      100

  • #
    AndrewWA

    The Telegraph – part of the cabal of Fake News Media.
    Hardly a credible source of information.
    However, even a broken clock is correct twice per day.

    52

  • #
    OldOzzie

    EV Fires: Why emergency crews and the public are dangerously unprepared

    We’re told electric vehicle utopia is coming. Except our first responders are warning Australian governments and the public that a serious, deadly problem is waiting to happen. Here’s what you need to know about EV battery fires…

    THE TOXICITY OF OUR CITY

    The toxic fallout from an EV fire is profoundly dangerous. You don’t even have to breathe anything in. You can just get some on your skin or clothing and you wake up permanently disabled. This is pretty serious.

    People are not told even the basics about what to do if an electric car catches fire somewhere near you, right now.

    Here’s what a senior official Greg McConville at the UFUA said:

    When the integrity of Lithium-ion batteries is compromised, the energy they store is released as heat and it’s known as a thermal runaway. This can cause fires that are extremely difficult to extinguish while releasing an extraordinary array of deadly toxic gases.

    There’s no greater likelihood of an EV fire than a combustion engine car fire, but when they happen, the risks are huge and the consequences are enormous.

    Thanks for Greg McConville pointing this out from some position of authority.

    The thermal runaway thing is important here. You can read my two extensive reports on catastrophic thermal runaway fires in EVs – especially if you intend to buy one yourself.

    On 23rd June, a mother & her four children died in Buenos Aires after inhaling toxic gases produced when a charging e-skateboard in their apartment caught fire. Thirty one other residents, including her husband, were treated for inhalation.

    &

    The truth about EVs and fire risk in our cities | Auto Expert John Cadogan – Note Cobalt Risk

    90

  • #
    Dave in the States

    Remember the protesters in China communicating with each other using their phones? The CCP wanted that feature eliminated and the tech companies willingly obliged.

    Your phone,
    your car,
    your stove,
    your PC,
    your TV,
    you bought it,
    You paid for it,
    You keep paying for it,
    but you don’t own it. Not really.
    They, like the insurance company, get to decide how, where, and when, you can use it.

    60

    • #
      John Connor II

      Software and firmware…

      How long before all browsers are required by law to prevent users from opening allegedly infringing sites?

      In a well-intentioned yet dangerous move to fight online fraud, France is on the verge of forcing browsers to create a dystopian technical capability. Article 6 (para II and III) of the SREN Bill would force browser providers to create the means to mandatorily block websites present on a government provided list.

      https://walledculture.org/how-long-before-all-browsers-are-required-by-law-to-prevent-users-from-opening-allegedly-infringing-sites/

      Hmmm…joannenova.com 404’s or redirects to cnn.com? 😆
      Suitably skilled people can fix that though. 😎
      Or simply use an older version of the software.
      Or don’t buy from companies that are compliant with such measures. They’ll change tack when they face backlash and bankruptcy.
      How long before your smart fridge refuses to work if you order meat via its iOT interface? 😎

      60

  • #
    OldOzzie

    EVS ON A COLLISION COURSE WITH REALITY

    The alleged transition to “green” energy is destined to crash and burn. A modern society can’t meet its needs for electricity with wind and solar sources that produce nothing a large majority of the time, supplemented by wholly notional “batteries.” The race to disaster is being accelerated by government-mandated use of electric vehicles, which will put impossible burdens on an already-inadequate grid. So it becomes a question of where the “green” dream will break down first.

    EVs may turn out to be the green Waterloo. Numerous jurisdictions around the world have purported to ban gasoline-powered vehicles by some date in the not-far-off future, a dictate that cannot and will not be met. Rather than flying off dealers’ car lots, EVs are accumulating there in growing numbers. At Heartland, Ronald Stein explains some of the reasons why. Stein itemizes the numerous factors that cause buyers to be wary of EVs, and adds this:

    Another problem for the automobile industry is convincing the buyers that its ethical, moral, and socially responsible to buy an EV, especially since most of the exotic mineral and metal supplies to build the batteries are being mined in developing countries with limited environmental regulation nor labor regulations.

