JoNova

A science presenter, writer, speaker & former TV host; author of The Skeptic's Handbook (over 200,000 copies distributed & available in 15 languages).


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Weekend Unthreaded

7.3 out of 10 based on 10 ratings

113 comments to Weekend Unthreaded

  • #
    RicDre

    EV Growth Projections May Go Bust

    The California warning signs may be verification about the drawbacks of EV’s

    By Ronald Stein

    With a simple stroke of the pen, Governor Newsom believes he has the power to change the lifestyles of all California residents, and control the supply-demand balance for societies and the economy’s’ transportation needs.

    Granted, that half the EV’s in the entire country are registered in California, the troubling news is that there may be warning signs about a bust to the EV growth bubble, as the statistics from California demonstrate that:

    -The highly educated and financially well off are currently the primary owners of EV’s.

    -EV usage being slightly more than 5000 miles a year is a reflection that the EV is a second vehicle and not the family workhorse vehicle.

    -The growing percentage of EV owners that are switching back to gasoline cars, is a message that may deflate EV growth projections.

    -The larger and heavier gasoline driven SUVs are currently half of the new car sales.

    Maybe the residents of the other 49 states that collectively make up the other 50 percent of EV’s in America (approximately one percent per state) have read what California Governor Newsom has not comprehended from the following 20 drawbacks of EV’s provided by Motor Junkie:

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2021/05/22/a-bust-to-ev-growth-projections-may-be-in-the-making/

    #10 is interesting, I don’t think I have heard this before:

    Highway Driving Consumption. The advertised range that many manufacturers brag about is the average or city driving figure. However, the highway range is much smaller, sometimes up to 50 percent less.

    140

    • #
      Klem

      Its no surprise there. Where I live there seem to be lots of EVs around, but you never see them in the winter. Their range is greatly diminished in cold weather.

      And besides, the public is gradually awakening to the fact that many of the materials used to make the batteries are mined by slaves and children. Even the average greedy, racist Leftist has a hard time accepting that.

      Fun, huh?

      140

    • #
      Rowjay

      Here is a List of Successful Electric Vehicle Trips around Australia – all 9 of them!

      I bring this up because of #10 in RicDre’s post. I recall one of the EV rounders stating that a steady 80kph gave them the best range. They would also be a mobile chicane out there at that speed, and they would most certainly NOT be towing a caravan!

      70

      • #
        Dennis

        It amuses me when EV advocates mention driving at 80KMH travelling around Australia, imagine the road trains driver’s frustration encountering these mobile road hazards.

        And when emphasis is placed on recharging not being a problem if drivers drive safely and plan for regular rest stops.

        The above might suit an elderly driver with lots of time to get nowhere.

        110

        • #
          Vlad the Impaler

          As a ‘senior citizen’, I take exception to your statement that an, ” … elderly driver with lots of time … “. If there’s one thing us elderly drivers do NOT have, it’s ‘lots of time … ‘

          Wise up, buddy-boy, or I’ll just have to beat you with my cane (or my walker, whichever one I can reach first, after a brief nap of several hours, provided, of course, I can remember where I put my cane or my … … … what were we talking about? )

          90

        • #
          yarpos

          Quite a few lappers take 4-6 months to go around Australia making frequent lengthy stops. Just cause you appear to be in a rush doesnt mean its a rule everyone else has to live by.

          10

      • #
        another ian

        Reminds me of the description of crossing Texas when the speed limit was reduced from 70 mph to 55 mph

        “It took it from being a journey to being a career”

        110

      • #
        James

        Reminds me of a conversation I had with a former Land Rover/ Rover employee. It occurred just after the VW diesel scandal. I suggested that car companies have always gamed the emission rules, and that a mechanic had told me that most of what is fitted to Australian cars would only work for the first few thousand miles.

        He reflected for a minute and proceeded to tell me about the miles per gallon figures that they were required to display at the dealers in the 70’s and 80’s. It was mpg at 50 mph. So the carburetors were set up on the needles (su or Zeniths) to run very lean at this speeds. So the number laws far better than real world.

        10

        • #
          yarpos

          Why would they fit anything special when we dont have regular emissions testing anyway?

          00

        • #
          another ian

          Years ago I saw a comment that a good SU tech with a jeweller’s lathe could give you any performance profile you had in mind

          00

          • #
            yarpos

            Yep but you have to wonder how the needle of an SU knows what speed it is doing when its basically a vacum operated system

            00

    • #
      Hanrahan

      This is one I’ve thought about.

      4. Practically Unusable in Third World Countries and Markets. The EV craze is limited to just a few first world countries and markets in the world. But other than that, electric vehicles in other areas are nonexistent. Even China, the world’s biggest market, has a hard time implementing any initiatives for electric cars.

      Australia, Canada, Africa, Sth America and Russia among them. Together they make a big slice of the land mass.

      71

    • #
      Dennis

      In Australia most EV are company cars including company fleet vehicles.

