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The Energy Crisis in Australia gets deeper

Shh. The Renewable Crash Test Dummy is at work

Another coal fired turbine blew this weekend and will be out for a month, adding to the problems facing the Australian grid, where gas was the main  filler-of-gaps in the forced transition but gas now costs a fortune, and we don’t have much else to fall back on. If only we had vast reserves of brown coal that was close to power stations?

If only we looked after those power stations and treated them like our lifestyle depended on them instead of like they were evil Storm Machines Mogambo!

The warnings are growing louder — our aluminium smelters are already going on standby to save us from rolling blackouts and it’s only the first week of winter. Retailers are going broke, asking customers to leave. The market system rides on long term futures contracts which hold the monster prices at bay, and everyone prays a storm doesn’t break an interconnector…

Manufacturers in peril as energy crisis deepens

Perry Williams, The Australian

Delta Electricity, which operates NSW’s Vales Point station, said it was concerned by the precarious situation, with fuel costs rising and tight supplies of coal. “There will be consequences of this. There are commercial and industrial customers who just won’t be able to keep going,” Delta chief executive Greg Everett said.

A third of coal units are unavailable in NSW, 27 per cent are out in Queensland and 23 per cent shut in Victoria, according to consultancy WattClarity.

Gas prices are 80 times normal levels:

A rare cap on gas markets of $40 a gigajoule – five times higher than a year earlier – remains in place for Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane after wholesale prices soared to 80 times normal levels following a cold snap and the demise of Weston.

Not another Government committee solution to a government committee problem…

After spending ten years trying to force old coal plants out of business, now they tell us they need a whole new market system to create incentives to keep the coal plants? These are the same coal plants that are so cheap they outcompeted every other kind of generator for fifty years?

The Energy Security Board, a body created by the nation’s energy ministers to remodel the power system, said it was working on options for a payment mechanism to introduce incentives to stop the early closure of power plants and create long-term signals for investment in dispatchable generation. “We think what we’re seeing with ongoing instances of closing power stations early, it’s critical that we have a market mechanism to get new supply in place when we need it – and to make sure we get the right mix of supply,” the board’s chairman, Anna Collyer, said.

“We can see the economics driving and environmental objectives driving that exit of coal, which just makes it more critical that we’re getting these new investments coming in.

It always fails when someone in the government thinks they know more than “the market” does.

It will take six months until some extra gas arrives:

Santos and its joint venture partner Beach Energy will bring a fifth drilling rig into the gas-rich Cooper Basin to boost supplies, with an extra 15 terajoules a day to flow by the end of 2022. Beach chief executive Morne Engelbrecht said producers increasing volumes was the best industry response.

“Coal shortages and the inability of sufficient renewables to reliably deliver energy security is the main factor driving current higher energy prices,” Mr Engelbrecht will tell a Credit Suisse energy conference on Tuesday.

The turbine that broke is at Liddell:

AGL confirmed on Friday one of three 500 megawatt units at Liddell has been taken out of service for at least a month, with the company blaming a malfunction with a generator transformer.

Can we start up the turbine they shut down at Liddell three months ago?

9.8 out of 10 based on 89 ratings

297 comments to The Energy Crisis in Australia gets deeper

  • #
    Thomas A

    Mmmm! Unaffected Aussie in the US. Like just about everyone else visiting JoAnne’s website, I’ve been watching this impending disaster for years. It seems so stupid that this situation has even progressed to this stage.

    901

    • #
      Don B

      Is it too late to send the political rulers a copy of Fossil Future?

      380

    • #
      ColA

      That w*nker Homes-a-Court will soon claim the cost to maintain the coal power stations makes keeping the plant going uneconomic, it’s true because that has been their intention for the last 5 or more years.
      Having worked for one of our largest steel companies for years in the 70’s-90’s I can give you a pretty good idea what the Board and upper management are doing to the old coal plants. As they get closer to their retirement age and unreliables get all the money and attention Capital works on coal plants stop (why invest in a “relic”?) and the maintenance budget gets cut and cut until the there are just the bare bones to keep things going, any minor failure becomes significant because they are not carrying the spares because management won’t invest in a plant with a terminal future. I watched them do it to Newcastle and Whyalla.

      880

      • #
        ColA

        When in-fact the opposite is true, it is a far greater return on investment and profit margin to maintain and upgrade an existing plant than it is to build new plant. ESPECIALLY when the new plant is UNRELIABLE.

        501

      • #
        Kalm Keith

        Worked in a plant right next to BHP Newcastle and experienced the beginning of wokeism in the late sixties to very early nineties. As I’ve described previously the last straw was seeing politics dominate steel making and the resultant dodgy wire which went into the ropes that stabilise Sydney Tower.

        Money drives the world, not common sense or real science.

        602

      • #
        Ted1

        To ColA @ #1.2

        The terminal management of maintenance is surely a key factor. But that doesn’t explain the breakdown at the Callide plant in Queensland.

        There are people who profit from the violent price fluctuations we are seeing.

        Add in the “virtuosity” of shutting down coal and we see a powerful incentive for destabilising the market and hastening the day when there is no more cheap power.

        These shutdowns should be subjected to criminal investigation.

        30

    • #
      DLK

      It seems so stupid that this situation has even progressed to this stage

      see Charles Mackay, Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds.

      170

    • #
      Geoff+Croker

      Australia has a large part of the world’s coal, uranium and methane.

      There would be oil but we are not looking for it.

      We have a huge country that is almost empty of people.

      How can ANY country with such wealth be energy poor?

      It takes talent to achieve such failure.

      591

      • #
        ghl

        That kind of talent we are not short of.
        So… Prices are astronomical, where does the money go?

        100

        • #
          Robert Sewell

          Taxes to build fields of solar panels, windmills to kill native birds, desalination plants to supply reserves of water.
          What isn’t built is HELE coal fired power stations and dams to store water and supply hydro power.

          160

      • #
        Ted1

        Long before my time my father had an uncle at Roma in Queensland.

        He said there was plenty of oil at Roma, but there was nobody honest enough to find it.

        Fifty years later Australia’s first commercial oil field was opened up just up the road at Moonie.

        10

  • #
    Thomas A

    And the irony of it all will be Labor, Greens, Teals and most of Australia calling for more renewables. Mind blowing lunacy!

    861

    • #
      Erasmus

      Yes, the same people who have opposed new gas exploration and extraction!
      Cynics have been proven correct – it doesn’t matter whether you vote for Labor/green/teal or the Lib/Nats, you get no sensible energy policies from any of them.
      And it’s all down to the climate scam.

      791

      • #
        Erasmus

        Matt Kean just said on Sky that we need more “renewables” and an “updated grid” to keep prices under control!
        They don’t call him Green Kean for nothing.

        440

    • #
      James Murphy

      Any disaster befalling the grid will be squarely blamed on how unreliable, polluting, and expensive coal is.
      I dont see any useful lessons being learned. There do not seem to be any rational and competent people in any positions to make a difference.

      I hope I am wrong though.

      761

      • #
        wal1957

        I hope I am wrong though.

        I don’t think you are wrong.
        High prices, blackouts/brownouts will have to occur numerous times before the “rational and competent” people in charge are forced to take notice.
        The question I have is why there is so little pushback from anybody in power? Is there any pushback at all?
        The so-called transition to unreliables that are “cheap” is seemingly occurring without any serious thought about the consequences.
        Energy poverty is a real thing in the UK. Surely we will follow.
        Industry closures seem inevitable and those industries that survive will have to raise their prices and lay off staff just to survive.
        Utter lunacy!

        290

        • #
          Paul Siebert

          Wal1957,
          We will see no push back against this energy insanity by any of our “betters” until we, us and ourselves are forced by circumstance to become literate again, in the birds and bees of basic life supports.
          We are all a bit captured at the moment by this Class Swab bloke

          40

    • #
      Ian

      “And the irony of it all will be Labor, Greens, Teals and most of Australia calling for more renewables. Mind blowing lunacy!”

      I think you may be wrong. Albanese is I think and certainly hope is more pragmatic than Turnbull and Morrison.

      This extract from The New Republic, a source that is definitely pro-renewables and anti-fossil fuels suggests
      Albanese is definitely not implacably opposed to fossil fuels.

      “Notably absent from the Labor climate agenda, though, is any direct challenge to Australia’s sizable fossil fuel industry, its top emitter. In fact, Labor actually supports expanding fossil fuels. Albanese has said he won’t move to phase out coal. “[I]f coal mines stack up environmentally, and then commercially,” Albanese has said, “they get approved, and then Labor would welcome any jobs that would be created from that.”

      https://newrepublic.com/article/166638/albanese-labor-australia-climate

      326

      • #
        Kevin Kilty

        You are skirting the issue. It is the lack of investment in power generation maintenance and construction that is the issue. You can pretend to back coal, but starve the appropriate sector of financing. It’s the game the Biden Administration plays in the U.S.

        270

      • #
        b.nice

        Thanks for admitting that Labor should be pushing for support of coal fired power stations.

        Now all you have to get around the green meanie agenda that is stopping investing funds and loans.

        And the state lino-greens that are also stopping the implementation of solid reliable dispatchable electricity infrastructure.

        Pretense that Albo has even the vaguest clue what really needs to be done, make you look extraordinarily naive.

        Coal fired power is far more environmentally and economically sound that wind and solar could ever be.

        180

        • #
          Ian

          “Pretense (are you an American?) that Albo has even the vaguest clue what really needs to be done, make you look extraordinarily naive.”

          But far less naive than someone that firstly doesn’t understand the age-old adage “don’t shoot the messenger” and secondly cannot recognise that if the PM is being criticised by a source that is pro-renewables and anti-fossil fuels then it is quite clear he is causing concern in those circles.

          You write:

          “Coal fired power is far more environmentally and economically sound that wind and solar could ever be.”

          Perhaps you should read this

          https://www.forbes.com/sites/christopherhelman/2021/04/28/how-green-is-wind-power-really-a-new-report-tallies-up-the-carbon-cost-of-renewables/

          And before you dissolve into totally misplaced chuckles as you are so prone to do or call this a Leftist rag as you are also prone to you should be aware that Forbes is considered Centre-right see link

          https://mediabiasfactcheck.com/forbes/

          313

          • #
            b.nice

            Talking carbon fotprint is meaningless, but the rest of your link shows just how environmentally destructive wind turbines are in all phases of manufacture and their short term life and disposal.