    EVs are terrible for the environment, and their supply chains raise serious moral issues. But probably most consumers have more personal concerns:

    The problem is that manufacturers are loading up the “supply chain” with EV’s on dealer lots, but they’re not seeing the “demand” for EV’s coming from the public.

    The current EV ownership profiles of the elite owners are that they are:

    * highly educated.
    * highly compensated.
    * multi-car families.
    * low mileage requirements for the families’ second car, i.e., the EV.

    Current EV owners are dramatically different from most of the vehicle owners.

    Something else that I hadn’t previously focused on is the used car market, which is vast:

    Historically, internal combustion engine (ICE) car sales in America are upwards of 55 million annually with about 15 million or 27 percent being new and 40 million or 73 percent being used car sales.

    That is astonishing! 73% of auto sales are used cars. And yet:

    To date, the EV industry has virtually no used car market! In addition to the constant EV charging challenges, who wants a used EV that may soon need an expensive battery replacement?

    With about 73 percent of all car sales being that of used combustion engine cars, the lack of a resale market for EV’s may be a major problem for the auto industry.

    Another thing that is different about EV drivers is that they largely–40% of them–live in California:

    So, how does California supply the electricity to charge all of those EVs?

    1. To support the State’s EV growth, California imports more electricity than any other US state, more than twice the amount of Virginia, the second largest importer of electricity. California typically receives between one-fifth and one-third of its electricity supply from outside of the state.

    2. The other 49 states have virtually non-existent EV charging infrastructures, and a few of them may be exporting their electricity to California!

    So where does the electricity come from if all 50 states are requiring use of EVs?

    There is no place on Earth–not even a demonstration project, not even a village–where energy needs are met entirely through “green” sources. This is not coincidental.

    The U.K. is ahead of the U.S. in trying to drive usage of EVs, so their experience is revealing:

    90

    • #
      Ross

      Energy is what lifts humans out of poverty.

      Energy is what feeds nation states.

      Energy is everything.

      30

    • #
      Ronin

      “There is no place on Earth–not even a demonstration project, not even a village–where energy needs are met entirely through “green” sources. This is not coincidental.”

      A great example of this is Flinders and King Islands, set amid the Roaring 40’s, they should require no diesel backup, instead they just save a few liters a year, mostly relying on diesel 24/7.

      60

  • #
    OldOzzie

    Deep Dive: Lithium Ion Batteries and Heat

    August 4, 2023

    Batteries Being Charged

    Similar to battery discharge (i.e. being used), charging the battery results in heat production. Reducing the impact of excess heat on the battery while charging is the main step you can take to preserve battery health, charging efficiency, and safety.

    . Preconditioning: Prepping the car for charging, or any use, will ensure that the battery starts the charging process at a lower temperature. In many modern EVs, if you set the car’s navigation to a DC fast charger, the thermal management system will automatically cool the battery in preparation.

    . External conditions: If possible, charging in a shaded area or a garage, especially in hot weather, is ideal. Additionally, planning your charging sessions during cooler times of the day, such as early mornings or evenings, can help reduce the amount of heat exposure on the battery.

    . Charging speed: Increased charging speeds result in more heat generation. This means avoiding fast charging, or, if not possible, at least avoiding fast charging under extreme conditions (e.g. direct sunlight, peak temperatures). Furthermore, some EVs allow the user to adjust charging current. Choosing a lower current will reduce the production of heat.

    40

    • #
      Ronin

      I think I would charge on a concrete pad far from anything flammable or valuable.

      40

    • #
      David of Cooyal in Oz

      So, not a good idea to charge at midday, when all that solar is available. Do it in the evening when there’s none.
      Mag-nif-icent.
      Cheers
      Dave B

      60

    • #
      yarpos

      Nearly every charger I have seen has been installed in an open bitumen car park, as you would expect really. Pity that’s sub optimal, but reality often is.

