JoNova

A science presenter, writer, speaker & former TV host; author of The Skeptic's Handbook (over 200,000 copies distributed & available in 15 languages).


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Broke arm today

While ice skating, slender left wrist successfully stopped ice rink from bruising hip. Now temporarily a one handed blogger. But grateful — thinking how different it would be in hunter gatherer days without handy people with xray machine. Wondering how well bones healed while wandering savanna fighting off snakes with sticks. (Yay, civilization).

Distal radius now has exoskeleton.

Like someone else’s arm

As a long time veteran of leg fractures  in youth of both skiing and car accident kind, this is not unfamiliar territory.

Blogging will be more concise for a while. A good challenge …

9.8 out of 10 based on 110 ratings

165 comments to Broke arm today

  • #
    Yonason

    Wishing you a swift and complete recovery.

    510

    • #
      David A

      Ouch !!
      Get well soon. Keep blogging anyway; Jo can do it, yes she can, if Jo can’t do it no one can!

      260

      • #
        David-of-Cooyal-in-Oz

        I’m in full support of David A,
        Sorry to hear of your accident. May it heal completely and rapidly.
        Cheers,
        Dave B

        90

      • #
        Annie

        Oh dear Jo! I hope you have an excellent recovery.
        Not a nice occurence but it’s always a risk with ice-skating. I badly damaged my right wrist ice-skating years ago but with no bones broken; soon learnt to write, badly, with my left hand and eventually was able to drive on the long straight road North to Alice Springs. Holding on to the steering wheel helped a lot!
        Best wishes; your blog is the best! Annie.

        50

    • #
      Ted1

      I haven’t tried ice skating yet. Like golf, it looks easy.

      40

    • #
      Rob Jones

      A couple of days on light duties and she’ll be right–too much sympathy and we’ll risk turning our beloved Boadicea of sceptics into a malingerer; imagine having that on our consciences.

      Jokes aside, sorry to hear of your mishapsident Jo & get well soon.

      30

  • #
    John F Hultquist

    Wife did something similar – closer to the elbow.
    Estimate of being careful is about 2 months.

    Inform us of when the cast comes off and we’ll throw a virtual party.

    Okay, everyone — get ready to buy Jo chocolates and wine.
    John

    210

    • #

      tx john. 🙂 typing is slow on big ergo keyboard, hand going right left right,
      Phone, with tiny screen, is faster with less travel time of finger but cant blog from it with 150 tabs open. Must be better soln. but not enthused about voice activated. Perhaps have to try it? Or maybe tablet style screen?

      240

      • #
        OriginalSteve

        Jo, sorry to hear about your gravitational misadventure, but on the bright side, it does give you the *excuse* to buy some voice recognition software and use it for typing in place of the robocop arm….. 🙂

        100

      • #
        clarence.t

        IIRC Anthony Watts does his by voice recog. might be wrong though.

        Might be worth contacting him for suggestions?

        Rest and recovery. ! Cheers

        90

      • #
        Ossqss

        FWIW, the phone voice recognition today works quite well, including punctuation. Autocorrect can be a bear sometimes if left on however. Tip, if you use it, turn on its learning option in settings, and it will learn your habits and voice/accents better.

        All the best to you on your healing journey. Cheers!

        130

      • #
        Ian

        Sorry to hear of your accident Jo. Hope the wrist mends much more rapidly than you expect.

        Commiserations

        Ian

        80

      • #
        Ian

        Sorry to hear about your accident Jo. Hope the wrist heals much more quickly than you expect. Are you right or left handed? Hopefully right.

        Commiserations

        Ian

        40

      • #
        AZ1971

        Must be better soln.

        There is. It’s called an assistant to the editor. I’d volunteer my services to spend the next 2 months chilling in AU instead of the 45°C relentless heat we’ve got currently in Arizona.

        Are you taking job applications, Jo?

        61

      • #
        Jojodogfacedboy

        Be honest Jo…
        What politician did you punch out?
        Sorry Jo, couldn’t resist.

        Take care and get well my dear!
        I hear they have some pretty good drugs now adays.
        Just don’t get hooked.
        I like you just the way you are…feisty.

        70

      • #
        Rob Jones

        Solution: Perhaps an independently wealthy PA?

        10

      • #
        William

        I used to use Dragon Naturally Speaking – very accurate.

        00

  • #
    William Astley

    I am sorry to hear of your injury. Thanks again for this great blog and your efforts/caring/honesty to save our failing democracies.

    Best wishes,

    William

    210

  • #
    Fuel Filter

    Jo, I broke my wrist about 2-1/2 years ago. At the time I didn’t have the $$ to get it set correctly.

    Now, I still don’t, and I’m suffering every damn day because of it. And it’s my R wrist. Remotes, mouse, tools, etc.

    Ask your Dr if he/she will give you etodolac. 400 or 800 mg. Non-narcotic pain reliever. It’s a high-potency NSAID, far better than ibuprofen. Works great for me.

    80

    • #

      ta. good point about setting. I am a bit blaze but will go to that appt with speccie that seems a bit of an effort and be grateful…

      140

      • #
        Vlad the Impaler

        Very sorry to hear of your injury. Speedy recovery. I’m NOT a physician, but I have been told that in some cases, ibuprofen can impede healing at certain stages, generally the earlier healing stages. It is OK for later on when some pain relief is needed.

        And don’t worry about the blog; we patrons will carry the load while you heal.

