JoNova

A science presenter, writer, speaker & former TV host; author of The Skeptic's Handbook (over 200,000 copies distributed & available in 15 languages).


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Thursday Open Thread

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8.8 out of 10 based on 15 ratings

229 comments to Thursday Open Thread

  • #
    Peter Fitzroy

    Note: 501000+ deaths in the USA – never mentioned, why?

    233

    • #

      Too busy finding a scapegoat for long term political incompetence in Texas.

      232

    • #
      el gordo

      ‘ … never mentioned, why?’

      Link?

      113

    • #
      Richard Ilfeld

      Probably because the excess deaths data vs actuarial expectations from the CDC doesn’t support the COVID
      counts, so, like temperature, some serious homogenization will have to be done to hide reality before we are presented with the “science”.

      I don’t mean to be flip; but a senior citizen, like myself, is likely to pass in any given year toward the end of life, often with a helper
      such as flu, or heart ailments, or a fall, or whatever. A death in this category assisted by Covid, but not unexpected within a years time frame,
      is difficult to handle scientifically, especially after it has been fully exploited politically.

      The relevant Covid numbers of concern, in my mind, are the otherwise healthy working folks who passed, and the economic loss as compared to other contagions such as flu.

      The deaths in this class are not 500,000, and are in fact so far from that number that it is unreportable.

      This may be measurable in FLorida; political catastrophe suggest the answer unknowable in New York and California.

      301

    • #
      David Maddison

      What did they really die of Fitz?

      Coincidentally, on the day when President Imposter Biden was installed as fake President, the WHO altered the criteria for what constitutes a positive PCR test result for C-19.

      It was lowered from an extremely sensitive number of replications, 40-45 which was almost certain to give a false positive to a much lower level which more realistically correlated with clinical symptoms.

      And no deaths from influenza and reduced claimed death rates from heart disease and cancer.

      What did they really die of?

      It’s all OK now, that bad Orange Man has been removed from his rightful office…

      See https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=423359705623247

      321

    • #
      hypersonic

      And 80 thousand under Bidens watch in just 4 weeks, he was handed a vaccine, he was handed a roll out plan and yet they still die.

      211

      • #
        GARETH LEWIS

        Death is a small price to pay to avoid that Heels Up Harris cackle.

        122

        • #
          dinn, rob

          for UK government and taxpayer to fund/assist technological development of PRC:
          2-12-21 115-page report from the British think tank Civitas is entitled “Inadvertently Arming China: The Chinese military complex and its potential exploitation of scientific research at UK universities.” Sponsorship of high-technology research in UK universities covers areas such as: Metals and alloys; Aerospace physics and hypersonic technology; Ceramics, piezoelectrics and rare earths; Drones and radars; Shipbuilding; Data science, AI, and facial recognition; and Robotics (land, sea and space).
          Conclusions China has a long history of weapons sales to regimes that carry out grievous human rights abuses including Iran, Syria, Burma and North Korea. In addition, China’s development of a surveillance state is already leading to systematic human rights abuses, with its treatment of the Uighur minority described as genocide.
          The methods by which the UK monitors and controls Chinese involvement in UK university research are, we suggest, inadequate. The companies sponsoring UK-based research centres include China’s largest weapons manufacturers including producers of strike fighter engines, ICBMs, nuclear warheads, stealth aircraft, military drones, tanks, military-use metals and materials, and navy ships.
          At its simplest, for UK government and taxpayer to fund and assist the technological development and possibly force-projection capabilities of the military of the People’s Republic of China is not in British national interest. https://thenationalpulse.com/news/ccp-exploiting-uk-military-research/

          20

    • #
      yarpos

      Never mentioned? the MSM has done nothing but for months, but nothing about the quiet reclassification of deaths by the CDC that made it look less impressive as a talking point. But still , yes it will rapidly go to zero with Joe at the helm but people will still stubbornly die in the US and elsewhere

      100

    • #
      Dennis

      US population over 330 million PLUS unregistered alien migrants estimated to be more than 10 million.

      Per capita Covid-19 related deaths are?

      Actual course of death with COVID-19 listed only?

      91

    • #
      RooDog

      Why would it be mentioned?