      I noticed in our local town they installed two new charging stations. They put them in the far corner of the the car park away from buildings and close to the road (fire services?) only joking, they are placed next to a power supply pole. Unfortunately given toxic gases comments upthread its directly opposite a Primary School which is downwind in the prevailing wind direction.

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        Annie

        They are next to someone’s private home too.

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        Steve

        Several large supermarkets near me, in the UK, have parking under the store, this is not uncommon. Guess where the EV charging points are ? Yep. At some point a fire is going to happen. How much is that going to cost ?

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          Steve

          Several large supermarkets near me, in the UK, have parking under the store, this is not uncommon. Guess where the EV charging points are ? Yep. At some point a fire is going to happen.
          How much is that going to cost ?

          In gold?
          Or in lives?

          Auto, just askin’

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  • #
    Mike Borgelt

    charging in a shaded area or a garage

    Great stuff.
    Charge in your garage.
    Burn your car and house down.

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    Serge Wright

    The China threat is very real and impossible to stop. With so many essential energy and transport products flooding our markets, we’re now the ticking time bomb. One method would be to set a shut down date some time in the future in all vehicle, inverter and battery firmware, kind of like a Y2K bug. This would take out the energy grid and all EVs even if devices were not connected or sat behind firewalls. That date would represent the start of the next big conflict and the conflict would be over before it started. All you need to do is set the date, update the firmware and push the west onto RE and EVs beforehand. In the case of Australia, Chris Bowen is doing the job on the CCP’s behalf.

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    Ronin

    I recently read a comical account of a person driving a new BYD Atto 4 EV from Sydney to Byron Bay, he figured going by the advertised range he could set off fully charged from Sydney and make it to Port Macquarie, well missed that target didn’t he, three charging stops later he made it to Port Mac.
    Has anyone ever heard of ‘Charger Etiquette’, me either.

    It seems the 110kmh on the Newcastle Expressway and a hot day requiring the A/C to be used knocked a heap of range off the thing.

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    • #
      yarpos

      There is a Youtube video of another BYD customer talking about driving Sydney Melbourne in a day. As if that is some kind of automotive triumph in 2023.

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      • #
        Ronin

        “As if that is some kind of automotive triumph in 2023.”

        It is a triumph if you drive an electric car.

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    RobB

    When the CIA has a backdoor into every PC, can hack into your phone, when it controls social media like Facebook and Twitter to silence a presidential candidate, when the FBI is weaponised to put a presidential candidate in gaol, when Brexit leaders, like Nigel Farage, who go against the oligarchs have their bank accounts cancelled, when the EU proposes a digital currency that they can switch on or off if you mis-behave, why do you worry about the Chinese?

    When Western oligarchs, who own all the media and cancel all dissenting voices, like those who dont want the jab, or those who dont want to hand over their freedoms, liberties and hard-earned cash to a climate change hoax, then tell you that China is the biggest threat to democracy and the free world, you should rather ask, why is China the number one industrial producer in the world today? It wouldnt be because the same Western oligarchs that are trying to shut you up, shut down their industries in the West, and moved them to China, would it?

    So who is the real enemy?

    Sorry, no matter how bad the CCP is – and I’m not pretending they’re angelic – its irrelevant; all this China bashing is there to deflect away from the real threats to democracy and freedom, which dont come from China…

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    • #
      RobB

      And just to add to all that…

      Why are China, Russia, and Donald Trump all portrayed by the oligarch-owned media as the biggest threats to “democracy and free world”? Its because the oligarchs and their deep-state allies cant control them.

      The oligarchs made a mistake with China, they thought that as it opened up to capitalism, it would develop a Western style “democracy” that they could buy off and control (as they do in the USA and EU). But it didnt turn out that way. So now the CCP is enemy number one.

      The oligarchs thought they would buy up Russian assets for a penny when the Soviet Union collapsed. Putin put a stop to that. So he is enemy number two.

      Hillary Clinton was going to make war against the Russians (one way or the other), and the “un-electable” Trump was there to guarantee Hillary won the 2016 election. But Trump went off-script and won the election. Now he is enemy number three.

      Biden the puppet got elected in 2020 and went back on script.

