JoNova

A science presenter, writer, speaker & former TV host; author of The Skeptic's Handbook (over 200,000 copies distributed & available in 15 languages).


Handbooks


Advertising


Australian Speakers Agency



GoldNerds

The nerds have the numbers on precious metals investments on the ASX



The Skeptics Handbook

Think it has been debunked? See here.

The Skeptics Handbook II

Climate Money Paper



Archives

Thursday Open Thread

8.7 out of 10 based on 10 ratings

161 comments to Thursday Open Thread

  • #
    WendyB

    More new covid rules today in WA? McGowan seems to be flying by the seat of his pants. And apparently he isn’t doing too well in his court case with Palmer.

    160

    • #
      Graeme#4

      Think McClown has always done that. Never seems to have any plans, and certainly no long-term plan for the state. He is lucky that the iron ore and gas exports prop up the state’s finances in a big way.

      160

    • #
      Dennis

      According to Court transcripts both of them have behaved like immature high school students towards one another.

      Pathetic, and explains a lot about McClown.

      80

  • #
    Annie

    Good Morning All.
    Min temp here today was 5C.

    90

    • #
      Graeme#4

      You are lucky. In Perth the hot weather just rolls on and on; 37 today. If it drops below 34 degrees, we are now regarding that as a cool change. The air conditioning is certainly getting a workout this summer.

      110

      • #

        Can I send my tomato plants to you? We skipped straight from January to March a month ago.

        81

        • #
          Annie

          My tomatoes have been the biggest failure ever; small, scrawny and with one bonsai fruit each! They tasted excellent though. They wouldn’t keep the wolf from the door.
          Courgettes were even worse, no fruits at all 🙁
          Anyway, we have a massive crop of excellent large figs, such as never seen. The mystery is that the birds have let us have them (so far). The birds have concentrated on the other fruits and acorns.
          Speaking of birds, there are plenty of those around, including a flock of King Parrots. They are very persistently into the apples in particular.

          100

          • #
            RickWill

            Pears and figs are doing well in SE Melbourne. We have had a total of 70mm of rain in the last week so autumn veggies are doing really well. Cucumber vine puts paid to the notion of “like watching grass grow”. You would not want to stand next to it for fear of getting entangled. Butternut pumpkins rampaging across the back yard.

            I have been in Melbourne for 34 years and this is the greenest I have seen March in all those years. Not really high rainfall but some solid downpours and just two warm days in the whole of summer.

            It will be interesting to see how autumn advances. Will the high moisture content keep conditions balmy through to June?

            100

          • #

            Annie… my plants are fantastic. Huge green and disease free. Storms (wind, hail) rain and cool have reduced fruit load and ripening.

            61

            • #
              Annie

              Mine were too cold, too windy, too hot, too windy, too dry, too windy, not to mention a hot, humid spell. The original seedlings were good, then set back by cold winds, then protectedby a new cool frame, then battered by alternating cool and hot winds and a distinct lack of rain just in our area, with rain all around at times but avoiding us like the plague…sigh! My gardening efforts were largely poor this year, except for some cauliflowers and broad beans. My red cabbages were going well and then gave up and have sat looking pathetic with small hearts forming but getting no further; we shared one small heart between us a few weeks ago. Yummy.

              30

              • #

                Who’d be a gardener?!

                31

              • #

                My self-seeded tomato plants were bountiful, but even daily handwatering could not save them from shadeless February sun and winds off the desert. They cling to life, but stopped producing.

                I have spoken to market gardeners in Perth who measure soil moisture down 60cm and water two or more times a day to keep strawberries alive.

                But we have more figs than anyone could eat and pomegranites…

                90

          • #
            GD

            Annie, my Geelong cherry tomatoes have done really well over the last two months. I get fresh tomatoes almost every day from four trees. Sweet and luscious, and the birds have left them alone, preferring instead the cats’ dry food.

            20

        • #
          Graeme+P.

          My tomatoes this year are cactus, too cool by far. The corn, beans and cucumbers fared much better.

          60

        • #
          Graeme#4

          Perth is losing a lot of street trees this year with the prolonged hot weather. The one out the front of my place finally gave up, despite lots of extra hand watering.

          40

      • #
        Annie

        We have never reached 40C this year (or last year for that matter). Previously in summer we always had two or three days of 40C or more. Instead, this year, it’s been hottish at times but horribly humid. In spite of the humidity we had only 3.2mm of rain in February; there were 3.4mm in the first few hours of the 1st of March and in the month over 50mm. Today is fresh and pleasant.
        I feel so sorry for all the people so badly affected by the floods in Queensland and NSW. It’s certainly a country of contrasts. Our pilot son says he’s never seen the area around Sydney so green.

        121

    • #
      Mantaray Yunupingu

      Hi Annie. I know all about how fickle this climate change thingy can be…

      Just got back from a quick camping trip, where we pitched our tents right near to a slow- flowing creek while another couple of tents were way up the hill, about 100 metres from us. Anyhow some dingbat came down to tell us it was bloody crazeeee being down on the grassy flats, since they could flood at any time. Mind your own business, fruit-loop!

      So waddya know? Next thing, about midnight, it commenced a-rainin’ and soon enough we were doing the dog-paddle in head-high water while all our stuff floated away. Boy were/are we angry at the government!

      Where’s that flamin’ Dom Perrotet with our $12,000 resilience payment (4 of us at three grand apiece)…and ScoMo from Marketing with the 4 months holiday accommodation vouchers? The sooner I can take the family to Daydream Island for the next 17 weeks, the better!

      Tell ya what…..Politicians only think of THEMSELVES!…

      BTW: Do we get the flights and drinks vouchers fop our Whitsundays trip or are we being forgotten AGAIN?

      60

  • #
    OldOzzie

    Summing Up Biden in One cartoon

    and

    Summing up Albo in One Cartoon

    Thanks Tom Daily Cartoons NewCattalaxy Blog

    100

    • #
      ColA

      Jacques Derrida:

      The Einsteinian constant is not a constant, is not a center. It is the very concept of variability — it is, finally, the concept of the game. In other words, it is not the concept of something — of a center starting from which an observer could master the field — but the very concept of the game.

      Hmmm …. I think he has definitely been taken out of context!

      https://physics.nyu.edu/sokal/weinberg.html

      20

    • #
      Annie

      Love Johannes Leak’s work.

      50

  • #
  • #
    OldOzzie

    Ukraine On Fire – Russian Aggression or American Interference? You Decide

    Ukraine. Across its eastern border is Russia and to its west-Europe. For centuries, it has been at the center of a tug-of-war between powers seeking to control its rich lands and access to the Black Sea. 2014’s Maidan Massacre triggered a bloody uprising that ousted president Viktor Yanukovych and painted Russia as the perpetrator by Western media. But was it? “Ukraine on Fire” by Igor Lopatonok..

    30

    • #
      OldOzzie

      Google Deletes Oliver Stone Documentary “Ukraine on Fire”, Western Government and NATO Afraid of Truth?

