JoNova

A science presenter, writer, speaker & former TV host; author of The Skeptic's Handbook (over 200,000 copies distributed & available in 15 languages).


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The Citroen Ami mini EV — the covered mobility scooter

It’s not a car, it’s a Quadricycle

Given that an EV is so impractical for long road trips, and is a “second car”, it makes some sense to have effectively a two seater shopping trolley, covered with plastic. At the moment, there is some loophole in the UK where this is allowed on the road, but doesn’t require a drivers license. Bureaucrats are bound to change that any second.

It looks ideally suited to slow London and Paris traffic and tight parking spots. But in higher speed Australian and US cities, I suspect accident stats would look ominous if the 485 kg plastic buggy met a two ton SUV at normal driving speeds. Not that it can do normal driving speeds. At 40km/hr top speed, its probably too slow to be legal on Australian roads, and too fast to be legal on sidewalks.

The sunroof is cute in cold climates, but here in Aus it might cause second degree burns and heat stroke in January. It has a 6kW motor and 5.5kWh battery pack — can it run an airconditioner AND a motor for half an hour?

I would be amazed if this were legal to drive unlicensed (or even licensed) on most Australian roads, but I haven’t asked. It may “take off” in Europe like the Mini did during an oil price crisis. There are no right hand drive options. Here in the vast suburbs, with a top speed of 45km/hr it will be hated by every other driver. Perfect for school zones though.

From Tonyb in comments:

No, don’t laugh, but is this the future of Electric cars, because whether we like it or not, the EV is the way most countries are heading. The Citroen Ami comes to the UK in a few months after taking Europe by storm(ish)

Its a 2 seater that will do 43 miles  (60km) on a charge which apparently covers the majority of journeys. I can see it in urban places but not to drive across country, but it wouldn’t be legal anyway on our motorways. Top speed 28mph (40km/h).

The thing is that for an electric car its very cheap at around £6000. Most electric cars over here are around £25/35,000. So it becomes realistic as a second town car and you keep your grown up fossil fuel one. At £30,000 the EV is likely to be your only vehicle and an EV as a first car is unlikely to be a good idea.

So, would it work in Oz’s urban centres?

Unlikely to be available in Australia

There is a webpage with a “.au” domain, and perhaps a theoretical Australian sort of model, with a canvas roof, and a top speed of “45km/hr”.  CarPrice suggests it costs $8k in Australia. I doubt it is sold here at all. Wheels Mag had it on their wish list last November.

The Citroen AU page ought to be reported for false advertising, claiming that it works “without emitting CO2”. In Australia that would only apply to homes with solar that only charge at lunchtime, or in SA on a windy day (but not during a storm). Otherwise, it’s 60% fossil fueled.

9.8 out of 10 based on 42 ratings

101 comments to The Citroen Ami mini EV — the covered mobility scooter

  • #
    skeptocynic

    It’s a toy.

    150

    • #

      But a nice and practical one 😀

      312

      • #

        Practical, Krishna Gans? For what? For whom?

        Regards,
        Bob

        101

        • #
          b.nice

          All it needs is a decent Boxer type engine, with turbo. 😉

          90

        • #
          Binny Pegler

          Could be ok for and inner urban ride share setup.

          51

        • #

          Just for shopping in short distances around home where the use of ICE is not so usefull in regard to the starter battery that recharges over longer distances only and the engine remains cool.

          41

          • #
            Graeme#4

            Just it’s just a second “car”, one that you have to really think about where you want to drive first. No thanks.

            20

          • #
            Hasbeen

            It doesn’t have room to carry the weekly shopping, so not really much use, except as a curiosity.

            50

        • #
          OldOzzie

          People like me – as tonyb says below

          The interesting thing about the Ami is that, for the first time, it addresses one fundamental problem of EV;’s which is that they are so expensive they can only be used as first cars which in that guise they have many failings.

          However if you can have an EV cheap enough to be your second vehicle that recognises that many journeys are quite short and you don’t need to use your ICE vehicle for it, that surely addresses a certain market?