      The Turnbull Government donated $300 million of taxpayer’s monies to promote EV to fleet operators via leasing firms.

      I don’t see many EV on my travels, over the past two weeks from NSW to QLD and now returning I counted two EV.

      50

      • #
        yarpos

        I see a few on weekends mainly , but then we live within 150kms of Melbourne. As we often say “shoulda moved further out”

        20

    • #
      OldOzzie

      When the Going Gets Tough, the Electric go Petrol

      Electric car-maker Tesla isn’t taking any range risks in Australia with their support vehicles. When they need to repair their breakdown-prone plug buggies, Tesla use reliable, petrol-powered Mitsubishis.

      60

  • #
    RicDre

    Thousands of Future Burger Flippers Stage a Climate Strike

    Guest essay by Eric Worrall

    Remember back when everyone was wondering who would do the menial jobs, if everyone graduated with a degree? Greta Thunberg has solved this problem for us.

    School Strike 4 Climate: Thousands of young Australians call for urgent action on climate change

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2021/05/21/thousands-of-future-burger-flippers-and-stage-a-climate-strike/

    The article features an image of a sign that says “You’ll die of old age, I’ll die of climate change”. My first thought when seeing the sign was that Stupidity will likely do them in long before climate change can do the deed.

    200

    • #
      Travis T. Jones

      Let’s just turn off their gas and coal power now and make them happy.

      110

    • #
      yarpos

      Funny how they usually strike on a Friday so the teachers get a day out and a segue into an early weekend get away.

      100

  • #
    RicDre

    EPA “Disappears” the 1930s Drought and Heat Wave Climate Data

    Guest essay by Larry Hamlin

    The EPA has deleted (this chart and data no longer exist at the EPA website) its prior indicator climate data trend chart showing “unusually hot and cold temperatures” across the U.S. and showing the U.S. Heat Wave Index from 1895 to 2015 (shown below) that clearly established the unique drought and heat period of the 1930s.

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2021/05/21/epa-disappears-the-1930s-drought-and-heat-wave-climate-data/

    80

    • #
      Serp

      I can only wonder at the disgrace contemporary science has developed into through its spawning practitioners who reinterpret the historical record to suit the financial interests of decarbonization profiteers.

      20

  • #
    RicDre

    Aussie Banks Grilled on “Climate Virtue Signalling”

    Guest essay by Eric Worrall

    Australia’s big banks have defended their moratorium on financing Aussie coal projects, claiming they are required by international regulatory bodies to which Australia is a signatory to consider their “climate risk” exposure.

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2021/05/20/aussie-banks-grilled-on-climate-virtue-signalling/

    80

    • #
      Lance

      Risk (x) is usually multiplied by the probability of the risk factor, P(x), actually occurring.

      As none of the AGW claims have yet proven true, the P(x) = 0.

      Therefore, AU banks are relying upon R(x) x P(x) = 0 to quantify their risk exposure.

      Talk about a scam.

      80

      • #
        David Wojick

        As I read it, financing coal plants is risky. That would be the risk that fear driven policies will shut them down. It’s not the climate that is risky, it is the fear. I have to agree.

        90

  • #
    Pauly

    CarWow, a UK car comparison site, has done a number of EV range comparison videos:
    https://youtu.be/ZH7V2tU3iFc

    Surprisingly, while actual performance never quite met manufacturers’ quoted range figures, they weren’t far off. And it seemed that they were maintaining normal motorway speeds.

    In the meantime, James May of Top Gear fame has found out about an unwanted design “feature” of his Tesla Model S:
    https://garagewire.co.uk/news/watch-james-may-reveals-tesla-battery-glitch/

    Apparently, Teslas have a standard 12 volt battery that can go flat if the car is not driven regularly. What happens next is more like Keystone Cops than a well engineered concept.

    100

    • #
      Hanrahan

      I mentioned James May’s problem here before and it can happen to any keyless entry car.

      “It also has on the front trunk a conventional 12V car battery which keeps all the systems alive and the memory and computer and all that usual rubbish.

      “It makes the car unlock.

      “That, because I hadn’t used the car for a while, had gone flat.

      The on board interrogator for your fob is always on when the car is locked. The article I read said that it draws 0.9 A. That sounds high to me but even if it is less, it is still draining. Because mine is kept in a locked garage I never lock the car. The 12 V battery in my hybrid is 11 years old. They last because they don’t have to crank the engine.

      30

      • #
        another ian

        The name batteries I get here usually just make their 2 year warranty.

        Yet it is common to see mention in US machinery blogs of 8 – 10 years for batteries in similar use.

        And they all start engines

        20

      • #
        Tilba Tilba

        “It makes the car unlock. “That, because I hadn’t used the car for a while, had gone flat.”

        I can’t believe – I mean I literally can’t believe – that these Tesla vehicle designers who are paid millions … did not consider the likely possibility that both batteries might go flat.

