You will buy the batteries that unreliable wind and solar need, but the government will own them…

By Jo Nova

They want you in an EV so they can use your battery to rescue the unreliable grid they built

There is a desperate need to add billions of dollars worth of batteries to smooth out our volatile grids. As I said last year:

The hapless homeowners will buy the back up battery for the grid and install it in their garage. (Sometimes they might drive it too.)

It’s so much the better if the unwashed masses pay for the batteries themselves, and so it has come to pass. Some academics in Canberra are excited that they finally proved the point and sucked some electricity out of 16 cars at a tight moment in February.

A vehicle-to-grid response: Electric vehicles fed power into Australian grid during blackout, says report

During a major storm event that eventually cut power to tens of thousands of homes, a fleet of electric vehicles (EVs) were able to feed power back into Australia’s electricity grid, according to a new report from The Australian National University (ANU).

These 16 cars provided all of 107 kilowatts for an unspecified length of time.

They let slip just what a drain EV’s will be on the average household.

“Stopping just 6,000 EVs charging would have kept the power on for those 90,000 customers whose power was cut on February 13.

So one EV consumes as much electricity as 15 houses, and we want to add a million to an unreliable grid? Where is all that electricity coming from?

And as Andrew Bolt points out, you might have been charging your car for a reason…

There’s huge bushfires, say. They knock out electricity lines, like the ones that went down and triggered Victoria’s big blackout. Your EV, which you were charging at home, is suddenly drained to save the electricity system. And then the fires approach. Or the floods.

So after they subsidize your EV purchase, and you think you have a good deal, they’ll raise the price of electricity. Then they’ll offer their hostages discounts if they join the scheme and plug in the car every day. But when your car battery depreciates “to landfill”, or your house burns to the ground, you’ll be the one paying the bill.

UPDATE: To clarify —  It will be voluntary but only the wealthy will really have the choice…   Like air conditioners that the government switches off in our homes on hot days, the unwashed masses will find the “discounts” offered to keep their car plugged in at peak hour will be hard to refuse.

Expensive electricity is not a bug, it’s a feature. Cheap electricity gives power to the people. Expensive electricity gives power to the bureaucrats who control the complicated pricing schemes. The bureaucrats give discounts to encourage certain “patterns of behavior”. The wealthy do what they want.

h/t Bally and MeAgain.

REFERENCE

Bjorn C. P. Sturmberg et al, Vehicle-to-grid response to a frequency contingency in a national grid – successes and shortcomings (2024). DOI: 10.21203/rs.3.rs-4445838/v1

9.9 out of 10 based on 111 ratings

115 comments to You will buy the batteries that unreliable wind and solar need, but the government will own them…

  • #
    John Hultquist

    “… vehicle-to-grid, with vehicles discharging within 6 seconds of the contingency event, and shortcomings, with vehicles recommencing charging before the power system had fully recovered.”

    I wonder, if you are on a highway, will your car take itself to a near-by plug? You will not get to the daycare to pick up the kid. Your passenger, in the midst of a stroke, can just relax until tomorrow. The hospital will still be there.
    The future looks wonderful! 🙂

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    • #
      Geoff

      So we are going to be forced to leave our EVs connected to the grid with lithium fire starters in our homes while we sleep just because a know nothing political party can get re-elected?

      This logic could be extended to a huge airport carpark and eventually to all electrical equipment.

      The government will control your battery.

      What could go wrong?

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      • #
        Chad

        Geoff
        July 11, 2024 at 9:51 am · Reply
        So we are going to be forced to leave our EVs connected to the grid with lithium fire starters in our homes while we sleep just because a know nothing political party can get re-elected?

        Where has it been said that “we will be forced to leave our EVs connected to the grid” ?
        Ev owners already leave them connected overnight to charge…..but its not compulsory !

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        • #
          Geoff

          True till Burn Your Dreams is shipped in mass to Aus.

          70

        • #
          Ted1.

          Chad, that’s the way they think.

          But, suppose we come to that, the batteries should be stored in the servos, not in the homes. Nor in the cars. Put smaller batteries in the cars and provide efficient swapping facilities at the servos.

          Of course we could hope that the Wokes wake up and none of this happens.

          70

          • #
            Tel

            Swapping batteries makes sense with power tools … when the same guy owns the tools and also the batteries.

            It is unfortunately complete nonsense for the battery to be swapped at the servo … bad actors are guaranteed to swap out their damaged battery for a good one.

            50

        • #
          Ronin

          Where was it said we were forced to have covid jabs.

          30

          • #

            It will be voluntary but only the wealthy will really have the choice….

            So after they subsidize your EV purchase, and you think you have a good deal, they’ll raise the price of electricity. Then they’ll offer their hostages discounts if they join the scheme…

            Like air conditioners that the government switches off in your home on the hottest days, the unwashed masses will find the “discounts” offered to keep their car plugged in will be hard to refuse.

            Expensive electricity is not a bug, it’s a feature. It gives power to the people who control the complicated pricing schemes. They give discounts to encourage certain “patterns of behavior”.

            I will add this point to the post.

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          • #
            Ted1.

            Where were you? Lots of people had the choice of take the jab or take the sack.

            There was pressure in some places attempting to deny even that choice. People who objected were accused of being granny killers, preventing the dogooders from eliminating the disease.

            100

  • #
    David Maddison

    And they don’t care if you lose the ability to use your freedom-giving motor vehicle because it has a flat battery because all it’s energy has been “donated” to the grid.

    They don’t want you having the freedom of personal mobility anyway. Your mandated EV will be permanently stranded and permanently connected to the grid to provide “free” battery services.

    And proof of the fact that they don’t want you (non-Elites) to drive is given by their support for 15 Minute Cities (WEF) rebranded in Australia as 20 Minute Neighbourhoods.

    https://intelligence.weforum.org/monitor/latest-knowledge/8d496bec33e74bd9b0e0eaf99b9a1f8f

    https://www.planning.vic.gov.au/guides-and-resources/strategies-and-initiatives/20-minute-neighbourhoods

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    • #
      Chad

      The vehicle owner can control and program the max/min amount of battery capacity to be retained.
      Current plans for these” Vehicle to Grid” schemes offer some very high FIT tarrifs depending on time of day . Early participants (in SA) claim to earn $100s per week !
      https://www.solarquotes.com.au/blog/aussie-v2g-pioneer/

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      • #
        RickWill

        The batteries have a limited cycle life dependent on the depth of cycle and rate of cycling. So every cycle erodes some of the battery value. They may be making $100/wk from their FIT but what is happening to the battery life.

        Tesla batteries are achieving around 20% loss of capacity after 240,000km. Assuming a 400km range for 80% DoD, the battery has been cycled around 600 times over say 8 years to clock up the distance. Now cycle the battery 3 days per week for 2 years and you have taken about half the cycle life of the battery just on grid support duty.

        The real question for EV owners is how does the battery warranty respond to the grid support application.

        Only politicians get something for nothing. The rest of usually pay the price in some way.