          We have a shop 200 yards away selling Electric bikes at up to £6000 many of which are used for commuting plus these dangerous electric scooters. Get some rain, cold, wind or the dark and that bike commute so pleasant in the sun when you are young becomes a different proposition in adverse conditions and the AMI becomes a practical alternative. Imagine a couple where one works from home whilst the other takes the first car, an ICE, on a long commute. The other person might go short distances to shop or a meeting and could use the AMI EV

          50

          • #
            Yonniestone.

            Surprised no ones mentioned their postie delivering in the three wheeled EV (EDV), its made by Kyburz Switzerland https://kyburz- switzerland.ch/en especially for AusPost the DXP AU.

            It will do 45kph with a range of 115kms we’ve used them for over a year now with mixed results, coming from a motorcycle/car enthusiast background my first thought was why would you use the trike config 1 wheel front 2 wheels rear?, we only need to look at the Honda ATC 90 from the 70’s and 80’s to see the dangers https://www.hotcars.com/this-is-why-the-3-wheeled-atv-was-banned-from-the-usa/ also vehicles such as the Robin Reliant.

            And as predicted from even the test stage rollovers occurred due to the narrow rear wheelbase and top heavy config, the other problems have been the front suspension being too soft which our local mechanic has fixed with good results and the low top speed vs road traffic.

            Even though our EDV stays to footpaths bike lanes and road shoulders a few Posties have been hit from behind with cars being impatient or idiots in general and that’s my concern as riding my Honda 110cc motorbike I can maintain my spot in traffic and manoeuvre quickly to avoid obstacles or danger, its also legally road registered which helps greatly in insurance and incident standing.

            Even the pedal/e-bikes are more appealing to posties for getting out of the way and ease of use, we have a mixed result of likes vs dislikes of the EDV with some refusing to use them after a trial due to safety and others loving the idea, the biggest problem I see with replacing the motorbikes with these is accessibility where a motorbike can go and an EDV cannot resulting in more stopping and walking the mail to a point and as has happened 2 to 3 EDV’s used to replace one motorbike on a round.

            While the cost or safety factors don’t seem to balance out replacing our motorbikes with electric vehicles I think the big factor is AusPost has signed on to UN SDG’s , from their site,

            As one of Australia’s largest companies, we’re well placed to help advance the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

            In 2016, we were one of the first Australian companies to embrace the UN Sustainable Development Goals, by using them to underpin our corporate responsibility strategy. These 17 goals provide a blueprint to put the world on a sustainable path to 2030 and address massive economic, social and environmental challenges.

            50

            • #
              • #
                Yonniestone.

                That’s the one, I’ve ridden many motorbikes over the years and I’d say this is the most accessible and toughest one out there, it’s not a race bike, touring, cruiser, moto-x, ADV, but it’s light, reliable, cheap, comfortable and easy to ride.

                20

              • #
                Skeptocynic

                Yes, same around here.

                What I want to know is why are these not allowed to be sold new to the general public?
                It can’t be that they don’t meet regulations because second-hand used postie bikes are commonly used by the public.

                If the government is serious about easing traffic congestion and curbing fossil fuel consumption then why can’t we buy these totally practical little units new?

                Why aren’t The Greens pushing this?
                Oh yeah, that’s right, it’s not as relevant to a greener planet as trans issues and gender pronouns.

                30

            • #
              Skeptocynic

              You make a good point about the practical dangers of the one wheel on front design, especially with the narrow rear track.

              What I want to know is why Australia has to buy these things from Switzerland? Have we become so inept, so lazy, or so stupid that we can’t even make simple things like these in our own country any more?

              There are plenty of Australians who could, but the decision to buy Swiss instead of encouraging some local Aussies to submit designs and tenders is a decision made by public servants and that explains everything.

              30

              • #
                Yonniestone.

                Honda Australia did sell the NBC110 new in showrooms that’s now replaced with the CT125 and Super Cub C125 https://motorcycles.honda.com.au/models/onroad/scooter

                There’s some really fast and comfortable scooters out there, I did consider one for commuting as the Harley can get a handful in traffic, but in Ballarat the car is king, LOL.