            “At Arizona State researchers are working on electrochemical processes to extract metals like tin, copper and lead from solar cells by dissolving them in baths of nitric acid, then hydrofluoric acid and sodium hydroxide.”

            “which results in piles of old blades that typically end up being landfilled. ” (every 10 years)

            Not to mention the huge piles of concrete left in the ground, and the horrendous pollution in the manufacturing of neo-magnets and plastics and solar panels..

            Its all so very environmental, isn’t it. ! 😉

            And the fact that everywhere with large wind and solar infection of the grid has the highest electricity costs, shows just how economically destructive it is..

            … not to mention the other industrial and economic failures that erratic supply brings to anywhere that wind and solar infecct the grid too much..

            172

          • #
            b.nice

            and mediabiasfactcheck… so funny that you think that is in any way relevant !

            41

            • #
              Ian

              and mediabiasfactcheck… so funny that you think that is in any way relevant !

              It is far from being funny when I have to include such irrelevances as you invariably dismiss any publication I refer to a Leftist rag. I well remember in one of your comments you called Nature, which is widely regarded as one of the best science journals in the world a leftist rag which reveals your utter lack of knowledge of scientific publications.

              As usual a link is provided in yet another vain attempt to deflect your inevitable and inane remarks.

              https://arxiv.org/pdf/2008.04721.pdf

              PNAS is Proceedngs of the National Academy of Science

              113

              • #
                b.nice

                And how you think your PNAS link is in any way remotely relevant to “mediabiasfactcheck” site, is beyond anyone’s comprehension.!

                Did you just pluck it out of mid air to self-aggrandize?

                Always arguing from the opinion and the pseudo-prestige, because you can’t argue with actual science.

                Did you even find any data for output from those little wave generators?

                Did you ever find any real scientific proof of warming by atmospheric CO2?

                90

            • #
              b.nice

              Still trying to make out you have any relevant to say.

              That is hilarious.

              You have shown your continued gross ignorance of anything to do with actual real science.

              All you have is calls to vain authority, but still a total lack of anything resembling any understanding of science.

              Pitiful.. at best.

              Your link above was exposed as showing just how environmentally and economically destructive wind and solar are

              You stuffed up, but your ego won’t let you admit it, so go off on yet another childish distraction.

              Get over yourself.

              51

          • #
            Kalm Keith

            This comment has been fact checked and deemed to be “pretentious” and possibly written in the past tence.

            30

            • #
              Ian

              “This comment has been fact checked and deemed to be “pretentious” and possibly written in the past tence.”

              Best not try to be funny by writing tence as some may believe it to be the correct spelling. Apologies of course if you thought it was the correct spelling

              19

          • #
            b.nice

            This “mediabiascheck”, has “The Conversation” rated as “least biased”

            https://mediabiasfactcheck.com/the-conversation/

            They have got to be joking… talk about making a mockery of their own ratings !

            130

            • #
              wal1957

              Wow!
              And the fact checkers wonder why we don’t trust them?

              90

              • #
                yarpos

                people constantly referencing “fact checkers” was a highlight of that recent “mid wit” article and video.

                its like it absolves you any any responsibility to think or apply basic logic and common sense, because some unknown people, with unknown credential,s via unknown filters and funded by unknown entities have “fact checked something.

                60

              • #
                b.nice

                “its like it absolves you any any responsibility to think or apply basic logic and common sense”

                Ian.. to a “t”

                60

          • #
            b.nice

            ““don’t shoot the messenger””

            If you didn’t “believe” what you posted.. why post it.. or at least make sure people know you don’t “believe”

            By posting as you do, you are posting your opinion, just using someone else’s words.

            And seriously, why even post words from a rabid climate alarmist/activist… They are the words of an ignorant mindless twerp.

            90

            • #
              Ian

              By posting as you do, you are posting your opinion, just using someone else’s words.

              And you don’t of course? Yeah right.

              You may recall you chuckled at and congratulated another commenter who incorrectly, stated a company to which I had referred, as going bankrupt. Neither of you commented when I provided the link to show the company was still operating and expanding. You b.nice had egg all over your face.

              You write:
              “If you didn’t “believe” what you posted.. why post it.. or at least make sure people know you don’t “believe”

              Unlike some I have the intelligence to realise there is much about which I have little knowledge and so cannot realistically claim to either believe or disbelieve it. But having spent innumerable years on reading scientific and political articles I am able to recognise articles that are well argued and convincing and those that are not.

              I doubt you ever will

              112

          • #
            b.nice

            Reading a bit further from Ian’s link we find this.

            “the International Renewable Energy Agency predicts that we’ll have to deal with a cumulative 78 million metric tons of antiquated solar panel waste and tens of millions of tons of old turbine blades by 2050

            And he tries to tell us its not going to be environmentally destructive.

            WOW !

            “Coal fired power is far more environmentally and economically sound that wind and solar could ever be.”

            Proven correct, by Ian’s link.

            110

      • #
        kraka

        “I think you may be wrong. Albanese is I think and certainly hope is more pragmatic than Turnbull and Morrison.” You dont live in WA by any chance do you. I know a moron named Ian over there who thought Rudd was a better PM than Howard. Albanese is a green assed joke who wouldn’t know pragmatism if it hit him in the face.

        00

  • #
    David Maddison

    Due to charity work I do as a volunteer, I am highly aware of the suffering of people in places like Melbournistan in Australia who are currently cold and miserable inside their own homes because they can’t afford electricity or gas to keep warm.

    Being cold also has a significant impact on children who find it hard to do homework or focus when cold.

    The general name for this is “energy poverty”. It is not a theoretical concept, we already have it in Australia, a country which used to be known for some of the world’s cheapest energy, although the Lamestream media refuse to acknowledge energy poverty. (And we know it is now common in Europe.)

    And all you wealthy Leftists- please don’t say “you just need to wear more clothes inside”, your standard answer. Mankind invented dwellings to be warm and comfortable and be able to ditch some layers of animal skins or clothes. And in my experience Leftists don’t care less about these people, or anyone really. And they certainly won’t donate money to help these people with their high electricity or gas bills which Leftist ideology caused in the first place.

    More unreliables ALWAYS leads to higher consumer electricity prices. Building more windmills, solar panels and Big Batteries will only make the problem worse.

    It doesn’t matter about why or the specific mechanism by which this happens, the end consumer price is all that matters and it is guaranteed to keep increasing with more unreliables. (I am yet to discover an exception.)

    781

    • #
      David Maddison

      I predict deaths due to carbon monoxide poisoning, CO2 suffocation or house fires as cold people try unconventional or unsafe methods to keep warm in the colder areas of Australia.

      440

      • #
        Bruce

        The uptake of domestic electricity significantly reduced the occurrence of house fires, GLOBALLY.

        It also hugely reduced atmospheric pollution in urban areas.

        However, it’s back to a Dickensian / Hobbsian dystopian nightmare, AT BEST, for the general tax-payers, AS POLICY.

        Anywhere north of the Capricorn line is starting to look attractive, but do it now, before the fuel gets cut off.

        This is a HUGE social engineering operation. The body-count will be “impressive”.

        380

        • #
          b.nice

          “It also hugely reduced atmospheric pollution in urban areas.”

          Being out in the country, lots of smoking chimneys 🙂

          If my back was younger I might also have one. But I’ve been there, done that, not any more thanks.

          50

      • #
        Hanrahan

        If you can work from home come North where in winter you close the windows and occasionally pull up the doona.

        Sweating doesn’t kill you in summer. 🙂

        10

    • #

      Dave
      Another factor emerging in Germany is the denuding of parks and accessible woodlands. People are obviously trying to avoid high heating costs by getting wood wherever they can. And you can bet wood prices follow those of gas upwards…. And I thought the greens wanted to keep the woodland areas….

      I actually live on an area of bushland, and have cut up old wood from there for the occasional fire in our outside fire place. I have just locked in 18 c per KWhr so the pressure is not great, yet, but it will end and I am seriously looking at a wood fire box.

      150

    • #
      ando

      Time to start chopping down trees and burn them to keep your family warm. This is what we said would happen if socialist/green imbeciles dictated energy policy….far worse environmental outcomes!
      The politicians who went along with this insanity, need to be held to account.

      200

      • #
        Graeme No.3

        I haven’t seen any reference to the EU (nor the UK) banning imports of wood chip from Russia.
        I haven’t kept up with that market but a few years ago Russia was selling a million and a half tons a year into the EU. A million in bulk and the half neatly packed in plastic bags for domestic use.
        Use was said to be going up because a wood fire was cheaper than electric heating (and at least 300,000 german households had been cut off because they couldn’t pay their electricity bill). Anecdotally use of wood in the UK has increased, even in London where air quality has been reduced in recent years.

        130

  • #
    Kalm Keith

    The chairperson of the Energy Security Board says;

    ” it’s critical that we have a market mechanism to get new supply in place when we need it “.

    She’s certainly done her job in diverting our attention away from the basic engineering reality of electricity production; see, all we need is a Market.

    But maybe nature can help.

    Lightning Bolts have huge amounts of “electrical energy”, maybe the “committee” could collect and market that in renewable non plastic containers which we could take home for use in emergencies. Maybe even add lightning conductors from the top of derelict Wind Turbines to collection points at ground level.

    The future is only limited by our imagination, and of course, a suitable committee to create a Market.

    521

    • #
      David Maddison

      I assume the chairperson is a quota fulfilment hire rather than a merit hire… They always are in these types of positions…

      471

      • #
        Robber

        AEMC Commissioners are appointed by Australia’s state, territory and federal governments to make the rules under the national energy laws, and to advise governments on overall energy market development.
        Chair Anna Collyer was partner of Allens law firm from 2001 to 2020.
        Charles Popple has a Bachelor of Engineering from Monash University and a Master of Engineering Science in power system engineering.
        Michelle Shepherd was the General Manager Regulatory and Government Affairs at Alinta Energy for 6 years and holds a Bachelor of Commerce and a Bachelor of Applied Economics.

        30

        • #
          David Maddison

          Robber, I was referring to the Chair of the Energy Security Board who is a different person.

          60

          • #
            Kalm Keith

            It says above that Anna Colyer is head of the ESB. ?

            20

          • #
            Robber

            The Energy Security Board (ESB) has announced that Anthea Harris — currently Deputy Secretary, Energy, with the Victorian Department of Environment, Land, Water & Planning — has been appointed Chief Executive Officer of the ESB.ESB Chair Anna Collyer said, “The ESB’s policy work is at a critical stage. Australia’s energy ministers have tasked the ESB with implementing agreed reforms and developing policy alternatives to efficiently deliver the necessary resource capacity and manage congestion in the National Electricity Market’s future system. Anthea Harris has held many important positions as an economist and is considered to be one of Australia’s leading experts on emissions trading.