        Every building, every aeroplane, every ship, every elevator, every mine, etc … everything … includes the capacity to escape if absolutely all power fails.

        These people are fools.

        60

      • #
        another ian

        Do those “concealed grab handles” under the wheel arches also make it easier to tea leaf them?

        00

  • #
    • #
      Broadie

      Lance
      In the second links comments section an Associate Professor (AP) from Auckland attempts to discredit those who request evidence for the virus on application of Koch’s postulates.

      Koch’s postulates, aka how to tell whether a microbe causes disease

      Robert Koch is also famous for his “postulates”, the four conditions he and his mentor Jakob Henle postulated had to be met for a microbe to be considered the cause of a disease. It is these postulates that have now been discovered by the internet and (badly) applied to Covid-19. This is how Koch’s postulates were first laid out more than 130 years ago:

      1. The organism must always be present, in every case of the disease.
      2. The organism must be isolated from a host containing the disease and grown in pure culture.
      3. Samples of the organism taken from pure culture must cause the same disease when inoculated into a healthy, susceptible animal in the laboratory.
      4. The organism must be isolated from the inoculated animal and must be identified as the same original organism first isolated from the originally diseased host.

      I believe the AP shoots its own foot by smearing the postulate as out of date without understanding the concept can be applied to the results we are seeing now.

      The actual experiment is ‘In Vivo’ conducted in live cells and fails step 3 as well as the argued absence of virus isolate step 1,2& 4(below) where irrespective of a positive rT PCR the infected cells ( a human petrie dish) are asymptomatic in ~ %99 of those inoculated.

      The contact tracing is not tracing inoculated cells and finding symptomatic individuals, it is by and large finding cells that are asymptomatic and deeply upset at the prospect of being quarantined.

      10

      • #

        Take a step back. Koch’s postulates are great but Koch wrote them within the confines of the tools of the day. If PCR, EM and fluorescent labeling were things in 1890 they’d be written differently. Stuff that was gold standard 130 years has been justifiably superseded.

        10

        • #
          Broadie

          My advice exactly GA.

          Take a step backwards and you are actually looking at real life results in the format of Koch’s postulates. And the result is that there is a greater than %95 confidence that the disease COVID is unrelated to the virus SARS COV 2 as detected by the rT PCR.

          But rest your furrowed brow, the narrative is under control.
          The best man is on the job ensuring the breakthrough cases due to positive rT PCR will no longer be reported for the vaccinated.
          Wodarg certainly saw through this one early. Corona Virus come and go and form part of the yearly infections. Their success at beating our defenses is in their ability to mutate.

          10

        • #
          Peter C

          Take a step back. Koch’s postulates are great but Koch wrote them within the confines of the tools of the day. If PCR, EM and fluorescent labeling were things in 1890 they’d be written differently. Stuff that was gold standard 130 years has been justifiably superseded.

          Perhaps Gee Aye.

          In the case of Covid19 Koch’s postulate 1; is presumably satisfied by a positive PCR test.

          How about 2,3 and 4? What alternative criteria do you suggest.

          10

          • #

            The virus is directly observed in tissue samples from diseased people. Unique strains can be used to trace person to person transmission.

            Broadie – I don’t think you understood my points nor Koch’s postulates and you certainly haven’t read the scientific literature.

            00

            • #
              Broadie

              Point me to the literature please. GA

              The Victorian Health Department has declared the strain is the same as the one that came from South Australia. How do they know so quickly yet Pathologists and Virologists like Wodarg are still waiting for evidence of something other than the total mismanagement of the normal flu season effects on an increasingly aging and/or obese population confronted by collapsing public health facilities.

              When was the last death from the so-called vaccine, GA?
              And when was the last death with COVID in Australia? Ans ~ October last year.

              I have just witnessed a very bright and healthy Radiologist having had a dreadful night of fever and distress after the second Pfizer Vaccine, yet I have not seen one person sick with Covid in the whole time and I have met people in isolation from outbreaks right from the very start.
              Hell, Covid is even in our sewerage.

              Where is the pandemic? certainly seems to be absent in most countries including China.

              00

  • #
    Lance

    CDC changing the testing thresholds to manipulate Covid Case results

    https://off-guardian.org/2021/05/18/how-the-cdc-is-manipulating-data-to-prop-up-vaccine-effectiveness/

    “The CDC is demonstrating the beauty of having a “disease” that can appear or disappear depending on how you measure it… This is a policy designed to continuously inflate one number, and systematically minimise the other.

    To be clear: If these new policies had been the global approach to “Covid” since December 2019, there would never have been a pandemic at all.”