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    • #
      OldOzzie

      Andrew Bolt: EV battery plan latest crackpot global warming scheme

      The only thing to like about a plan to steal power from EV batteries to save an electricity system wrecked by other warmist schemes is that it punishes those who think they’re saving the planet by buying an electric car.

      The only thing to like about the latest crackpot global warming plan is that it punishes people vain enough to think they’re saving the planet by buying an electric car.

      The plan – pushed this week by an Australian National University academic and naive reporters at the ABC and The Age – is to steal the power in people’s EV batteries to save an electricity system being wrecked by other warmist schemes.

      Oh, and steal it exactly when there’s, say, a bushfire you might be desperate to flee. In your car.

      Ha ha ha.

      An ANU paper published this week said researchers had got 16 EVs to pump power back into the system when a big storm cut power in Victoria this year to 90,000 homes.

      The ABC was as excited as it was ignorant of engineering: “A fleet of just 16 EVs charging across Canberra was able to rebalance the power during a major blackout in Melbourne this year.”

      What? The batteries of just 16 cars could save Melbourne from a major blackout? They couldn’t and didn’t.

      But the ANU paper’s lead author, Dr Bjorn Sturmberg, said, getting another “105,000 vehicles responding in this way would fully cover the backup required for the whole of the ACT and NSW.” For a short burst.

      Only Japanese EVs can put electricity back into the system but Sturmberg hopes this will become a standard feature to save an electricity system already so shonky that we’re paying big manufacturers to shut down when there’s not enough power.

      Hmm. Intriguing. Until you apply this to the real world.

      There’s huge bushfires, say. They knock out electricity lines, like the ones that went down and triggered Victoria’s big blackout. Your EV, which you were charging at home, is suddenly drained to save the electricity system. And then the fires approach. Or the floods.

      What will you drive?

      There must be an easier way, and Sturmberg’s paper accidentally hits on it. Stop the Albanese government’s push to make us buy electric cars rather than petrol ones.

      Sturmberg’s paper notes Victoria’s blackout of 90,000 customers “is equivalent to stopping 6000 EVs charging at 5kW”.

      These cars hog that much of our electricity already?

      Today we have under 200,000 EVs on our roads. Under the government’s plans, we should have anything up to 2 million EVs by 2030. That’s a hell of a lot of electricity we don’t have.

      Is petrol really so bad?

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      • #
        OldOzzie

        EVidently Lousy EV Demand Is EViscerating EVeryone’s Prior Plans

        For a government-mandated, bet-the-farm sure thing, our purely electric vehicle future sure has been nothing but an ongoing litany of bad news.

        I, for one, sure have been fascinated watching – and documenting – as the whole grifting Green, not-ready-for-prime-time scheme falls apart in real-time.

        So here I am with today’s round-up of sobering reality checks on what happens when climate cult fever dreams meet a free marketplace.

        In yet another blow to the already reeling German economy – again, thank you, Greens – Volkswagen has once more drawn an EV blank and come up fahrvernügies.

        Well, shoot. What happened there?

        …It noted that it is also considering the restructuring or potential shutdown of its Audi plant in Brussels, where it employs 3,000 people, on the back of weak demand for the Audi Q8 e-tron line — a fully electric offering from the brand, launched in 2019.

        …If it presses ahead, this would mark Volkswagen’s first factory shutdown in nearly four decades, since the 1988 closure of its plant in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania.

        Analysts have said Audi has been consistently a thorn in VW’s side, with delivery issues, etc.

        There were rumors the latest VW move was going to be quite a leap from frying pan into the inextinquishable EV fire…

        Mercedes had banked on at least 50% of their vehicle sales being electric by 2025.

        It is growing ever more obvious that there is no way the company is going to come close to meeting that threshold. Ergo, adjustments are being made to scale back plans already in the works while others are being put on hold.

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        • #
          OldOzzie

          EV Boosters Cannot Do Math

          According to Electrly, the electric vehicle charging manufacturer, it takes an average of 90 kilowatt-hours of electricity to fully charge a Tesla Model Y long range all-wheel-drive vehicle, 83 kWh for the Model Y performance version, and 67 kWh for the standard range Model Y.

          Each Tesla uses between 0.24 to 0.30 kWh per mile, or about 4,500 kWh over a year for 15,000 miles of driving.

          Other electric vehicles use more or less, but within a similar range. At 0.30 kWh per mile, that’s 90 kWh for 300 miles of driving for the typical week.

          The average American household without an in-home EV charging station consumes about 30 kWh per day, or about 10,720 kWh over a year’s time. With just one electric vehicle being charged at home, that total increases to about 15,220 kWh. For two-EV households, that total runs up to nearly 20,000 kWh per year (assuming both drivers commute to work). That’s nearly double current electricity usage for such families.

          Without an EV in the garage, air conditioning uses nearly a fifth of household electricity, followed by space heating and water heating (a combined 25%). But adding just one home-charged EV changes that calculus dramatically. The EV takes up about 30% ot the much higher total electricity use, dropping the share for all other uses significantly.

          Two home-charged EVs would eat up nearly half the household’s total electricity usage – and require thousands of dollars to upgrade the house’s electric panel. Today’s 50-kva transformers, which cost about $8,000 each, can power about 60 homes; that number drops closer to 40 if each of those homes houses one electric vehicle, closer to 30 with two EVs using home chargers.

          For a city with 120,000 homes, which today may require about 2,000 transformers, the addition of 120,000 home-charged electric vehicles means adding 1,000 transformers, about $8 million. But that’s just the tip of the iceberg, because distributing 50 to 100% more household electricity requires generating 50 to 100% more electricity.

          All this costs money that most Americans today do not have, especially at the generation end.

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    • #
      Ted1.

      “They don’t want you having the freedom of personal mobility anyway.”

      That’s what I am finding after failing a driving test when the assessor stuffed it up for me, and I didn’t know how until I got the report a couple of days later.

      This is long, but some of my mates here might find it useful. My suggestion is if you have to do one of these tests, use your own car. And negotiate a lower fee.

      First the neurologist gave a very vague report that mentioned, but didn’t call for, an Occupational Therapy Road Test. I reckon the vagueness of the report showed that the neurologist was overworked and may never recover from the mayhem that the CV19 inflicted on us. But I was in a hurry to get my licence back. My junior GP gave me hope that he could work around it, but it takes a month to get an appointment and that didn’t materialise, which left me thinking that he might have beeen instructed by superiors that you don’t understate specialists.

      So, in my impatience, I went to the local RMS, who read the paperwork as requiring an OTRT, and gave us a couple of phone numbers. Dubbo (140 km) could not do it for three months or more, Orange (180 km) didn’t respond promptly to my filling in a form on their website. I turned to the coast (330 km) could do it, and i made an appointment. The bloke rang back a bit later. Could I change the time to 3 pm.

      OK. It didn’t occur to me that that was school time, the busiest time all day. There turned out to be lots of schools and school buses on our test route.