                They did have an Aussie maker for the AusPost EDV Aus cycle? in Melbourne but they went OS.

                20

        • #
          Andrew Wilkins

          For people who want to go theshops reasonably quickly (rather than walking and lugging heavy bags) and park easily.

          00

        • #
          Ted1

          Krishna Gans @ #1.1 is on the right track, so get used to it.

          Even if sticking with the ICE engine it will be necessary to greatly improve the efficiency of our personal transport. That means stop using up to two tonnes of iron to convey one human being. 485 kg is a good place to start for a 2 seater.

          And 60 km/hr should be readily achievable, even more.

          No more 5 star ANCAP ratings, though.

          00

      • #
        OldOzzie

        But a nice and practical one 😀

        Agree very 2CV with Fold up Window Flaps and mesh seats

        Citreon Australia site shows more – https://www.citroen.com.au/about-citroen/concept-cars/ami-one-concept.html

        30

    • #
      tonyb

      No its not a toy and whatever we may think of EV’s they will be the way forward until the elite realise they are a deadish end.

      The interesting thing about the Ami is that, for the first time, it addresses one fundamental problem of EV;’s which is that they are so expensive they can only be used as first cars which in that guise they have many failings.

      However if you can have an EV cheap enough to be your second vehicle that recognises that many journeys are quite short and you don’t need to use your ICE vehicle for it, that surely addresses a certain market?

      We have a shop 200 yards away selling Electric bikes at up to £6000 many of which are used for commuting plus these dangerous electric scooters. Get some rain, cold, wind or the dark and that bike commute so pleasant in the sun when you are young becomes a different proposition in adverse conditions and the AMI becomes a practical alternative. Imagine a couple where one works from home whilst the other takes the first car, an ICE, on a long commute. The other person might go short distances to shop or a meeting and could use the AMI EV

      So I will be following this through and perhaps take a test drive out of curiosity. I can’t see it having any practical use for me as we have one diesel car only, but it is an intriguing concept, especially for those who can’t afford a grown up EV as their first car but want to have green tinges if not be green all the way through.

      It is sad we have got to this, but that is the way the world is going as even practical hybrids are being banned, let alone highly efficient ICE’s

      73

      • #
        Denny

        Hi Tony, Kid here.

        While I couldn’t see me in an EV for the only transportation, I would certainly think about something like this just for short trips to the store, etc.

        I just drove back from Florida going 700 miles in one exhausting day and then finishing the 1,000 trip the next day with 5 hours of traffic backups. When trying to make time, even a 5 minute gas fill up is 4 minutes too long, so waiting for any recharge is a non starter. But for driving around very short trips it could be very useful. Thanks

        50

      • #
        Skeptocynic

        No its not a toy

        I can’t see it having any practical use for me

        Pick one.

        00

  • #
    b.nice

    Didn’t the UK and other places used to have electric milk carts and such !

    I remember seeing them in James Bond and Transporter movies.

    Whatever happened to them. 😉

    60

    • #
      StephenP

      Yes, I remember them.
      Look up images in Google “electric milk floats”.
      They are reappearing on city streets as presumably they don’t incur a daily emmission zone charge, and also have a lot of customers in a relatively compact area.

      20

    • #
      Joao Martins

      Yes! And they did not burn themselves suddenly!

      00

    • #
      Ronin

      They were still around in 2008 when I was there, lead acid batteries, I think.

      40

      • #
        tonyb

        There are plenty of electric milk floats still around and the Post Office also have some for deliveries.

        10

  • #
    StephenP

    This brings back memories of the Sinclair C5 which was produced in 1985.
    There is an interesting article in Wikipedia that gives a lot of the background to the development which involved some serious engineering.
    It was not a commercial success, but I do think that with further development to give it more kerb appeal and load carrying ability it could have met today’s requirement for an urban transport.
    Apparently the chassis and bodywork were designed by Lotus.
    They have a cult following who have produced a range of variants, including one claimed to do 150 mph!