        Vlad

        140

      • #
        Pauly

        Highly recommend physio after the cast comes off. I snapped off the end of my radius a few years back after a crash while bike riding, and the bone doctors did a great job setting the bone and then making sure the cast held everything in position.
        After the cast comes off is when the hard work starts, to get full movement first, then full strength. I was lucky to find a hand and wrist specialist. Only worked from elbow down. Amazing to find how much soft tissue damage you can do in a simple fall. And how long it takes to “repair” all that damage. None of which can start until after the cast comes off.
        Best wishes!

        120

      • #
        Peter C

        Jo,

        If you take a usb memory stick to the appointment, the ortho surgeon will probably give you a copy of your xray.

        40

      • #
        yarpos

        the drugs are affecting your spellink cheker

        40

      • #
        Claudine

        Did the same 2 years ago, made a mess of it and have a plate. Once the pain goes away and they start pestering you with 20 text messages a day for physio appointments, do make the effort. Do the exercises. I still play with the little physio ball at the traffic lights, heh. And do the scar tissue minimisation routine, all the time.

        30

      • #
        Lawrie

        Blase. Can be nasty. My wife broke her wrist getting out of the Toro in October, was out of cast late January and still has aches. She is 30 or 40 years older than you so takes longer to heal. It all depends on your surgeon I believe. I have had several breaks and in both cases perfect healing and no ongoing problems. Get well soon and I will help with chocolate. It seems there are many more requests for chocolate these days from the Salvos to the hospitals. I often wonder why we fund people to film their periods but not to treat cancer or even feed the hungry.

        30

    • #
      Dave in the States

      When I broke mine 3 years ago during a bike crash it turned out to be a compound fracture. The dislocated ulna had poked through and then back in. In that case I was left with no choice because it has to be treated within hours. I got the orthopedist on call. I lucked out, because he turned out to be an excellent surgeon. He did a great job. It required pins, and the other bone, the radius, was shattered and required a plate and seven screws.

      He wasn’t too pleased with me when he took the pins out and they were bent. I had kept using it, rather than take it easy. I had very little pain after surgery and required no pain medications at that time or since. I have 100% function and range of motion. I self rehabbed following a program given by the surgeon.

      120

  • #
    AC Osborn

    Sorry to here that, I hope it heals quickly for you.

    60

  • #
    Margaret Smith

    Sorry to hear that, Jo. Ice skating is inherently dangerous as is horse-riding which I enjoyed (though I didn’t enjoy a cracked rib from a flying toss). I hope you are right-handed. Thanks for all your hard work.

    90

  • #
    dk_

    Hoping that you get better soon! Having had to do keyboarding single handed many times due to similar injuries, I sympathize.
    Still trying to figure how hunter-gatherers would have been ice skating, though. I thought they had roller blades! 😉

    90

  • #
    Yonniestone

    Sorry to hear about your unlucky break, you and David weren’t trying a Torvill and Dean move?

    Also consider the fact we weren’t supposed to see ice skating again, maybe It’s good practice if you stay that far south.

    This will at least give warmists and trolls a fighting chance to keep up with your excellent content you produce on a daily basis, second thoughts they still don’t stand a chance.

    100

  • #
    Dave in the States

    Been there and done that. Good luck. It should turn out fine.

    70

  • #
    OldOzzie

    Stay Well.

    60

  • #
    PeterS

    Be well.

    50

  • #
    Carguy Pete

    Oh no!

    I hope you have a very speedy healing.

    Rest and relax and have your significant other wait on you.

    70

  • #
    Kalm Keith

    Best wishes for a good rebuild Jo; admire your positive approach.

    KK

    80

  • #
    DevonshireDozer

    I hear falling down whilst skating is the latest symptom attributed to covid.

    Hope you heal quickly.

    Best,

    DevonshireDozer

    100

  • #
    Contemptible Blackguard

    Bloody hell Jo – where am I going to get my daily dose of witty sarcasm? I think Dragon Naturally Speaking has improved now. You should try it, as that might help you to put forth your excellent writing?! Get well soon and stop Skating!

    80

  • #
    Lance

    Crikey!

    Stop testing the gravity detector. 🙂

    Increased Vitamin D, protein, and calcium supposed to help healing. Justifies steak and beer.

    Hope the pain is tolerable or is with medication. Gabapentin helped me with nerve pain.

    This might be interesting: One Hand Keyboard Software http://www.onehandkeyboard.org/

    No idea if it would work for you, but there’s a free trial.

    Get Healthy!

    90

  • #
    Just Thinkin'

    Broken bones are not good at any time.
    Unless you need, I was going to say a break, time
    away from what you do.

    You are probably lucky it was your left wrist, although
    if it had have been the right wrist you could have joined
    the champions who have mastered using their right hand
    for doing some thing.

    Take special care as your skills are badly needed in Australia.
    May the break heal well in record time.

    110

  • #
    wokebuster

    That two arms photo is freaky. The arm on the right looks like a man’s arm. BTW totally appropriate for a climate skeptic to enjoy ice skating. Here’s hoping for a speedy recovery.

    50

  • #
    Raven

    Damn, Jo . . hope it heals quickly.

    Back when I was young and silly, I used to roller skate competitively (speed skating) and once tripped over the proverbial match or something and clonked my head.
    Anyway, off to hospital in the ambulance and apparently I sustained concussion which led to amnesia for two days . . and what a surreal feeling that was.
    The worst part was a girl I was keen on at the time came to visit with a couple of my friends. I didn’t recognise any of them, so that was an opportunity missed.

    I’m sure there’ a joke in here about sceptics already working with one hand tied behind their back, but I just can’t find it. 😉

    100

  • #
    Penguinite

    That’s it! Close all these dangerous ice rinks! Get well quick Jo. God speed!