      00

    • #
      Harves

      Because then people would start to question why more than 80,000 have occurred in less than a month since Biden took office.

      70

    • #
    • #
      William Astley

      I totally agree. And the US covid deaths are completely preventable. And the covid isolation not required. And the covid vaccinations optional. Covid has designed to evoke dangerous human immune responses which attack the body. Covid was designed to be dangerous. And the new releases of covid have been designed to defeat vaccines.

      The Fake news and the US Democratic party are on the side of the Medical Industry, not the people.

      It is pathetic that Bangladesh and India (both Bangladesh and India and other poor countries are preventing and treating covid using Invermectin) have defeated covid using science. Our system is so stinking corrupt the Medical Industry hide the cure, to make money selling vaccines, year after year.

      This was no small move. Were it a country, U.P.’s more than 230 million citizens would rank it fifth worldwide. As India’s largest state, its embrace of ivermectin may have changed the treatment landscape across India.
      “This authentication of ivermectin revived the faith of people,” Dr. Chaurasia told me, “and net result was a massive inclination to take these drugs” — both ivermectin and hydroxychloroquine.

      “The economy is flying,” Dr. Tarek Alam, who led several studies on the drug’s efficacy, told me in an email. “Hospitals have empty COVID beds and the initial demand for ICU has come down.” Indeed, Bangladesh – the world’s most densely populated country — has an even lower fatality rate than India, ranking 126th globally.

      US Covid Deaths = 502,000 People, 28 million cases

      India Covid Deaths = 156,000 People, 11 Million cases

      This is an interesting article.

      India and Bangladesh has defeated/is defeating covid using invermectin and HCQ. And of course the people in India and Bangladesh are less Vitamin D deficient than most Western countries because of latitude and living conditions.

      “The economy is flying,” Dr. Tarek Alam, who led several studies on the drug’s efficacy, told me in an email. “Hospitals have empty COVID beds and the initial demand for ICU has come down.” Indeed, Bangladesh – the world’s most densely populated country — has an even lower fatality rate than India, ranking 126th globally.

      https://trialsitenews.com/an-unlikely-nation-is-kicking-this-pandemic-guess-which-then-why/

      This was no small move. Were it a country, U.P.’s more than 230 million citizens would rank it fifth worldwide. As India’s largest state, its embrace of ivermectin may have changed the treatment landscape across India.
      “This authentication of ivermectin revived the faith of people,” Dr. Chaurasia told me, “and net result was a massive inclination to take these drugs” — both ivermectin and hydroxychloroquine.

      By the end of 2020, Uttar Pradesh — which distributed free ivermectin for home care — had the second-lowest fatality rate in India at 0.26 per 100,000 residents in December. Only the state of Bihar, with 128 million residents, was lower, and it, too, recommends ivermectin.

      But Uttar Pradesh did more than treat 300,000 mild cases at home through 2020; it also opted to use ivermectin to prevent infection. It seems a young health officer’s COVID response teams had taken the drug and remained well – something prophylaxis studies support. U.P. then had contacts of COVID patients take it, with similar success. “Recognizing the sense of urgency,” Amit Mohan Prasad, a U.P. health official, wrote in a Dec. 30 article, “we decided to go ahead.”

      Such urgency is in short supply in the U.S., where the single-minded focus is on vaccination. Nonetheless, a group of doctors called Frontline COVID Critical Care Alliance is pressing for adoption of ivermectin immediately as an adjunct and bridge to vaccination. Its logic is twofold: Ivermectin has a known safety profile, as a life-saving drug given to millions since the 1980s, and 46 COVID studies, including 18 peer-reviewed, have shown “high efficacy.”

      However, even India is holding back, perhaps temporarily. The Indian Council of Medical Research declined in October to recommend ivermectin nationwide, citing, as other such entities have, the need for more data. Similarly, COVID guidelines in bordering Bangladesh make no mention of the drug, despite successful studies done there.

      In India, premier medical centers have, nonetheless, adopted it. In Bangladesh, doctors are using combination ivermectin/doxycycline therapy for home care, as are major hospitals in Dhaka for inpatients.
      “The economy is flying,” Dr. Tarek Alam, who led several studies on the drug’s efficacy, told me in an email. “Hospitals have empty COVID beds and the initial demand for ICU has come down.” Indeed, Bangladesh – the world’s most densely populated country — has an even lower fatality rate than India, ranking 126th globally.