    30

    • #
      Deano

      150 miles an hour in a Sinclair C5 would be terrifying. Perhaps they towed it behind a Ferrari with a monkey strapped inside.

      30

  • #
    Will

    It is still rubbish whether it be a toy for the spoilt rich or a woke virtue signal for the affluent middle class (no doubt in an attempt to delay their extinction). Just wait until it goes “bang” in the garage.

    51

  • #
    Mike+Jonas

    I live 30.8km from my doctor, and most of the route is 110kph motorway. I don’t think that a vehicle with a range of 60km and a top speed of 40kph would be much use to me.

    120

  • #
    NOEngineer

    Some neighborhoods in the US allow “golf carts” to be used to be used locally for seniors to run to the store or the country club. Some are diesel but most are electric vehicles with old-fashioned lead/acid batteries. This looks like a fancy extension of that. None of these are practical for anyone who has to work for a living outside of dense urban areas.

    40

  • #
    John R Walker

    Dangerously unstable IMO and slower than a fit bloke on a bike – start the video from 3:20 or petrolheads might want to watch it all?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_gEjTTnu50E

    20

  • #
    yarpos

    Where we lived in Europe in the early noughties they had cars with a 40kmh speed label on them (about the size of a dinner plate)

    If you lost your licence for less serious offences (nobody dying) or if you got to old to pass the driving test you could still drive one of those cars. I think they had rules about distance from home and you had to keep off the Autoroute/Freeway.

    20

    • #
      StephenP

      Yes, disability scooters are now quite commonplace in the UK. You see them everywhere, on pavements, in the road and you have to watch your back with some of the drivers as the vehicles can have remarkable acceleration.
      There is even a firm http://www.tramper.co.uk that makes cross country vehicles with a respectable range that are becoming quite popular among those who find they are no longer able to get about in the Great Outdoors.

      30

    • #
      OldOzzie

      Speed Limit Manly and Manly Beachfront 30km/hr

      40

  • #
    Sambar

    Ideal for the new speed restrictions being imposed upon Victorians. Increases in streets with a 40 kph limit are being touted and of course these limits are only for our “safety”
    This type of vehicle appears to fit with the” keep em in the immmediate area they were born” idea while still creating the impresion we can travel where ever we want in our own vehicle

    50

  • #
    Peter Fitzroy

    A vehicle designed to meet a specific and narrow market segment is derided because it it not all things to all people – the manufacturer did their research, they feel that this will sell, but an Australian knows better, LOL

    418

    • #
      Broadie

      The concept isn’t new PF. Google ‘Golf Cart’. Most of your holidays would require the chauffeur driven one as a prerequisite for your patronage. You may find the reason it does not already exist is that no one wants it.
      Any chance you may list your steeds, energy sources and usage for the amusement of your friends on this blog?

      80

    • #
      Ronin

      Seriously, where are you going to use it, and for what.

      70

    • #
      Hanrahan

      Peter, it is clear it is not “all things to all people”. Assuming this vehicle still costs the going rates for rego and insurance, add depreciation, IS IT CHEAPER THAN A TAXI?

      71

    • #
      farmerbraun

      “designed to meet a specific and narrow market segment”
      It may look like that to you , at this time.
      But you may be being deliberately misleading.

      50

  • #
    UK-Weather Lass

    I am very definitely in London and have lived with 4 wheel Motability vehicles on pavements for a long time. As with all vehicles it is the ‘driver’ who determines how safe / unsafe the vehicle is when out and about. On paving stones it is much easier to hear these silent menaces coming but many pavements no longer have that signature tune of wheels crossing joints and even at jogging or running pace (>8mph) they can cause serious injury to unsuspecting other road users e.g. pedestrians with less than perfect hearing. We already have the menace of cyclists who are not content with their own lanes and ride along pavements often with little or no consideration for others. They continually dice with probability ratios and potentially serious crashes. We also have the currently unresolved menance of e-scooters which have been involved in fatal accidents with pedestrians.