      I did the indoor interview and passed that OK. Then to their car. On the way, a very strange question. You are standing at the side of a busy road and want to get to the other side, there are no lights or pedestrian crossings, what is the first thing you would do?

      Wait for a break in the traffic was not it. My imaginary road got bigger and busier. The question persisted.

      When my next suggestion was to be bring a swag and try my luck at 3 am he told me. Look right, look left and look right again. Which still has me baffled. This was work, not play. That must score me points on some academic index. Would they be positive or negative points? That question did put some lumps and bumps into my road ahead.

      The car was parked in a challenging position, tail down in a steep driveway. OK, we can do that. But there was no rollback when I released the handbrake. I wondered, maybe modern cars have anti rollback systems that totally stop it. More later on that.(Maybe the bloke was already working the brakes without my knowing it.)

      Now the 30 minute drive. I immediately ran into a problem.

      Often when applying the accelerator there was a delay before the motor responded. Getting
      power seemed at times to be a lucky dip exercise, sometimes too little, sometimes too much.
      I found this quite disconcerting.

      Not being familiar with the vehicle I had decided that this must have been a characteristic of the very popular vehicle that drivers get used to. Then it got a whole lot worse. (I copy a bit here).

      Instructed to turn left at an intersection from a very low speed, I commenced to make the
      turn. The vehicle did not respond to my depressing the accelerator. Then, after a delay, it
      responded with a full throttle “vroom” that catapulted the car into the intersection, with a car
      approaching from the left. The Instructor made a grab for the steering wheel but fortunately didn’t
      reach it, because if he had it would have been impossible to turn the wheel and we and the car
      approaching would have been forced to stop in the roadway. I was badly shocked.

      Had that car been closer we would have hit it.

      This event was not mentioned in the copy of the report that I have.

      I was thoroughly rattled. Shortly after I hit a speed bump at more than best speed, which would have supported their premise of dementia. After their ignorance ascribed the previous event as dementia. It was the car, not I that was demented.

      Next we went into heavy pedestrian traffic, following directions all the time. There, after stopping and starting in a shared traffic zone, I found myself on top of a roundabout. This was no ordinary roundabout. It was an artwork that belonged in a gallery, not a public road. The whole area as I remember paved with red bricks, with a bit of a raised circle in the middle. I should have seen it, because I had already been directed through it from the other side. There must have been a lot of pedestrian traffic to look out for.

      Then we got out into open space. Says I: Thank God for that! I didn’t know what was coming.

      In a 50 km/h zone we were approaching an intersection in very light traffic with cross traffic moving freely. Visibility was good, and there may have been an opportunity for us to continue into the intersection without stopping. I maintained some speed against that possibility if it presented on arrival.

      I can’t now recall at what point I had committed to entering the intersection, but when I applied for the power to join the traffic my motor died. The dominating recollection from that point is the shock of finding myself in an active intersection in a vehicle which was not responding to controls.

      I can’t remember how I resolved a terrifying situation. I had no idea why the car was not responding to my application.

      On receiving a copy o the report we had our answer to the whole schemozzle. The car was fitted with a dual braking system. And the instructor had been working it! A dual braking system has a feature which cancel the accelerator when the dual brakes are applied. My problems were caused by the instructor fiddling the brakes. Not when he applied them, because at that time I was applying them too, but when he was slow to release them, which kept the throttle cancelled until he did release them.

      Not knowing about the dual controls I attributed this event to the accelerator problem, something I didn’t know about the vehicle. Which turned out to be right.

      After reading the report I realised that it was the instructor, not I, who created that event, by activating the secondary braking system that I did not know existed. And the event was nominated as a second critical error! The report declared that the speed I was travelling at indicated I had ignored the signage.

      There was no error on my part. Once again the assertion that I was not aware of the situation is just plain wrong. I was fully aware until my controls were cut.

      My “error” was to have a different plan to the assessor.!

      They charged me $1,150 for this “service”.

      The letter from RMS directed appeal at the local court.Try convincing a court when you are deaf and worrying about the $1,000 for the solicitor. The only thing I heard clearly was :”These are professional people, you know”.

      I should have ignored that directive and tried my luck at the counter at RMS. Will try next.

      It’s pretty clear they want old people off the road. I thought that would have to get around discrimination laws if somebody pursued it.

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      • #
        Ted1.

        The incorporation of that red brick roundabout into a test route surely represents entrapment. The use of the school timing is bad enough.

        31

  • #
    Tonyb

    There is an attraction for using the battery on your EV to supply power to your home in the event of a power cut, or if you own solar panels to use those to charge the battery either to drive the car or to use it as a power source to run the home appliances when the panels are not collecting power.

    To seamlessly gain access to the battery power for home use presumably there would be a need for inverters and wiring so the mains supply is disconnected when EV power cuts in.

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  • #
    David Maddison

    Remember, the freedom of personal mobility of not one single Elite Leftist will be affected by any of this. They will still be driven in taxpayer funded limousines and fly to Klimate Krisis Konferences in private jets.

    https://www.skynews.com.au/australia-news/melbourne-lord-mayor-sally-capp-should-be-ashamed-for-spending-more-than-30000-on-ratepayerfunded-limousine-travel/news-story/ed5d9d47ab26949999b9b12b07c33c7e?amp=

    Melbourne Lord Mayor Sally Capp ‘should be ashamed’ for spending more than $30,000 on ratepayer-funded limousine travel

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  • #
    Bushkid

    So, I wonder how it will work when the car batteries are all flat because they can’t be charged because the grid relies on wind and solar that can’t supply enough electricity to keep the grid alive to charge the car batteries that the grid is supposed to be going to rely on to keep the grid alive …

    Have these clowns given even a moment’s thought to what they’re doing?

    At what point do the Australian public wake up and shunt the uniparty? At present, the majority are turkeys voting for Christmas.

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  • #
    Honk R Smith

    Consideration of such schemes are only necessary because the renewable system failed to deliver as promised.
    But it is safe and effective and although it won’t prevent power outage, it does reduce your chances of hospitalization and and death.

    231

    • #
      Just+Thinkin'

      Your last part sounds familiar.

      Did you borrow it from another Grubbnmnt web site?

      140

    • #
      David Maddison

      All that “free” wind and sun and it can’t even be slightly used without spending vast amounts of money to collect it.

      But our “scientific” “experts” at CSIRO bizarrely keep telling us it’s the “cheapest form of power”.

      Rather than throwing away $916.5m for 2024-25 on CSIRO, why doesn’t the government ask a yachtsman how much it costs to collect intermittent wind energy? He’ll tell them for free.

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      • #
        Ian Rogers

        These days, ‘CSIRO’ is just another anagram for ‘LYSENKOISM’.
        They stopped providing “frank and fearless advice’ years ago.

        110

  • #
    Harves

    Oh dear, some poor researcher said the quiet bit out loud.
    “With the number of EVs on our roads growing fast, the grid won’t be able to cope with everyone charging at the same time when they get home in the evening,” he said.