    110

    • #
      yarpos

      reminiscent of adjusting how you measure temperature to suit the narrative you are pushing

      70

  • #
    John R Smith

    There is so little attention being paid to POTUS quoting Mao this past week.
    “Women hold up half the sky”.
    Apparently not the first time.
    It is reported he has a speech writer who is found of the Chairman.
    The Great Leap Forward.
    45 million of your own people erased in 4 years.
    (I guess with Identity Politics, if it’s your own kind it doesn’t count as much.)
    World record tally, if I’m not mistaken.
    Hardly ever talked about.
    Which smooths the way for POTUS to repeat the Chairman’s wisdoms.
    As for me, I worry that ‘Great Leap Forward’ and ‘Build Back Better’ have spooky similarities.

    90

    • #
      John R Smith

      that should read … “a speech writer who is fond of the Chairman.”

      20

    • #
      Tilba Tilba

      “Women hold up half the sky”.

      I think it’s well-and-truly moved into the lexicon, into the language … because it is a good pithy statement. The fact that Mao said it is no longer especially relevant to its usefulness.

      15

  • #
  • #
    RicDre

    Joplin Disaster & Bill McKibben Ten Years Later

    Reposted from NOT A LOT OF PEOPLE KNOW THAT

    MAY 22, 2021

    By Paul Homewood

    Today marks the 10th anniversary of the Joplin, Missouri tornado that killed 161, the first triple-digit toll since 1953. At the time the usual suspects quickly came out of the woodwork to blame it on global warming

    In fact McKibben’s disgusting climate porn could not have been more wrong. 2011 was no more than an outlier, and since then the frequency of strong tornadoes has continued to decline from the global cooling years in the 1970s

    FOOTNOTE

    McKibben also used the Texas drought in 2011 as another example of the effects of global warming. Needless to say, he was wrong about that as well

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2021/05/22/joplin-disaster-bill-mckibben-ten-years-later/

    40

  • #
    Travis T. Jones

    Greta the green doom goblin talks about our relationship with nature …

    … queue the video with the green doom goblin sitting on a fossil fuel made couch, calmly, serenely patting a dog …

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BEyri_Nfb3w

    Whoa! Wait. What?

    A dog?

    “The issue of carbon pawprints has been in the news recently thanks to a new book: Time to Eat the Dog.

    The authors claim that keeping a medium-sized dog has the same ecological impact as driving a 4.6 litre Land Cruiser 10,000km a year.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/ethicalman/2009/11/time_to_eat_the_pets.html

    The green doom goblin should try a chianti with that dog.

    70

  • #
    Peter Fitzroy

    Europe is colder than the arctic, where temps exceed 30C, and in May

    But China!!!!

    16

  • #
    RicDre

    Here is a follow-up to an earlier thread about the F-150 Lightning towing range:

    Electric Ford F-150 Lightning: Here’s how far it can probably tow

    By Gary Gastelu

    The Ford F-150 Lighting will be able to tow up to 10,000 pounds, but how far?

    That’s the question on a lot of Fox News Autos readers’ minds, given the sort of range anxiety caused by electric vehicles and the still incomplete charging infrastructure available to support them.

    Ford hasn’t yet said how towing or hauling the F-150 Lightning’s maximum 2,000 payload will affect range, but energy is energy and internal combustion engine vehicles offer an idea.

    Typically, a truck sees at least a 30% drop in fuel economy when pulling 10,000 pounds, though it can be more than 50% in some situations, according to tests by PickupTrucks.com.

    That means F-150 Lightning owners can likely expect to make it 150 to 210 miles between charges with the extended battery.

    This is assuming, of course, that they started with a full battery. The F-150 Lightning is capable of being recharged at a public fast charging station from 15% to 80% full in 41 minutes, but the process slows down for the last 20% to protect the cells from overheating, so drivers may not want to wait around to top it all the way off during a road trip.

    https://www.foxnews.com/auto/electric-ford-f-150-lightning-tow

    40

    • #
      RicDre

      And this interesting comment to the F-150 Lightning article:

      acsm

      What I’ve read thus far is that based on road tests, the average electric vehicles takes 2 and sometimes 3 times as long to get somewhere on a road trip of 1000 miles as a regular gas powered vehicle. Seems to me that you would add a lot of expenses to your trip that you wouldn’t ordinarily have such as more motel stays. Just where are they going to put these charging stations, and will there be a line when you get there. If you drove the speed limit your range will probably drop, especially if you’re crossing Arizona in the summer, your AC draws more battery power, so the 2oo mile so range may not cut it. There are places in this country that are more than 100 miles apart, good luck with that. Will AAA hang around for an hour on the rural country road charging your batteries, and how are they going to charge them, oh probably with a gas powered charger? while I certainly see some benefits to having an electric vehicle in the city, in my mind it does nothing but cause agony and frustration for that thing called Road Trip with the family.

      100

      • #
        Tilba Tilba

        While I certainly see some benefits to having an electric vehicle in the city, in my mind it does nothing but cause agony and frustration for that thing called Road Trip with the family.

        Perhaps in the future people will own either one or no cars … rent or lease an EV for city commuting and local trips, and rent a gas-powered something for that vacation in Disneyland or Yellowstone. The well-off might well own one of each. Not sure how it saves the planet.