    But the most nonsensical part of the electric vehicle obsession is that the majority of electricity used to charge these vehicles comes from ‘ungreen’ sources and involved the very processes the green lobby abhor … and that is not even mentioning the CO2 emitted from the processes of constructing, maintaining and supplying them to users. This is just more virtue signalling from the greens … who would be better off lobbying for nuclear building and fracking in the UK so we can become energy independent and even export our rich and pure energy at a profit.

    100

    • #
      Binny Pegler

      I didn’t have any issues with EVs in and urban environment, especially inner urban.
      But I do have a huge issue with the fantasy that they run on pixy dust and happy thoughts.
      An EV doubles the electrical energy needs of the av household, this is something that is just glossed over.

      80

      • #
        paul courtney

        Mr. Pegler: Agreed, one more thing glossed over. “Glossed over” also is, if this car is the “future of EVs”, and it’s using lead acid battery (to avoid fire??), then the proposition that “battery tech will improve” is the future for EVs, is utterly falsified. This will not phase the enthusiasts.

        40

      • #

        Binny Pegler
        March 5, 2022 at 9:12 pm ·
        An EV doubles the electrical energy needs of the av household, this is something that is just glossed over.

        Binny..
        Average daily distance driven by car owners (Australia) is 35km..= 6 KWh for an EV.
        Average daily household power usage (family of 4) is 20 KWh
        Hardly a doubling of power used.!

        00

        • #
          Binny Pegler

          So more half of car owners drive more than 35km. How much power is used with the aircon running? (in the car).

          00

        • #
          Binny Pegler

          6WKh is mid range good conditions, which doesn’t allow for hot/cold weather and time standing in traffic with the aircon running
          Also charging efficiency is 60-90% so 6KWh of battery becomes 8-10 KWh of household power.
          Throw in a suburb with a longer commute and a high up take of EVs, and you have a problem that no one wants to talk about.
          Fact is doubling is a very real possibility in a lot of areas.

          10

    • #
      GrahamP

      “cyclists who are not content with their own lanes and ride along pavements”

      This bought back memories. I haven’t heard the use of “pavement” for years when an English friend told our small children to stay on the “pavement”.

      Called a “footpath” down under here in Oz and I think “sidewalk” in the US.

      20

  • #
    Honk R Smith

    I thought we weren’t supposed to own anything.

    110

  • #
    Porter Rockwell

    It might be possible to license this vehicle on WA roads at least, however it would have to have a maximum speed of 45kph and would be restricted to roads with a speed limit of less than 70kph. You might of noticed the Postie’s operating the three wheeler EDV’s in the metro areas? They are very scary on busy roads, so far no fatalities nationwide.

    10

  • #
    Gerry

    It might have a market in Delhi ….nothing goes faster on the roads than 40kph there ….except tuk tuk drivers high on ice….. with sales in India, who needs sales anywhere else ?

    40

  • #
    Alex

    City and town green areas are going to suffer from a lack of man-made (vehicle-produced) CO2, especially when one considers the high quality of car exhaust that modern petrol and diesel cars have achieved. So, when we reach a very high level of quality in fuel-powered vehicle emissions, we kill the vehicles and introduce poisonous-batteries powered vehicles that need topping every night for several hours instead of once or twice a week, topped up within 5 minutes.

    As for emissions, the same amount of CO2 will be emitted once the power to drive a car is transferred from an IC engine inside the car to a steam turbine-alternator combo inside a power station. Windmills and solar wheel barrows just won’t cut it.

    10

  • #
    James Murphy

    These cars are notorious in France as the car you get when you lose your license for drink-driving.
    if you’re an adult, this is the first thing people think of when they see these on the street. I think you can drive one from age 14.

    30

  • #
    Deano

    A 40 kph top speed won’t be a problem – they’re progressively lowering speed limits for, you know, ‘safety’. All part of a program to make driving proper vehicles as unpleasant as possible.