            22

        • #
          ghl

          Thank you Robber.
          If they’re so smart…..
          Have you any idea what their instructions are?
          Job definitions>
          I am reminded of the Enron saga, and stories of convenient (i.e.profitable) outages.

          20

        • #
          yarpos

          Good grief what is that token bloke doing in there?

          actually given recent events, what have any of them been doing?

          30

    • #
      Mike Jonas

      ” it’s critical that we have a market mechanism to get new supply in place when we need it “. Actually, that is correct if you think about it. What ‘new supply’ can it mean? It can’t mean new wind or solar, because no market mechanism can get new renewables supply in place for the times when new supply is needed, ie, the times when the sun and wind are asleep. So the ‘new supply’ has to be of dispatchable energy – coal, gas, nuclear. I read the needed ‘market mechanism’ as being a level playing field where each energy source is treated purely on its merits. That really would fix the problems, in the time that it takes to build new coal stations. Not as fast as everyone would like, but the problem has been carefully increased over a very long time.

      110

      • #
        ghl

        In the UK the “Market Solution” was the creation of a tariff that paid for acres of standby generators waiting for their big moment.

        20

    • #
      DLK

      Lightning Bolts have huge amounts of “electrical energy”,…

      someone should submit this as an RET project.

      70

      • #

        Benjamin Franklin tried this with a kite and it didn’t work.

        90

        • #
          DLK

          i don’t think ‘working’ is a requirement for the RET?

          110

        • #
          David Maddison

          Actually, Franklin’s experiment did work as he described in the Philadelphia Gazette of 19th October, 1752:

          As soon as any of the Thunder Clouds come over the Kite, the pointed Wire will draw the Electric Fire from them, and the Kite, with all the Twine, will be electrified, and the loose Filaments of the Twine will stand out every Way, and be attracted by an approaching Finger. And when the Rain has wet the Kite and Twine, so that it can conduct the Electric Fire freely, you will find it stream out plentifully from the Key on the Approach of your Knuckle. At this Key the Phial may be charged; and from Electric Fire thus obtained, Spirits may be kindled, and all the other Electric Experiments be perform’d, which are usually done by the Help of a rubbed Glass Globe or Tube; and thereby the Sameness of the Electric Matter with that of Lightning completely demonstrated.

          70

        • #
          David Maddison

          Actually, Franklin’s experiment did work as he described in the Philadelphia Gazette of 19th October, 1752:

          As soon as any of the Thunder Clouds come over the Kite, the pointed Wire will draw the Electric Fire from them, and the Kite, with all the Twine, will be electrified, and the loose Filaments of the Twine will stand out every Way, and be attracted by an approaching Finger. And when the Rain has wet the Kite and Twine, so that it can conduct the Electric Fire freely, you will find it stream out plentifully from the Key on the Approach of your Knuckle. At this Key the Phial may be charged; and from Electric Fire thus obtained, Spirits may be kindled, and all the other Electric Experiments be perform’d, which are usually done by the Help of a rubbed Glass Globe or Tube; and thereby the Sameness of the Electric Matter with that of Lightning completely demonstrated.

          20

        • #
          William

          John, In the spirit of renewable energy, we should try flying a kite in a storm again! It is very apparent that in the renewables world, failure does not equal failure as the answer there is to add more things that don’t work in the hope that one day it might!

          40

  • #
    b.nice

    “Can we start up the turbine they shut down at Liddell three months ago?”

    Why would they have bothered fixing it when they are faced with imminent closure anyway.

    And remember, the green meanie has also made it hard for continued investment in coal and coal fired power and for insurance.

    In woke-speech they call it responsible investment… well yes.. its responsible for the situation we are now in.

    431

    • #
      Lawrie

      Matt Kean wants to shut them all. I hope Matt Kean fronts the cameras when the system collapses. Neat trick to stop people finding out how perilous the system is- just shut the big energy users and cause another industry to disappear. We will be a nation of cafes and not much else while we wait for China to come and dig that terrible coal for us. It is time the architects of this shambles were exposed.

      561

      • #
        Kalm Keith

        “Exposed”- ?

        Shouldn’t they be rewarded in proportion to the benefits they have created?

        Maybe the end reward would be punishment.

        110

      • #
        Graeme No.3

        How will cafes work when there is no electricity?
        Perhaps they could get our resident red thumber pedalling a bike with generator and use that output for the coffee machine?

        261

        • #
          Earl

          Future “dahrlings” are going to have virtual babies not real ones so they will be having virtual coffees at their local virtual cafe as a break from virtual nappy changing so as long as the unreliables can generate enough power to charge their phones once a day that is all they need.

          110

        • #
          William

          Graeme, don’t be too harsh on our resident red thumber. He/she/they whatever serves a purpose as no matter what you might post, no matter how inane or wrong there is someone sillier than you.

          61

      • #
        Lawrie

        Matt should read this from India-https://humanevents.com/2022/06/06/indian-coal-makes-electricity-as-wind-farms-sit-idle/

        10

    • #
      Ian

      “And remember, the green meanie has also made it hard for continued investment in coal and coal fired power and for insurance.”

      And you might like to remember it was the Liberal government in NSW and the Liberal government in Victoria and the Liberal Government in South Australia sold off the state owned power stations in 2013 and that only WA, the NT and Tasmania have kept complete control of their power supply. And you also may not know that the Greens have never been in government either Federally or at the State level in Australia.

      414

      • #

        I’ll get in before they do – it has to be green infiltrators. Those governments were never true conservative.

        413

        • #
          b.nice

          “Those governments were never true conservative.”

          Only a completely blind fool thinks current Liberal state governments are in any way conservative.

          They are riddled with the green disease. Otherwise greenie zealots like Matt Kean would never get pre-selection, let alone put is charge of sensitive portfolios.

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      • #
        b.nice

        What the heck as that go to do wth the current situation of making insurance and loans hard to get due to greenie agendas

        Absolutely nothing.

        Just a petty attempt at distraction.

        And trying to pretend that the whole of state politics isn’t infected with the green disease.. just look at Matt Kean

        Your deliberate naivety is hilarious.

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      • #
        b.nice

        If only people had listened to Tony Abbott when he tried to push for a removal of the RET, and increasing the size of the coal fired fleet.

        Instead we had the irksome, useless, pale-green ooze that was Turnbull, followed by a jelly-spined do-nothing non-entity in Morrison.

        https://www.9news.com.au/national/abbott-steps-up-push-for-coal/39ae4ba5-d71a-4a42-a394-7b8f649eb76f

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      • #
        ghl

        Ian
        So where did Christina Keneally fit in then ? Queen of the renegged promise not to privatise?

        40

      • #
        b.nice

        “only WA, the NT and Tasmania”

        Tasmania has hydro, the dams belong to Tasmania.

        WA around 50% private electricity production

        “Western Australia’s largest generator is Synergy, owned by the Western Australian Government. Synergy produced around 50% of large-scale electricity generation in the South West electricity market in 2016.

        Horizon Power owns and operates generation facilities that supply towns located outside of the South West Interconnected System (SWIS). There are also a number of privately owned generation facilities throughout Western Australia.”

        60

      • #
        el+gordo

        Governments of all persuasion are going green and only global cooling will convince them that CO2 doesn’t cause warming. Shouldn’t be too long now.

        70

      • #
        yarpos

        You might also like to remember that in VICs case the sale was driven by the total financial carnage wrought on the State by Labor, which took a decade to repair. Simpleton comments about who is power at any moment without context are valueless.

        70

  • #
    David Maddison

    Even though energy supply is mostly a state matter in Australia, Morrison failed to provide pro-energy guidance for the country and the absolute worst thing he did was to fail to get us out of the Paris Accords which was definitely his responsibility. It was a huge opportunity wasted. In fact, of the numerous failures of his “leadership” that was probably the dominant one.

    He could have and also should have initiated a high level inquiry into the anthropogenic global warming fraud but look what happened when Abbott wanted an inquiry into the BoM. The Klaus Schwab acolyte embedded in both the Abbott and Morrison governments, Greg Hunt, made sure that wasn’t going to happen.

    The commitment to Paris has committed Australia to economic destruction and increasing rates of energy poverty and deindustrialisation due to high energy prices. The Left love it!

    Just as more unreliables mean higher consumer electricity prices, they also mean more economic destruction. There are no exceptions I am aware of.

    The only people who support unreliables are evil doers and their wilfully ignorant followers. (Because ignorance is a deliberate choice.)

    471

    • #
      Rafe+Champion

      Possibly more important than the Paris Accord was Turnbull’s appointment of Audrey Zibelman to head AEMO.

      481

      • #
        Barry

        This was obviously at the time a bad decision.
        In hindsight, it was a catastrophe.

        But she’s appointed hundreds of like minded people. AEMO will have to be destroyed before the whole saga can be over.
        AEMO delenda est

        230

  • #
    David Maddison

    Questions:

    1) How close are we to large scale grid failure? I guess this could easily happen after a few winter days with no wind. And certainly after the next coal.power station is destroyed.

    2) How close are we to it being economical to generate electricity at home with a diesel or LPG (propane) generator or one powered by natural gas?

    3) Is there no one with any influence on government that has any clue what’s going on? Are professional engineering and scientific organisations too terrified to speak out?

    4) The grid is being saved somewhat by the deindustrialisation of Australia plus load shedding from shutdowns of aluminium smelters.

    441

    • #
      Lawrie

      We here have said for a few years now that only when there was a disaster would some reality bite the dummies in charge. Not them directly since ignorance seems to be a badge of honour but when the masses start demanding reliable power and there is the real threat the pollies will lose their power.

      361

  • #
    JB

    Surely with the introduction of domestic smart meters it ought to be possible to ensure that green voting electorates are the first to suffer blackouts and other power restrictions. A form of user pays perhaps?

    381

    • #
      ColA

      JB,
      The only thing that would do would be a huge boost in chinese diesel generators, as we see in Jo’s earlier post, the green electorates are rich, upper class public servants and managers – do as I say not as I do (= I need the lights on so I can manage YOU!!)