      In a remarkable display of propaganda and Big Tech effort to erase history, thereby shaping public opinion, YouTube, which is owned by Google Inc, has deleted the award-winning Oliver Stone documentary “Ukraine on Fire.” Apparently, the truth about the history of Ukraine is against the interests of the current global order who are seeking to exploit the Ukraine-Russia conflict.

      In response to the effort by Big Tech, NATO, the collective western governments and World Economic Forum, the producer, director and copyright owner Igor Lopatonok has released the copyright and made the documentary available for open download [Vimeo LINK]. It is also now available for viewing on this {Direct Rumble Link} and shared below.

      It is in the interest of NATO and the current Biden Administration, that people do not fully understand the Nazi history of Ukraine. The Oliver Stone documentary is well sourced and cited, and apparently a concern for the collective west.

      80

  • #
    Alistair Crooks

    I wonder if any of the great military strategic minds of the west look at the stalled lines of Russian tanks and ask themselves how an electric tank squadron would work on a battlefield?

    130

    • #
      TdeF

      With Green shells using animal farts as propellant. Sorry, that is not Green as methane is a terrible Greenhouse gas too, far worse than carbon dioxide. So just coiled springs wound by hand by the crew who would be breathing out lots of CO2. It’s really hard to come up with a Green tank. So just paint it green and buy carbon credits.

      110

    • #

      I’m sure they are only they wont tell us. Why would they?

      05

    • #
      Hanrahan

      More importantly, is Xi Jinping observing the strife Russia has gotten themselves into simply driving across a border, a line on a map? To take Taiwan by force they need to reenact D Day, a much bigger ask.

      Chinese and Russian doctrines appear similar in that both depend on overwhelming force NOT skilled Generals.

      20

  • #
    OldOzzie

    From Thread Below

    OldOzzie
    March 10, 2022 at 7:46 am · Reply
    Peter Fitzroy
    March 9, 2022 at 4:24 pm

    OO – late stage capitalism in a book, trying to blame one group is just silly, China used Walmart as its distribution network, making walmart and china a tidy profit. This could only happen if the American population were wholehearted supporters. In short, the USA did it to themselves, no conspiracy required

    Peter suggest you read the book Red-Handed:
    How American Elites Get Rich Helping China Win by Peter Schweizer

    Peter Schweizer covers all sides re American Elites

    1. The Rope
    2. The Bidens
    3. Capitol Hill
    4. Silicon Valley
    5. Wall Street
    6. Diplomats
    7. The Bish and Trudeau Dynasties
    8. Higher Education
    9. Fighting Back

    That the Chinese government seeks to infiltrate American institutions is hardly surprising. Schweizer shows that a number of American elites are eager to help the Chinese dictatorship in its quest for global hegemony. He reveals the secret deals wealthy Americans have cut to help China build its military, technological, and economic might. Equally as astonishing, many of these elites quietly believe the Chinese dictatorial regime is superior to American democracy.

    Sundance Conservative Treehouse always give the best exposure of the UniParty – ie. both Democrats and Republicans

    100

    • #
      Peter Fitzroy

      you or Mr Schweizer fail to explain why China is needed, you know the ‘helping China win”. It would be better phaseed as ‘helping capitalism win’, then you can use china as a distraction, a role which your elites prefer as it draws attention away from them. As I said this is late stage capitalism as described by theorists 200 years ago

      28

      • #
        b.nice

        The capitalism that everyone in the western world relies on for their existence. Even you.
        North Korea beckons you. !

        20

        • #
          el+gordo

          Not just the Western World, China is a big fan of the free market.

          The problem is that American capitalism stinks to high heaven and needs adjusting. The Belt and Road is not an attempt to take over the world by force, uplifting the masses to become middle class shoppers is good business acumen.

          In the fullness of time the Americans will be commercially dudded because Beijing has unshackled the SOEs and turned them lose on the world.

          00

          • #

            Peter, the elected governments are supposed to stop Predatory Capitalism, not protect it.

            The problem we have now is not due to competition but due to monopolies… A few bankers have a monopoly on legally-counterfeiting money, the Fed Reserve has a monopoly on setting interest rates and thus artificially sets the price of the most important commodity in the world markets — the price of money. They create the booms and busts and profit from it.

            Without competition, the Big Fish become Bigger Fish, until there are only a few sharks left.

            Amazon, Microsoft, Google, etc — they eat all their little competitors.

            70

            • #
              Peter Fitzroy

              yes – that is what is meant by late stage capitalism – the original theory was built around US Steel, the Railroad barons, and the coal and iron miners (company towns – remember them)

              The idea runs like this: a company can not grow its market by normal means, and rather than stagnate, moves to remove competition thereby maintaining profits, where that fails, form a cartel. (Australia Coles and Woolworths)

              Now if you can grow profit by exporting manufacturing to the third world, then that is what you do. If you can lobby governments for good deals (qv American companies are considered private individuals for this purpose).

              eventually maintaining profit means that you eat your workforce (casualisation anyone), and organise restrictive trade practice (think geo limitations for ebay or amazon – which means that an Australian pays more for the same item than an American does)

              But you are essentially correct, the lack of competition is a feature of this phase of capitalism

              32

  • #
    David Maddison

    The legacy fake news media mafia refuse to broadcast Donald Trump rallies but you can watch them live on or via Newsmax.

    Go to https://www.newsmaxtv.com/trumprally for details.

    I don’t think the text message reminder mentioned will work outside the US.

    80

  • #
    OldOzzie

    Global Governments Begin Warning of Critical Food Shortages

    March 9, 2022 – Sundance

    First things first, there is no need for panic, and it is important to remember the United States is a net food exporter. The U.S. is blessed with a food production and capacity industry that leads the world. We have fertile land, abundant harvests and the strong advantage of food independence.

    That said, the influence of multinational corporations in our agriculture industry over the past three decades has ramifications, and we have outlined exhaustively, on these pages, what the real-world consequences are. As we head into a chapter of global food crisis, the food production capacity of the United States can be viewed as an asset, but only insofar as we are willing to secure a national food supply for our own America-First interests.

    What we have talked about prudently on these pages is now coming into greater focus, as global leaders are beginning to prepare their own citizens for the long-term consequences of their disruption to the food supply chain.

    The meteor of government intervention hit the ocean back in the spring of 2020, when government intervened in the food supply process, the tsunami -the ripple effect from that intervention- is now within sight of shore.

    I’m not going to repeat the history here. CTH readers already know the details {Go Deep} – for everyone else, use the site search function. As a result of intervention, global COVID intervention, food stocks were depleted. Combined with increased energy costs, driven by the ideological chase for climate change under the guise of ‘Build Back Better,’ we end up with higher fertilizer costs for this year.

    This global “crisis” could provide the perfect entry for global government to fundamentally transform their relationship with the people.

    Food insecurity will generate massive demands on governments around the world for solutions.

    60

    • #
      PeterS

      I’ve been warning of critical food shortages and sky rocketing prices for several months. At the time I wasn’t sure of the timing and the triggers. Now it’s becoming clearer as the jig-saw pieces fall into place. I also noted that as a result of all that, millions if not billions of people will very likely starve to death. It’s all part of the grand plan of the globalists to promote a tyrannical NWO.