    40

    • #
      Chris

      Deano just a titbit. Urban Planners push for lower speeds because you need less distance for stopping. The lower the speeds the more cars ( people) you can cram into a given area. They use terms such as “sustainability” and ‘efficient use of infrastructure’, to provide a ‘battery farmed’ lifestyle with a modicum of green space.

      10

  • #
    Senex

    These vehicles (“quadricycles” in English language Eurospeak) are death traps. Petrol-powered examples have become very popular with teenagers in Sweden, for example (at least those who can afford them) because they are classed as mopeds and can be driven without a license and at a younger age than a regular car – the minimum age for a driver’s license is 18. They are universally made in China, and have a lightweight frame with non-structural plastic bodywork. Like the Ami, they have a limited speed and interior space, but many of the interior appointments of proper cars. They also have effectively zero crash protection.

    Traditionally, Swedish youth built and drove modified passenger vehicles called “EPA Tractors” or “A-Tractors”. The rules for the two classes were somewhat different, but in both cases a regular vehicle is altered to restrict its top speed to 30 km/h. Of course, they retain all of the safety features and crash protection of the original vehicle. Originally introduced to allow poorer rural residents to use old vehicles as substitutes for expensive tractors, they are still fairly popular outside of cities, but are sneered at by more affluent suburban Swedish youth.

    20

  • #
    Dave Ward

    Unlike this joke, the original Mini (not a BMW disguised as one) was a “Proper” car, which could seat 4 people (at a pinch). It had a top speed in excess of 70mph, and far from holding up other traffic, could run rings round most of them! Even with the small fuel tank installed in the boot, it could manage more than 150 miles on a fill-up, and could be refilled in a couple of minutes.

    The battery-electric milk floats that were commonplace years ago were conceived (and perfectly suited) for the job they did. This was at a time when almost everybody had milk delivered to their door, so they could be based at a local dairy or depot no more than a few miles from any customer. Deliveries started before most people were awake, and traffic wasn’t an issue. Overnight charging of the lead-acid batteries was done at cheap rate, when there were no computer data centres running 24/7.

    Both these vehicles were a sensible solution to a need, which is more than can be said for the current politically enforced madness. And original Mini’s are now highly sought after – can you see a Nissan Leaf being exhibited at a car show in 50 years time?

    40

    • #
      Gary S

      The mini was fab! I believe the record for occupants stands at 27 – not all seated of course! Yes it was a real car which won many racing trophies as well.

      00

  • #
    Fuel Filter

    I remember the first time I saw a “le car” in vids a few years back and I almost choked on my coffee.

    My first thought? “Roller Skates on Larger Wheels.” Believe it or not, but these death-traps are friggin EVERYWHERE on US roads and far too many death-defying morons take them on our freeways. (65-70 mph speed limits.)

    AND, they cost well over $18,000.

    Fine (I guess) for the streets of Paris or London. But in major US cities?

    So, would you buy one for your granny? Well, not unless you had an inheritance coming to you!

    40

  • #
    neil

    This is the future of the car but it will be a lot safer, fully autonomous with no controls. Just a mobile capsule that you book like an Uber and costs as much as public transport but takes you door to door. Private car ownership and public transport will be consigned to history within 40 years. Country travel will be the same but in full size drones and air travel for holidays. I’m not sure how caravaning and camping will look in 2060

    03

  • #
    farmerbraun

    Surely the point is that when there is no petrol or diesel, you will be very happy to travel in an EV .
    But naturally you won’t own it ; but you will be happy.
    Right?

    10

  • #
  • #
    Thomas A

    Where do I put the golf clubs?

    10

    • #
      farmerbraun

      The golf course will be converted to a community organic garden.
      Your clubs may have some alternative use. Mole eradication?

      20

  • #
    tonyb

    I see the European car of the year 2022 is an electric Kia costing £40000 which puts the AMi at £6000 into perspective. There are few EV’s below £25000. Surely that is the sort of money where it needs to be a first car or the only car but I wouldn’t have an Ev as my only or main car as there are too many inherent problems. Not the least of which is range in the real world, with passengers and luggage, and with wipers, headlights, heaters all on. I wouldn’t risk a long journey without careful planning which renders it pointless and expensive as your main car.