    I’m sure this will be the leading story on every news outlet.

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    • #
      OldOzzie

      EVs Could Damage Roads Way More Than ICE Cars Due to Weight

      People are concerned about the weight of battery electric vehicles (BEVs).

      Their massive battery packs may represent a higher risk of serious injuries and death in crashes.

      In April, the British Parking Association warned that old parking buildings could fail if BEVs became the industry standard. A while later, a parking building in New York collapsed just due to the higher weight of modern cars. The Telegraph sorted out another danger posed by the added mass BEVs present: damages to roads, increasing the number of potholes.

      The British newspaper used a known method that highway engineers frequently apply in their studies. The idea is that any weight increase in an axle of a vehicle raises the damages to the road to the fourth power – hence the formula’s name. The Telegraph then used a study from the University of Leeds that calculated the mass of 15 popular BEVs in the United Kingdom. The research revealed that electric cars are 312 kilograms (688 pounds) heavier on average than comparable vehicles powered by gasoline engines.

      With that information, the British newspaper calculated that BEVs could expose roads to 2.24 times more damage than gas cars. As diesel vehicles are slightly heavier, the stress rate drops to “only” 1.95 more damage than they usually cause.

      The problem tends to increase because BEVs do not pay road tax or fuel duty, which funds repair efforts. The British government may try to avoid creating new taxes to compensate for these ones to stimulate BEV adoption, but it will be inevitable to do something about that in the near future.

      According to The Telegraph, the Centre for Policy Studies suggested creating a vehicle tax related to its weight.

      That would be an excellent way to make heavier cars less attractive, which would include large ICE SUVs that have a single occupant most of the time.

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      • #
        Chad

        the Centre for Policy Studies suggested creating a vehicle tax related to its weight.

        Careful what you wish for !….
        Lets not give tthem ideas !
        There are 10s x more heavy ICEs , SUVs, Utes, luxury cars, etc, ..than EVs
        And any observer knows that 90+% of road damage is caused by trucks and busses ( check their axle weights )
        Then there is the small detail of the quality of road construction and maintenance !🙄🤔

        41

    • #
      OldOzzie

      The Nationwide 500,000 EV Charger Charade

      To identify the charade, one must first look at the math. 500,000 charging stations will cost the government $400 billion, not the $7.5 billion the President has promised…

      60

    • #
      Chad

      “With the number of EVs on our roads growing fast, the grid won’t be able to cope with everyone charging at the same time when they get home in the evening,”

      Dont worry, at any significant rate of EV sales, AUSTRALIA will have zconverted to Nuclear generation before even 50% of cars are EVs !

      30

    • #
      Ted1.

      Harves, it will happen. The prols won’t know what hit them.

      It is not hard to calculate. The energy that currently comes from oil and gas will have to be delivered down the wires.

      The wires can’t possibly handle the increase within the timeframe.

      20

  • #
    David Maddison

    There are standards for V2G charging such as ISO15118.

    I wrote an article on EV charging including V2G in the July 2023 Silicon Chip. (Not all pages may be accessible if not a subscriber.)

    https://www.siliconchip.com.au/Issue/2023/July/Charging+Electric+Vehicles

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  • #
    Just+Thinkin'

    You couldn’t write a book with this scenario.

    No one would believe you and call it “fiction”.

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  • #
    David Maddison

    We (non-Elites in Australia) are already being conditioned to think being warm and comfortable is selfish. For example I got an email from the Victoriastan Government suggesting I set my home heating to a mere 18C (64F) and wear more clothes inside.

    The Federal government has also put a super-tax on ICE vehicles that don’t meet fuel economy standards thus restricting certain vehicles to Elites only.

    As I said above, they really don’t want you to drive at all. They are tightening the screws by making ICE cars unaffordable followed by mandated purchase of EVs whose only purpose will be to provide free battery grid backup services.

    Many people can work at home and get home-delivered food and supplies as demonstrated during the plandemic.

    We will be kept at home, freezing, while the EV in the driveway/garage harvests sporadic power from the grid when it’s available to keep your and your neighbourhood lights on.

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    • #
      Dave in the States

      East Germany.

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    • #
      Richard C in NZ

      David >We (non-Elites in Australia) are already being conditioned to think being warm and comfortable is selfish.

      And being cold is just a matter of “learning to live with it” and “improving the quality of insulation”, according to Andrew King, Senior Lecturer in Climate Science, The University of Melbourne:

      Southern Australia is freezing. How can it be so cold in a warming climate?
      https://theconversation.com/southern-australia-is-freezing-how-can-it-be-so-cold-in-a-warming-climate-233977

      In any winter, Australia has cold outbreaks. So, even if the next few months are likely to be warmer than normal, we should expect a few cold days and nights at some point. Learning to live with the cold and improving the quality of insulation in Australian homes would help make our winter cold snaps seem a lot less harsh.

      Cold is just a state of mind and insulation, apparently.

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      • #
        Richard C in NZ

        >Cold is just a state of mind and insulation, apparently.

        State of mind maybe, going by this dude:

        Would you be able to survive in the Siberian wilderness in -70°C with bears and wolves to keep you company? Well, the ‘world’s loneliest man’ can.

        Samuil has lived in the heart of the Yakutsk forest five hours away from civilisation for the last two decades in one of the harshest environments on Earth.

        The 67-year-old even moved away from his former small village in Russia because life was ‘quite boring’.

        ‘World’s loneliest man’ lives in -70°C temperatures five hours away from society
        https://metro.co.uk/2024/07/08/worlds-loneliest-man-lives-70-c-temperatures-siberia-21182931/

        Insulation leaves a lot to be desired though:

        Life is hard for him because he lives in a cabin built just from materials he finds in the wilderness and to keep warm he cuts down trees to build fires.

        Freezing air also seeps through the windows that have holes in because they are made of crumbling sheets of cellophane.

        But he’s managed to keep some warmth in the cabin by lining the inside with tarpaulin, tin sheets and blankets.

        I wonder if that state of mind and insulation is what Andrew King, Senior Lecturer in Climate Science, was alluding to?

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      • #
        Skepticynic

        Got a really good laugh out of that, thanks.
        “Learning to live with the cold”, after 40 years of global warming. Cracked me up!

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      • #
        CO2 Lover

        You can bet that after the ban on gas house connections in the People’s Republic of Victoriastan, double glazed windows will the next to be mandated along with EV recharging points in all new garages whether you own an EV or not.

        Mandatory solar panels and Tesla Powerwalls are also likely to be mandated for new homes.

        Powerwalls are connected to the grid all the time, unlike EVs.

        The cost of all these “Green” initiatives will make new homes even more unafforable for the non-elites.

        https://www.thermaldoubleglazing.com.au/blog/how-much-do-double-glazed-windows-cost-in-australia/

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      • #
        Richard C in NZ

        >Andrew King, Senior Lecturer in Climate Science, The University of Melbourne

        Anyone familiar with University of Melbourne HVAC?

        Gas powered heating?