    60

  • #

    Hi Jo
    Soz to hear about injury. But global warming makes ice slippery a well known unknown fact tic(tongue in cheek).
    Have hit tip jar maybe some choccies instead of flowers even though not as carbon neutral.
    Rgds
    Jack

    60

    • #
      RicDre

      Hi Jo,

      I hope your arm heals quickly and am sending some Emergency Chocolate Support units you way to thank you for your great work on this blog.

      100

  • #
    TedM

    Hope you have a complete and rapid repair job Jo. WE all love your wonderful mix of science and satire.

    40

  • #
    ColA

    Hi Jo,

    Brings back many memories of youthful scratches, bruses, stiches and broken bones from the farm, horses and bush.
    At one stage I fell out of a tree and broke a bone in my foot, plaster for 3 months, mum was”not haappy Jan” because she just bought me a new pair of school shoes. 6 weeks after the plaster was gone I fell out of the same tree and broke the outher foot! Mum was happy, got a year out of 1 pair of shoes!!!!

    Get well soon and remember it won’t take long for the muscle memory to work the left hand glass lifting action!!! 🙂

    40

  • #
    Chris

    Sorry to hear you are broken and knocked up, I hope it all goes well. I found that when it reached the itchy stage a knitting needle down the caste worked wonders. Take care.

    70

  • #
    George McFly......I'm your density

    My most sincere best wishes for a full and speedy recovery Jo. All of us thank you for your wonderful work.

    PS No flowers but if you need any assistance with chocolate please say so,

    Robert (aka George McFly)

    60

  • #
    Tony Dique

    Get well soon Jo. May I suggest voice recognition software in the interim? Especially useful for when you want every 4th word incorrect 🙂 but in truth it does work well and can learn new words.

    40

  • #
    TdeF

    I wish you a steady recovery. I used to skate and ski, which is almost as odd for Melbourne as it is very odd for Perth. But skating is such fun and fast. However my bike riding is good fun and I insist my other riders wear gel gloves and your slender wrists are at risk in any sport.

    You always put your hands out and the little bit of gel padding reduces impact by 1000:1.

    In falling, the points of impact are utterly predictable. Everyone can name them. For bike riding helmets are essential as you always hit your head, but for older riders I have also bought special nicks for some which can have a pocket of non Newtonian liquid which means you get up from concrete. The liquid is flexible but hardens on impact but is much softer than concrete or bitumen.

    It is amazing to me that some of the world’s best bike riders in the Tour De France, like our Caleb Ewan are so damaged with broken hips and clavicles (collar bone) from often light falls when the (tiny) points of impact are so predictable and even easy to protect. Motorbike riders just get up, but it took half a century to get those bike daredevils to wear a real helmet. Even then they were probably sold on the aerodynamic advantages, not the safety. Still they have their trusty lycra body armour and no one bothers to put some kevlar in it, so the abrasions are horrific.

    So please protect those wrists. In falling ice is a slippery surface and slightly more flexible than concrete and not abrasive, but a direct impact is still dangerous. And incredibly disabling.

    110

    • #
      TdeF

      As for roller bladeing, a tiny pebble can send you flying onto the road and you have no brakes, except bones. Wear all the armour and you bounce up. I have helped bleeding children whose parents sent them out with only new boots. And then there are Canadian sports Lacrosse and Ice Hockey where nothing short of full body armour is adequate.

      60

  • #
    Geoffrey Williams

    Best wishes,get better soon Jo.
    GeoffW

    70

  • #
    Old Cocky

    Sorry to hear that, Jo. Broken bones are no fun at all.
    All the best for a full recovery.

    60

  • #

    Bad luck jo.

    The doctor reccomends you eat lots of chocolate

    90

  • #
    Eric Worrall

    Hi Jo, hope it heals quickly Mate!

    80

  • #

    Hi Jo,
    With luck you will heal quickly but I understand the problems with one-handed typing.

    I broke my left humerus in 2009, up near the shoulder, in a freak fall. I was surprised to find how incapacitated I felt, especially in the kitchen. I turns I am what they call ‘mixed handed’ – I do most things with my right hand but a few specific things (like peeling fruit, opening cupboard doors, unscrewing jars) exclusively with my left. I never realized how much I did with my left hand until I couldn’t use it. Made for an interesting journey…

    all the best for an uneventful recovery.

    Susan Crockford, in Victoria BC

    140

  • #
    Peter Fitzroy

    Best wishes on full recovery.

    180

  • #
    Robdel

    I wish you a rapid recovery. Do not overdo the typing.

    80

  • #
    Saighdear

    Oh Jo, … the older we get the ‘dafter’ we seem to get by way of doing / having accidents from things we never gave a second thought to, in the past.
    Maybe it would be a good time to take the time and entertain us ( yourself getting frustrated) by using Speech Recognition to type. All this auto-correcting stuff can come out with some real eye-opener stuff! … or as I learnt on our TV Prog Ch4’s Countdown last week ( but I’ve forgotten the term for it: ‘ I can’t be ASKED to do it ‘ ….
    Och girl, you’re young – it’ll mend quickly. Hoping we don’t overload the Moderator. Take care.

    60

  • #
    Neville

    Sorry to hear of your problems Jo and hope you have a full and not too painful recovery.
    I broke my left wrist after falling from a cherry picker from about 4 metres while picking my Avocados about 25 years ago.
    The doc wanted to set it properly but I decided against it and carefully used it after a few days.
    Not a major break of course but it was very painful and I still have some niggly pain today. BTW it wasn’t my fault because the bloody mast just snapped and I was quickly upended and found myself falling to the ground in a slit second.
    My fault for buying an old cherry picker plus a hidden fracture in the mast that was evident after my accident.
    Anyhow all the best Jo and I hope you soon have a full recovery.