      211

      • #
        crakar24

        I can vouch from experience public servants dont get paid very well so i dont think these are the rich people you are referring to

        27

        • #
          ColA

          Crakar, I did say upper class, go look up how much a middle class public servant earns in Aus, then a senior public servant, then look up how much the judges in the American Supreme Court earn and

          41

          • #
            crakar24

            What is a “middle class” public servant Cola? There is no such thing as a “senior public servant”

            These are the servants you should vent against

            SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE
            Guidepoints SES B1 SES B2 SES B3 Pay
            point 1 $166,943 $202,575 $251,898 Pay
            point 2 $176,348 $214,399 $268,939 Pay
            point 3 $184,317 $224,777 $284,534 Pay
            point 4 $190,184 $235,161 $300,124 Pay
            point 5 $195,890 $244,552

            60

        • #
          yarpos

          I think your experience may be rather dated. They do nicely compared to the private sector, as the level rises it becomes quite a joke from a risk/reward perspective

          20

    • #
      David Maddison

      JB, I have often suggested that with the right programming of smart electricity meters, consumers could select supply from either “green” generation or from proper coal, gas, hydro or even nuclear generation.

      Conditions would be that one system would not be allowed to feed into the other and that prices are determined by the free market. So if the wind stops blowing and the sun stops shining the lights go out.

      It shouldn’t be a problem for green types because they keep telling us unreliables are cheaper and more reliable than coal. Well, let them put their money where their mouths are.

      290

      • #
        Robber

        Tangoenergy offers electricity with a 16% discount off the Victorian Default offer, but you can also sign up for Tango Blue, 100% renewable electricity, but that costs 12% more than the VDO. Must be appealing to those rich Teal voters.

        50

  • #
    Honk R Smith

    You realize the failure will be blamed on the non-believers.
    Like vax failure is because of unvaccinated.
    An unmasked face invites the Devil.
    Non-compliance is sin.

    It would have worked if not for negative the vibes.

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  • #
    Peter Fitzroy

    Odd that Western Australian gas prices are not mentioned in this post. Could it be because 17% of exportable gas is held for domestic consumption, and not subject to price gouging like gas on the east coast? Or could it be because it was a government initiative to stop such gouging? Or could it be that it was a Labor government initiative?

    16

    • #
      Peter Fitzroy

      odd also that this post will not be released. pity

      16

    • #

      Only in your own head Peter. It’s a 200 word post. I also didn’t mention nuclear power, the largest uranium reserves in the world, fracking, the lack of gas exploration in Victoria. And I already answered your question about WA’s gas policy. Imagine if the NEM had strong brown coal baseload power generators or nuclear power. We could be selling 100% of that Expensive Gas to the world to save Ukraine and make a bezillion dollars in profits and earning extra tax revenue to fund hospitals and schools.

      Imagine if WA had limited Iron ore explorations or slapped eco-green rules on the industry as much as Vicdanistan has on gas? We wouldn’t be sitting pretty, reaping in billions of dollars.

      150

      • #
        Peter Fitzroy

        Could it be that it destroys your campaign blaming renewables for everything. Still, your bobble headed supporters will hear nothing else. Propaganda is like that

        18

        • #

          So you admit you have nothing then? Not one word to explain why Big Renewables would have saved us from this debacle if only we had enough of them?

          80

        • #
          b.nice

          What a weird, fabricated load of nonsense you manage, PF.

          Anyone who really thinks that unreliables have helped the NEM stability, is living in a delusional cloud cuckoo land.

          Anyone that can’t see that the places with the highest infection of unreliables have the highest prices, must be deliberately blinding themselves in the hope of protecting some weird anti-science religious agenda/belief.

          And all of this “unreliables” anti-CO2 nonsense, destroying grid stability, destroying the capability of reliability of supply, and causing rapid price rises, is of course, for absolutely no rational or scientific reason whatsoever.

          70

        • #
          b.nice

          “will hear nothing else”

          Certainly not from you.

          Your comments are devoid of anything scientifically or rationally based.

          “Nothing”, is all you have to offer.

          30

        • #

          Another addition to serial offender Peter Fitzroy’s misrepresentations and lies : ” Could it be that it destroys your campaign blaming renewables for everything . Still your bobble headed supporters will hear nothing else ”

          Joanne does not assign culpability to renewables for “everything” in the negative sense. That is another one of your defamatory contrived fictions .We are agreed on something however : ” propaganda is like that “

          40

      • #
        James Murphy

        Jo, Victoria has quietly (compared to their announcements when they introduced the restrictions) changed their ban on onshore exploration…
        https://earthresources.vic.gov.au/projects/onshore-conventional-gas-restart

        30

  • #
    Rafe+Champion

    The hour of the Energy Realists of Australia has come. For more than two years we have been sending briefing notes on the energy crisis to every sitting member state and federal from coast to coast. The first batch of notes can be found here at the RiteOn site and our own site is under construction so our notes can be presented as factual material with no political bias.

    There are more notes on our site – most of the content is filler put in by the web contractor to provide a template.

    We really need a piece called Planning to Fail about the leadership in AEMO, the ESB and the other agencies. Decisive steps were the appointment of Audrey Zibelman to head AEMO and Kerry Schott to ESB.

    A part of planning to fail is recruiting to fail, as you find in an interview with AZ where she indicated that commitment to decarbonization was practically a requirement for employment in AEMO.

    After Zibelman we have Daniel Westerman who comes with experience in planning and implementing RE policy in Britain and North America. Would you really want to have that on your cv?

    551

  • #
    Graham Richards

    I can’t wait for the Green “bubble “ to burst!!
    Plunge SA & Victoria into freezing darkness. I wonder is those dummies will even know what’s gone wrong They’ll probably blame racists or Transphobes, maybe it caused by anti vaxxers or the war in Ukraine. I bet extreme right wing factions won’t escape either.
    How we laughed!!😂😂😂😂

    381

    • #
      crakar24

      No one in SA is talking about this Graham so whatever is to happen (total grid collapse etc) will come as a total shock to a vast majority of people. The SA gov will spin this and blame the out going liberal party like everything else at the moment.

      160

      • #
        IanB

        The new SA Labor government will also tell us that their new green hydrogen white elephant project will
        save us from the nasty carbon pollution at a measly cost of only $600 million. But wait there’s more, it will
        also provide a nice export income because the German government is keen to buy that lovely green
        hydrogen from us. Just ask our dear Premier Pete he’s all over it.

        We lurch from one insanity to the next.

        00

  • #
    Robber

    Who could not have seen this coming?
    Tell coal-fired generators they need to close ASAP because they are dirty “polluters”.
    Then subsidise solar and wind so that when the sun shines and the wind blows coal generators must curtail production, thereby reducing their revenues.
    With loss of revenue, where can they cut costs? Why reduce maintenance of course, and defer replacement of components as they approach end of life (and probably lose some experienced personnel).
    Add to that the reliability problems caused by ramping up production every night and throttling back every day.
    Coal generation 2010: 164,000 GWhr (18,700 MW); 2015: 153,000 GWhr; 2018: 146,000 GWhr; 2021: 128,000 GWhr (14,600 MW)
    That’s a 22% reduction in output – that must surely have stopped catastrophic warming?
    And what will the new plan require by 2030 with a new government keen to prove its green credentials, never mind the cost or reliability?

    320

    • #
      David Maddison

      And what will the new plan require by 2030 with a new government keen to prove its green credentials,

      One thing I’m sure they’ll do is to make sure closed coal power stations are demolished as quickly as possible, probably blowing them up as a spectacular media event.

      It is important for the new government to burn all bridges and sever all connections with the past in order to herald the new green socialist utopia.

      290

  • #
    Neville

    The trouble is that most left wing idiots BELIEVE that we just need more TOXIC, UNRELIABLE S & W ruinables to fix their mess.
    I’m hoping for a groundswell of sanity to start to emerge in the MSM in Australia, in the EU and the USA.
    Surely this has to happen soon or we really are heading for a very precarious future? Waiting for NOV mid terms in the US is not soon enough, but it will be one sure sign that the voters have had a gutful and then the MSM will probably begin to wake up? Who knows?
    But the problem is we’ve just elected the clueless Albo Labor govt and a collection of wealthy, pig ignorant Teals who couldn’t care less about the data and evidence of the real planet Earth.
    They prefer their fairy tales and fantasy world and want to waste billions $ for decades and for ZERO change.

    360

  • #
    yarpos

    “…..and the inability of sufficient renewables to reliably deliver energy security”

    unfortunate wording, sounds like the if we just install more “RE” it will all be good

    it doesnt seem that “RE” has improved energy security anywhere, quite the reverse

    240

    • #
      el+gordo

      His wording was fine and he is correct, Santos is a gas merchant after all. Renewables cannot do the job so gas fired power stations getting gas from Narrabri is a midterm solution.

      40

  • #
    David Maddison

    The Elites and their useful idiot supporters depriving the people of electricity is reminiscent of the scene from Total Recall when the evil guy deprives the dwellers on Mars of air.

    30 sec scene: https://youtu.be/X8lT-Sn-HqE

    90

    • #
      Neville

      D M that 1990 movie is sure dated today and the TV screens are square and not the 16/9 of today’s panels.
      But I’m sure the younger Arnie is still as silly today as he was 32 years ago.
      Some things never change.

      71

  • #
    Neville

    And let’s be sure we really understand what has happened since 1970 and how we’ve arrived at this ludicrous situation over the last 50 years.
    This is the graph that proves we’ve been taken for fools and China, India and the developing countries have no interest in following our mad rush for more TOXIC ruinous, so called S & W energy.
    Why has this taken decades for the so called advanced countries to start to wake up? And meanwhile TRILLIONs of $ have been flushed down the toilet and we have NOTHING but an expensive, chaotic energy mess to show for it?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_carbon_dioxide_emissions#/media/File:World_fossil_carbon_dioxide_emissions_six_top_countries_and_confederations.png

    200

    • #
      David Maddison

      It’s a very powerful graph, Neville, and please keep posting it.

      Frankly, I’m surprised Wikipedia hasn’t censored it.

      90

  • #
    Kalm Keith

    Audrey Zibelman – Turnbull.

    Turnbull – Audrey Zibelman.

    Audrey Zibelman – Turnbull.

    One hates Australia; the other one despises us.

    150

  • #
    RickWill

    A rare cap on gas markets of $40 a gigajoule

    If I did not have my own supply of wood, I could get firewood delivered for $450/tonne:
    https://www.firewood.com.au/collections/fireplace/products/mixed-firewood
    This works out at $25/GJ.

    My retail price for gas in April was $25/GJ. If the June wholesale price flows through then buying wood would be a better option than using gas. You also get the free workout splitting larger blocks and loading the wood burner.