        Coal?

        50

        • #
          Richard C in NZ

          Me >Anyone familiar with University of Melbourne HVAC? [in respect Andrew King, Senior Lecturer in Climate Science, The University of Melbourne article]

          David >I got an email from the Victoriastan Government suggesting I set my home heating to a mere 18C

          The Melbourne University
          Temperature Settings Guidelines
          https://sustainablecampus.unimelb.edu.au/energy/temperature-settings-guidelines

          Heating and cooling can form up to 50% of the energy usage in many Melbourne University buildings. The University seeks to maintain uniform temperatures within the range of 20°C to 26°C throughout air conditioned buildings. This forms part of the University’s commitment to reduce its carbon footprint, through less energy used from heating and cooling systems.

          And,

          The Victorian State Government and WorkSafe Victoria recommends a temperature range of 20°C to 26°C for the Working Environment, which is heating in winter up to 20°C and cooling in summer down to 26°C.

          >Gas powered heating? next

          40

          • #
            Richard C in NZ

            >Gas powered heating?

            The University are very coy on this but do offer some clues.

            First is their upgrade plans:

            Smart Campus Energy Upgrades
            https://sustainablecampus.unimelb.edu.au/energy/sceu

            The four-year Smart Campus Energy Upgrades project (SCEU) will deliver $45 million worth of programs that will save 18–25 GWh of energy per year.

            This equates to approximately 20% of the University’s energy consumption, equivalent to carbon savings of 19,000 to 26,000 tons annually.

            Ok fine, what is the residual 80%?

            Second clue is their carbon emissions:

            Our carbon emissions
            https://sustainablecampus.unimelb.edu.au/energy/our-emissions

            Points to the 2019 report:

            Greenhouse Gas Assessment – CY 2019
            https://sustainablecampus.unimelb.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/3556300/UoM-CY2019-GHG-Report-V2-ExecSummary.pdf

            Scope 1
            Natural Gas, Transport Fuels, Stationary Fuels, Refrigerants, Waste-Incineration

            17,532.4 tonnes of CO2-e, +10.5%

            Hunch partially correct re gas but not sure what that is used for – not necessarily heating.

            Big reveal is “Stationary Fuels” – next

            20

            • #
              Richard C in NZ

              Stationary Fuel Combustion Sources
              https://www3.epa.gov/carbon-footprint-calculator/tool/definitions/stationary-fuel.html

              §98.30 Definition of the source category.

              (a) Stationary fuel combustion sources are devices that combust solid, liquid, or gaseous fuel, generally for the purposes of producing electricity, generating steam, or providing useful heat or energy for industrial, commercial, or institutional use, or reducing the volume of waste by removing combustible matter. Stationary fuel combustion sources include, but are not limited to, boilers, simple and combined-cycle combustion turbines, engines, incinerators, and process heaters.

              “solid, liquid, or gaseous fuel” is coal, oil, and gas.

              UoM has accounted for Natural Gas already in Scope 1 so that leaves coal and/or oil in Scope 1

              I wonder what Andrew King, Senior Lecturer in Climate Science has to say about that.

              20

  • #
    Neville

    So first we have to destroy our environments to install toxic W & S and then the entire toxic mess could be in the ground in 15 to 20 years and this entire toxic disaster will waste trillions of $ for nothing.
    But if we also have many very critical requirements for our EVs we may also have to surrender the same EVs to the govt and forget about rushing a family stroke or heart attack victim or accident or loved one to safety.
    So who pays for the future court cases that will definitely occur because of govt’s priority use of your EV, while a family member died as a consequence?

    180

  • #
    Richard C in NZ

    >Cold is just a state of mind and insulation, apparently.

    State of mind maybe, going by this dude:

    Would you be able to survive in the Siberian wilderness in -70°C with bears and wolves to keep you company? Well, the ‘world’s loneliest man’ can.

    Samuil has lived in the heart of the Yakutsk forest five hours away from civilisation for the last two decades in one of the harshest environments on Earth.

    The 67-year-old even moved away from his former small village in Russia because life was ‘quite boring’.

    ‘World’s loneliest man’ lives in -70°C temperatures five hours away from society
    https://metro.co.uk/2024/07/08/worlds-loneliest-man-lives-70-c-temperatures-siberia-21182931/

    Insulation leaves a lot to be desired though:

    Life is hard for him because he lives in a cabin built just from materials he finds in the wilderness and to keep warm he cuts down trees to build fires.

    Freezing air also seeps through the windows that have holes in because they are made of crumbling sheets of cellophane.

    But he’s managed to keep some warmth in the cabin by lining the inside with tarpaulin, tin sheets and blankets.

    I wonder if that state of mind and insulation is what Andrew King, Senior Lecturer in Climate Science, was alluding to?

    00

  • #
    david

    At least there will be no chance you of paying unrealized capital gains tax on your EV. However you will when your ICE vehicle becomes a collectors item!

    160

    • #
      OldOzzie

      Speaking of Collecters Item ICE,

      I was walking back, yesterday morning, along Winbourne Road Brookvale (Industrial Area Northern Beaches) after dropping 4WD off for Service, to McDonalds for pickup by wife, when I noticed a beautiful Black Walkinshaw Performance W557 HSV with Yellow Brembo Brake Callipers Parked on the street, then another HSV and soon another 7 HSVs including a W507 and a number parked down the drive of MotorTorque Mechanical

      All beautiful cars & immaculate – Definitely ICE Collectors Cars

      110

  • #
    Ronin

    There might be some redeeming aspects to powering the grid with your EV if the power you gave them was ten times the cost of the power you took from the grid to recharge your EV, maybe.

    80

    • #
      Chad

      Currently it is !
      Feed in Tarrifs for V2G are based on time of day/ peak wholesale costs, andd can be 10-20x the retail price .

      11

      • #
        Chad

        Further, most people operating V2G are charging their EVs from Roof Top Solar , using the battery to maximise the FIT returns from time of day programming.
        Much the same way that the big grid batteries “harvest” the arbitrage from the grid.

        01

        • #
          Old Goat

          Chad,
          Its not a feature of the system, it is a symptom of the problem . Reliable base load power will make it go away . Everyone else paying for it .

          40

        • #
          Richard C in NZ

          Chad >“harvest” the arbitrage from the grid

          A Central Otago cherry orchardist does that:

          Turning cherry orchard electric pays off
          https://www.odt.co.nz/rural-life/horticulture/turning-cherry-orchard-electric-pays [And see video embedded]

          Helps that the guy is a computer programmer and tech head.

          Way O/T but also interesting (to me anyway) is the Upright Fruit Offshoots method of growing at same orchard:

          Forest Lodge – Upright Fruit Offshoots
          https://www.forestlodge.nz/

          Also here:

          Grower on the up with new planting system
          https://www.odt.co.nz/rural-life/horticulture/grower-new-planting-system

          Technology is one thing but growing efficiently is another. From that last article:

          Mr Weaver estimated up to 400ha of cherries in about 20 orchards used a mix of features from the UFO and FOPS systems in Central Otago, including his 2ha orchard in Springvale near Alexandra.