        17

    • #
      yarpos

      I doubt many of these will be seen on highways doing anything useful. Just overweight shopping trolleys. The useful payload is a joke for something that size, but the main game in the US seems to be towing rather than carrying.

      100

  • #
    OldOzzie

    Listened to following BBC Podcasts Season 1 – 13 Minutes to the Moon – on road trip with son – excellent

    Epic stories of Nasa’s missions to the Moon. Season 1: the first Moon landing, Apollo 11.

    Season 2: the near disaster of Apollo 13.

    Presenter: Kevin Fong. Theme music: Hans Zimmer

    60

  • #
    another ian

    “What Biden And The Environmental Left Are Really Planning For Us”

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2021/05/22/what-biden-and-the-environmental-left-are-really-planning-for-us/

    30

  • #
    RicDre

    When wind turbines are no longer useful: They get explosive demolition

    Video follows.

    Controlled Demolition, Inc. (CDI) of Phoenix, Maryland, USA (acting as Explosives Design and Performance Subcontractor to Main Demolition Contractor, Dallas Demolition of Houston, Texas who was working for RiverCap Ventures of Rocky River, Ohio, the General Demolition Contractor) performs the successful explosives felling of 90, Mitsubishi 1000A Wind Turbines in New Mexico.

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2021/05/22/when-wind-turbines-are-no-longer-useful-they-get-explosive-demolition/

    As Observer comments on May 22, 2021 3:57 pm

    “The end of an error”

    60

    • #
      yarpos

      I wonder if they bother with the 40 odd tonnes of reinforced concrete in the base , or just sort of smooth the dirt over?

      30

      • #
        Gary Simpson

        Love the bit about the owners salvaging blades, etc. for re-use as spares for other towers. Doesn’t look to be very much that’s recoverable.

        30

  • #
    Dennis

    Debating the climate hoax propaganda and creatively accounted for warming trend exceeding the real natural warming since the last Ice Age is pointless and plays into the hands of the political manipulator’s agenda, wrecking the free market capitalist system that has brought prosperity to developed nations and aid to developing nations.

    30

  • #
    Chad

    Hunter Gas power plant……$650m wasted ?..
    The above is a common chant from the Left/Green Eco warriors who want to see the money used for “Renewables” instead.
    However,..here is a simplified comparison of what you get for your dolla’s
    $650 m for a 600MW gas plant that could supply 600MW x 8760 hrs x 90% utilisation == 4.7 m MWh annually . IE a continuous 24h, 7day, year round power supply.
    $650m of renewables (solar is cheapest, @$1.0/W ) buys a 650MW solar farm, which could supply approx 650MW x 8760hrs x 0.25 == 1.42 mMWh annually.
    Thats just 30% of the gas plant capacity.
    And that would of course be intermittent, daytime only power.!
    In order to achieve a equivalent capacity from RE, it would require 3+ times the solar plant size ..
    So approx 3+ x $650m. = $2.0 bn ?
    AND if it needed to be a continuous supply 24/7,…a very large battery (~6.5 GWh !! ) at a cost of roughly $3.0 – 5.0 bn ! Just for a 12 hr “overnight” supply
    So, RE equivalent would be $5 – 7 bn at least !… ( about 6 times the cost of the Gas option !)
    And that is still no guarantee of a reliable power supply in bad weather periods.
    Obviously all figures are approximations, but the scale of the difference is apparent.

    110

    • #
      Dennis

      To maybe explain the woke mind I quote two comments from the Bolt blog last year;

      * Wind turbines provide intermittent unreliable energy supply because of wind variations – reply that there will always be at least one wind turbine operating somewhere in Australia.

      * Same contributor explained that if the writer had an EV it would be recharged overnight from solar panels.

      40

    • #
      Tilba Tilba

      Obviously all figures are approximations, but the scale of the difference is apparent.

      I appreciate that the equivalent RE output is both much more capital expensive, and much less reliable. But have you factored in the cost of necessary gas pipeline infrastructure, transport, and consumption of gas – over say 30 years? And other costs in terms of a carbon tax / carbon credits / contribution to emissions?

      09

      • #
        Chad

        ….But have you factored in the cost of necessary gas pipeline infrastructure, transport, and consumption of gas – over say 30 years? And other costs in terms of a carbon tax / carbon credits / contribution to emissions

        ..No, just as i didnt factor in the costs of a major distribution line to get power from the “suntrap spot” somewhere way out west, to the Hunter, and the fact that fuel costs are insignificant in real terms to the consumers,.. and as for Carbon tax….well, i was trying to just use actual costs, not make believe, made up number from fairytale economics. !
        ..And ,..what price is a reliable power supply worth ?

        70

        • #
          Kalm Keith

          Thanks for bothering to reply to that piece of junk:

          clear and concise, and real.