    60

  • #
    Steve of Cornubia

    Sorry to hear this, Jo. I have only been on an ice rink once and all I learned was how easy it is to suffer concussion. I can still hear that sickening ‘boom!’ as the back of my head met the ice.

    Get well soon! 🙂

    80

  • #
    Rob

    I’ve broken my wrist ice-skating too! Too embarrassed about falling over, I got up and continued as if nothing had happened. Girlfriend eventually convinced me to go to a hospital to get it checked, and it was fractured. Missed out on a free trip to San Francisco as a result. Get well Jo.

    60

  • #
    David Maddison

    Wishing you a speedy recovery Jo!

    As for what primitive man would do…

    There is evidence of 36,000 to 38,000 years ago that an individual with a broken foot must have been nursed back to health.

    “Ancient Human’s Healed Foot Fracture Shows Prehistoric Nursing in Israel”

    https://www.haaretz.com/archaeology/.premium-ancient-human-s-healed-foot-fracture-shows-prehistoric-nursing-in-israel-1.8557154

    There is evidence that Rhesus monkeys survive broken bones in the wild without treatment.

    “FRACTURES HEAL IN ORDER TO SURVIVE – EVIDENCE FROM EARLIEST HUMANS”

    https://landauinjurylaw.com/theathleteslawyer/2016/09/19/fractures-heal-in-order-to-survive-evidence-from-earliest-humans/

    60

  • #
    yarpos

    Oh noes! glad all the bones stayed inside, get well soon, stop breaking things, especially yourself.

    60

  • #
    Ronin

    Jo, sorry to hear of your skating misadventures, you’re young, it should heal fast.
    Gravity wins every time.
    All the best.

    50

  • #
    John R Smith

    Jo, if you don’t get back to work immediately, we may all soon be wandering savannahs and fighting snakes.
    A perfectly good civilization may go to waste.
    Did Churchill complain about a little wrist injury during the Battle of Britain?
    No.
    A good stiff scotch, sans water, and back on the parapet.
    Do we know the whereabouts of John Kerry when this happened?

    80

  • #
    u.k.(us)

    Suck it up buttercup.
    We need you 🙂

    50

  • #
    David Maddison

    Here is an obligatory connection between ice rinks and Climate Change(TM).

    https://inhabitat.com/ice-rink-alternatives-and-their-environmental-impact/

    I was HORRIFIED to learn that the more woke ice rinks now use AMMONIA as a refrigerant because all the good ones are banned.

    There was a very good reason we got rid of ammonia refrigeration (as with windmills) first time around.

    The Left, as usual, are prepared to possibly kill people with toxic ammonia gases to supposedly “save the environment”.

    Ammonia refrigeration is very dangerous because when the chemical is mixed with air in the 16%-25% range it can cause a large explosion capable of leveling an entire building. The ammonia itself is also very toxic and is corrosive to the eyes, skin, and lungs.

    110

    • #
      Lance

      David, the ammonia refrigerant cools brine that is circulated throughout the skating rink underneath the ice at -20 to -25C. There is no ammonia circulating in the occupied space. The ammonia refrigeration system is usually housed in a separate chiller building or other sealed away area and has an obligatory brine tank connected to a burst diaphragm in the sealed system so that if over pressure occurs for any reason, the anhydrous ammonia is vented into the brine and immediately absorbed in addition to alarms sensors, and positive ventilation. There are very strict rules about using ammonia refrigeration systems. NH3 is detected by smell at 1 part/billion, and is an insufferable irritant at 5 ppb. 16% concentrations would be toxic and explosive, I’ll grant that. But.

      Ammonia refrigeration has been in use for more than 100 years. It is 3-10% more efficient than any of the CFCs, HCFCs, HFCs, or other HFE alternatives. It is often used in places where the ambient temperature is above 45 C or higher because many other refrigerants exceed their critical pressure and are inoperable at those temperatures. That’s why the UAE uses lots of ammonia chiller systems. They work at high ambient temperatures.

      Ammonia, used properly, is a very efficient refrigerant. Heat of vaporization is 1371.2 kJ/kg ( 589 BTU/Lb) compared to HCFC 22 at about 80-100 BTU/Lb or 20% of the refrigeration capacity of ammonia by mass flow.

      I’m not advocating Ammonia. It is simply a working fluid that has advantages and disadvantages. It isn’t something to be inordinately fearful of. Retrofitting a skating rink from R22 to ammonia or other fluid runs about USD 2 Million. There’s about 3000 Kg of R-22 in a usual skating rink. The only HFE currently available for this purpose is 1234YF at USD 250 / kg to say nothing of the compressor replacement costs. It is a matter of tradeoffs.

      60

    • #
      Fran

      Three workers were killed by an ammonia leak in Vancouver in 2017. It apparently coroded some pipes.

      https://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/multiple-deaths-after-ammonia-leak-in-fernie

      30

  • #
    lyntonio

    Hope it wasn’t your drinking arm, Jo.
    If you want, I will do it for you.
    Always willing to assist another Sandgroper.

    100

  • #

    Joanne,

    thank heavens this happened in 2021, and not back in 1784, eh!

    We all remember Bass and Flinders as the early explorers here in Australia, and they both began their exploring in 1795.

    However, George Bass was more than the explorer. He was ships surgeon when he arrived here, and you think of surgeons as older guys, eh!, after years of practice to get to that senior position.

    George Bass started his first job in 1784 as an ….. apprentice surgeon, umm, at the age of 13.

    It took him five years to gain his full qualifications as a practicing Doctor and a fully qualified surgeon, so that was at the age of 18. Then he went out and joined the Royal Navy.

    So, imagine falling and breaking your wrist in 1784, and visiting the Doctors to have it fixed.