      80

      • #
        OriginalSteve

        Obamas sock puppet, Bidet, who appears doesnt know what day it is, appears to be attacking food and energy and distribution in the US.

        Its this attack on the US infrastructure by the locusts they call the current incumbents, appear to be the root cause of it all.

        00

  • #
    Ronin

    I can’t see how China can ever be a world power when it has food ,energy and resource dependencies, it nobbled Germany and Japan.

    80

  • #
    RicDre

    Biden Says Gas Prices Are Not His Fault Unless They Go Back Down Again

    March 9th, 2022 – BabylonBee.com

    Joe Biden held a press conference to address criticisms head-on claiming he is responsible for America’s higher gas prices. The President strongly refuted such claims, stating that he’s not responsible—unless of course, the prices go way down.

    “It’s simply not true. It just isn’t folks,” said Joe Biden defensively. “I have no control over gas prices whatsoever—unless, of course, they go way back down again. In that case, then it’s all me.”

    https://babylonbee.com/news/biden-says-that-gas-prices-are-not-his-fault-unless-they-go-back-down-again?utm_source=Gab&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=Gab

    80

  • #
    OldOzzie

    Destroyer can’t deploy because CO won’t get COVID vaccine, Navy says

    An ongoing legal battle over whether the military can force troops to get vaccinated against COVID-19 has left the Navy with a warship they say they can’t deploy because it is commanded by an officer they cannot fire.

    It’s a standoff the brass are calling a “manifest national security concern,” according to recent federal court filings.

    The issues stem from a lawsuit filed in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida late last year alleging servicemembers’ rights are being infringed upon by the COVID vaccine mandate because their religious beliefs prevent them from taking the vaccine.

    Judge Steven D. Merryday issue an order last month banning the Navy and Marine Corps from taking any disciplinary action against the unnamed Navy warship commander and a Marine Corps lieutenant colonel for refusing the vaccine.

    In the process, the case has raised questions about the lines between military good order and discipline, and the legal rights of servicemembers as American citizens.

    120

  • #
  • #
    John

    Re. Recent Sydney rainfall. No doubt you’ve heard it’s due to climate change, and is entirely unprecedented.

    Here’s a graph I just made of observatory Hill data, comparing 2022 to date, to 1990 and 1956, which were two similarly wet years.

    https://ibb.co/fk16y4S

    The data is from:

    http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/data/

    station 66062 (1956 and 1990)
    station 66214 (2022)

    120

  • #
    • #
      OldOzzie

      Sydney COVID-19 patients developed ‘resistance’ to common treatment

      A drug widely used to treat COVID-19 patients at risk of serious illness appears to be ineffective in some instances, new research shows, with the antibody treatment triggering drug-resistant mutations in rare cases.

      The world-first research conducted by Sydney researchers, published in the New England Journal of Medicine on Thursday, has prompted calls for better tracking of the effectiveness of monoclonal antibody treatments used to combat the virus in hospitals.

      Sotrovimab is a COVID-19 treatment administered via intravenous drip to patients considered to be at risk of severe disease from the virus that has been widely used at hospitals since it received regulatory approval last August.

      Researchers from the University of Sydney and NSW Health Pathology assessed samples from the first 100 patients to receive the treatment in western Sydney’s hospitals during the Delta wave.

      Among the 23 patients who had virus samples collected before and after sotrovimab was administered, genome sequencing showed eight were persistently positive for COVID-19 after their infection.

      Virus in four of those patients acquired “receptor-binding domain mutations” within six to 13 days after receiving the drug, which reduced the effectiveness of the treatment by greater than 100-fold.

      “We’re giving out these drugs, and we don’t really have a surveillance system in place to catch, potentially, the acquisition of a resistance,” said Dr Rebecca Rockett, who was a co-author of the study.

      70

    • #
      Annie

      Read on and discover, surprise, surprise, that the hospitalisations were for conditions other than Covid. They just showed positive results on testing after arrival in hospital.

      110

      • #
        OldOzzie

        Annie – They just showed positive results on testing after arrival in hospital.

        Yes interestingly, they tested me on arrival from Post Op Recovery into ICU for COVID – 3 swabs – was told aim was to check as I left to see if I contacted COVID in Hospital – No one else in Recovery Ward knew anything about it and was not tested as I left

        Left Hand does not know what the Right Hand is doing.

        70

  • #
    John Connor II

    Australia: Biological weapons

    The Australian Department of Defence formed the New Weapons and Equipment Development Committee soon after the end of WW2. Documents in the National Archives, declassified in 1998, revealed the extent to which Australia considered the development of biological weapons in the 1940s and 50s.
    Secretary of the Department F.G. Sheddon sought the advice of leading microbiologist Sir Frank Macfarlane Burnet in December 1946. Burnet was Director of the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute for Medical Research, and won the Nobel Prize for medicine in 1960. Sheddon asked whether Australia had the capability to develop biological weapons that would work in tropical Asia without spreading to Australia’s more temperate population centres.

    Burnet wrote a comprehensive memo to the Department of Defence in which he said Australia should develop biological weapons that would work in tropical Asia without spreading to Australia’s more temperate population centres.

    “Specifically to the Australian situation, the most effective counter-offensive to threatened invasion by overpopulated Asiatic countries would be directed towards the destruction by biological or chemical means of tropical food crops and the dissemination of infectious disease capable of spreading in tropical but not under Australian conditions.”
    In a meeting with Sheddon in January 1947, Burnet argued that Australia’s temperate climate could give it a significant military advantage.
    “The main contribution of local research so far as Australia is concerned might be to study intensively the possibilities of biological warfare in the tropics against troops and civil populations at a relatively low level of hygiene and with correspondingly high resistance to the common infectious diseases.”
    Burnet was invited to join the chemical and biological warfare subcommittee of the New Weapons and Equipment Development Committee in September 1947. The committee prepared a report, of which Burnet was the principal author, entitled Note on War from a Biological Angle suggesting that biological warfare could be a powerful weapon to help defend a sparsely populated Australia. The report urged the government to encourage Australian universities to research areas of biological science of relevance to biological weapons.
    “The main strategic use of biological warfare may well be to administer the coup de grace to a virtually defeated enemy and compel surrender in the same way that the atomic bomb served in 1945. Its use has the tremendous advantage of not destroying the enemy’s industrial potential which can then be taken over intact. Overt biological warfare might be used to enforce surrender by psychological rather than direct destructive measures.” (Note on War from a Biological Angle)
    The minute of a meeting in February 1948 note that Burnet “was of the opinion that if Australia undertakes work in this field it should be on the tropical offensive side rather than the defensive.”
    Burnet and a delegation of the chemical and biological warfare subcommittee visited the UK in 1950 to examine British chemical and biological warfare research. In a report of the visit Burnet concluded that “In a country of low sanitation the introduction of an exotic intestinal pathogen, e.g. by water contamination, might initiate widespread dissemination.”

    “Introduction of yellow fever into a country with appropriate mosquito vectors might build up into a disabling epidemic before control measures were established.”
    The subcommittee recommended that “the possibilities of an attack on the food supplies of S-E Asia and Indonesia using B.W. agents should be considered by a small study group”.
    It 1951 it recommended that “a panel reporting to the chemical and biological warfare subcommittee should be authorised to report on the offensive potentiality of biological agents likely to be effective against the local food supplies of South-East Asia and Indonesia”.