          I have visions of a sledge hammer at work.
          🙂

          40

      • #
        el gordo

        ‘But have you factored in the cost of necessary gas pipeline infrastructure, transport, and consumption of gas – over say 30 years?’

        A lot of the farmers and graziers are unhappy with the gas pipeline cutting across their land, but its its not a deal breaker. We need infrastructure spending right now.

        ‘And other costs in terms of a carbon tax / carbon credits / contribution to emissions?’

        None of that will eventuate, so its irrelevant.

        00

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    • #
      Raven

      All Scientists Forced To Retire After Realizing The Science Is Now Settled

      WORLD—Thousands of scientists around the world are looking for new work after they realized the science is settled and there was no need for them anymore.

      “The science is settled,” said climatologist Blorg Norbergrobben as he hung his head sadly. “I heard that on CNN. What am I going to do with my life now that all knowledge has been uncovered and will never be overturned by new discoveries? Maybe I’ll get a job as a political advisor!”

      OK, it’s the Babylon Bee. 😉

      https://babylonbee.com/news/All-Scientists-Retire-After-Realizing-The-Science-Is-Now-Settled

      70

  • #
    mc

    Ivermectin Triple Therapy Protocol for COVID-19 Released to Australian GPs for Infected Elderly and Frontline Workers

    SYDNEY, Aug 19, 2020 – (ACN Newswire) – Triple therapy specialist Professor Thomas Borody, famous for curing peptic ulcers using a triple antibiotic therapy saving millions of lives, has released the COVID-19 treatment protocol to Australian GPs, who can legally prescribe it to their COVID-19 positive patients. They can also prescribe it as a preventative medication. Borody says this could be the fastest and safest way to end the pandemic in Australia within 6-8 weeks.

    https://www.newsmaker.com.au/news/378315/ivermectin-triple-therapy-protocol-for-covid19-released-to-australian-gps-for-infected-elderly-and-frontline-workers“>

    Dr. Pierre Kory testifies to Senate Committee about Ivermectin, Dec. 8, 2020
    Scroll down to video.

    https://www.cnsnews.com/article/national/susan-jones/physician-tells-senate-ivermectin-covid-wonder-drug-if-you-take-it-you“>

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    • #
      Kalm Keith

      I like that!

      A lot.

      70

    • #
      Sceptical Sam

      Kory’s paper, with dosages, is here:

      https://osf.io/wx3zn/

      Quercetin is the ionophore for zinc in Kory’s treatment.

      Interestingly, Borody’s Triple Treatment (for Covid) doesn’t seem to have an ionophore identified, notwithstanding one of its elements is zinc.

      60

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    Robber

    Another big fail for wind in Vic at 6.30pm on Friday evening, delivering a whopping 7.5 MW from a nameplate capacity of 3,100 MW. While at 4.30pm it was negative 0.4 MW.
    And not much better in SA, delivering 105 MW from 2,100 MW nameplate.
    Just as well we still have gas and hydro to meet those peak demands without wind and solar.

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    Robber

    Meanwhile on bi-election day in NSW, won by the Nationals, for the Saturday evening peak coal delivered 77% of demand, plus 12% imports, 8% hydro, 2% wind.
    While in Qld coal was delivering 90% of demand.
    Yes, let’s educate those climate alarmist school kids who demand we stop using fossil fuels.

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        Hanrahan

        With a Melbourne cup field of candidates the Nat got 31%, that’s 50% more than labor. I think that’s good. Labor have painted themselves into a corner, they are now the fashionable urban elite party not the party of the workers.

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          yarpos

          Excellent summary of where they have landed themselves. They cannot be unaware of this but they are so driven by the noisy PC minority mob they are too scared to do anything else. I will be tuning in to whatever channel Penny Wong is on to watch her explain the next one away.

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        David-of-Cooyal-in-Oz

        This link puts the candidates in decreasing order of their primary vote count, updated regularly (?), which I find a bit easier to read.
        I find it interesting that not one candidate/party who stood at the last election had an increase % in his/her primary vote, and about 60 % of those votes were exhausted before reaching either the Nats or Labor.

        ” By-election preferences are flowing 15.9% to Nationals, 20.5% to Labor with 63.6% exhausting. In the same polling places at the last election, preferences flowed 15.6% to Nationals, 19.4% to Labor with 65.0% exhausting..
        Exhausted votes are ballot papers under Optional Preferential Voting that did not contain a preference for one of the final two candidates in the contest. Exhausted Pct calculated as a % of formal votes. ”

        https://www.abc.net.au/news/elections/upper-hunter-by-election-2021/results

        Cheers
        Dave B

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    Hanrahan

    Kamala Harris has disgraced herself but MSM will not show it. She shook hands with the Sth Korean PM and immediately wiped her hand down her dress as if to clean it.

    Imagine the outrage if Trump had done that?

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      yarpos

      It will be interesting to see what will be manufactured when Biden reaches his use by date. I find it hard to believe even the Dems would offer up Harris as POTUS. But then, I never imagined the US could be where it is today.