      71

      • #
        Roger Knights

        Other recent converts or semi-converts to ivermectin are Slovakia, Macedonia, Belize, Zimbabwe, Dominican Republic, and a couple of others I’ve forgotten.

        10

  • #
    Hanrahan

    RIP Rush Limbaugh.

    I’ll miss him.

    270

    • #

      I listened to him quite a lot in the 90’s believe it or not. May he rest in peace along with his words.

      923

      • #
        OriginalSteve

        “…along with his words”.

        Really Leaf…did you have to go there?

        281

      • #
        John R Smith

        Gee,
        In 2005 I was listening to Rush Limbaugh as a lark because embarrassingly I probably thought a lot like you at the time.
        He said “there has been no global warming for 17 years”.
        I thought, “that has to be an outright lie.”
        Searching to prove the lie to myself, I discovered he was right.
        At least more right than wrong.
        He pulled back the curtain for me.
        I for one will celebrate his life AND HIS WORDS for my remaining ride time.
        I am proud of myself for showing restraint.

        451

        • #
          John R Smith

          that should read 2015 …
          Enlightenment for me was still 10 years out.

          100

          • #
            TdeF

            The real lie is not warming itself. That is just part of a long chain of unproven statements or lies. The essential foundation lie is that the 50% increase in CO2 since 1900 is man made. That is a long proven lie. Even in 1958 it was measured very accurately at 2.03% +/0.15% when scientists had really expected 14%. According to the IPCC, highly soluble CO2 does not go into the oceans like all gases. And fish do not breathe.

            Warming releases CO2 from the oceans where 98% of all CO2 is dissolved. Doesn’t that make simple sense instead of the wild unexplained hypothesis that CO2 is heating the oceans and killing the Great Barrier Reef?

            The CO2 lie is the critical one because everything hinges on this. Correlation is not causation. And this unproven unlikely idea played to the arrogance of the 1980s where the UN decided that humans controlled the planet, the sun, the oceans and the temperature. We don’t.

            331

            • #
              John R Smith

              Thank you.
              “UN decided that humans controlled the planet.”
              Well, at least certain humans want to control the inhabitants of said planet.
              Seems to be working.
              “Correlation is not causation”
              Yet we humans seek it like a dog seeks a bone.

              100

            • #
              RickWill

              The basis of the fantasy is the “greenhouse effect”. Once you understand this, any discussion about what CO2 does other than improving plant productivity is just getting into a pointless discussion. There is no denying that CO2 is going up and it has contributed to plant productivity.

              The “greenhouse effect” makes a silly claim the the surface temperature is 33 degrees C higher than the average radiating temperature. Although the Chinese and Europeans differ by a wide margin on what it is actually doing:
              https://1drv.ms/u/s!Aq1iAj8Yo7jNhBlQt8jdeBoZ9NhY

              How could such nonsense gain traction when it is plainly clear to anyone who cares to look that the sea surface temperature on Earth is regulated at two hard limits; 30C in the tropical warm pools and -2C in the sea ice water interface. Who could be surprised by the fact that the average surface temperature is the arithmetic mean of the two controlled lints and dream up nonsense about”greenhouse effect” – such silly garbage.

              Unless you are discussing plant productivity then CO2 does not even get into a discussion. Certainly it has nothing to do with global climate. Trees might improve local climate and they are a good source of fuel.

              171

              • #
                TdeF

                Yes. That’s the next lie. But if CO2 levels are outside our conceivable control, why are we taxing our electricity to pay for other people’s Windmills. It’s the greatest and most useless tax on the poor in our history and created by allegedly progressive, caring socialists. Idi*ts.

                131

              • #
                Simon Derricutt

                Rick – your physics is correct for ocean surface, and the hard limit on sea surface temperature because when it’s at around 30°C it produces clouds that then reflect the solar energy back out into space can easily be seen working. It’s however worth noting that this doesn’t apply to dry land areas. There’s thus still some wriggle-room for a “greenhouse effect” to operate and to affect average temperatures.