    The activities of the chemical and biological warfare subcommittee were scaled back soon after, as Prime Minister Robert Menzies was more interested in trying to acquire nuclear weapons.

    Australia signed the Biological Weapons Convention in 1972 and chairs the Australia Group.

    With an estimated 130+ bioweapons facilities in over 2 dozen countries, who knows eh…

    Rabies cases increasing worldwide and the UK Oxford Uni developing a human Rabies vaccine..
    I was only joking when I said it would be a good vector 😇

    30

  • #
    OldOzzie

    The Global Disinformation Campaign to Suppress The Evidence of Efficacy of Ivermectin

    After a week of non-stop lectures, panels, speeches, and expert testimony, my new mission has now come into focus.

    Pierre Kory, MD, MPA
    Feb 1

    As one of the world’s leading experts on the clinical use of ivermectin in COVID-19, I feel that it is my personal responsibility to try to create a historical record of the myriad actions taken against ivermectin by the global vaccine and pharmaceutical industry due to ivermectin’s long known and now proven role as the single greatest solution to the global pandemic.

    All subsequent “Disinformation Campaign Against Ivermectin” posts should be understood in this vein. My previous post of my recent testimony in Senator Ron Johnson historic expert panel hearing detailed the incredible efficacy reported by the numerous health ministries around the world that deployed ivermectin in early treatment programs. Note that I did not even bother to detail the 68 of 77 controlled trials involving 86,000 patients from 26 countries (many of them prospective, double blind, randomized controlled trials) that collectively report massive reductions in infections, hospitalizations and deaths, nor the dozen systematic reviews and meta-analyses (summary analyses of all the trials) that report the same. Nor did I present the analyses done after removing all the trials being attacked as low quality or “potentially fraudulent”.. which actually found the signals of benefit INCREASED.

    I am tired of presenting the efficacy data. The “debate” of the efficacy of ivermectin has long ceased to be a “data argument,” despite the attempts to make it one by claiming the world over that it’s efficacy is “unproven” due to the supposed fact that these many dozens of trials are all low quality, small, and/or fraudulent. For sure, such assertions have successfully injected such doubt that the near entirety of academic medicine in nearly all the world’s countries have accepted it as scientific truth. These assertions can and should only be understood as a massive global propaganda and censorship campaign against the efficacy data. That is why I believe the only way forward is to expose each and every one of “their” Disinformation tactics. If I am successful in doing this, it is my hope that this may begin to help end the decades long war of the pharmaceutical industry against repurposed, generic medicines.

    I feel the case of ivermectin may be a unique opportunity given that, in their pervasive war on numerous off-patent, effective therapies in dozens of disease models over decades, never has a single generic drug posed as large a threat to industry profit nor have they ever committed such openly brazen and widespread criminalities using unprecented levels of informational control. It is my belief and hope that their insane and relentless over-reach to protect profits in the global pandemic, similar to Napoleon’s foray into Russia, just may have opened an opportunity to so fully expose their deadly tactics that we can begin to counter them on a global scale.

    170

  • #
    OldOzzie

    1st World Problems – Too much lobster and caviar: going out in Sydney has a premium problem

    Going out in Sydney is too often geared toward high-end, unaffordable bars and restaurants that are out of reach for the average punter, the state’s nightlife guru has warned, calling on the industry to offer cheaper options that would get people out of the house more often.

    The problem has been exacerbated by COVID-19 as hospitality operators battling labour and supply shortages try to regenerate revenue as quickly as possible through a premium focus, NSW 24-Hour Economy Commissioner Michael Rodrigues said.

    Well-heeled diners and corporate lunchers kicked off a “lobster, caviar, pandemic’s over” trend at big-name restaurants after lockdowns, but this was geared toward Generation X and Baby Boomer audiences, he said.

    This “premiumisation of product” could be an issue for younger consumers, “particularly in a city like Sydney which is just flat out expensive”.

    “If you look at the cost of a cocktail in a bar it’s $24-$30 and that will increase,” Mr Rodrigues said. “You may have a younger audience attend a bar, but they may order a cocktail to share between two or three people.

    “We want to make sure that we’re covering off other price points equally well because I’m thinking about the market as a whole. You want more people coming [out] more regularly. And if it goes to a largely premium product then my concern would be that people don’t come out as regularly.”

    30

    • #
      OldOzzie

      NSW taxpayers invest $777 million to build resilience. They’ll expect a dividend

      Meanwhile, a relatively new state agency, Resilience NSW, faced criticism because of a lack of clarity about what it is designed to do. When established by then premier Gladys Berejiklian in April 2020, it was sold as a new “world-leading disaster preparedness and recovery approach for the NSW community”.

      Berejiklian created Resilience NSW and made Fitzsimmons its commissioner. “Through Resilience NSW we will redouble our efforts to prevent, prepare and recover from crises which impact NSW,” Berejiklian said at the time.

      However, even MPs and ministers within Perrottet’s government do not know exactly what the agency is charged with doing. Preparation and prevention is its remit, but clearly it did not prepare Lismore for its deadly deluge. Whether that’s a reasonable expectation for an agency that is not yet two years old, many will have that expectation.

      Resilience NSW has a significant annual budget. The most recent figure from the government is $777 million.

      Of that, $38.6 million is spent on wages and almost $30 million is for operating costs, including the Sydney CBD building where it is based. The rest, according to the government, is for grants, including for disaster relief and bushfire recovery, as well as non-government volunteer groups such as Marine Rescue NSW and Surf Life Saving.

      If you compare this to the State Emergency Services (SES) budget of $240 million and the NSW Rural Fire Service’s $658 million, it is a bureaucracy behemoth. Fitzsimmons, however, believes the agency is being unfairly targeted. He says Resilience NSW will step in for the recovery phase once the SES is no longer controlling the immediate response. Perrottet has made it clear that he does not want a repeat of the mistakes made in Bega in the aftermath of the Black Summer bushfires and is personally working on a recovery strategy.

      40

      • #
        Tel

        Slush fund boondoggle that doesn’t need to deliver anything tangible. These things inevitably get loaded up with political operatives who then have a base and a war chest to deploy as they see fit. They aren’t even subtle about it anymore.

        The mistakes in Bega had nothing to do with any “recovery phase” … the mistakes were made beforehand because there wasn’t sufficient clearing, lack of fire breaks, and not enough fuel reduction burning done in preparation for a hot and dry summer. It’s a lesson that’s been known for over 100 years but the buggers won’t do it.

        10

  • #
    David Maddison

    I saw this on a pro-trump FB group:

    Those of you who voted for Biden, here’s your chance to brag! What has he done so far that you’re most excited about?

    160

  • #
    OldOzzie

    Fighter jet fiasco could push Zelensky to the negotiating table

    Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky has pleaded with the West to “send us planes” after the US refused to countenance a Polish proposal to supply fighter jets, drawing an explicit boundary around how far Western support will go.