    There is considerable government largesse on offer for home owners to reduce their energy costs. I expect double glazing will soon be on the list.

    Two certainties –
    1. There is real climate change but not much will be noticeable in the next millennium. Expect to experience cold weather if you live outside the tropics.
    2. Unit cost of energy will inevitably rise.

    As a matter of interest, an electricity distributer in central Melbourne has begun installing batteries to take advantage of rooftop solar in the district without worrying about reverse power flow out of the district. The cost of these batteries will be locked into distribution costs for decades to come.

    A hybrid motor vehicle makes economic sense in Australia.

    81

    • #
      RickWill

      This situation was emerging in Australia when Rudd came to power. Sense prevailed for two years when Abbott held fast. Regulars here should have insulated themselves from the consequences of high energy costs.

      The one positive from Covid is that most office workers now know they can work effectively from home. This is a huge positive for decentralised living. It also reduces demand on public transport, city roads and fuel demand.

      If you have a good size suburban block or larger block in a semi-rural/rural location, you can be self-sufficient for energy as well as provide some basic food needs.

      The electricity network in Australia is a mess. It will be bandaid on bandaid. It will be increasingly socialised with things like price caps and assistance packages that are nothing more than lipstick on a pig. The one thing that won’t happen is that all the W&S will be ripped out and new coal plants built.

      190

    • #
      crakar24

      Rick,

      your numbers hold up until the LAB/GRN government slap a carbon tax on us wood burners 🙂

      140

      • #
        David Maddison

        And in Vicdanistan, Comrade Chairman Andrews has prohibited firewood collection in many areas in which you were formerly allowed to.

        They really do want us to freeze in the dark.

        160

      • #
        Annie

        As we are helping to save usage of electricity, they should be applauding us….hmmm.

        20

  • #
    robert rosicka

    Can anybody work out how much less CO2 is being emitted by Oz now with these turbines out ? Must be a truly astronomical 0.00000000% compared to our normal 0.0000%.

    220

    • #
      ando

      Exactly. Can anybody work out what the change to temps or climate would be if Australia reduced our co2 ’emissions’ to 0%? The answer as we know is not measurable, so why the f are we throwing billions down the drain that achieves nothing but wrecking our nation and causing worse local environmental outcomes – not to mention environmental disasters in poor countries that mine raw materials and manufacture the useless panels and windmills that we import? The only answer I can come up with is that middle class need to be taken back to slave status and our globalist sellout politicians agree whole heatedly…whilst greatly increasing their personal wealth.

      180

      • #

        IS that really the only answer you can come up with? Something about slaves and globalists.

        If I was following the money I’d say that you are afraid for your investments.

        123

        • #
          Annie

          GA can you come up with a better answer than Ando’s when tptb seem to be so bull-headedly, wilfully ignorant?

          190

        • #
          b.nice

          GA, denying what his spiritual leaders in the WEF have stated out loud. Very funny.

          Start paying attention. You can’t live in blatant ignorance all your life, you know.

          131

      • #
        Serge Wright

        If you assume all warming is due to human GHG (Which is highly doubtful), then Australia is generating about 0.0014 degrees C per decade, based on UAH satellite data.

        30

    • #
      Graeme No.3

      Our electricity generation produces about 0.26-0.29% of world emissions, or about one month’s increase (every month) from China and India.
      So we are “throwing billions down the drain” for f all benefit (except to the financial types).

      150

  • #
    Serge Wright

    Without a storage solution, RE is simply not a viable solution for a grid. What is unfolding both here and overseas was totally predictable, but the green zealots will never listen and their answer is always “more RE” to address the problem of too much RE. It’s too late to fix the issue now. The damage has been done and we have a left wing government that effectively has an agenda to shut down the grid and turn off the lights. Fun times ahead as we crash and burn (or freeze) and without any political will to build new coal plants we have no way out of this mess for the next generation unless the LNP grows a pair between now and 2025.

    220

  • #
    Ian1946

    South Australia using diesel for 10% of demand. Obviously they need more windmills.

    200

    • #
      b.nice

      Currently, diesel is probably cheaper than Gas.

      Wind is actually going quite well.. at the moment.

      Certainly windy where I am in the Hunter wines region.

      110

  • #
    Anton

    You Aussies are lucky. You can just on put a heavy sweater in winter. In the British winter that is coming in 6 months people will die of cold because they can’t afford energy to heat themselves.

    270

    • #
      Ross

      Anton, its gets pretty cold in the southern states. The same trend still applies – more people die under cold conditions vs hot. We have pensioners in Australia who turn off their heating in winter to avoid the high power bills, so not much different to the UK.

      200

    • #
      Annie

      It depends on where in Australia. Here in country Victoria, with snow on the hills, rather more than an extra sweater is needed. Even with the stove going we can need not only a sweater but several layers thereof! Hat, coat, scarf and gloves outside too.

      120

      • #
        Annie

        I should add that I am a Pom who prefers cooler, but not freezing, weather and loathe the high summer here in Aus.

        120

    • #

      Tops of under 10C all week here with wind chill making it much lower. I found similar weather oop North in late May 2019

      41

    • #
      yarpos

      Yep, in the 80s my boss was an expat Canadian. When people came in complaining about the cold his favourite retort was ” at least if you go outside in the wrong clothes you dont die!” it never got old

      Fast forward 25 years and I was living in Europe getting a little taste of what he was talking about, but still kid stuff compared with Calgary.

      60

  • #
    Ian1946

    Live, Real Time, Electricity Supply & Demand, graph. NEM Watch.

    https://www.nem-watch.info/widgets/reneweconomy/

    [Wee edit for clarity. – LVA]

    20

  • #
    Zane

    We may need to run an extension cord to China 😃.

    90

  • #
    David Maddison

    Some price comparison, gas vs electricity.

    $40 gigajoule gas price cap.

    1 gigajoule is equivalent to 278kWh.

    In terms of gas equivalent to electricity 1 kWh of gas costs 14.4 cents compared to consumer electricity price of about 30 cents per kWh.

    But as RickWill pointed out he pays $25 per gigajoule for gas so that works out to be 9c per kWh electricity equivalent.

    However, I believe it is still cheaper to heat one’s house electrically with heat pumps (split systems) than with gas because heat pumps are much more efficient than gas combustion. That is the case even with outrageously high electricity prices.

    Gas is probably cheaper than electrical resistive heating, however.

    90

    • #
      RickWill

      However, I believe it is still cheaper to heat one’s house electrically

      COP is realistically around 3 on the heating cycle for an inverter system. So 1kWh in will get 3kWh out. About 10MJ for 30c. Or $30/GJ.

      This is slightly better than burning wood (if I had to buy wood) because the wood burner puts 30 to 40% of the heat up the flue. I have a long internal flue that reduces that heat loss somewhat – at best 70% stays in the house. Wood is notionally free for the sake of collecting it. I have to trim trees anyhow to lower the risk of failure and there are State forests nearby.

      I have a friend in rural Victoria who installed a 3kW heating reverse cycle heat pump for zero cost to him a year ago. They took advantage of some of the government largesse:
      https://www.heatingupgrades.vic.gov.au

      A reverse-cycle air conditioner is one of the most cost-effective and energy-efficient ways to provide heating and cooling for your home in one system, for year-round comfort. Find out if you’re eligible for the $1,000 rebate today.

      His installer did all the paperwork and he paid nothing.

      The big issue with going green at grid level is access to land for wind turbines, solar farms and battery locations. This is driving more distributed systems. Hence woke governments will continue to encourage distributed systems as these use land/roofs already held by the proponent.

      I expect to see Federal offers for household batteries and anything that reduces energy demand. Double glazing has been done in the UK so there is already a model for that. The double glazing did not create the same issues as dodgy building insulation.

      So far I am not aware of a reliable heat pump hotwater system. It is something I will review if my gas system dies.

      70

    • #
      Chad

      David Maddison
      June 6, 2022 at 8:58 am · Reply
      Some price comparison, gas vs electricity.

      $40 gigajoule gas price cap.

      What was the price 10-20 yrs ago ?
      And what other charges are included in the $$/Gj bill price ?

      10

  • #
    Bruce

    Speaking of “energy security”:

    Has anyone pondered the effect of wobbly electricity on that other abomination, the NBN?

    The old copper networks were “disconnected when this thing was installed.

    All your domestic communications services operate via the cheesy, imported “modem”.

    Said magic box runs on MAINS power, as does EVERY repeater / “node” on the system.

    Turn off the electricity and the whole rock-show falls over, no phones to call for an ambulance, no internet to monitor Granny’s medical electronics, (which will have also fallen over).

    NO mobile services because the “towers” that make the entire system work are powered by electricity. Sure, they have backup generators, batteries, inverters, as required, but for how long.

    The old and ruthlessly maligned copper network was a MUCH tougher beast than the NBN.

    The service stations will not be able to pump what little insanely expensive fuel they may still have, to run your car that is only allowed to be riven ion days not ending in “Y”..

    All is, apparently, proceeding as planned.

    And a happy D_Day to all who actually still care.

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    • #
      David Maddison

      I am not aware of the copper wire telephone system ever having gone down. It had an unbelievable 100% up time or very close to it. The exchanges had huge battery banks and generators. I once heard the old exchanges had 3 weeks of backup electricity and then all they had to do was refuel the generators.

      Just this year alone my NBN system has been down three times for “maintenance”.

      No NBN connected phones will work.

      And in the event of a power failure, not only will NBN not work, cell towers only have a few hours battery backup. Once they go down there is no possibility of emergency calls to fire, police or ambulance.

      161

      • #
        David Maddison

        My elderly mother is currently suffering a power outage on the lower North Shore of Sydney.

        Naturally her NBN phone won’t work. The only communication she has for emergencies is her cell phone but only for the few hours until the cell towers exhaust their batteries.

        This lead me to discover something interesting. If you call an NBN phone which is down because of lack of power, it appears to the caller to have a normal ring tone. The caller has no idea their call is not getting through.

        That’s what happens when you allow politicians to make engineering decisions.

        101

      • #
        Graeme#4

        If you mean copper wire to the home, I was on a suburban cable that had reached its use-by date. All the techs did when I complained was switch the pairs around between users, including the gradually-increasing number of faulty pairs. Eventually they had to replace the entire cable. It certainly impacted the ADSL service for over a year

        30

      • #
        yarpos

        yep, the exchange I worked in as a kid had 3 x 4000Ah 48V batteries and a big ar$e (technical term) generator. The only constraint on running grid down was the supply of diesel , which in those golden days was a non issue.