                However, the IPCC (and official climate scientists in general) only consider CO2, NOx, Methane, and a few minor gases such as SF6 as the important greenhouse gases, and ignore the elephant in the room which is water vapour. Water vapour content in the air varies between about 20,000ppm and 40,000ppm (2-4%), is obviously radiative, and covers a lot more spectral bands than CO2 does. If we’re going to specify “the greenhouse effect”, then H2O is in fact the main one we should be looking at. There’s at least 50 times as much of it as there is of CO2, and it obviously will have more effect per ppm than CO2 can.

                In the back-of-the-envelope calculation, though, let’s just set the greenhouse effect from CO2 equal to that of water vapour, and set the water-vapour content to 20,000ppm. Total greenhouse gas (ignoring Methane and others which are measured in ppb and thus around the 1ppm mark) will thus be 20,420ppm or so. If we double the CO2 content, then the total greenhouse gas goes to 20,840ppm. This is around a 2% increase in greenhouse gases. If the greenhouse gases account for 33°C at the moment (as they specify) then at maximum (ignoring the logarithmic effect of increase in greenhouse gases too) we’d get around 33.67°C. This puts an absolute limit to the equilibrium climate sensitivity to CO2 at around 0.7°C per doubling. IIRC if we burnt all the fossil fuels we currently know about we’d maybe reach around 700ppm of CO2 in the atmosphere, so we aren’t even going to reach a doubling from current levels.

                On the other hand, if we look at the rise from “pre-industrial” around 280ppm in 1800 or so, and the rise in temperature since then (around 1°C) then that’s around 0.7% increase in total greenhouse gases, which translates to around 0.27°C rise from CO2 increase alone since then using the same rough approximations. The other ~0.7°C rise must have thus been natural.

                By choosing the minimum water-vapour content, and over-estimating the effect of CO2 relative to water-vapour, and ignoring the logarithmic dependence, the 0.27°C is the absolute maximum rise since 1800AD that can be assigned to CO2 increases since then. A better calculation will reduce that number. In order to even reach the ~1°C range, you have to speculate that there’s an amplification factor where a rise in CO2 causes a rise in water-vapour. Then again, if you specify that, then that is positive feedback, and the extra water-vapour will also cause a further rise in water-vapour as the temperature rises, so we’d have a runaway system that would keep increasing in temperature without limit. By specifying that positive feedback, we are also specifying that there is a “perfect” total amount of greenhouse gas in the atmosphere, and that if it goes above that then it will keep increasing, and that if it goes below that then it will continue to decrease. Given the 2-4% range of water-vapour in the atmosphere this is obviously untenable. Therefore the hypothesis that the effect of CO2 can be amplified by water-vapour increase is shown to be simply wrong, and it doesn’t happen.

                However, if you look at the temperature versus CO2 for the last 200 years or so, and recognise that the main CO2 rise started around 1950 or so, then the majority of the temperature rise happened before the CO2 started rising. Also, from around 1940-1970 the correlation was negative – as CO2 increased the temperatures dropped, so that the climate scientists in the ’70s were predicting glaciation by the year 2000 (which didn’t of course happen). From around 2005 to now, the correlation is zero – CO2 rose while temperatures remains around the same. The only reasonable conclusion to take from that is that CO2 level hardly affects global temperatures at all, and that there is another reason for the rise in temperatures since 1800. It also follows that altering our emissions of CO2 and going “Carbon-free” will make bugger-all difference to whatever processes are causing the gradual changes in global average temperatures.

                The salient point about the global average temperature is actually how stable it is when the Sun’s output and our distance from it are both varying so the energy we receive varies by around 1% (again, on simple physics that would give maybe around 3°C difference). The control system must in fact have negative feedback to achieve this stability. I think your “ocean thermostat” is the main cause of that general stability. Given the long-term history of our planet going through long periods of glaciation interspersed with relatively-short periods of pleasant temperatures such as now, it seems there are actually two stable temperatures that we flip between. As far as I can tell, though, we have no actual control over which phase the world will be in. We just have to adapt to it.

                It seems to me that having more CO2 in our atmosphere will not measurably affect the natural rate of change of temperatures and climate, but instead will only increase crop yields. The oceans stabilise the average temperatures, and the gradual changes that do happen naturally need to be adapted to since we can’t affect them.