    “Yes, ma’am, that wrist is definitely broken. Let’s see if we can fix it. George, I have a job for you.”

    Tony.

    Postscript – Hard to think that when George Bass and Matthew Flinders sailed that eight foot skiff out through Sydney Heads into the Great Southern Ocean and turned right, George was only 24, and Matthew was only 21.

    230

    • #
      Peter C

      Thanks Tony,

      Most people are aware of Bass and Flinders voyage to Port Maquarie in the Tom Thumb and also Bass’s whale boat voyage in which he reached Westernport Bay in Victoria. He speculated about the existence of Bass Strait because of the persistent west flowing current in those waters. Soon after he and Flinders made a circumnavigation of Tasmania in the Norfolk (built at Norfolk Island) and They were nearly wrecked on a lee shore, during a storm. They squeaked around the southwest tip of Tasmania into safer waters.

      We leant those things at school when we did Australian history. I expect it has all been dropped from the curriculum now.

      George Bass career as a Navy Surgeon is much less known. I only heard about it when I attended a Navy medical branch dinner at HMAS Cerberus, formerly the Flinders Naval Depot and we heard an after dinner speech about Bass. A centrepiece in the wardroom was a silver figurine of Mathew Flinders, about 18 inches high.

      We medical officers resolved to commission a similar silver statue of Bass to adorn the wardroom. Bass was taller than Flinders so his statuette is also a little larger.

      HMAS Cerberus is located on Westernport Bay, Victoria and includes the spot at which Bass turned his whaleboat around to sail/row back to Sydney, having exhausted his supplies.

      Raising the money took several years. To help get the money together we made about a dozen statuettes from the same mold, cast in Bronze. I am the proud owner of No.7. One statuette was donated to the RN Naval hospital in Portsmouth (HMS Hasler). Hasler has now closed so who knows where that statuette is now.

      A problem for our sculptor artist was that there was no painting of Bass made during his life time. There is a painting in the picture gallery in London but it was painted after his disappearance. The image on the 50c coin seems to have used that as a guide so we did also.

      A guest at our dinner was Mr Bill Wilson, a plastic surgeon. He owns a property on the Bass river on the eastern shore of Westernport Bay and also owns a small compass which Bass was said to have used on his whale boat voyage. The statuette of Bass has a telescope in one hand and the compass in the other. Bill Wilson donated the silver for the Bass statuette.

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      • #

        It’s hard to comprehend that when he sailed out of Sydney, headed for South America in the Venus, in 1803, and was never seen again, and after such a long and distinguished career, he was only 32 years old.

        Tony.

        90

    • #
      Peter C

      Thanks Tony,

      Most people are aware of Bass and Flinders voyage to Port Maquarie in the Tom Thumb and also Bass’s whale boat voyage in which he reached Westernport Bay in Victoria. He speculated about the existence of Bass Strait because of the persistent west flowing current in those waters. Soon after he and Flinders made a circumnavigation of Tasmania in the Norfolk (built at Norfolk Island) and They were nearly wrecked on a lee shore, during a storm. They squeaked around the southwest tip of Tasmania into safer waters.

      We leant those things at school when we did Australian history. I expect it has all been dropped from the curriculum now.

      George Bass career as a Navy Surgeon is much less known. I only heard about it when I attended a Navy medical branch dinner at HMAS Cerberus, formerly the Flinders Naval Depot and we heard an after dinner speech about Bass. A centrepiece in the wardroom was a silver figurine of Mathew Flinders, about 18 inches high.

      We medical officers resolved to commission a similar silver statue of Bass to adorn the wardroom. Bass was taller than Flinders so his statuette is also a little larger.

      HMAS Cerberus is located on Westernport Bay, Victoria and includes the spot at which Bass turned his whaleboat around to sail/row back to Sydney, having exhausted his supplies.

      Raising the money took several years. To help get the money together we made about a dozen statuettes from the same mold, cast in Bronze. I am the proud owner of No.7. One statuette was donated to the RN Naval hospital in Portsmouth (HMS Hasler). Hasler has now closed so who knows where that statuette is now.

      A problem for our sculptor artist was that there was no painting of Bass made during his life time. There is a painting in the picture gallery in London but it was painted after his disappearance. The image on the 50c coin seems to have used that as a guide so we did also.

      A guest at our dinner was Mr Bill Wilson, a plastic surgeon. He owns a property on the Bass river on the eastern shore of Westernport Bay and also owns a small compass which Bass was said to have used on his whale boat voyage. The statuette of Bass has a telescope in one hand and the compass in the other. Bill Wilson donated the silver for the Bass statuette.

      60

  • #
    Bruce of Newcastle

    Broke right hand once, then the plaster cast caused some really impressive blisters when trying to write with it on.
    Best wishes Jo!

    70

  • #
    Raving

    In my thirties, slipped on ice and instinctively reached back with my hand to break my fall. Ended up with a hairline fracture to the elbow, of all places

    How and where things break, changes with age. Please be careful

    90

  • #
    Michael Spencer

    Needless to say Joanne: All the very best for your successful recovery, and your continuing efforts to tell the truth about things!

    P.S. It’s good to see that you manage to get some time off to do other things!

    90

  • #
    Phillip Charles Sweeney

    Ah Civilisation

    Joanne you could try

    https://www.ibm.com/au-en/cloud/watson-speech-to-text

    I broke my arm once – well a car broke my arm when I ran in front of it – no fun at all!

    I wish you a speedy recovery

    60

  • #
    Flok

    Get well Jo,
    speed the recovery with boron supplements. Once the plaster is off get some cabbage leaves and wrap tightly around the area overnight to reduce any inflammation fast.