    Poland on Tuesday revealed it was unwilling to send Ukraine its 28 Soviet-era MiG-29 jets without NATO or US involvement, to avoid becoming the focus of any Russian retaliation. And the US quickly signalled it was unwilling to become directly engaged, saying this was a decision for Poland.

    This seems to have exposed the threshold of Western willingness to support Ukraine militarily, for fear of attracting Russian retaliation and of being fully drawn into the conflict.

    The apparent disarray and hesitancy may prompt Mr Zelensky to step up his reported back-channel negotiations with Moscow, amid increasingly intolerable civilian bloodshed and destruction in key Ukrainian cities.

    Conditional neutrality

    A day earlier Mr Zelensky, though, admitted to a US television interviewer that “NATO is not prepared to accept Ukraine” – a sign his government may be preparing to accept Russia’s demand that Ukraine become strictly neutral.

    Meanwhile, the revelation of the West’s boundaries of support for Ukraine will be an encouraging sign for Russian President Vladimir Putin, who faces a choice about how far to push his invasion before he starts negotiating an end to the war.

    Russian foreign ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova said the Kremlin did not want to overthrow the Ukrainian government and would prefer to use dialogue to achieve its aim of ensuring Ukraine did not join NATO.

    “Some progress has been made” in talks to resolve the conflict, she said.

    Sanctions bite

    There are reports Germany has begun pushing back against proposals for further sanctions, including adding Russia’s largest financier Sberbank to the SWIFT ban or topping up the Russian energy boycotts.

    Military peril

    On the military front, meanwhile, Russia on Wednesday allowed six humanitarian evacuation corridors, as it continues to bombard major cities, destroy civilian buildings and infrastructure, and mass troops for what looks like an attack on the capital Kyiv.

    Both sides have accused each other of violating the ceasefires around those corridors, with the Ukrainians particularly concerned about Russian breaches on the roads out of Mariupol, the most heavily besieged city.

    40

  • #
    OldOzzie

    Carney warns of moving too slowly on energy transition

    Mark Carney, one of the world’s most influential climate change powerbrokers, has sent an implicit message that the AGL board needs to be shaken out of its complacency.

    Comments made by former Bank of England governor Mark Carney at The Australian Financial Review Business Summit about the energy transition were the ideal counterpoint to those made a day earlier by Macquarie Group’s Shemara Wikramanayake and Morgan Stanley’s James Gorman.

    Wikramanayake and Gorman expressed concerns about the loss of social licence if the move away from fossil fuels happens too fast and causes energy prices to shoot up, whereas Carney warned of the risks posed from moving too slowly.

    What was far more interesting was his answer to a question from the floor about the advice he was giving companies on the amount of capital that should be allocated to decarbonisation.

    Financing the path to net zero

    Carney says the first step is to understand the carbon footprint of the company or, if it is a financial institution, understanding the carbon footprint of the companies you lend to or invest in.

    The second step is to understand the extent to which the business has a plan to get to net zero.

    “If you’re in the power sector globally, for example, the pathway to net zero runs through shutting coal in advanced economies by 2030, or the early 2030s at the latest,” he says.

    “So, are you getting on a pathway that’s consistent [with that]? And then the question is: what’s the capital required in order to do so?

    “And if you’re not going to be on that path, then you’re not going to deploy that capital. Why not? Is it because you think your country isn’t serious about the transition? Or is it because you don’t have the capabilities to effectuate the transition and remain competitive in your industry?”

    50

    • #
      OldOzzie

      Oil and gas spike into the energy transition

      The energy price spikes of the past few weeks have sharpened the contradictions in the timing of the transition to renewable energy.

      Jennifer Hewett Columnist

      More soaring oil and gas prices are another inevitable byproduct of the war in Ukraine and the West’s determination to punish Russia. There’s less inevitability about whether this hastens or delays the energy transition to more renewables.

      Oil and gas have already become the expensive reminder of the world’s continued dependence on fossil fuels despite their lack of popularity among global investors in recent years. The trend of reduced investment and lower prices coincided with the resurgence of demand and higher prices as the global economy recovered more quickly than expected from the COVID-19 pandemic.

      A range of business leaders at The Australian Financial Review Business Summit warned the massive increase in energy prices, as well as potential job losses from a rapid shutdown of oil and gas, risked losing public confidence in the transition to renewable energy.

      But according to economist Warwick McKibbin, for example, Vladimir Putin has “made the best climate policy the world has had for the last decade”.

      “He’s driven up oil prices, he’s driven up coal prices, he’s driven up fossil fuel prices,” he told the Summit this week. “What do you do when that happens? You substitute into more reliable, low-emission technologies.”

      Kevin Gallagher from Santos called current prices “unhealthy”, but insisted turning off supply would not speed up that transition and only lead to “demolition”.

      “If you just go and shut down hydrocarbons, the world will become more dependent on Russia, the Middle East,” he said. “Because the reality is that the world’s not ready for those new fuel sources like hydrogen.

      But consumers also understand the energy crisis of 2022 is hitting them very, very hard already. What’s next?

      40

      • #
      • #
        OldOzzie

        Sanctions on Russia will shake the world economy for years

        Economic damage doesn’t stop at borders, even when it’s justified

        This economic harm to Russia is dramatic, and it won’t be contained to that region of the world. The war and the West’s response will harm the rest of the world in the coming months and years — and perhaps even longer than that.

        Consider just a few of the consequences we’ve already seen. Oil prices briefly hit $130 a barrel, an all-time high, and some are predicting it may top $200 or even $300 per barrel. This run up has also led to adverse effects on plastic producers. Meanwhile, wheat prices are up nearly 70 percent, an outcome that is, as at least one commenter noted, historically correlated with “instability and violence.”

        Natural gas prices are climbing, too, and central banks in other countries are now taking action to curb inflation — which was already rearing its ugly head long before the crisis in Eastern Europe. In Hungary, the central bank has hiked interest rates the most since 2008.

        Major stock market indices lost more than 3 percent in a single day due to fears of a US import ban on Russian oil — an outcome that came a day later. Shell is the latest company to cease buying Russian crude. Those losses were led by American Express, which saw its stock price lose nearly 18 percent after the corporation’s decision to vacate the Russian market.

        Many private schools in the United Kingdom, long reliant on tuition from wealthy Russian oligarchs, are taking huge hits also. And let’s not forget the strains caused by the refugee crisis: with nearly two million Ukrainians leaving the country, the population of Poland has increased by more than 3 percent in just ten days.

        This will only be the beginning. Places that border Russia and Ukraine will bear more of that burden in the short term, but no corner of the world will be spared. While countries like Finland — where it’s been estimated more than a quarter of companies do business with Russia — will face consequences first, the impact is sure to spread far and wide.

        50

      • #
        yarpos

        McKibbin doesnt seem to appreciate that they can only pretend his “reliable low emissions technologies” actually work due to the presence of coal, gas and oil.

        10

    • #
      Kevin Kilty

      One of Margaret Thatcher’s less well known quotations is

      “Surely there is something logically suspect about a solution which is correct whatever the problem.”

      Does it fit this issue. No matter the facts and despite how absurd they sound, they all demand to accelerate the switch to renewables. Unfortunately many of them are influential enough to do real damage.