          He and his wife Irene planted the block on their “commercial lifestyle block” about eight years ago. “This is fun and it’s enough to be commercial.”

          The orchard generates about $600,000 gross income.

          And,

          New Zealand exports nearly 4000 tonnes of cherries.

          By comparison, Chile exports about 500,000 tonnes of cherries.

          Disclosure: I love Chilean cherries. I buy 500kg snap frozen bags NZ$6.20 and consume 5 a day. That’s my quota. Otherwise I’d consume the whole bag.

          20

  • #
    Neville

    Again here’s the latest debate or conversation between Aidan Morrison of the CIS and Dr Finkel about our so called energy transition.
    I’m now even more convinced that toxic W & S are definitely BS and fraud and I only hope that Aidan is able to pursue the liars and con merchants and make them include all of the costs of toxic W & S.
    I hope Jo and Dr David Evans have the time to watch this video and hopefully get in touch with Aidan and the CIS team.
    You’ve both got the Maths and Science background to more easily understand the data than I have and hopefully Aidan can shift the debate and make the CSIRO answer some of his probing questions.

    https://www.cis.org.au/commentary/video/what-to-do-about-the-energy-transition-redouble-or-rethink-alan-finkel-and-aidan-morrison/

    90

  • #
    Robber

    Unreliable wind and solar? Surely not /sarc.
    Across the entire AMEO grid at 6pm last night, wind and solar delivered just 10% of demand, or 2,950 MW from a nameplate capacity of about 20,000 MW.
    Oh, and those big batteries, just 200 MW.
    What kept the lights on? Reliable, dispatchable coal 57%, gas 17% and hydro 16%.

    170

    • #
      Richard C in NZ

      >Across the entire AMEO grid at 6pm last night, wind and solar delivered just 10% of demand, or 2,950 MW from a nameplate capacity of about 20,000 MW.

      NZ this morning, in the middle of a windless “record” high pressure system, wind is little more than a zephyr:

      Current Generation (MW)
      Power Generation (as at) 11 Jul 2024 10:30
      Wind 191 MW

      Total generation (as at) 11 Jul 2024 10:30
      6163 MW

      Wind nameplate capacity (I think) 1,263 MW so 15% of capacity and production 3% of total generation.

      As usual Hydro Geothermal Gas and Coal doing the heavy lifting.

      https://www.transpower.co.nz/system-operator/live-system-and-market-data/consolidated-live-data

      70

  • #
    Chris

    Solar supply is cut off from the grid during a power outage so that workers can repair transmission lines, how will that work with lots of EVs feeding in to keep the power on?

    80

  • #

    What happens when after they drain your EV car overnight, you hope in the next morning, and you can’t drive to work as it is flat? That will increase productivity not.

    120

    • #
      Ronin

      ‘Boss, I’ll be late, I have to charge my car up.’

      50

    • #
      Chad

      The vehicle owner dictates how much and when the battery can be discharged.

      03

      • #
        Yarpos

        Another variable or intermittent supply. Great , thats just what we need.

        If it kept behind the meter, fine

        30

      • #
        DOC

        Chad #17.2
        Until a government has enough EVs to drain to the grid. Then, at the stroke of a pen the consumers choice is cancelled.
        That’s the principle being applied to the WA Marine Park when it passes the WA Parliament. Keep it unthreatening until it passes into law and then the appropriate Minister can use the power given by that legislation to change whatever he likes by a stroke of his pen!

        40

  • #
    David Maddison

    We are fast approaching the stage of the ultimate inversion: the stage where the government is free to do anything it pleases, while the citizens may act only by permission; which is the stage of the darkest periods of human history, the stage of rule by brute force.

    Ayn Rand

    280

  • #
    Ronin

    This Ev2grid sounds like the other scam where we, the taxpayer, pay for roads, bridges, motorways and tunnels, then our pathetic govt sell them to their mates and charge us to use them for eternity.

    90

    • #
      David Maddison

      Australia is rapidly getting to the point where a significant amount of economic activity is based on Government sponsored scams of various kinds such as wind, solar, Big Batteries, useless major construction projects for the benefit of the CFMEU union thugs and Chinese companies (especially im Victoria) and previously the covid scam etc..

      140

  • #
    Ross

    By now you should have worked out that wind energy is among the greatest frauds in the history of human civilisation. With only a bit of curiosity you would know by now that solar, has only a capacity factor about half that of wind and is waste of minerals and land even for sunny Australia.

    If you are really cynical you would see that the EV rollout is just a scam to get you to buy a wind turbine backup battery when the grid blacks out.

    Realising all that, you would also know that blowing up our coal stations was moronic and that Australia should have overturned our ban on the nuclear power industry decades ago and by now possibly had one on-line.

    Similarly, you might have detected that the range and duration of EVs is all priced into the Net Zero scheme – and it’s no coincidence the policy focus is on micro or more commonly referred to as “fifteen minute cities”.

    You probably realised years ago that recycling is a giant con and is just getting worse because due to higher energy prices minimal materials can be now recycled locally.

    In fact, there isn’t a single facet of Net Zero that’s beneficial to humanity. As much as the 2035/2050 target is unachievable it is not even affordable. It’s just too expensive to upgrade the grid, street level energy infrastructure, housing or road networks.

    Most people on this blog will have already cottoned on to all this. You’ve probably argued this on many other blogs etc and you’ve experienced the same thing I have. They’ll tell you some magic gizmo is just around the corner that will make their pet green project viable, or claim that it is functional based on their limited personal experience. They’ll have posted links to some experimental project at some university or government research organisation that will never be upscaled or see practical utilisation.

    Cynically, you’ll predict that the green revolution will not create jobs because when did making energy more expensive ever create new jobs? From past disastrous schemes (Pink batts etc) you’ll know for sure that when government makes an industry a job creation scheme, it will collapse under the weight of its own inefficiency.

    I wont need me to tell you that Net Zero is a transition to a mineral intensive energy system. It will require multi-factor increase over the current levels of minerals mining, and that extraction process is not remotely green and relies on mass abuse of human rights in some countries.

    If you’ve worked all that out then you know there is absolutely no reason whatsoever to vote Labor, Greens,Teals or even LNP. They will do more to destroy the Australian economy and its infrastructure than the Japanese could ever have dreamed of during WW2.

    80

  • #
    joseph

    What is there not to like? We’re saving the Earth!

    20

  • #
    Neville

    Again here’s my link to the facts about much higher Nuclear energy density and yet toxic W & S are only available for 3.6 months and 1.8 months of every year.
    Nuclear is available 24/7.
    So again how do we recharge the flat batteries using unreliable toxic W & S? And how do we also provide additional power for future AI requirements?
    Here’s the Nuclear energy quote and link again.