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      • #

        The Oligarchy… messrs George Soros, Bill Gates,and other
        top-down supporters of the globalist, elitist land-seizing,
        empire-building cabal, we presume.

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      • #
        Saighdear

        Quite agree on principle, but I am frustrated that I cannot pin down just WHO the controlling Oligarchs are…

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        • #
          Saighdear

          [SNIP]
          Duck duck go n’ Gurgl “who are the oligarchs” ….. just Russians? top of the page… you kidding ?

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        • #
          RobB

          Yes, it is a problem. There are plenty of well-known names out there. If you ever get invited to Davos you will likely meet a lot of them. Unfortunately I dont mix in those circles…

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      Steve

      “why do you worry about the Chinese?” Cognitive dissonance ?

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    Saighdear

    Huh, meantime the BIG OEMs in industry continue trading with / in China. eg John Deere “Made in China” appears on some of their component parts. VW and the rest ( no intention here of rating any company ) .. so what’s this all about? we buy PC Components, we trade freely with ALI-B or X.
    Smacks of a form of Racism.
    But the idea of Electric powered economy & Industry with this n that USING CPUs just leaves the door wide open to vulnerability.
    I am very happy with my basic Diesel engined equipment. I AM IN CONTROL.

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    • #
      ozfred

      I AM IN CONTROL.

      Well at least as long as diesel fuel is available for sale.
      I like my 1991 Rodeo….. diesel

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      • #
        Saighdear

        I think the fuel WILL be still available for some time, access ? Dunno: you seen any Manuf’rs making electric Combine Harvesters and such like? Police & military, Fire engines or ambulances,…. very few , bar the Hype of Dreaming military wannabes.

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        • #
          ozfred

          Have you followed the decrease in rural regional representation in WA? The rules are increasingly being made by urban dwellers. A majority of which may think milk comes from a factory to the grocery stores.
          In any case, lower overall volumes (demand) for diesel will likely increase its cost, which will be an additional expense for the farmers who are mostly price takers rather than setters.
          Can you say reduced food production?

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          • #
            Saighdear

            ‘Can you say reduced food production?’ should that be Can you SEE reduced food production?
            Well that’s what does worry me, somewhat: but when you listen to the UK’s NFU and Agri edu “establishments” ( Ivory towers) you wouldn’t think so. I think the Milk form the trees translates to a Gravy Train.
            Isn’t it train that Society wants us to be Vegans, but we still refer to G R A V Y = which is made from meat ! – Probably just confirms how society thinks it sources its food from.

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    John Connor II

    Tesla infotainment jailbreak unlocks paid features, extracts secrets

    Researchers from the Technical University of Berlin have developed a method to jailbreak the AMD-based infotainment systems used in all recent Tesla car models and make it run any software they choose.

    Additionally, the hack allows the researchers to extract the unique hardware-bound RSA key that Tesla uses for car authentication in its service network, as well as voltage glitching to activate software-locked features such as seat heating and ‘Acceleration Boost’ that Tesla car owners normally have to pay for.

    By gaining root permissions, the researchers were free to perform arbitrary changes that survive infotainment system reboots and Tesla’s ‘over-the-air’ updates.

    Moreover, they could access and decrypt sensitive information stored on the car’s system, such as the owner’s personal data, phonebook, calendar entries, call logs, Spotify and Gmail session cookies, WiFi passwords, and locations visited.

    The jailbreak enables an attacker to extract the TPM-protected attestation key that Tesla uses to authenticate the car and verify its hardware platform’s integrity, and migrate it to another car.

    Besides car ID impersonation on Tesla’s network, this could also help in using the car in unsupported regions or performing independent repairs and modding, explain the researchers.

    https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/tesla-infotainment-jailbreak-unlocks-paid-features-extracts-secrets/

    Pleasant dreams, Tesla owners. 😁

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    Crakar24

    Gov are looking at banning Chinese made cars from RAAF bases due to cameras and gps location devices.