    But a cheap EV such as the Ami as a second car?

    Its supposed to be coming to the UK in June so if I manage to get a test drive I will hopefully be able to report on whether its completely mad or that it fills a specific niche

    30

    • #
      farmerbraun

      Tony , you’re not getting with the programme. You don’t NEED a car ; you WANT one.
      The supermarket will have electric delivery vans.
      Electric and “free” public transport will take you anywhere in town. If you work (and you will until you die) the company will provide electric transport.
      Now what do you want a car for?
      P.S. Holidays are reserved for the elite . Besides you can’t afford it (in the brave new world).
      Get it?

      60

      • #

        Farmer Braun

        I am disappointed that you seem to be querying the great wisdom of our wonderful elite. They know best and we must accept it gladly.

        Holidays? Those are for the elite, as a serf I wouldn’t presume to go any further than the 43 Imiles range of the ami

        30

        • #
          farmerbraun

          Well done Comrade ; your new social credit score will reflect your enlightened thinking.
          Your power ration for next week will include 2 extra kWh .

          30

      • #
        ozfred

        The people who actually GROW your food will never be able to get grocery delivery from the stores…. 30 km seems to be a financial limit rather than a physical one

        00

    • #
      Ronin

      My query is why is there nothing between 25,000 and a wheelbarrow with a door and seats

      30

  • #
    mikewaite

    probably of no great interest to anyone but me but I am sure that that video wsa taken in Wallingford , south oxfordshire , UK .
    It was, when I went to the grammmar school there, in Berkshire. In 1956 we stood outside the 18th Cent town hall shown in the video to listen to a speech from HM to celebrate 800 years of wallingford’s charter, a year late, but royalty cannot be pushed.
    Now back to the topic, sorry.

    10

    • #

      Mike

      I used to live near Wallingford and moored on the riverside meadows many times on my boat.

      I lived in Berkshire and we were very angry at losing Wallingford and the vale of th white horse and gaining slough.

      bearing in mind the cobbles and the speed bumps it seems the Ami coped well

      00

  • #

    Switching all commuters into micro single seat EVs (similar in size to a quadbike) would be a way of fixing almost all city rush hour congestion at low cost. Such EVs can be mass produced for a few thousand apiece, and allows each lane to become two, can allow near total elimination of inefficient public transport, and probably triples or quadruples the capacity of existing parking. Certainly a lot cheaper than efforts to expand roading capcity in cities.

    21

  • #
    Andrew Wilkins

    I just checked:
    You need a full driving license to drive one in the UK.

    00

  • #
    max

    From Tonyb in comments:
    No, don’t laugh, but is this the future of Electric cars, because whether we like it or not, the EV is the way most countries are heading.

    Let’s look at a few things Vaclav Smil has to say:

    Electric Cars

    Smil points out that electric cars have been around a long time and are still expensive compared to internal combustion cars. But his major concern seems to be that the amount of additional electricity required would be more than could reasonably be added within a short time frame. And, given the limitations of renewables, there would probably need to be a big ramp-up in fossil fuel use, to accommodate the additional cars.

    https://www.resilience.org/stories/2010-10-18/vaclav-smils-energy-myths-and-realities-review/

    Most recent US forecasts have anticipated EV penetration rates of between 5-10 per cent by 2020. Yet given current sales of EVs and PHEVs, even a 3 per cent penetration rate by the end of the decade seems unlikely.

    The worldwide total of EVs on the road reached 2 million units in 2016. If you plot the trajectory of the global stock of EVs since the beginning of their sales to the year 2016, you will see that the equation that best fits the data (a fourth-order polynomial) projects about 32 million units in 2025. But the International Energy Agency’s 2017 EV outlook estimates growth from 40 million to 70 million units worldwide by 2025 and from 160 million to 200 million by 2030. Then there are the environmental consequences. If EVs are to reduce carbon emissions (and thus minimize the extent of global warming), their batteries must not be charged with electricity generated from the combus- tion of fossil fuels.