    I know that trying to compare Nuclear fuel to Coal or Oil is difficult to understand. But here’s a quote from one of the Nuclear sites.
    Of course the USS Ronald Reagan Super Carrier wasn’t refueled for 25 years and the US Subs are never refueled for at least that period of time.
    Just unbelievable energy density.

    “With a complete combustion or fission, approx. 8 kWh of heat can be generated from 1 kg of coal, approx. 12 kWh from 1 kg of mineral oil and around 24,000,000 kWh from 1 kg of uranium-235. Related to one kilogram, uranium-235 contains two to three million times the energy equivalent of oil or coal. The illustration shows how much coal, oil or natural uranium is required for a certain quantity of electricity. Thus, 1 kg natural uranium – following a corresponding enrichment and used for power generation in light water reactors – corresponds to nearly 10,000 kg of mineral oil or 14,000 kg of coal and enables the generation of 45,000 kWh of electricity”.

    https://www.euronuclear.org/glossary/fuel-comparison/

    60

  • #
    Raving

    Good plan but battery prices are tanking (Twitter)

    20

  • #
    Old Goat

    Apart from all the other issues raised above , how long do you think EV batteries will last being used for both transportation and household power ? As they age their fire risk will increase too . The insurance industry which has been jacking up premiums will go into overdrive . Bang head here ……X

    100

  • #
    Yarpos

    I have trouble getting my head around how myriad different sources of low level power , sitting at the botton of the grid topology behind transformers is going to make any difference at all to a major grid event.

    Sounds like wishful thinking to me, but as the left says I just need to be educated.

    It would be more impressive if they had solved the first level problem of getting the things charged quickly, reliably and conveniently for the average consumer.

    100

    • #
      Ronin

      And because all the power is passed through an inverter, there is no inertia like there is from spinning generators, even cow fans have no inertia because the power is inverted to push it into the grid.

      40

    • #
      Chad

      #
      Yarpos
      July 11, 2024 at 9:51 am · Reply
      I have trouble getting my head around how myriad different sources of low level power , sitting at the botton of the grid topology behind transformers is going to make any difference at all to a major grid event.

      +1 ? Agree, i have only ever heard that domestic RT solar etc feed back to the grid, cannot get back past the local distribution step down transformers, to the transmission lines.
      In effect, all it does is reduce the local demand on the grid, which wont work once the majority of consumers all have RT solar,..or vehicles pushing power back !
      Maybe Rick or Lance can confirm or explain what the senario is ffor feed back to the grid ?

      20

      • #
        ozfred

        Locally Synergy will show you the half hourly grid consumption / feed in if you have a smart meter.
        Perhaps the local supplier should have to have available the same throughput numbers for all of the substation (and larger) transformers?

        10

  • #
    Kalm Keith

    Discussing this is relevant, but once again the real issue is left untouched.

    Human Origin Carbon dioxide does not cause global Warming.

    Once this fact is acknowledged all further discussion on co2 emissions is pointless and strongly suggests that the real issue is control of the masses by dominant forces acting through the UNIPCCC, the WEF and all levels of government.

    Let’s face the facts.

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    • #
      DOC

      Kalm Keith, Absolutely! It’s a statement one must keep making whenever one addresses these crazy schemes.
      The basic science is ignored on most climate outcome fear campaigns. Those campaigns aim to suppress this basic reality to achieve automatic expectations of the disinterested science-devoid public that the basic reason for all this turmoil is fact and doesn’t need addressing. Just as the MSM hid Biden’s afflicted cerebral functioning for 3years and is now blowing itself apart as its duplicity is revealed, so must the science of Climate Change have its days of revelation and all these groups hiding the facts to enforce Marxist social change and dictatorship on the Democracies must face their day of exposure and Court processes for lying for 40years to the public. Hopefully, prisons will be large enough to hold these miscreants, and their profits and businesses will be sold up and the proceeds used to reimburse the public.

      40

      • #
        Kalm Keith

        Like that last bit: the perpetrators of this attack on democracy must be punished and made to reimburse society for all damage done.
        Special attention must be paid to the removal of all dysfunctioal renewables remnants and the environment restored to its pre-scamdemic condition.

        Basic atmospheric science says that no gas can carry “extra” heat: thermodynamic analysis further debunks the concept because and in reality our greatest danger is that we will lose too much energy to the massive energy sink that surrounds us. Quantitative analysis shows that even if CO2 could trap heat, the amount involved would be microscopic.

        The whole thing falls apart when science comes to the table.

        30

        • #
          Kalm Keith

          The Science.

          Many tricks are used to engage the general public/taxpayer in the “scientific ” discussion. The averaging of temperatures, the ignoring the fact that there are two very different heat transfer periods during the whole 24 hour cycle, the use of famous names, like Arrhenius, to give the idea credibility, and so on.

          The Controllers of this CAGW monster love to dive deep into apparently scientific concepts that are simply junk to the real Scientists.

          The real science is there, it just needs to be outed.

          00

    • #
      GlenM

      Of course the premise is all wrong; C02 warming lacks evidence no matter what support it gets from the drones. The Earth is flat with eternal tortoises on the back of An elephant.

      20

  • #
    Greg in NZ

    Humanity’s carbon pollution [sic] causes more stormy erratic wild weather – except when it doesn’t. NZ to ‘potentially’ break its mean sea level record of 1046 hPa today as The Great Calm Of July lingers on…

    There’s been no wind all week, the past 2 mornings have seen pea-souper fog conditions lingering till after midday, and when the sun does appear it’s way to the north and heading for sunset – so much for Green Prayer Wheels and Holy Shiny Mirrors – thank goodness for hydro dams and Huntly Coal/Gas Power Station keeping city folk’s electric vibrators humming.

    It’s a good time to be camping at Miranda Hot Springs where you can slither in and out of thermally steaming hot pools to yer heart’s content, and then go back for more. Boiling hot water coming up out of the ground (joy!) wonder if that’s our fault as well.

    120

  • #
    Ronin

    QLDs largest industrial wind farm, Coopers Gap, nameplate cap 452Mw, presently putting 6mw in the grid, and that shining jewel of green power in Bass Strait in the path of the Roaring 40’s, is 92% distillate.

    100

  • #
    Tony Tea

    A “fleet” of EVs sounds impressive; “16 EVs” less so.

    60

  • #
    Ronin

    “Australia’s green bank is investing $50 million to firm up the electricity grid by giving consumers more control of their homes, electric cars and energy bills.

    The Clean Energy Finance Corporation loan announced on Wednesday for tech firm Intellihub, the country’s largest provider of smart metering devices, will bankroll a nationwide rollout of smart meters and behind-the-meter devices.”

    Another scam, similar to EV2G, beware if you get a ‘smart’ meter installed, your power bills will escalate dramatically, especially if you don’t have a battery.

    50

  • #
    Rupert Ashford

    Some compelling reasons for not buying the rubbish. But the next step will be to push the price of petrol and diesel into the stratosphere, thereby making it unaffordable to force the rest of the holdouts to buy these monstrosities – and someone please tell me it won’t happen. I have a bridge for sale for you.