      60

    • #
      Ronin

      Looks like the power industry is going the same way as the car industry.

      30

  • #
    David Maddison

    Apparently there are a number of privately owned kangaroo pets in the USA. See:

    https://www.indy100.com/viral/where-to-buy-kangaroo-us-9725393

    I don’t see why not either. Most species are neither rare or endangered.

    Of course, such pet ownership is almost always illegal in Australia, as with any other native species.

    30

  • #
    OldOzzie

    Capitol Hill’s dangerous kangaroo court

    This rabidly partisan committee is a bipartisan failing

    By Peter Navarro

    The U.S. House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol should get to the bottom of why the attack occurred, who may have instigated that attack (including possible ANTIFA anarchists, FBI informants and left-wing agitators), and why the Capitol Hill Police and National Guard failed to protect the Capitol perimeter despite ample warnings from the White House and intelligence community. Instead, this rabidly partisan committee has weaponized its subpoena powers and is pursuing a mission that, with no small irony, severely threatens the election integrity of the 2024 presidential race.

    Instead, playing checkers in a chess world, Mr. McCarthy played right into the hands of Mrs. Pelosi by refusing to seat any Republicans. Mrs. Pelosi countered by seating the RINOs Ms. Cheney and Mr. Kinzinger, and the “Never Trump” game was on.
    This kangaroo committee now seeks to prevent Mr. Trump from running for president in 2024 by saddling him with criminal charges and a possible felony conviction that would preclude him from running. Collaterally, the committee is using coercive tactics, including the threat of jail, to silence those such as me, Steve Bannon, John Eastman and others who firmly believe that the 2020 election was likely rigged.

    The criminal case against Mr. Trump is as flimsy as it is fanciful. It rests on the deeply flawed presumptions that the Nov. 3 presidential election was fair, that Mr. Trump knew he lost the election fair and square, and that, despite this, Mr. Trump sought to abusively use the powers of government to overturn a legal result.
    In fact, on Jan. 6, 2021, Mr. Trump had a reasonable presumption that the election may well have been stolen from him. In the aftermath of the Nov. 3 election, I produced a three-volume “Navarro Report” based on thousands of affidavits and thousands more pages of court testimony, news articles and other documents. These reports reveal a disturbing pattern of election irregularities across the six battleground states where President Biden allegedly won the election — Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Nevada, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. In fact, the number of possible illegal votes dwarfed the narrow alleged Biden victory margins.
    Based on these reports and numerous other information, Mr. Trump firmly believed the Nov. 3 election was unfair and that, as in Bush v. Gore, he had a firm obligation to the more than 74 million Americans who voted for him to challenge the results in all ways legally possible.

    That is exactly what Mr. Trump peacefully did, and that is why there is no possible civil, much less criminal, cause of action against him.

    Accordingly, under the very real threat of arrest and possible imprisonment, I have informed the committee that it is their responsibility to contact the president and his attorneys directly if they want me to cooperate with their investigation. Instead of doing that, the committee has conspired with the White House to assert the novel and dangerous principle that a sitting president in Mr. Biden can strip his predecessor of executive privilege — and thereby compel me and others to appear before their Star Chamber.

    Ultimately, the only way this out-of-control committee will be reined in will be through a resounding Republican victory in the 2022 Congressional elections. Until then, we can expect Mrs. Pelosi’s Democrat Congress to do what it has done since 2018: waste time and resources on partisan witch hunts while ignoring the real people’s business.

    50

    • #
      OldOzzie

      Why it’s so hard to prosecute Donald Trump

      Opinion by Elliot Williams

      Editor’s NoteElliot Williams is a CNN legal analyst. He is a former deputy assistant attorney general at the Justice Department and is currently a principal at The Raben Group, a public affairs firm. Follow him on Twitter @elliotcwilliams. The views expressed in this commentary are his own.

      20

  • #

    https://www.cfact.org/2022/03/08/do-wind-farms-change-the-weather/

    Do wind farms change the weather?
    By David Wojick

    The beginning: “The effect of lots of wind turbines on weather and climate is a small but active research area. Wind power converts wind energy into electricity, thereby removing that energy from the air. The research issue of how taking a lot of energy out might affect weather or climate seems to have emerged as early as 2004. Studies range from the global climate impact down to the local effects of a single large wind facility.”

    Lots more in the article, including a wacky proposal to use an enormous number of offshore turbines to suck the energy out of hurricanes. I am not making this up.

    51

  • #
    • #
      Annie

      Thanks for that PeterS.

      60

    • #
      Kalm Keith

      Please, please.

      Don’t let Gee Aye see that.

      60

    • #
      PeterS

      The take from that is given our governments are still coercing people to be vaccinated knowing the do more harm than good given the pandemic is effectively over opens them up to crimes against humanity more than ever. I won’t hold my breath though as they are now busily scaring us on another front by goading Russia and China into a world war.

      50

      • #
        el+gordo

        Who are these people goading Russia and China into WW3?

        04

        • #
          another ian

          Maybe “Wimken, Blinken and Nod”?

          “Blinken and Biden Fold, Pentagon Rejects Poland Offer for United States to Start World War III
          March 8, 2022 | Sundance | 507 Comments
          Ha-Ha-Ha… Oh, the Biden administration is not happy with Poland. Not happy at all.
          Earlier this afternoon, Poland called Secretary of State Anthony Blinken’s bluff, over the U.S. claims that Poland was going to send fighter jets into Ukraine. This followed Sunday’s announcement where Poland said the U.S. State Dept was lying.

          Earlier today, Poland said they would give the U.S. the planes if Blinken and Biden wanted to start World War III, but Poland wasn’t going to help the U.S. create a war with Russia. This put the U.S. in a ‘put up or shut up’ position. Well, Blinken and Biden just folded, per the Pentagon:”

          https://theconservativetreehouse.com/blog/2022/03/08/blinken-and-biden-fold-pentagon-rejects-poland-offer-for-united-states-to-start-world-war-iii/

          “Pentagon Spox Underscores Sending NATO Planes Into Ukraine Would Be Dangerous “High Risk” Escalation of Conflict Which Could Lead to World War III With Russia
          March 9, 2022 | Sundance | 355 Comments
          Pentagon Spokesperson John Kirby held a press briefing today (full video below) to underscore the U.S. military does not support the sending of any NATO planes into Ukraine. “The intelligence community has assessed that the transfer of MiG-29s to Ukraine may be mistaken as escalatory and could result in significant Russian reaction that might increase the prospects of a military escalation with NATO,” Kirby said. “Therefore, we also assess that the transfer of MiG-29s to Ukraine to be high risk,” he continued.

          Now ask yourself this question:

          How could the transfer of MiG-29’s evolve from a “green light” position by the U.S. State Department Sunday, into a “high risk” assessment by the Pentagon today?
          This is the question that no U.S. media will touch, because the answer is almost too jaw-dropping to contemplate. However, this answer must be outlined in order to fully grasp what took place.”

          https://theconservativetreehouse.com/blog/2022/03/09/pentagon-spox-underscores-sending-nato-planes-into-ukraine-would-be-dangerous-high-risk-escalation-of-conflict-which-could-lead-to-world-war-iii-with-russia/

          30

  • #
    OldOzzie

    Biden Bans Russian Oil, Blames U.S. Oil for Sitting on Sidelines

    The White House determined its energy policy long before Russian tanks started rolling across Ukraine.