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    Stanley

    Brought to you by a car company that made the “Cactus”. This is Cactus Mk 2 or a “coffin on wheels”.

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    Ross+Holding

    So, some people are getting excited about a roadworthy golf cart. Am I missing something?

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      Graeme No.3

      Yes, there’s no room for 2 people AND golf clubs.

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      Saighdear

      In a word, yes.
      Legislation: 4 v 2/3 wheels. and your driver licence. and then all the other safety legislation, whether you’re for or aghainst all the reg’ns ( hoch aye the nhoo ) – these ‘h’s keep phopping in as typhose or haudio glitches. – I’m a bit breathless with excitement this Sunny morning with white ( hoar) frost this morning around Nigg.

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    Mark Allinson

    Re-cycling an old joke:

    This car is so small that if it hits you while crossing the road, you will need go to hospital to have it removed.

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    Philip

    I like it. It does bother me that cities are run on petrol cars. Not that I care two hoots about emissions, but the consumption of the valuable resource.

    Oil is brilliant, it feeds the world with the diesel motor, so you don’t want to run out diesel, and anything to preserve that should be considered. Because it is ultimately a finite resource, at a cheap price certainly, and you must conserve it for the vital role of agriculture and industry.

    So to replace cars in cities, to save the resource, is a valid goal as I see it. Especially when cities could run on electric vehicles. Most people only drive a small distance in cities that can easily be covered by current technology, and even small vehicles like this. And most city dwellers don’t even get away to the regions on weekends anyway. So I think this type of design could be valuable. ‘

    The thing is the price, being viable for lower income people. One of the big problems with the EV is that its impact on the poor will be immense. Second hand EVs will not cut it on the market like the Toyota Corolla did. They will be in need of very expensive new batteries that the poor can’t afford.

    So these cars are affordable and while easy to mock, I think should be considered for that very important reason, and the challenges examined. Ultimately it’s a design problem with the city that needs addressing. But running cities on petrol is an extraordinary waste, but people still need to get around affordably and independently so maybe there’s something in this.

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    Saighdear

    Yes an’ no. …. ‘ it makes some sense …. covered with plastic’ PLASTIC ? you can’t have that! …. will pollute the oceans, needs oil to make it. needs oil to lubricate the bearings. NEEDS OIL. Drilling Oceans. Plastic from Gas ? FRACKING – you can’t have that ! and yet I’ve been saying this for years: If it’s good enough for Gerry A’ Tric, it’s good enough for Mrs Smith. but because it has 4 wheels, … the stupid Civil Servants get their Toofless gums caught up in it ( Maybe it jams in their Oesophagus ‘cos they didn’t do as they should have been taught to. I’m not going to elaborate any further …. but you all know what I mean.

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    Old Goat

    We already have mobility scooters and golf carts and most of them run on lead-acid batteries . For 1-2 people commuting with “carry-on” type loads this new vehicle might be useful. HOWEVER our power grid is barely coping with its current loading and would need considerable input to run this sort of load. China has been producing electric bike and scooters for some time now and I have seen a few in use . If electric vehicles would stop catching fire ,be easily recycled, become practical and cost less we might be persuaded to use them (like “renewable power”). I will be waiting for a EV that can tow my boat….

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    Ronin

    Speaking of cars, 8am chaos on the Harbour bridge, 5 car prang, one car on it’s roof and on fire, wonder if it’s an EV.

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    Geoffrey Williams

    Citroën ami, has to the most ugly thing I’ve seen on 4 wheels . .

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    sophocles

    The 1961 Citroen Ami is a reasonably presentable car.
    There’s even a station wagon and it has a moderate but
    usable performance.

    The 2022 Ami is not.
    It’s a plastic something to scrape off the bottom of one’s shoe …

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    Bozotheclown

    Me and a lot of other people live where heat is a requirement inside a vehicle in all but 4 months out of each year. This for Defrosting and defogging glass as well as human comfort. Then there is traction necessary on snow and ice.

    I won’t be buying.

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