                51

              • #
                John R Smith

                My understanding is that Texas was one of the leading states in ‘renewable’ energy because of their geography and climate. Works for them.
                (dumb word, nature has been renewable for 14 billion years or so)
                Now the Left is criticizing Texas energy policy.
                After the climate didn’t behave in the manner the alarmist assured us it would.
                Is reason and debate enough to counter this level of hypocrisy?

                20

      • #
        David Maddison

        Gee Aye, isn’t it wonderful when you get to listen to someone you don’t agree with. Leftists generally censor those they disagree with, conservatives don’t as evidenced by you being allowed to post here but not we conservatives on Leftist sites.

        RIP Rush Hudson Limbaugh III. Thank you for your service.

        280

    • #
      Dave in the States

      In America we have a phrase or a descriptor: “a straight shooter” When someone says: “Shooting ya straight” it means I’m telling you the unvarnished truth without any bull. That’s what Rush did and he was a straight shooter.

      If one wanted to get the important news-unfiltered- you listened to Rush. And 99% of the time he was right and the MSM talking heads Democrat Party propaganda spokespersons were wrong.

      220

  • #
    Kalm Keith

    Modern political method of redirecting public anger over NSW Government’s Bushfire Fail:

    create a hero, even if he wasn’t one.

    https://www.9news.com.au/national/mural-honouring-nsw-rfs-commissioner-shane-fitzsimmons-defaced-sydney-erskinville/5f10c619-c599-4601-876d-625ce84ff1e6

    50

    • #
      David Maddison

      Weren’t the real heroes the actual firefighters?

      130

      • #
        Kalm Keith

        That’s the point.

        And the covered up issue is that if state governments had done their job there would have been little or no danger to life and property and less actual firefighting to be done.

        With removal of trees close to property banned, with pre-emptive burns essentially banned, with all routine Bush management procedures abandoned, these current fires are Government Made.

        Still, Australia is not alone: fires in Greece and California in the last year show that governments ignore common sense and compensate with a spectacular air show that burns up even more taxpayer money.

        200

    • #
      GlenM

      Fitzsimmons is seen as a bureaucratic ….. in the bush. A hero for the left who need heroes because they are vacuous and haven’t a clue about anything regarding the real world.

      40

  • #
    Hanrahan

    It didn’t take long, Biden being elbowed out already.

    Kamala calls Macron & Trudeau. Vice President now runs US foreign policy

    What a breach of protocol.

    270

    • #
      Yonniestone

      What’d you expect, it’s like thinking that a car theif will have a strong respect for road laws. 🙂

      90

    • #
      Dave in the States

      It indicates they don’t want an unrehearsed and uncoached Biden talking to heads of state.

      110

    • #
      TdeF

      It is a disaster because the Federation, the President of the United States were roles created explicitly for international policy, trade, defence, not domestic. As the Wu Flu disaster has proven, the States control everything else. International relations is his job. As for the PM in Australia.

      For Kamala Harris to take over international relations means Biden is going back to his bunker, afraid to even meet people. America has elected a man who does not want the job and cannot do it. A sock puppet for the extreme left. But everyone knew that.

      250

      • #
        Tilba Tilba

        Dick Cheney and Donald Rumsfeld ran foreign policy for George W Bush – and Joe Biden also did a fair bit under Barack Obama … it isn’t particularly unusual.

        111

    • #
      PeterS

      The Republic died on Jan 20. The Constitution died late 2020. Next will be the Federation of States – it will die too eventually. Then the non-Democrat sates will have to contend with the mad rush of people leaving the Democratic ones, which by the way has already started.

      [SNIP. You know that needed rephrasing right? – Jo]

      71

      • #
        PeterS

        Yes, inciting violence is only allowed by the left and they can say it all the time. We can’t even in defence since we are nice people. The trouble with that is we can’t defend ourselves against their actions, which of course is a nonsense.

        61

  • #
    Gary Simpson

    Much ado regarding facebook this morning. Personally, I have never used it, never would. Seems the JINO’s (journalists in name only) and PINO’s (politicians in name only) are apoplectic over Zuckerberg’s actions. They are surprised that a monopolistic propaganda organisation run by a leftie dictator is acting this way. They are all fools of the worst order.