        40

    • #
      RickWill

      Has anyone pondered the effect of wobbly electricity on that other abomination, the NBN?

      If power goes out, everything is chaotic. City and suburban traffic flow becomes a disaster. Shops shut because they can no longer trade. Supermarkets hope their emergency generator kicks in and they take action to reduce heat input to freezers.

      In these circumstances, it is best to be at home and set up your alternate power supply if it is not automatic. My fridge and freezer run off-grid anyhow. I have good torches that will light rooms for hours and I can run extension lead to other appliances. Wood heating if needed. Evaporative cooling if needed. Gas cooking and gas water heating.

      Victorians had a tough time when the gas ran out a couple of decades ago. I now have a standby electric hotwater system for that event. It has run off solar but only in the summer time.

      It would be nice to sit back and watch Netflix but a book is just as good and always have something that I have not read that I plan to read.

      90

      • #

        …..but a book is just as good and always have something that I have not read that I plan to read.

        Lonesome Dove

        Tony.

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      • #
        Philby

        Our motorhome is equipped with solar panels and batteries plus inverter, diesel heater and gas hws and stove and frig. Tv works well USB charging , When the power is interrupted we go to the motorhome.

        90

      • #
        John R T

        Lauden, Rachel, ‘Cuisine and Conquest’

        10

    • #
      yarpos

      Depends on duration and extent of the outage.

      Cell phones do not go off instantly in a power outage. The wider NBN network does not go off instantly in a power outage. These systems have back up power but of course that will have a finite life if a long outage occurs.

      We had a black out for half an hour or so last night. When the lights came on we had NBN available as soon as the router and NBN box had rebooted and 4G service all the time , which is how we track the fault with AUSNET.

      given enough time it will all crumple

      20

  • #
    Bruce

    “…..riven ion”?

    Try: “driven on”…..

    10

  • #
    Neville

    Meanwhile Canberra is heading for cold conditions this week and they’ve already had a dusting of snow and ditto Ballarat, the Dandenongs etc in Victoria.
    And this is one of the earliest seasons and good dumps of snow already for the Ski resorts in NSW and Vic.
    These Antarctic winter blasts are a bummer for the loonies’ endless nonsense about extreme heat and Dr Hansen’s scary fairy tales about increasing dangerous SLR around the planet.

    http://www.bom.gov.au/act/forecasts/canberra.shtml

    101

    • #
      RickWill

      Meanwhile Canberra is heading for cold conditions this week and they’ve already had a dusting of snow and ditto Ballarat, the Dandenongs etc in Victoria.

      This is alternate weather. It is proof positive of climate weirding caused by more atmospheric CO2.

      Maybe in the new religion, Albo could just declare he has won the climate war and CO2 is no longer a problem (never was). Dig more coal, release more gas and pump more oil. The world needs what Australia has.

      Australia could just keep burning lignite in Victoria to power the whole country because no one else wants that stuff – YET.

      121

      • #
        yarpos

        Canberra well be fine as they are 100% totally renewable(tm) and unperturbed by the machinations of the NSW grid.

        20

  • #
    DLK

    Another coal fired turbine blew this weekend

    according to the left this will make power cheaper.

    151

  • #

    I get angry every time I hear “dispatchable”.

    As an engineer let me explain. Dispatchable nearly always refers to gas. Now gas plants can operate two ways. One – straight thru with 35% efficiency and when one has to turn it on and off or change the load significantly then this is the way you end up running it.

    The other is around 65% with a proper combined cycle operation. But it requires a steady load and to bring the plant up you have to settle in straight thru mode. And one has to install the combined cycle setup for the plant.

    No prizes for guessing which way we will have to operate if we need gas to support on/off wind and solar…. low efficiency. So we lock in high costs from day one. So also, many supplying these dispatchable units will not even bother to invest in the combined cycle, just install it with the turbine and always run inefficiently. And lock in high power costs.

    We have idiots at the helm. Covid showed us just how incompetent these people are, now we have the power grid about to collapse after years of appeasement and cowardly actions from bureaucrats and politicians.

    Stop bureaucrats and politicians having anything at all to do with energy supply and system operation – only Engineers should be allowed to make any decisions in this area.

    351

    • #
      Graeme No.3

      And a lower efficiency the emissions increase.
      And you don’t have o use clean gas when diesel fuel, kerosene (even cooking oil?) are cheaper.
      And the Greens never mention those emissions (because they are essential for renewables)

      100

  • #
    Neville

    Same nonsense as usual for King island. Wind energy is like a banshee on steroids and SFA solar and the always reliable Diesel generator is AGAIN saving the day.
    The clueless battery AGAIN is adding ZIP to their grid.

    https://www.hydro.com.au/clean-energy/hybrid-energy-solutions/success-stories/king-island

    110

    • #
      RicDre

      And speaking of King Island, I noticed a while ago, Wind was producing about 1800 KW, Solar was zero, the battery was being charged around 100 KW, the Diesel Generator was producing about 400 KW and nearly 100 KW was being dumped into the Resistor and apparently being wasted since the arrow to the Resistor is not bi-directional. I wonder why the were wasting electricity by dumping it into a resistor; was it because the Diesel could not be throttled down any farther without being shut down and if they did shut the Diesel down, the wind by itself couldn’t provide enough power for the total load which was greater than the wind output at the time.

      70

      • #
        RicDre

        And I see it doing something similar at 10:26AM time: Wind 2011 Wk, Solar 19 KW, Battery -18 KW, Diesel 488 KW, Resistor -428 KW, Output 2072 KW Flywheel -43 KW … nearly the whole Diesel output is being dumped into the Resistor.

        100

        • #
          David Maddison

          The battery will have a maximum charge current and voltage it can absorb so surplus power has to be dumped if there is no other demand for it.

          Perhaps they should use a “green hydrogen” plant as a dump load, LoL.

          61

    • #
      Forrest Gardener

      The solution is clear to any teal. If solar is producing 2% of the power then you need 50 times as many panels.

      On a more serious note why do they need a battery in that system? It makes no sense at all to me. Maybe it is for nights with no wind when the diesel generator runs out of fuel?

      111

      • #
        RicDre

        “On a more serious note why do they need a battery in that system?”

        Maybe to help smooth the load and/or stabilize the Frequency when the Diesel is not running? I’ve noticed there are times when the Diesel is off line that the battery switches rapidly between charge and discharge cycles which could be for load balancing/frequency stabilization since you have no control over the wind and solar output. They do have a flywheel there for load/frequency stabilization but its probably only good for very short periods of time.

        40

  • #
    OldOzzie

    The AFR View

    Labor needs a realistic net zero transition plan

    The lesson of the energy crisis is that the decades-long transition to cleaner energy cannot be achieved simply by flicking the off switch on fossil fuels.

    Climate change and energy minister Chris Bowen is correct about the climate wars leaving Australia ill-prepared for the full-blown energy crisis that has landed in the lap of the new Labor government. There are now no quick fixes for the perfect storm of global and domestic events that has produced a gas shortage and sharply higher electricity prices.

    Australia must transform its carbon-intensive resource economy in a world moving towards net zero by 2050. But the lesson of the crisis is that the decades-long transition to cleaner energy cannot be achieved simply by flicking the off switch on fossil fuels. Labor now needs to come up with a plan for an orderly transition that matches its commitment to reducing Australia’s carbon emissions with maintaining energy reliability and affordability.

    The first principle is that old sources of energy cannot be closed down until adequate and price-competitive replacement supply is up and running. That is ironically underlined by a Labor government elected on the promise of stronger action on climate change now heeding calls to get coal-fired plants firing to help reduce soaring energy prices, as revealed by AFR Weekend on Saturday.

    During the election, Labor claimed that its “Powering the nation” plan would create jobs, cut power prices, reduce emissions, and boost renewable energy. Yet it did not release the modelling that purported to show that spending $20 billion on new transmission lines connecting wind and solar generation to the grid would reduce household electricity bills by $275 a year.

    A practical transition plan needs to be technology-neutral and not repeat the mistake of demonising any particular energy source.

    To enhance the operation of Australia’s private carbon trading market, Labor has promised to expand the emissions reduction “safeguard mechanism” to bigger carbon emitters. But it has provided no detail of how this will be squared with ensuring emissions-intensive trade-exposed industries “will not face greater constraint than their competitors” which would send carbon-intensive jobs offshore. And what is Labor’s position on carbon capture and storage to abate fossil fuel emissions, which the 2017 energy security review by former chief scientist Alan Finkel said was essential to Australia’s net zero hopes?

    Rather than increasing the sovereign risk of a commodity-exporting economy, more gas exploration and development is needed so that Australia can help the global transition to a lower-carbon world. A practical transition plan needs to be technology-neutral and not repeat the mistake of demonising any particular energy source. As such, it should be open to the role zero-emissions small scale nuclear generators might play in a low-carbon economy.

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    • #
      DLK

      Labor needs a realistic net zero transition plan

      might as well make plans for a realistic perpetual motion machine.

      221

    • #
      DLK

      it should be open to the role zero-emissions small scale nuclear generators might play in a low-carbon economy

      will never ever happen as the greens will not allow it.

      71

    • #
      OldOzzie

      Politics of energy hits a perfect storm

      This week’s emergency meeting of federal and state energy ministers will be big on the rhetoric of co-operation but short on practical answers for soaring energy prices and inadequate supplies.

      Jennifer Hewett Columnist

      It’s hardly the start Chris Bowen wanted in his new role as climate change and energy minister. But it’s the reality of an energy market facing a far more difficult policy climate than the campaign rhetoric of either Labor or the Coalition.

      These energy contradictions have been a long time building, even if surging power prices have only recently turned them into a new cost of living crisis for Australian consumers. Nor are they about to be solved by the general enthusiasm in the community or among Australian corporates for the transition to renewables. The emergency meeting of state and federal energy ministers this week will do little more than solemnly agree the market is a mess with no short-term fix feasible but long-term plans are a definite must.

      Blaming the former federal government for nine years of delay in establishing a “robust” framework is logical so soon after the election. It only offers temporary protection. For all those manufacturing businesses having to adapt to costs well beyond any business plan or households horrified by escalating power bills, high prices have already become Bowen’s problem to manage.

      Not that he’s alone. Many economies are struggling with price spikes amid an urgent search for reliable supplies of oil and gas and, yes, coal to supplement growth in renewables. The energy revolution is accelerating but so is the casualty list.