    Best wishes

    50

  • #

    Oh, Owwww!
    Very sorry to hear of your accident. Get well soon and keep on blogging as best you can in the meantime. If any one can, you can!

    50

  • #
    • #

      PeterC — got it in one, yes colles fracture. dinner fork indeed. Will need surgery and plate too. Sigh! but recovery will be quicker then.
      Not multiple fragments. but displaced.

      90

  • #
    Speedy

    At least you haven’t lost your sense of humour Jo! Would chocolate help?

    Cheers,

    Speedy

    70

  • #
    Strop

    Wondering how well bones healed while wandering savanna fighting off snakes with sticks. (Yay, civilization).

    Although there weren’t many ice rinks in the savanna. At least not while the snakes were active.

    The doctor investigating my potentially broken arm said my x-ray came back negative. Don’t they all?

    Sending some emergency chocolate money. Or for a bottle of something …. purely for medicinal purposes.

    50

  • #
    Amadeus

    Best wishes for a speedy recovery. Look forward to your erudite jottings every day.
    Your break reminded me of an incident when the love of my life slipped going down our moderately steep driveway here in Mount Ommaney (Qld). It wasn’t very elegant and she rolled onto our front lawn. Being the loving, caring, new age sensitive guy that I’ve been for 78 years, I said to my beloved “…stop being a wuss and get up so we can finish our walk…”. She took a few steps and decided it would be better for her to head back inside the house.
    Two days later an Xray showed she’d broken her leg in two places.
    And to this day, she’s dined out shaming me in the company of others.

    110

    • #
      Strop

      In two places?

      I’m guessing one was on the driveway. But was the second on the lawn or back in the house?

      60

      • #
        Amadeus

        Both on the driveway, Strop.. In hindsight, my beloved did pretty well getting back into the house…..while I continued the walk.
        I deserved to be shamed. However, chocolates have potent sedatives, especially ALDI’s liqueur ones which come out around Christmas time. I helped her to eat them…one for you, one for me – you know the routine..

        60

    • #
      Tides of Mudgee

      Amadeus, you describe yourself as a Sensitive New Age Guy, commonly known as a SNAG, but I think you’re more of a CHOP, Chauvinistic, Hedonistic, Opinionated Pr#ck. At least you didn’t kick her while she was down. (Just in case you’re still blanching from her shaming of you, this is an attempt at humour). ToM

      40

      • #
        Kalm Keith

        Maybe Amadeus was deceived by the slow onset of pain his wife experienced.
        Takes a while for pain to get past the initial rush of ‘drenalin; maybe even Mrs A thought for a few moments that she had been shaken, not broken?

        Chopping snags?

        40

        • #
          Amadeus

          Keith, adrenalin masks a lot…the fact that the bride got herself up led me to think she was just a bit shaken…Mind you, its been all shaken and stirred for me since then…

          40

      • #
        Amadeus

        Trust me Tides, I’m all of those. BUT the shaming turned out to be worse than the broken leg. She milked it for all it was worth…

        70

    • #
      MP

      Chuckle, just happened to my wife 4 months ago, she was in the yard and the boof headed dog (55kgs) was doing his bolt around the yard and ran into her leg, she was screaming for 10 mins for me, I thought it was a chook, so I ignored her.
      Found her lying in a heap wailing, dog curled up beside her, Dog was fine after a good check.

      Took her to the hospital 4 days latter, broken just below the knee and above the ankle, 3 months in fibre glass and still can’t walk to the stove.

      40

  • #
    Old Goat

    Get well soon. Use what technology you can – its the advantage that “progress” offers . Four or five weeks unthreaded will not offend anyone here I suspect….

    90

  • #
    Greg in NZ

    Ice skating? In Perth?! It’s worserer than we thunked! Stick to snowboarding or surfing – no one EVAH got hurt in those sports…

    Cin-cin Jo! 🍷

    60

  • #
    Tides of Mudgee

    The daring young Jo on her skating regime,
    Came down with a thud and broke arm it would seem.
    With expletives a’plenty and plaster in place,
    May the mending assume a lickety-split pace.

    All the best Jo and enjoy the rest, if you allow yourself to get some. ToM

    100

  • #
    Hasbeen

    There comes a time in life when we should give up some things that are more dangerous than they look. We may still be young, but the body doesn’t believe us.

    I was only 61 when I had to give up show jumping with the kids, as the body did not bounce as it once had.

    You are too important to go knocking yourself around Jo, so do try to be more careful, we all need you, fit well, & under full sail.

    60

    • #
      Strop

      I was only 61 when I had to give up show jumping with the kids, as the body did not bounce as it once had.

      No doubt the kids found using a horse far more effective too.

      80

  • #

    Hi Jo,

    Long time.. Sorry to hear about your arm.

    Have you seen this video?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_W8tWkT2BC0

    Apparently low levels of Vitamin D have been strongly shown in a recent large scale study to increase the likelihood of hospital admission by 2.3 times. Combine this with the other studies to date and there is a very strong case developing for considering Vitamin D supplementation as a way of taking the ‘sting’ out of COVID-19…

    I’ve reached out to Andrew Bolt and the NSW Premier and others to raise awareness; Vitamin D certainly needs consideration as part of the toolkit against COVID-19.

    At the very least they need to be tracking how Vitamin D levels interact with infection vectors and outcomes; there well may be a lot more to this.

    Currently suffering the Sydney lockdown…

    [Thanks! Weve known 4 20 years that D is assoc with a reduction in all cause mortality. If only black lives mattered it would have been included as essential in testing and treatment for years. – Jo]

    180

    • #
      Chris

      The Scandinavian countries supplement their milk and bread with VitaminD and it is normal practice in winter to take whiny, lethargic, depressed kids to the doctor for Vitamin D tests.