    240

    • #
      OriginalSteve

      Oh facebook…its a company…I believe…..

      Hey, if everyone cancelled thier accounts, Facebook would wither and die ( which it needs to….or gets heavily regulated )

      Either will do….

      Most social media appears to be just another left wing agitprop outlet anyway.

      160

    • #
      Gary Simpson

      It’s a bit like dealing with the CCP and expecting them to display honesty and integrity and then being surprised when they stamp their feet when things don’t go their way.

      80

    • #
      RossP

      Congratulations to Scomo and Australia in general for standing up to Facebook. May it just be the start of the fight against big tech.

      80

      • #
        Tilba Tilba

        Facebook has made billions by essentially not paying for any content, and Google is pretty much the same. Their argument has always been that they dramatically increase exposure and the number of customers … there is some logic to this, but apparently not enough for the media companies to accept.

        Murdoch must have applied pressure, along with big Oz-based media players.

        Perhaps the era of super-profits are over, and FB etc might fall back to being “normal” companies, notwithstanding their near-monopoly status.

        80

        • #
          Tilba Tilba

          Actually, I heard an interview on RN yesterday evening, with the editor of the Katherine Times in the NT. She was pretty devastated by the decision of Facebook to drop all news content.

          Lots of regional and small-town newspapers barely survive, and she explained that FB drove at least 60% of their business, with decreasing hard-copy subscriptions and a strong resistance to paying for an online version.

          I’m the first to admit that I don’t fully understand how being on FB should matter that much – surely if someone wants to read the Katherine Times (and be exposed to its advertisers) then they go directly to the paper’s website. No? Facebook isn’t a browser or a public right-of-way – and it’s certainly not the only path to any website.

          10

  • #

    I remember those Australian wildfires.
    What is the global trend?

    http://phzoe.com/2021/02/17/trend-in-global-fires/

    280

    • #
      WXcycles

      Nice job Zoe!

      140

    • #
      Dennis

      Australia is a land of droughts and flooding rains, extremes of weather conditions.

      In 2019/20 the bushfires were the result of;

      * Very dry conditions after years of drought.
      * A lack of land management to reduce fuel fire hazard on the ground for years, notably in UN backed National Parks and and State Forests, but not only.
      * A reluctance of “green” employees in councils to issue land clearing and back burning permits to land owners.
      * Climate emergency politics.

      121

    • #
      R.B.

      A recent inquiry found that a much greater area that was burnt was started by lightning than humans, in NSW. They compared the area of grass fires burnt in western NSW that is huge every year, and the most was in the mid 70s, as Jo posted here, with the area of forests burnt near people – started by people- east of the dividing range. A deliberate attempt to stick everybodies head in the sand. It was the worst year ever because of activists.

      50

    • #
      el gordo

      The wildfires in the UYS and bushfires in Australia were both exacerbated by ‘blocking’ caused by meandering jet streams.

      33

    • #
      GlenM

      Indeed, bugger all fires this year as expected. Dominant easterly flow rather than hot NWesterlies. Try and tell that to the left mob and they won’t believe you.

      10

    • #

      The global wildfire trend is available at the link below and this is what they said in mid-December 2020:

      https://atmosphere.copernicus.eu/how-wildfires-americas-and-tropical-africa-2020-compared-previous-years

      “2020 has been a year of extremes when it comes to wildfires. The Arctic and US saw record high levels of activity during the summer, whilst Canada and tropical Africa saw record lows. These lows have contributed to 2020 so far being one of the least active years since Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS*) records begin in 2003.”

      50

  • #
    another ian

    Latest Pointman

    “Collaborators”

    https://thepointman.wordpress.com/2021/02/16/collaborators/

    Have words like Quisling been banished yet?

    20

  • #
    Sceptical Sam

    Their ABC pays Blood Money to Insurgence USA activist

    John Sullivan – the founder of a left-wing activist group – received US$2,500 from their ABC for his footage of Trump supporter Ashli Babbitt being shot at the U.S. Capitol.

    Full story here:

    https://thenationalpulse.com/breaking/media-paid-sullivan-for-capitol-footage/

    The 18-page affidavit reveals that Sullivan allegedly incited violence by exclaiming “we gotta get this s**t burned” and “it’s our house mother****ers.”