    Some dept are now realising equipment bought from Chinese company has links to CCP….they all have links to CCP lol

    When they construct new buildings they tempest sweep it and then have to jack hammer bugs out of the concrete slabs used for walls and floors 🙂

    We are stoopid, lazy woke with social engineering degrees have taken over and will be out downfall

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    • #
      Saighdear

      Well, ….jack hammer bugs out of the concrete slabs … but a teenzy weenzy molecule or two infecting a ponytailed lassie from Schweden gets the attention of all the World’s leaders and drives us all around the Bend ( AJAXED ) Can you make this up?

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      Philip

      When they construct new buildings they tempest sweep it and then have to jack hammer bugs out of the concrete slabs used for walls and floors 🙂

      Who is they?

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    Saighdear

    Well, ….jack hammer bugs out of the concrete slabs … but a teenzy weenzy molecule or two infecting a ponytailed lassie from Schweden gets the attention of all the World’s leaders and drives us all around the Bend ( AJAXED ) Can you make this up?

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    anticlimactic

    The problem with most ‘green’ initiatives is that they won’t work. One of the worst examples are EVs.

    Just for the ingredients for batteries hundreds of new mines will be needed. Vast amounts of oil will be used for exploration, mining, refining and transportation of these materials. The batteries have a lifespan of only 10 to 20 years, and there appears to be issues recycling them.

    EVs actually need electricity which few people seem to realise. Any developed country will need to spend 100 billion dollars at a minimum to upgrade the grid. This will be a complete replacement of power lines and transformers to cope with higher demand AND additional reliable power stations to actually produce the electricity.

    EVs will be just a long drawn out disaster.

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    anticlimactic

    While all these fears may be justified, including for modern combustion engine vehicles, who is most likely to hack these vehicles, China or YOUR GOVERNMENT!

    [Hint: why would anyone in China be remotely interested in YOU.]

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    • #
      Saighdear

      Yip ( or yep) Yes, that’s what I’ve always been saying … could or CAN lead them on a wild goose chase !~
      but thinking of what your car MAY see when you are close to ring/ Geo-ring-fenced Sites. Can see that point. Better stop free access to Garglle Satellites, etc… maybe its all just scaremongering. SHout Boo in the dark.

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      ozfred

      [Hint: why would anyone in China be remotely interested in YOU.]
      Mostly when the consolidated “you’s” would make a substantial majority of the total population.

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    Steve

    If my memory serves me well …
    This is not a new/EV thing. The problems associated with ‘intelligent’ cars (and dumn drivers) was raised many years ago (>10) when ‘self driving cars’ were being developed in the states. I believe, some west coast universities carried out tests and demonstrations showing that digitised cars could be hacked and remotely controlled.
    China is not really the issue. Sure they theoretically could do this, but the implications for them if found out would be serious. A bigger risk is, for example, digital cities where the state uses digitisation to control you, A La London today.
    The fact is with digitisation of everything, you are just enabling the ‘state’ to monitor you and enforce its agenda upon you. Privacy and security nowadays is very tenuous. It may be smart, clever and convenient but what are you giving up.

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    mundi

    I would like to point out that just a few months ago the Beijing Certificate Authority was added as a trusted root cert authority by practically all major vendors (google microsoft mozilla), and thus to almost every device on earth.

    The CCP now have a way to perform man in the middle attacks. Or course once they are found out the CA would be removed, but targeted attacks when the end users don’t understand how to save the falsely issued certs by the CA as proof, can be easily pulled off.

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    Mike S.

    The ability to remotely hack vehicles was demonstrated a number of years ago, not just on “self-driving” cars (as Steve noted above) but on more normal cars. Spying through the OnStar system was demonstrated, as well as a few other things I’ve forgotten, and while it wasn’t tested at that time the ability to influence brakes and steering via driving assist systems (such as automatic parking, etc.) was shown to be at least theoretically possible. Not to mention I read back then that limited remote control systems were already in some cars, in rental fleets where a remote command could be sent to a stolen car that would lock the doors, roll up the windows, and bring the car to a stop trapping the occupants until police arrive.

    10