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    Matt Thompson

    Check out this absurd breach of logic and scientific method.
    As Jo stated years ago, mention climate change, get funding regardless of the idea. No focus on the impending doom of climate change, no funding.

    https://apple.news/AFnAEuU77S8itsyHncIxPmw

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      Kalm Keith

      Quick; send money to Indonesia and Griffiths University.

      Urgently, or else the rock art will defoliate.

      I have great admiration for the University staff who took time off from teaching and spent a month in the back blocks of this hot country to collect details of the environmental disaster in progress.

      Just imagine, after forty thousand years of existence, and we ruin it in fifty years of burning fossil fools.

      The guilt.

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    another ian

    ‘Fauci Flip Flops On COVID Origins, Now ‘Not Convinced’ Virus Developed Naturally.”

    https://thenationalpulse.com/breaking/fauci-flip-flops-on-covid-origins/

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      el gordo

      Brinkmanship and hollow words from the Global Times.

      China won’t take Taiwan by force, they are playing a long game. Along the BRI we see the new world order developing organically and in due course all those countries will agree that Taiwan belongs to China.

      Beijing will then take it without a shot being fired.

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        yarpos

        They do like to think they play the long game, but then they destroy themselves on a regular basis throughout history. Looking at Winnies behaviour especially internally it seems likely the fuse will get lit again. Also the demographic outcomes of 1 child /abortion are starting to come home to roost in an increasingly toxic homeland. Interesting times.

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    another ian

    “What my Soviet life has taught me about censorship and why it makes us dumb”

    https://areomagazine.com/2021/05/21/why-censorship-makes-us-dumb-in-soviet-russia-then-and-in-america-today/

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      Lucky

      A long article but worth reading.
      Compares censorship in US now with censorship in the USSR. Concludes it is not as serious. Yet.

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      Peter C

      Zoe posted this on the weekend Unthreaded.

      I am glad that she is also getting exposure on WUWT.

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    el gordo

    Global cooling signal, blocking high pressure too far south for this time of year and note the meandering jet stream.

    https://www.weatherzone.com.au/synoptic.jsp?d=0

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      Peter C

      Thanks el gordo,

      I see the blocking high. I thought they were quite common. Why is this one a global cooling signal?

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    Dennis

    Tom Foolery predicted years ago that there would not be sufficient future rainfall to fill the dams again, and since the dams have filled a number of times.

    So please explain this forecast, climate change hoax and warming trend scare considered …

    Sky News

    The next Hawkesbury flood is likely within the next four years with “every chance” it will be higher and more destructive than it was in March. NSW experienced its third wettest week on record in early 2021 – averaging a state-wide rainfall average of 102 millimetres. The Mid North Coast faced the worst effects where rivers reached heights unseen before. Tens of thousands of homes experienced flooding – many for the first time in decades – along the Hawkesbury-Nepean. Sky News Meteorologist Rob Sharpe said the forecast was based on historical factors across the Hawkesbury-Nepean over a couple of hundred years along with climate drivers. “It’s a region that I’d be very worried to own property in,” he said.

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    Dennis

    Posted at JoNova weeks ago, consider Sky News item above and BoM ….

    beowulf
    March 23, 2021 at 12:01 pm · Reply
    My family has lived and farmed around the Hunter River since about 1850, so there is 170 years of oral history passed down through the generations. I grew up on stories of the 1893, 1949 and 1955 floods, the latter two being recent history just before my birth. I also grew up with the never-forgotten sweet stench of rotting vegetation in my nostrils after the numerous floods of my childhood on the Paterson River (a Hunter tributary). The Hunter River has the biggest catchment of any NSW coastal river and includes some very high rainfall terrain in places.

    Maitland CBD sits on the riverbank where the bullock wagon track once ran and a series of grog shanties sprang up to service that trade from the (then largest) river port of Morpeth to all places north and west right up as far as Toowoomba in QLD. Until the advent of the railways in the 1880s Maitland and Morpeth were THE pre-eminent NSW towns outside of Sydney. Newcastle had yet to blossom. The river has changed its course many times since settlement, but back then the paddle-steamers used to come right up behind the Maitland shops to unload into bond stores, so Maitland was on the river for good reason.

    The Hunter’s history is nothing but floods and droughts. One of my grandfather’s earliest memories was of standing knee-deep in flood water as a 7 year old pulling beetroot to salvage what they could of their crop before it all went underwater and rotted. The locals took it in their stride. When the river was rising they would put their beds up on bricks and go to sleep, likewise with their other furniture. The 1955 flood was on a scale the locals had not seen.

    In 1955 an entire street of houses below Maitland Hospital was washed away with their residents clinging onto the roofs. A line of big poplars stretched across the floodway downstream and some of the “lucky” residents were able to clamber into the trees as their houses were smashed to pieces on the bridge below. They were hanging out of the trees for a couple of days before they could be rescued as the current was too fierce and the only helicopter sent in for rescues had crashed during an earlier attempt elsewhere, killing all.