    That’s their ABC.

    Bet you don’t see it on their ABC.

    180

  • #
    another ian

    Stock up time for beer and nibbles

    “HotAir: Cuomo has begun threatening his Democratic allies to keep them from turning on him in the nursing-home scandal engulfing his administration”

    http://www.smalldeadanimals.com/2021/02/17/flu-fighters/

    60

  • #
    Neville

    Here’s a quote from Shellenberger ( latest IPCC expert reviewer) and Dr Hansen ( former head of NASA GISS) about the unbelievable safety of Nuclear power. Of course most of our energy around the world comes from FFs ( 80+%) and there has to be higher numbers of deaths from those sources.

    But don’t forget that countries like China now have a very high percentage of their total energy from coal ( 67%) while the USA only derives about 17% of their T energy from coal. But China at 76 is now close to the first world average life expectancy of about 81 and that recent big increase has only occurred when coal usage has surged. So therefore I know Shellenberger and Dr Hansen are not telling us the full story about the benefits of FFs.

    Here’s their quotes + graphs about energy and safety from the different sources of base-load power. Dilute S&W power are a dirty , unreliable, toxic environmental disaster and Energy dense power ( see graphs) are the only reliable base-load sources of energy on the planet.
    PLEASE READ THE LINK AND EVIDENCE BELOW.

    https://environmentalprogress.org/energy1

    “Bottom Line”:

    “The best energy is the smallest and densest that creates the most power for the least environmental impact. That’s nuclear energy. Only nuclear has high power density like the newest natural gas plants but zero emissions unlike fossil fuels. Nuclear’s incredible power density is the reason for its extremely small waste output, easily contained in a few cans.

    Because wind and solar require so much land and air, they expand the impact of energy production, reversing recent global trends that allow us to use less land for food and energy production in order to leave more for nature. In addition, seasonal variation guarantees that a fossil fuel backbone will always be necessary, as the leading wind and solar countries in the world have long known and prepared for. Because nuclear replaces both fossil fuels and renewables, current environmental harm from energy sprawl and future environmental harm from global warming are both mitigated. And yet human flourishing is assured”.

    110

    • #
      WXcycles

      “The best energy is the smallest and densest that creates the most power for the least environmental impact. That’s nuclear energy. Only nuclear has high power density like the newest natural gas plants but zero emissions unlike fossil fuels.

      All very pro, but not particularly honest.

      Unfortunately, nuclear is also the only electricity energy source that has created two radioactive exclusion zones (there are others too, btw) for ~300 years, plus 4 melted non-contained reactor cores today, and at least one of them (Fukushima #2) may continue to contaminate soil, ground water, and the marine environment or Japan for centuries to come, as no one can figure out how to remove these and treat them. Plus the hazard from Fukushima was that one or more fuel storage pools could easily could have caught on fire. And thank our usually under-performing god’s that it didn’t, or no one would even consider nuclear power today. You can’t just be pro something, and ignore countervailing facts which show that it’s low risk usually, but you are in deep trouble if you do get problems.

      Fukushima radiation exclusion zone map:
      http://maptd.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/fukushima-ground-radiation.jpg

      Chernobyl radiation exclusion zone map:
      https://media.gettyimages.com/photos/map-of-the-30km-chernobyl-zone-showing-terrestrial-density-of-239-picture-id80216627?s=594×594

      Personally I’d stick to coal, as it is not a pollutant, just a flammable rock that emits the stuff life loves, stored solar energy, and plant food. And it’s far cheaper, less complex, vastly less clean up cost, with much less risk of such a scale of environmental damage, material loses and human exclusion on health grounds.

      And I’m not even anti-nuclear.

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        Nadia bin Du Natan

        Bit of a shame to be wasting all that coal though. In the future we may be able to enhance it with thorium energy and pull a lot of fissionable materials out of it. I’d rather stop exporting it and keep it to ourselves.

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        Neville

        WX cycles I agree that coal is the only choice for OZ at the moment, but Nuclear is still very safe IMHO.
        S&W are a dirty, toxic disaster and the entire mess has to be cleaned up and replaced about every 20 years and FOREVER.

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        • #
          el gordo

          This is the same rubbish we get time and time again, you are a lukewarmer peddling nuclear power. Oz will not go down that path.