      70

    • #
      David-of-Cooyal-in-Oz

      Thanks for the link. An interesting validation of previous info, and well put.
      At just 14 minutes it’s a handy reference.
      It’s a pity they weren’t able to get numbers for people who were infected, but not hospitalised and confirm that even higher blood levels are beneficial. My understanding is that 60 ng/ml is a better target for avoiding hospital.
      (And don’t be deficient in zinc.)
      Cheers
      Dave B

      50

  • #
    TdeF

    It’s an odd thing with accidents. They are surreal. One second you are fine and the next, you are different. Your life is different. There is always a sense of disbelief. I feel sorry for those people who lose limbs and just cannot believe it.

    My favorite Monty Python version is when Eric Idle has his leg missing and the doctor, Eric Chapmen (who was a doctor in his former life) advises him that it will all be right soon. So Eric asks rhetoically, “so it’ll just grow back then?”

    80

    • #
      TdeF

      Dave Allen was a wonderful comedian. He had a view on accidents and people’s attempts to cheer you up by talking about people who were far worse off.

      Say you broke an arm, they remembered someone who broke two. If you lost a leg, they remembered someone who lost both. It never ends. And he had to say it cheers no one up. But in typical fashion he suggested we spare a thought for that poor person at the end of the line against whom no one is worse off.

      70

      • #
        TdeF

        And speaking of Climate Change (nee Global Warming), I was walking the dogs in the park this morning at 2C and thinking that even if the UN/IPCC/EU succeed in their brave quest to cripple Western democracies and limit warming to 1.5C by 2100AD, I would not be much warmer at 3.5C. Where Oh where is your Global Warming? We are paying billions a year and pay still even more to create ice in Perth in mid winter.

        110

  • #
    BriantheEngineer

    Saved body with face once on ice, RIP the tooth lost in the adventure

    90

  • #

    Feel better soon, Jo
    -Z

    120

  • #

    Jo, get well soon, we need you.

    90

    • #
      mc

      Yep, agreed, we need you Jo, the country needs you, civil society needs you! Hope you have a speedy recovery. Cheers.

      30

  • #
    John Raat

    Jo wish you a speedy recovery without any after effects. Could have been worse if you had broken both arms.

    90

  • #
    Doc

    This is what happens when you take off the cotton wool Jo! Fall on the outstretched hand.
    6 weeks plaster (in the old days. fibreglass these days?) Can you imagine how many here will have withdrawal syndrome by not having the voice of wisdom for a while? Reading all the bone shattering 🙂 events of people online here, it’s almost a medical practice itself. Bit of elevation always helps for a few days. All the best.

    60

  • #
    bill treuren

    Apparently Vit D3 is way forward, I am assuming you are a user so speedy recovery. Do enjoy your site.

    90

  • #
    Chrism

    Down with gravity ! (said the protest placard)

    elevation ! is a key

    good luck

    50

  • #
    Paul Miskelly

    Hi Jo,
    So sorry to hear of your accident.

    Please take as much time as necessary to make the best possible recovery. There are so many tiny bones in the wrist that their full healing may take time. As TdeF (#27) rightly says, we tend to use and re-use the same points of contact when we fall, so please take the time to regain as much as possible of “them bones”‘ original strength.

    To echo what so many have already said here, the world really needs your skills, with those of us here deeply appreciating them, but, if necessary, come back to the fray only when you are well on the way to a full recovery.

    Wishing you all the best,

    Paul Miskelly

    100

  • #
    greggg

    You can always put a cat on it Jo.

    ‘In a 2006 study conducted by Fauna Communications, researchers found that the frequency of a cat’s purr is between 25 and 140 Hz. This covers the same frequencies that are therapeutic for bone growth and fracture healing, pain relief, swelling reduction, wound healing, muscle growth and repair, tendon repair, and mobility of joints. This would support the theory that purring is not just self-soothing for cats, but is actually a form of self-healing.’

    https://consciouscat.net/2019/01/07/the-cats-purr-a-biomechanical-healing-mechanism/

    Be well.

    60

  • #
    Michael Hammer

    So sorry to hear of your accident Jo. Just hope it is not too painful and heals quickly without any long term problems.

    50

  • #

    All the best for a speedy recovery, Jo.

    70

  • #
    PeterPetrum

    Oh dear, Jo. What a bummer. I can sympathise. I broke my wrist on the roof of the hospital on Thursday Island (don’t ask!). By the time I got back to civilisation my wrist had set badly and I needed a bone graft from my hip bone to straighten it. Sounds like you are in good hands. I hope it mends quickly.

    50

  • #
    another ian

    Hi Jo

    Wishing you a speedy recovery

    40

  • #
    Vladimir

    Get well soon, Jo !
    May be Amazon Alexa can help you to run this website.

    20

  • #
    Gerald the Mole

    Get well soon, we need you.

    50

  • #

    Bummer. You take care Kiddo.

    Pointy

    70

  • #
    Geoff Sherrington

    Jo,

    May it heal quickly and straight.
    It is a bummer when something like this, unplanned, inserts itself in to the daily routine with disruption.
    Geoff S

    30

  • #
    Deano

    OUCH! I hope you’ve got one of those husband/partner gadgets to help make toast and drive you about etc.

    I broke my radius are tripping over while running years ago and the mid-twenties student doctor at the local hospital’s A&E tried twisting it around to diagnose it. That hurt so bad I had to grab his arm to stop him. He threatened to call security and I said I’d rather wait for another doctor. The next doc was about 50 and knew what he was doing. He just laid my arm on a table and poked it and moved each finger gently while asking “Does this hurt? Tell me when to stop.” Chalk-n-cheese.