    In fact, before those tanks were even idling on the border, President Biden signed a series of executive orders that prioritized addressing climate change across all levels of government and halted all new oil and natural gas leases on public lands. The order came in January of 2021 after he canceled construction permits for the Keystone XL Pipeline on his first day in office. And, he said, it was meant “to make it official that climate change will be at the center of our national security and foreign policy.”

    “There’s a fundamental misunderstanding of the administration as to how the process actually works,” Sommers said of the White House charge that the industry has left resources untapped. It takes more time than the administration is letting on, he added, because with a lease “there has to be a lot of development that occurs between the leasing and then ultimately permitting for that acreage to be productive.”

    As he sees it, the administration is “purposefully misusing the facts here to advantage their position.”

    “The president can’t hide from his record,” the Wyoming Republican told RealClearPolitics before ticking off one by one how Biden nixed the Keystone pipeline, paused new oil and gas leasing permits, and named appointments to key government posts who are unfriendly to the industry. “America is the world’s energy superpower,” Barrasso added. “It’s time we started acting like it again.”

    Searching for a glut of surplus oil abroad is an odd look for a Democratic party that made climate change the center of its policy agenda. Last October, for instance, California Rep. Ro Khanna asked Chevron CEO Michael Wirth if he was “embarrassed as an American company that your production is going up while European counterparts are going down?”

    Until that future arrives, the president seemed to shrug. Do you have a message for the American people about gas prices, reporters asked after Air Force One touched down in Texas. “They’re going to go up,” Biden replied. What can you do about it, the reporters pressed. “Can’t do much right now,” he said

    30

  • #
    sophocles

    Mt Manam went off with a 50,000 ft plume. Anything which tosses volcanic ash over 32,000 feet acts to cool the upper atmosphere, so this is a cooler. That’s two, so far. Another 3 (or maybe 4) to go to chill the upper atmosphere with volcanic ash.

    30

  • #
    Environment Sceptic

    Best example of how genuine leadership is conducted that i have ever seen.

    The Curtain Close on COVID Theater
    211,171 views
    Streamed live on Mar 8, 2022
    Governor Ron DeSantis
    19.9K subscribers
    Governor DeSantis hosts a roundtable with physicians nationwide on ending COVID theater once and for all.

    https://youtu.be/iulvEmAmtcQ?t=652

    10

  • #
    OldOzzie

    Was Nancy Pelosi Drunk at Her Latest Presser?

    There’s a lot going on in the world right now. Luckily, the United States is led by the best and brightest among us, not the least of which are House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and President Joe Biden. What could possibly go wrong with such mental giants making major decisions for the nation?

    Jokes aside, we are actually led by geriatric dunces who couldn’t successfully manage a McDonald’s restaurant. Given that, it was no surprise when Biden flaunted his senility again on Wednesday. Apparently feeling left out of the conversation, Pelosi then put on a performance that left me wondering if she was drunk.

    I’m not kidding. It was that bad.

    30

  • #
    OldOzzie

    Biden Sends More Mixed Signals Than a Bad Tinder Date When It Comes to Oil

    Joe Biden and his team have been doing everything they can to discourage American energy production since he came into office, with the claim that it’s necessary for their radical, climate change agenda.

    Yet, Biden lied on Tuesday during his remarks about banning Russian oil, “It’s simply not true that my administration or policies are holding back domestic energy production.”

    What that’s about is that they don’t want to get tagged with the rise in gas prices and suffer the consequences of the angry electorate come November. That’s why they’re also lying by calling it a “Putin price hike,” as though it just started rising when Russia invaded Ukraine; indeed, it’s been going up since the 2020 election when Biden came in.

    But, they keep letting the plan slip – that the priority is their radical energy goals;that’s what it’s about.

    Biden was talking with companies Wednesday about semiconductors. I’m not sure what he’s trying to say here, but it’s one heck of a jumbled word salad.

    20

    • #
      yarpos

      I like his move to talk with Venezuela about importing oil after banning Russian oil, when the Russians own a fair chunk of oil production in Venezuela.

      Its a bit like when they did import Russian oil, and the Babylon Bee suggested they should sell Alaska to the Russians. Then it would be a foreign country and they could drill there and import the oil.

      10

  • #
  • #
    David Maddison

    I think that without a radical change of thinking in Australia, the country will continue to decline.

    There will be no more large and useful projects, only useless large projects such as ever more windmills, solar and now “green hydrogen” projects and no further serious exploration for oil, gas or coal.

    Most of Australia’s resources will continue to go into solving a “climate emergency” which doesn’t exist.

    70

  • #
  • #
    John Connor II

    I can’t help but smirk at Poland’s brilliant strategy of giving their old Soviet jets to Germany with the potential to ship them to the USA to use in their proxy war.
    Hats off Poland.
    Your move America 😅😅
    Better stick with your internet cyberattack instead…

    30

  • #
    Brenda Spence

    John Campbell is having serious doubts about pfizer… he is almost speechless!

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=7YOD9drZasM&feature=share

    When will the MSM take up this scandal?

    What about the other jabs, what do their trials show?

    50

    • #
      David Maddison

      John has been very careful to stay within the YouTube guidelines about not criticising Big Pharma or the Left but now he is pushing up against the boundaries of that. I hope they don’t censor him.

      50

  • #

    Censored by the USA: https://newsrescue.com/is-usa-really-scrambling-to-delete-evidence-of-ukraine-bioweapons-program-web-archives-expose-million-dollar-project-records-being-deleted/
    Censored by Britain: Freeview channel 234: RT (This channel is currently unavailable) https://www.rt.com/russia/551374-ukraine-biological-warfare-labs/
    The Ukraine bio labs story appeared on GB News. The Russian invasion routes towards Kiev and in the south of Ukraine, seem to coincide with the locations of the Bio Labs. Kathy from Conservative Woman then appeared on the Mark Stein Show on GB News after 8pm to talk about her censorship from Twitter, for talking about Invermectin. Mark revealed that New Hampshire is to make it mandatory for all pharmacists in New Hampshire to sell Invermectin without a prescription. Also it was revealed that a film with Dr Tessa Lawrie of BIRD has been banned by Youtube. So I will see if I can buy a DVD of the banned film. Banned in Britain, so I bought my Invermectin from INDIA. You are supposed to take 12mg at the first sign of symptoms. And that’s all you need to take for the cure. Also on 22 February 2022, Assistant Deputy Metropolitan Police Commissioner, Jane Connors, said that the police are no longer investigating Crime Reference Number: 6029679/21: https://m.box.com/shared_item/https%3A%2F%2Fapp.box.com%2Fs%2Fgfecmj570suz4j5kw0m4o6rslzf7ny9f & https://www.notonthebeeb.co.uk/post/lawyers-fight-back-against-police-whitewash. This means that the International Criminal Court (The Hague) Case number: OTP‐CR‐473/21 is to instigate the investigation.