      Bowen is happy to concede the Coalition can’t be blamed for contributing factors such as the Russian invasion of Ukraine or floods and bad weather affecting coal mines or the number of ageing coal-fired power stations being offline for repairs, both planned and unplanned. Even the early burst of winter weather in southern Australia is exaggerating the impact.

      But he insists Australia is far less resilient than it should have been in its ability to respond to “the perfect storm” of such pressures.

      That’s all true. But there are plenty of culprits beyond Canberra, including state governments, regulatory gridlock, apprehensive investors and the potency of the argument in some quarters that the current generation of renewables, storage and batteries could efficiently manage gaps in supply this decade.

      The result is the Coalition’s promotion of a “gas-led recovery” has been exposed as a sham – but so too have all those arguments that gas should have no role as a crucial interim fuel in power generation and supply for energy-intensive manufacturing.

      The confusion over this has created some made-in-Australia policy debacles, including a reluctance by larger energy companies to invest in “dispatchable” power in the absence of government guarantees, incentives or longer-term contracts.

      Right now the political price to be paid can only go up – directly in line with power bills.

      That requires co-operation of fractious state governments and bureaucracies, of course. In advance of Wednesday’s meeting, Bowen is already praising an improvement under federal Labor. Relations between the NSW liberal Energy Minister and Treasurer Matt Kean, and former federal Energy Minister Angus Taylor were notoriously difficult, for example.

      But it is also governments in NSW and Victoria that have stymied any new gas developments in their states for years as they prioritised investment in renewables.

      The idea of a “capacity” market where generators are paid to have power available when needed – think gas and coal – is still contentious, for example. Even companies like Origin don’t believe coal should attract such financial incentives – having announced plans to close Australia’s largest coal mine in 2025, seven years ahead of schedule.

      Large-scale batteries and better storage and transmission are clearly part of the future answer (Hmmm see King Island Renewable Energy Integration Project (KIREIP) Real time energy dashboard) – with investment planned or under construction as technology improves. But right now the political price to be paid can only go up – directly in line with power bills.

      71

      • #
        Zane

        The fact that a ministry of ” Climate Change ” even exists shows that the lunatics are fully in charge of the asylum. Expecting rational energy policy to come out of this clown show is like asking a shark to go vegan.

        191

      • #
        yarpos

        Perhaps electric Jesus Mr Canon Brookes will consider powering Sydney rather than Singapore with his grand vision in the NT? Havent heard much about that lately, I guess its steaming along.

        60

  • #
    Peter C

    It will take six months until some extra gas arrives:

    Over the weekend I saw 3 LPG tankers enter Westernport Bay. All arrived empty and it seems they are filling up at the Long Is Pier.

    When gas is critically short it seems that were are exporting it overseas!

    151

  • #
    Ross

    Then remember the new Minister or Energy is Chris Bowen and be very afraid. Remember dear little Chrissy from the Gillard Labor government? He was the Immigration minister and talked endlessly about “push- pull factors” and the fact that we couldn’t turn boats around. The more he talked, the more boats that arrived and the more people that drowned or were assaulted by pirates. Then, within months of Abbott and the LNP being elected, with the implantation of Operations Sovereign Borders, the problem had been solved. There’s going to be a huge amount of denial, blame and not much reality in this electricity supply space in the near future, if that previous experience with Bowen is any example.

    231

  • #
    Neville

    The Biden loony is declaring that he must raise taxes to help push their TOXIC energy fantasies of S & W.
    Yet he also BELIEVEs that the big energy producers like Saudi Arabia etc should increase their exports of fossil fuels? DUH?
    With clueless leaders like Biden and Albo we don’t need enemies like the Putin psycho or the Chinese Commo Party slave drivers and genocide practitioners.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kVhaxo5-URw

    81

  • #
    el+gordo

    Liddell is a wake up call.

    ‘The Coalition government claimed that prices would “skyrocket” if the Liddell capacity to be retired in early 2023 was not replaced by the private sector. But the Liddell Task Force Report – which has been sitting on Taylor’s desk for five months – has finally been published and does not back this claim.’ (RenewEconomy 2020)

    32

  • #
    Honk R Smith

    I was thinking, here in the Ununited States of Biden, the the Greenies have wanted high energy prices for years.
    I realized maybe they were too dumb to anticipate what it would do to the economy.
    Then I thought, how dumb of me not to have understand how dumb they are.
    Of course, the manipulators knew exactly what they were doing.
    I also had not anticipated the depth of elite depravity.
    But I did learn how to spell Ghislaine.
    (Actually no, had to search it, not sure how to pronounce it either.)

    131

  • #
    Graham Richards

    If Australian gas producers are having trouble diverting gas supply for domestic consumption because they get higher prices overseas may I suggest a quick fix to redivert the gas?

    Quite simple really, increase royalties paid to the state by 25% to subsidise local prices.
    Alternatively tax all gas exports at 25% to achieve a similar result.

    Gas will suddenly appear in abundance in Australia at reduced prices. Next problem with energy producers?? If coal production can be used to subsidise Solar/Wind energy there’ll be nothing wrong in taxing gas exports to subsidise local consumers.

    121

    • #

      Something similar to this has been suggested by many people

      33

      • #
        Peter Fitzroy

        it exists in Western Australia

        24

        • #
          Graeme#4

          Yes, and the 15% domestic reservation scheme, put into place by a strong Liberal premier against the wishes of the gas producers, has resulted in WA having a plentiful supply of cheap gas for both domestic and industrial use. Also gas peakers, located along the north-south main gas line running right through the main population corridor, means that additional cheap energy can be quickly brought on line when required. And not being connected to the “National” grid means WA continues to enjoy cheap reliable energy.

          40

      • #
        Graham Richards

        That’s the actual problem. The folk who have any good ideas do not have the opportunity
        To test or put them into practise.

        Those with the power & opportunities just waffle & waffle. That seems to be the modus operandi ever since Tony Abbot was dumped in favour of the The Founding Father of Waffle,
        Malcolm Turdball!

        50

    • #
    • #
      Robber

      The exporters have probably signed long term contracts with Japan, Korea etc that probably do not reflect the current spot prices.
      But here in Oz we now want more gas than contracted for, hence pay high spot prices.

      40

  • #
    crakar24

    Remember we are being led by people who hold the same ideology as these people

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2022/06/04/climate-madness-prince-charles-backs-face-masks-for-cows-in-bid-to-tackle-climate-change/

    In short we dont stand a chance

    151

  • #
    another ian

    Around this area

    And now you know for sure!

    “Remarkable Admission, Pete Buttigieg Announces Biden Inflation Plan is to Create Increased Dependency State and Apply Socialist Economics, Biden Led Govt to Provide Medicine, Childcare, Housing and Food
    June 5, 2022 | Sundance | 310 Comments”

    https://theconservativetreehouse.com/blog/2022/06/05/remarkable-admission-pete-buttigieg-announces-biden-inflation-plan-is-to-create-increased-dependency-state-and-apply-socialist-economics-biden-led-govt-to-provide-medicine-childcare-housing-and-fo/

    61

  • #

    I want to point out some irony in all this.

    Joanne mentions this in her text:

    A third of coal units are unavailable in NSW, 27 per cent are out in Queensland and 23 per cent shut in Victoria, according to consultancy WattClarity.

    There are ten Units currently off line. Overnight, two came back on line and two more went off line.

    Ten out of 48 Units off line means that 21% of the total coal fired power fleet is off line.

    At this morning’s Peak, now just passed, those 38 Units delivered 14000MW just more than half of the total required power at 8AM.

    21% of coal fired power was off line.

    The irony.

    Each and every day, 70% of the entire wind fleet is off line.

    Tony.

    351

  • #
    David Maddison

    Depriving Australians of inexpensive and reliable electricity is obviously deliberate because I think it is impossible to be so stupid as to think you can run a modern society on wind, solar and batteries.

    Someone in government surely has to know this?

    Therefore the plan to make non-Elites freeze in the dark is deliberate. Only Elite politicians, public serpents, “academics”, trade unionists in favoured unions like the CFMEU, and various other privileged groups with their snouts in the trough will be able to keep warm.

    They do not care about regular and poor people (i.e. non-Elites).

    171

  • #
    David Maddison

    The Left want to create a 1000 year Green Socialist utopia.

    Hopefully it will fail just as did the last 1000 year utopia the National Socialists tried to create (who were similarly into “green” things, see Rupert Darwall, Green Tyranny: Exposing the Totalitarian Roots of the Climate Industrial Complex).

    102

  • #
    David Maddison

    Electricity shortages are not the only thing the Elites plan for us.

    Food shortages (lack of supply or higher cost) are already happening throughout the Western World.

    111

  • #
    David Maddison

    Those who have been to Third World countries will realise that in those places they have regular random or scheduled power outages.

    Get used to it Australia as we herald our magnificent Socialist Green Utopia under the brilliant guidance of Comrade Leader Albanese.

    122

    • #
      Dennis

      If a PM travelling overseas during a crisis is unacceptable as Labor’s many comments and advertisements claimed based on 2019 bushfires why is Albo overseas right now?

      Maybe because the energy crisis is primarily a State responsibility and the Deputy Prime Minister is Acting Prime Minister?

      103

  • #
    Mark Allinson

    What an exciting time for the lefty climate pushers – the goal of national destruction is within sight.

    141

  • #
    John in Oz

    I was pleasantly surprised to hear this from Peter Dutton (although powerless atm):

    Peter Dutton has confirmed that his frontbench pick for the opposition’s climate and energy portfolio signals he is up for a debate about nuclear power in Australia.

    In Sunday’s reshuffle the Liberal MP and nuclear power advocate Ted O’Brien was appointed to the shadow cabinet in the crucial portfolio.

    On Monday Dutton told ABC Radio National he was “not afraid to have a discussion on nuclear”, confirming he had considered O’Brien’s support for the form of power in deciding to take the fight to Labor on electricity prices and emissions reduction.

    60

  • #
    Zane

    An elderly lady in Melbourne on the age pension, a very good friend of my late mother’s, and someone who is known for stretching a dollar, has a nifty way of harnessing free solar energy for heating purposes to survive the chilly Victorian winter. She leaves her ancient Toyota Corolla parked in the driveway to catch the sun’s welcome rays and sits in it for hours to stay warm.

    Who needs gas? At least in the daytime… evenings are a different matter. Best to go under the doona early with a hot water bottle.