    40

  • #
    Neville

    So here are the most important questions for the toxic W & S extremists.

    Why do they want to destroy our environments for a zero return and repeat again in 15 to 20 years?
    How do we charge their monster grid batteries from unreliable, toxic W & S?
    How can unreliable, toxic W & S provide all the future 24/7 energy needs of AI ?
    Obviously there are no truthful, factual answers because toxic W & S + batteries have the lowest CF of all the available energy sources.
    So why would any sane country choose to waste trillions of $ on these verifiable toxic disasters? And why should we blindly accept a toxic burial and another toxic start up every 15 to 20 years?
    Anyone have any honest answers? Please can anyone provide the facts and data to refute my claims?

    40

  • #
    John Connor II

    Say after me:
    “The green future is not intended to save the planet. It’s here to enslave and control us.”

    The big green renewable lie will go down in history as one of the biggest delusional mistakes and epic fails ever.
    The proponents and pollies are totally clueless of reality and how they’re just useful idiots, pushing a deliberately flawed control grid.

    70

  • #
    Pat

    Jo,

    I read the preprint of Sturmburg, Lucas-Healy, Jones and Hapuararchchi and noted the figures, particularly figure 3, show the timings.

    The 16 EVs supplied 5 kW each for ten minutes.

    That’s a total of 13.3 kWh or 0.0104 kWh per EV.

    According to the CSIRO an average Australian household uses 23.49 kWh of energy per day in summer, or 0.98 kWh per hour.

    There were 90,000 households in the outage affected area so there was an 88,088 kWh energy shortfall.

    The 13.3 kWh supplied by the EVs amounted to 0.015% of the required energy.

    Looking at the bigger picture, in 2022 the electricity industry in Australia generated 272 TWh of energy. That’s 272,000,000,000 kWh.

    Dividing the total energy production by the energy supplied by a single EV give 26,112,000,000,000,000 for the number of EVs needed to replace the current electrical generation system, neglecting the detail that the EVs will all need to be charged somehow.

    Since there are currently 27,315,740 Australians, each Australian man, woman, child and other will need to own 955,932 EVs before this system becomes practical.

    We’re going to need bigger subsidies.

    And bigger garages.

    Pat

    00

  • #
    Pat

    Jo,

    I read the paper about powering Australia with EVs that you sited and noted that the figures, particularly figure 3, show the timing of events.

    The 16 EVs supplied 5 kW each for ten minutes for a total of 13.3 kWh, with each EV supplying 0.83 kWh.

    There were 90,000 households in the affected area. According to the CSIRO, an average Victorian household uses 23.49 kWh of energy on an average summer day.

    Assuming usage is uniform across the day (I know it’s not but let’s pretend), that’s 0.98 kWh per hour.

    The total energy shortfall was, therefore, 88,088 kWh.

    The 16 EVs supplied 13.3 kWh or 0.0151% of the required energy.

    To actually meet the shortfall would have taken 6,607 EVs, close to the 6000 quoted in the paper.

    Looking at the bigger picture, the Australian electricity industry generated 272 TWh of electrical energy in 2022. That’s 272,000,000,000 kWh.

    To equal this generation would require 326,400,000,000 EVs, ignoring the fact that they would have to be charged up somehow.

    Since Australia’s population is currently 27,315,740, each Australian man, woman, child will need to own, maintain and charge 11,949 EVs.

    We’re going to need bigger subsidies.

    And bigger garages.

    Pat

    100

  • #
    Jock

    Another problem that is unnoted is that the grid isnt set up for this. Even Solar only goes into the 400v system. It only supplies local residents’ in that part of the grid. It is not uploaded to the higher volt distribution system. To achieve what they are saying would require a full rewiring of local poles and wires. All capex would be regulated. They get paid no matter what. The price increase on bills would be large. And to do the entire system would take 20years or more?

    40

  • #
    STJOHNOFGRAFTON

    Let’s see them slave my back-up generator to their poxy spy grid.

    50

  • #
    Dennis

    I understand that most ICEV owners do not refuel until the fuel tank is nearly empty unless they are travelling long distance.

    Why would EV drivers keep their battery pack fully charged or even recommended 80 per cent all the time?

    30

    • #
      David Maddison

      It’s not the same.

      An ICE car can be refueled in under 5 mins.

      An EV takes about an hour on a supercharger, much longer at home. It’s best to top it off a bit at a time.

      10

      • #
        Bodge it an Scarpa

        What a gloomy post that was to read right to the end! And all the way through while lying in my hospital bed, my minds eye saw a procession of the millions of dumbed down idiots, morons, thugs, little hitlers, football fanatics, corrupt police and politicians, crooked highflier business men etc that would have passed through my life’s journey, and I suddenly lost the will to live , as I realised that there are no longer enough smart, intelligent, well informed people and brave people left to challenge and overpower the pure evil that have infiltrated the major institutions, I no longer wish to leave this place alive, but would not want to disappoint the wonderful doctors and staff that worked so hard to keep me alive.

        10

    • #
      ozfred

      Well the fuel price cycle in Perth means that financially aware drivers seldom “gas up” on Wednesday or Thursday.
      And country power consumers would be reluctant to let batteries go too low anytime since rural/regional outages “are somewhat more regular” than in Perth.

      00

  • #
    Dennis

    NSW South Coast and late 2019 bushfires one story about a Toyota HiLuxe diesel crew cab ute owner rescuing a family unable to recharge their EV to get away from the fire zone.

    60

  • #
    StephenP

    It all comes down to the basic problem with all battery systems:
    When you have exhausted all the batteries whether car based or battery farms
    how do you recharge the batteries if there is a wind drought and its at night?

    Interesting scenarios happened recently on the M5 motorway in SW England,
    twice the motorway was blocked with 9 miles queues in both directions lasting over 90 minute delays before traffic could get moving and they took hours to clear completely.
    This was in daylight in the middle of summer.
    How would it fare if all the vehicles had been EVs, including lorries, at night in the middle of winter?
    Maybe there is a market for diesel powered lorries with generators to rescue stranded vehicles.

    30

  • #
    Serge Wright

    Anyone that claims 16 EVs outputting 107KW can make a difference to a grid that generates over 30GW during the peak demand periods, is having a lend. This article comes at a time when EV sales are rapidly stagnating as the public wake up to their many serious limitations and in true left wing style the merchants of propaganda pump out the expected excrement.

    20

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  • #
    mwhite

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mvju5LCTnNc
    “Madness: The grid will DRAIN your EV battery to SAVE itself! | MGUY Australia”

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    ivan

    One question that hasn’t been asked. How soon before someone produces a one way battery charging cable? If I had an EV that would be the first thing I would make.

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    • #
      Chad

      Ivan,, very few EVs have V2G capability, ..and even fewer homes have the necessary systems to use it !
      Further, the vehicle owner controls the discharge options…on/off, timing, amount, etc etc

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  • #
    SimonB

    Cults AND snake oil grifters. What a time to be alive!

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