    32

  • #
    John Connor II

    Ukraine on fire
    Full Oliver Stone 2017 documentary here:
    https://www.bitchute.com/video/UqDzRh6Qjy0E/

    20

  • #
    PeterS

    Why did Dutton’s GoFundMe go over like a lead balloon?
    Proof the LNP is treating us for fools just as the ALP+Greens would.

    10

  • #
    KP

    Latest psyops, following on the Ukie Navy claiming they had sunk the Vasili destroyer of Snake Island fame, only to be exposed as the Lithuanian freighter that hit a mine last week…

    The maternity hospital in Mariupol recently shelled was evacuated in the first days of the Russian invasion, and the Ukie Army moved into the empty building. Hence Russia hitting it last night.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/ukraine-mariupol-hospital-attack-explosion-russia-b2032079.html

    Haha! Why would they do this??

    “Ukraine’s foreign minister said Russia was holding over 400,000 residents “hostage” in the city, blocking aid and escape routes.”

    The Russians want the civilians out of the cities so they can clean out the fighters left. The Ukies don’t want their meat shields walking off, so no-one is allowed to use the ceasefire corridors.

    30

  • #
    David Maddison

    https://flccc.substack.com/p/who-changed-the-scientific-conclusions?

    Who Changed the Scientific Conclusions of a Paper that Could Have Saved Millions? At Last, We May Have a Name.

    This is a scandal of immense proportions that warrants an immediate investigation.

    SEE LINK FOR REST

    50

    • #
      OldOzzie

      as previously noted

      A paper considering these many studies was written by lead author Dr. Andrew Hill at the University of Liverpool for the World Health Organization’s COVID Guideline Development Group. Hill was an early and vigorous proponent for ivermectin. His paper showed that ivermectin could reduce deaths by 75% if used throughout the world.

      — Inexplicably, just days before its publication, the paper appeared on a pre-print server, with its conclusions changed. Instead of concluding that ivermectin—one of the world’s safest and most inexpensive drugs— should be rolled out globally, it now concluded that more studies on ivermectin were needed before it could be recommended worldwide. Given the totality of scientific evidence for ivermectin, it was a stunning—actually shocking—reversal by Dr. Hill.

      —In an urgent Zoom call to Dr. Hill initiated by Dr. Tess Lawrie, Director of the Evidence-based Medicine Consultancy, Dr. Hill admitted to her that one of his study’s sponsors, Unitaid, had a say in the conclusions of his paper. But he would not divulge the name(s) of those who altered the paper’s conclusions.

      “Unless someone used his computer, Andrew Owen has his digital fingerprint on the Andrew Hill paper.”

      As it turns out, Andrew Owen is a Professor of Pharmacology & Therapeutics and co-Director of the Centre of Excellence in Long-acting Therapeutics (CELT) at the University of Liverpool. He is also scientific advisor to the WHO’s COVID-19 Guideline Development Group. Just days before Dr. Hill’s paper was to be published, a $40M grant from Unitaid, the paper’s sponsor, was given to CELT —of which Owen is the project lead. “The $40 million contract was actually a commercial agreement between Unitaid, the University of Liverpool and Tandem Nano Ltd (a start-up company that commercializes ‘Solid Lipid Nanoparticle’ delivery mechanisms)— for which Andrew Owen is a top shareholder,” says Harper.

      60

  • #
    Ronin

    Lismore, why do people persist in living in this swamp and why is it everyone elses fault when it floods.
    Enquiring minds need to know.

    51

    • #
      yarpos

      I recall my Uncle and Aunt moving there in the 60s, getting flooded. Moved to Ballina , got flooded. Finally moved to Brisbane and bought a house on a hill. Agents and conveyancers (solicitors in those days I guess) loved them.

      30

  • #
  • #
    John Connor II

    Friday evening will be beautiful for the whole world

    Ask the Kremlin what it means…

    10

  • #
    John Connor II

    Hmm…according to sources something MAJOR is about to hit this month, starting within days.
    Better make it movie/pizza/beer weekend..might be the last one.

    00

    • #
      KP

      hmm… caps AND bold, this must be serious as well as mysterious!

      I’m sure you’ll pick something to tell us that it was after the event…

      The 80tons of ammonia stockpiled in the Ukraine will be used..

      America will sober up and stop trying to run the world to their own advantage?

      Russia will crush the Ukraine and go home?

      Oh, the obvious one everyone is counting on, China will sort out its own semiconductors as America threatens to sanction them, and invade Taiwan. Meh…

      20

    • #

      So it is something that affects beer, movies and pizza but not wine, TV or ramen?

      Can’t be yeast, or Garfield umm struggling to see the link.

      00

      • #
        KP

        Yeah, Friday’s come & gone and nothing happened… Friday evening was calm and cloudy, maybe not actually ‘beautiful’.

        10

  • #
  • #
    Annie

    Sen Kimberley Kitching has just died. Shocking news.

    40

    • #
      Brenda Spence

      Sure is. She was one of the decent Labor pollies.

      30

    • #
      Hanrahan

      Annie, please don’t think badly of me but Kimberley was just a CFMEU thug in lipstick.

      10

    • #
      Hanrahan

      I watched MANY hours of the Union RC, the one that gave adverse findings on many, including Kitching, the RC that Turnbull buried because it was an Abbot initiative.

      I bear her no ill will, but nor do I mourn.

      As an aside anyone else notice Bolt’s attraction to painted ladies?

      00

    • #
      Serp

      She’s the clever one who sat the union officials’ workplace certification tests online and earned herself a senate spot; she was one of a kind who can’t be replaced.

      20

    • #
      MP

      Another heart attack at 52.

      00

  • #
    Ian Hill

    This news today. Stewart McSweyn, 1500m runner in Tokyo Olympics unable to finish a 5000m race not long after having his Booster shot. I hope he can recover to his former fitness.

    https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australia/stewart-mcsweyn-out-of-world-indoors-team/ar-AAUOdYn?ocid=msedgntp

    30

  • #
    KP

    “Britain’s armed forces minister James Heappey .. warned President Vladimir Putin that using chemical weapons in Ukraine could draw “an international response”.

    Looks like a false flag operation coming up…

    Ah yep, definitely..

    “The Biden administration has warned that Russia might seek to use chemical or biological weapons in Ukraine.”

    20

  • #
    Furiously+Curious

    I saw the Kitching death late this evening, having earlier heard someone mention they were going to a funeral, that had been delayed a couple of weeks, because of a backlog. As someone else said recently- ‘short on insurance companies, long on funeral parlours.’

    20

  • #
    Ronin

    Warnie had his booster, wonder if KK had same, not looking good.

    10

  • #
    Dennis

    So McClown is fully taxpayer funded for his legal representation and court costs (and travelling from WA to the East Coast return plus accommodation) in his legal arguments with Clive Palmer who as a taxpayer covers his own expenses.

    10

  • #
  • #
    Hanrahan

    ATM Qld and NSW black coal is meeting half the demand of AEMO.

    00

  • #
    Hanrahan

    Is there a whiff of peace in the air? DOW up, gold down and Putin talking of “Positive shifts in talks with Ukraine”.

    00