    As KK stated, the Newcastle surf clubs sent surf boats up to help with rescues, although Maitland had a number of heavy flood-boats always on hand too. The Army sent in trucks and Ducks (DUKW). The trucks did good service; the ducks not so much. Some of the Duck drivers insisted on plowing up and down the main street, creating bow waves that punched in the shop front windows on undamaged buildings. Out of town their activities were much more useful.

    After even the 1955 flood nothing remotely salvageable was thrown out. Mattresses were hosed off and stood out to dry for several weeks; clothes and bedding were used complete with mud stains; walls were scrubbed down until the fibres in the old plaster showed through; families pitched in to help each other. Several of my mum’s uncles and cousins had their homes and farms inundated.

    My father was the northern NSW trouble-shooter for the Massey-Ferguson tractor company. He spent months after the flood stripping down tractors, where MF provided all labour for free via its dealers in the Hunter. The farmers were only charged for oil. Starter motors and generators were washed out then dried in the ovens of a local bakery after each batch of bread was done and the ovens cool enough. Flies were in absolute plague proportions. Life went on without any gnashing of teeth or blaming the CO2 weather gods.

    After the excitement was over many houses were moved up onto higher ground, with real estate prices for ground on the hills rocketing within the year. The block where my parents had planned to build went from £100 to £300 while they were pre-occupied with the flood aftermath.

    KK is not quite right about the siting of the town in that the larger part of East Maitland as it then was, also went under. Only the newer hillside suburbs were unaffected. The hills were covered in homes mainly after 1955. Development throughout the floodplain was banned, but now we have three generations of blow-ins with no local knowledge plus young graduate engineers who think that floods are a thing of the past and it is quite OK to develop the flood plain once more. They base their confidence on the levee system strengthened in the 70s. The town centre has nearly gone under twice since then, but they know best. In time there will be a disaster that makes 1955 look tame.

    Incidentally, the early settlers were told by the Aborigines that they (the natives) had seen huge mega-floods in the past, one where kangaroos were trapped and washed off the hill on which Maitland hospital now sits — which would make the water probably 70 feet deep on the floodplain. By comparison 1955 was about 20 feet deep in the worst places. Geofluvial survey work has been done on Wollombi Brook (Cockfighter Creek) — a major Hunter tributary — which proves the occurrence of mega-floods in the past few hundred years prior to white settlement, so 70 feet of water may not be far fetched.

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    Rocket Rod

    A German scientist has discovered why the Wuhan coronavirus (Covid-19) “vaccines” made by AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson (J&J) are causing some recipients to develop deadly blood clots.

    According to Prof. Andreas Greinacher, a blood expert from the University of Greifswald, the two viral vector vaccines contain genetically modified (GMO) cold viruses that, upon injection, trigger an autoimmune response.

    Stray proteins, Greinacher says, along with a preservative used specifically in the AstraZeneca jab known as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), are directly responsible for causing the blood clots, he says.

    Greinacher and his team identified more than 1,000 human-derived cell proteins in the injections that they believe are getting into people’s bloodstreams and clamping onto a blood component known as platelet factor 4, or PF4, where they form complexes that activate the production of antibodies.

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    Liberator

    posting this now before i forget – may be worth a discussion of its own.

    Yackandandah’s community battery may not be ‘big’ but it’s enough to ‘petrify‘ energy providers

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-05-24/community-battery-yackandandah-ausgrid-electricity-shakeup/100159460

    $200 k battery, 274-kilowatt-hour battery purchased with help from government grants.

    powers 40 homes, charged by solar and?

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      Peter C

      Yes! Thanks Liberator.

      I am sure that energy providers are rubbing their hands with glee.

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      yarpos

      Yacks “energy sovereignty” plan (whatever that means) is classic BS. I tried to ask them about their plans to achieve whatever that means by 2023, by asking what the key milestones where and what success would actually look like. All I got was play the victim stuff saying I was picking on their precious community “initiative” Still the grants pour in.

      Last time I bothered to look at the website it had almost nothing of substance about the objective and lots of items where they dished out awards to each other. All the classic signs of another greenie non project , going nowhere, at taxpayer expense.

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    another ian

    Dog owners beware!

    Ivermectin and collie dogs is not a good mix

    https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1939-1676.2002.tb01611.x

    Might turn up as another reason for banning it for Peking Pox in humans (/s)

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      Peter C

      Thank Ian,

      Group I comprised 5 adult Collies that received at least 400 μg/kg ivermectin PO

      Please note! Especially anyone who is thinking of taking Ivermectin.

      The drug seems to be well tolerated in humans. However the dose given to the Collie Dogs was twice the recommended dose as used in human trials which seem to be 200ug/kg. I presume that PO means Per Oral.

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    CHRIS

    Batteries of any type or power are NOT renewable energy

    00