    By the way, you couldn’t have done this ice skating – because sacred Global Warming Theory says all the ice would have melted by now!

    30

  • #
    Don Bennett

    Ow, ow, ow! Hang in there, JoNova. You are my source of COVID saneness.

    Take care.

    50

  • #
    KevJ

    Speedy recovery Jo..

    30

  • #
    tom0mason

    Get well soon Jo and stay safe.

    30

  • #
    Ruairi

    Joanne, it is best to abstain,
    From long blogs and all heavy strain,
    And when next on that rink,
    Stay on all fours I think,
    Then soon you will be right as rain.

    80

  • #
    Lance

    get better!!

    40

  • #

    —thx 4 all the great comments. I had no idea how common these were. And so many diabolical tales. Much appreciated.

    thx also to those whove donated towards costs. Merci! 🙂

    Likely surgery next week to make sure bones are in the right places. Plus plate etc. It was useful to know what might go wrong. The torrid stories were interesting and useful.

    110

    • #
      Annie

      Hmmm! Not morale depressing I hope. Just look after yourself; you are a light in the darkness for so many of us. I hope David is a good cook!

      50

  • #
    Serge Wright

    Jo, you of all people should know that cold is more dangerous than heat ;).
    Get well soon !!!

    60

    • #

      yes. i live in sunniest hot dry state but broke bones on snow, ice, and tasmanian roads, 🙁

      60

      • #
        Annie

        Not much practise coping with snow and ice available in most of WA!

        30

        • #

          The stupid thing is that I did a few black mogul runs (not that well) but broke leg going slow on a green slope on fluffy powder.

          Likewise am OK skater. have been a bit gung ho sometimes, But was skating slowly…

          30

  • #
    Richard

    Ouch. Much sympathy. Ice skating accidents can be very nasty. Putting your hand(s) down to reduce the impact of a crash is instinctive. Imagine the poor cyclist who does it while not wearing gloves. How are they going to, um, go to the loo if both hands are heavily bandaged? You have to hope that you have a very good friend. Disclaimer: I have always worn gloves, but I have sacrificed my body to protect the paintwork on my bike.

    40

  • #
    Faye

    This was my husband’s experience when he fell off the ladder and landed on his right side breaking shoulder, ribs, wrist and hip. Luckily he was able to save any damage to head.
    His wrist has a plate and it has returned back to normal by 97%. The shoulder had a plate but started to pinch and when out of hospital, it was removed with no repercussions. The hip did not have a plate instead it had a 10lb weight on his leg to straighten out the hip. Awful being bed ridden for two months but a fantastic heal of hip.

    Jo, I hope all goes smoothly. We appreciate what you do for us out here. Regards Faye

    40

    • #

      what an awful accident Faye.

      Though I too would sacrifice all those joints to save my head. I had severe head inj once in car acc. Lost ten days. Took more than a year really to recover most. So lucky. Could habve been so ,uch worse.

      Head inj are the hardest.

      00

  • #
    another ian

    Hi Jo

    Some “recovery reading” – government debt explained

    https://www.redpowermagazine.com/forums/topic/141577-fiscal-cliff/

    30

  • #
    Louis Tokarz

    So sorry to hear about your arm, wishing you a speedy recovery and a huge thank you for all your hard work keeping us informed!

    30

  • #
    sophocles

    Through my use of large motorcycles for daily transport, I’ve noticed the automatic reaction to put an arm out and a hand down as we go over. I’ve learned not to. But it’s not so bad when fully encased in leather with strategic padding.

    However, back in the late 1970s before I was quite so adept at dodging the mad Auckland drivers, I did break a bone in my right wrist, so I can thoroughly sympathise with you, Jo. (Those of you who know motorcycles will realise that was my throttle hand. Ay di mi! Ice would be as rigid and as slippery as a wet tar-sealed road.) And we find out all the things we need two functional hands for, like tying shoelaces …

    You have my strong sympathy, Jo. Get better quickly.

    One thing I did discover: the benefit(s) of thoroughly and continuously exercising the wrist after the plaster comes off.

    40

  • #
    sophocles

    Through my use of large motorcycles for daily transport, I’ve noticed the automatic reaction to put an arm out and a hand down as we go over. I’ve learned not to. But it’s not so bad when fully encased in leather with strategic padding.

    However, back in the late 1970s before I was quite so adept at dodging the mad Auckland drivers, I did break a bone in my right wrist, so I can thoroughly sympathise with you, Jo. (Those of you who know motorcycles will realise that was my throttle hand. Ay di mi! Ice would be as rigid and as slippery as a wet tar-sealed road.) And we find out all the things we need two functional hands for, like tying shoelaces …

    You have my strong sympathy, Jo. Get better quickly.

    One thing I did discover: the benefit(s) of thoroughly and continuously exercising the wrist after the plaster comes off.

    20

  • #
    Rod McLaughlin

    I didn’t know they had ice in Australia

    Get well soon

    20

  • #
    Dumbarse Marcus

    I have never commented here til now…I would just like to say ,thank you for your website and I wish you a speedy , comfortable recovery.

    [ Thanks :- ) – Jo]

    10

  • #
    hasbeen

    https://www.news-medical.net/news/20200817/Study-demonstrates-new-stimulation-therapy-for-motor-rehabilitation-in-spinal-cord-injuries.aspx

    buy yourself a pemf devise —–PLENTY OF BONE STUDIES AROUND THE NET FOR CONSUMPTION—-

    what happens when the electo mag field of the earth diminishes
    final answer yes
    look around

    10