    Or maybe move to Queensland. 😃

    100

    • #
      Ross

      Haha. My mother-in-law did a similar thing. We had noticed that she was backing her car into her garage and leaving the garage door open. Didn’t think much about it, we thought maybe it was easier for her to get in and out of her car and drive away. Then we realised, that because the garage faced north, like your example, she would go and sit in the car post lunch, keep warm and have a lovely snooze in Winter. 🙂

      90

    • #
      David Maddison

      She leaves her ancient Toyota Corolla parked in the driveway to catch the sun’s welcome rays and sits in it for hours to stay warm.

      It’s disgraceful that this should have to happen in Australia.

      110

    • #
      yarpos

      “Or maybe move to Queensland. ” yes, cause she will just love the summers

      50

  • #
    Ross

    So we are probably entering an energy crisis, maybe one we were already in, but didn’t know it. Well, actually some of us knew or could predict it. As part of that energy crisis, price and rebate mechanisms associated with that change must also adjust. Some up, some down. You can bet no green billionaires will lose money. I’m pretty sure none of the public servants or politicians governing our power grid will be adversely affected. Nor probably the major power supply companies. So, that just leaves the mug punters or end users who will pay extra.

    70

  • #
    David Maddison

    I just saw this ad from Deputy Liberal Leader, in Vicdanistan, David Southwick.

    I am fighting for strong action on climate change and protecting our environment.

    I want to hear your ideas 👇

    The Liberals have no hope. Barely distinguishable from Green Labor.

    110

    • #
      Neil+Crafter

      I wish someone would tell me why they are dissatisfied with the current climate in Victoria. Is it too hot for them? Really. They are looking for non solutions to a non problem. But at least he’s fighting for it!

      30

    • #
      Philip

      Liberals falling over backwards to try and harness climate votes is hilarious. It is sad that they are now going along with it. A long way from Ax The Tax days.

      40

    • #
      David Maddison

      A friend said to me that the problem with the Liberals is that they are trying to out-Left the Left.

      30

    • #
      Ronin

      Here’s a message for you Mr Southwick, let labor do the climate change thing, you get the Victorian economy going again, you know, jobs, businesses, gas drilling, those kind of things that labor are not interested in.

      90

  • #
    Dazza

    The left have been sending negative investment signals around coal for at least the last ten years, leading to the grid’s current parlous state. Then they blamed the previous government, now they want to send positive investment signals for coal power. What are all those banks going to do now after they previously refused to fund coal power?

    60

  • #
    Zane

    John Kerry in Europe is telling everyone that the war in Youkraine must not derail the phasing out of coal.

    80

    • #
      RicDre

      I am hopeful that after the November mid-term elections, we can keep the coal and phase-out John Kerry so that he can go find a new ketchup Baroness to marry.

      50

  • #
    Philip

    Commercial and Industrial customers who won’t be able to continue working, and yet I heard NSW Labor talk about increasing commercial and industrial activity. To do that you need power, so will Labor see sense in this and back coal, at least in short term ? It is this pragmatic reality we see played out in Europe right now.

    I’m sure their answer is more windmills anyway. Even the Liberals say that these days.

    60

  • #
    Philip

    For domestic world to have a generator hooked up to the mains somehow would be a good idea. There are obviously going to be some blackouts at some stage. Does anyone know if this is possible and how ? Or do you just have a generator and run an extension chord to the fridge and the xbox (and modem).

    20

    • #
      Dave

      You’ll need a manual or auto transfer switch if you want to connect all the house to the genset.

      Manual is a lot cheaper and a reasonably quick job.

      Arrow does a good spread on it here: https://arrowpower.com.au/connect-generator-to-house/

      Sad when times like this make you make a decision to install a genset!
      I’ve got a small genset with an extension cord for the fridge. Hot water and cooking is gas.

      Least I can still mow & whipper snip. 🙂

      40

    • #
      David Maddison

      Forget about keeping your NBN modem going. When the grid goes down the NBN will likely go down as well.

      And I think the grid will go down at some point after the next coal power station is shut down.

      And Australia, the dumb country, doesn’t just mothball power stations. Standard procedure is to destroy them as fast as possible so they can never be bought back.

      Thus, I think grid failure could be for months or years, at least with limitations on how much power is allowed to be used until expensive diesel and gas turbine generators can be bought online.

      Look to Venezuela for what your future looks like.

      60

    • #
      yarpos

      We did this at our place , it cost a 500 hundred dollars or so (and good chunk was the switch). Just manual transfer switch to completely disconnect the mains and allow attachment of the generator. A bit of discussion about which circuits we wanted to work under generator conditions and installed and tested. Been used a few times now when blackouts went on a bit long.

      One benefit I didnt think of is that we arent exposed to the power shock when the grid comes back as we are disconnected from it. Its all stable and humming along when I switch back. I only know its back if I look at the meter during a generator check or AUSNET send me an SMS to say its back. Simple and seems to work well.

      50

  • #
    DLK

    TWO New Studies Show Link Between Incurable, Degenerative Brain Disease and the Experimental Covid-19 Vaccine

    Two new clinical studies – one peer-reviewed by researchers in Turkey, and one pre-print by researchers in France – have begun to establish an alarming link between an incurable, degenerative brain disease called Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and the experimental Covid-19 vaccine.”

    at link

    60

  • #
    Ronin

    “AGL confirmed on Friday one of three 500 megawatt units at Liddell has been taken out of service for at least a month, with the company blaming a malfunction with a generator transformer.

    Can we start up the turbine they shut down at Liddell three months ago? ”

    Perhaps they can pinch the transformer from the mothballed unit and use it on the failed one.

    60

    • #
      David Maddison

      Was the previously shut down unit mothballed or just destroyed or in the process of destruction?

      After all, the Left want these units to be destroyed as fast as possible.

      30

  • #
    Honk R Smith

    I accidently saw 30 seconds of the Queen’s Jubilee thingy when I accidently clicked the ABC (American) TV channel.
    A few years ago, I had detox from NPR.
    Now it’s all the MSM. They have lost their minds.
    Anyway …
    it was Duran Duran singing ‘Girls on Film’ as Drag Queens paraded in very outrageous, likely very expensive couture. Didn’t know drag payed so well.
    Fortunately, was able to click away before too much damage was done to what is left of my sight.
    Moments later …
    the Jubilee reappeared and it was the non-cuckold Prince speaking about how “our Earth is in imminent danger from
    human caused Climate Change”.
    That’s the totality of what I witnessed of the celebration of the Queen … pun?

    The fact is, people are under threat of freezing or heating to death in this year of 2022 … as a result of political climate hysteria.
    Just a reminder, there is no space travel, and the Rolling Stones are touring Europe.

    70

    • #
      Honk R Smith

      Isn’t there a Churchill quote …
      “the British Navy was built on rum, sodomy, and the lash”?
      So I guess no surprise.

      20

      • #
        John in Oz

        During my 20 years in the Oz Navy we did not have wine, women and song so had to put up with rum, bum and gramaphone.

        00

    • #
      Graeme No.3

      Honk:
      One of the few benefits of getting old is to remember those “imminent dangers from Climate Change” which haven’t occurred.
      I have made a small list, far too long to post here.
      The earliest I’ve got on Tipping Points goes back to 1864. “As early as 1864 George Perkins Marsh, sometimes said to be the father of American ecology, warned that the earth was ‘fast becoming an unfit home for its “noblest inhabitant,”’ and that unless men changed their ways it would be reduced ‘to such a condition of impoverished productiveness, of shattered surface, of climatic excess, as to threaten the depravation, barbarism, and perhaps even extinction of the species.’” 
      The earliest I heard was from Dr. (as he then was) Paul Ehrlich in (I think) 1966 in person on a visit to Australia. He said the coming ice age will cause droughts. Oil will run out in 10 years. The “times of famine” are upon us, and will be worst by 1975. Ehrlich said “the world food supply cannot feed the expected 2½ billion people expected. It is totally impossible in practice. By 1975 cannibals will roam the Mid West.
      the coming ice age has yet to arrive.
      droughts have got less.
      Oil hasn’t run out.
      Famine hasn’t struck, indeed the world population has increased to nearly 8 billion.
      I am not sure about cannibals roaming the Mid West, but haven’t heard of any problems there. Have you?

      With a record like that he would be in running for the inaugural FLANNERY AWARD. (Now obscure Australian Climatologist who predicted that Sydney, Adelaide and Perth would all run out of water by 2009 and Australia would be in permanent drought “as even if the rain did fall it wouldn’t get to the dams”. Also that polar bears would soon be extinct. From memory he didn’t claim that “children won’t know what snow is.”

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      John B

      I’m sure the Queen wasn’t watching it. More likely reading the form guide. God bless her.

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      Honk R Smith

      Interesting, I think I had a comment deleted possibly for using a word descriptive of a practice that major corps and Western Governments are flying flags to celebrate.
      Or maybe just for a possible insult to the British Navy.

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    crakar24

    The local news here in SA stated athletes all along the east coast were suffering cardiac arrest at an elevated rate compared to pre covid levels, but just like our current demise in power generation has nothing to do with the lack of fossil fuel the rise in cardiac arrest has nothing to do with the vaccine.

    Pay no attention to those conspiracy theory sites, stay on narrative by following your favorites on twitter and Facebook.

    Sleep well sheep.:)

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    Dave in the States

    So, OZ is sitting on a whole bunch of coal, but they must suffer an energy crisis because of a superstition.

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    Jim Veenbaas

    Fossil fuels are not going away anytime soon. I’m very skeptical that western nations will actually tap into their own resources, even though they have vast deposits. They’ll keep buying from despotic countries like Russia, Saudia Arabia and Venezuela. The west is beyond rational decision making.

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    crakar24

    “Short-term fix to gas crisis is to bring coal plants online, Resources Minister Madeleine King says”

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-06-07/gas-crisis-fix-bring-coal-plants-online/101130832

    no comment required

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      I heard that interview – she didn’t sound very convincing in anything she said – you’d need to listen to the intonation and not just read transcripts.

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        post-script to that is that Ted O’Brien (Climate change and energy shadow) was similarly poorly performed in the same half-hour.

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      b.nice

      Why should they spent money they can’t loans for anyway, for a short-term “fix” ?

      They should come straight out and say that certainty for the next 10-15 years at least is guaranteed.

      “Carbon” payments and targets should also be scrapped.

      They really should have listened to Tony Abbott and scrapped the RET, and built new HELE plants, years ago.

      The blame for this situation needs to be placed totally at the feet of the greenie anti-CO2 agenda.

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    crakar24

    Testing

    00