          17

        • #
          el gordo

          ‘Companies that are planning new nuclear units are currently indicating that the total costs (including escalation and financing costs) will be in the range of $5,500/kW to $8,100/kW or between $6 billion and $9 billion for each 1,100 MW plant.’

          Nuclear Power Plant Construction Costs – Synapse Energy …

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        • #
          WXcycles

          I think you are right Neville, safe modular micro-nuclear looks very promising.

          10

      • #
        Frost Giant Rebellion

        The way I look at it, if we are thinking of energy in terms of centuries and not decades, we can afford to be wasteful with thorium, but not with coal. Coal may be expensive to get in two hundred years. We need that coal energy for two more updated generations of coal plants … but thereafter if we are not turning it into liquid, and relying more on thorium for electricity, we have been wasteful and promiscuous with our hydrocarbon paternity.

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        Sceptical Sam

        The Fukushima issue was not a result of nuclear power. It was a result of incompetent modelling of likely tsunami impact, and an unstable geology.

        Australia is, geologically speaking, very stable. Built in the right place, tsunami threats would be no problem.

        The construction of a couple of liquid fluoride thorium reactors would see Australia energy drought-proofed for generations to come. We might even see a resurgence of the manufacturing industry.

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        Matthew

        Anyone who builds nuclear reactors in a known major fault zone and puts their backup generators 50 feet from the beach is somehow asking for trouble.

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        Chrism

        Coal spreads more radioactivity into the biosphere than Chernobyl or Fukushima

        10

      • #
        William Astley

        I totally agree. We are stuck at the childish talk about how much will do or do not ‘like’ ‘nuclear’ power, ignoring the fact of past problems and ignoring the reasons why people do not trust the nuclear industry or/and our government to keep us safe. After Three Mile island, congress started an investigation into PWR and BWR.

        We do not need cheerleaders for nuclear power. In every other industry except in the nuclear industry the optimum design is found. Why is it taking so long to ‘fix’ the nuclear industry? And the green scams do not work.

        Pressure fuel rod, water fission reactors are expensive and dangerous, because of the engineering problems that come with that design. That design (fuel rods and water coolant) is not the solution.

        This is the engineering problem that makes fission reactors dangerous. When a fission reactor is shutdown (fission stopped), it continues to produce heat (roughly 7% of thermal output) for about 48 hours, as the very short lived radioactive products decay.

        PWR and BWR are cooled by flowing water. If cooling water flow stops, the water boils and the water cooling system fails.

        When the water boils, the water cooling system fails, some of the 50,000 fuel rods melt and the super hot fission products melt through the 10-inch-thick, pressure vessel, that operates at 90 atmospheres. PWRs are the Largest pressure vessel in the world.

        If pressure is lost (vessel cracks, a pump casing fails, a cooling valve failed closed, the cooling pumps stop working, and so on), the water boils, the fuel rods melt, and the high radiation from the fuel rods, breaks down the water, to make large amounts of explosive H2 and O2 which will in all cases explode, at the high temperature and pressure in the reactor. That is why fuel rod, water cooled reactor require a containment building. To contain the explosion that, that design is prone to.

        A typical PWR/BWR contains 50,000 thin wall zircon fuel rods. A third of the fuel rods must be replaced every 2 1/2 years. The zircon if it is exposed to air will breakdown releasing the radioactive noble gases that have produced during fission and causing a hydrogen explosion. The fuel rods are expensive engineered products. Uranium is not expensive. Fuel rods are expensive. The US does not have a nuclear reactor business. It has a fuel rod business.

        The US is running very old (40 years old) BWRs/PWRs to make money for the fuel rod producing companies.

        This is a video explanation of an optimized liquid fuel fission reactor design. It operates at atmospheric pressure and has no fuel rods. It cannot exploded. It is a fission toaster that produces heat. No possible explosions.

        No possible radiation leaks. The molten salt reactor does not require power or flowing water to cool. It is walk away safe, in event of loss of all control/power and/or human operators. The molten salt stays in the reactor and the reactor is located in a below ground vault, that is covered with a thick cement pad to protect against airplane attacks. An explosive attack on the vessel itself would kill those in the vault and leave the radioactive salt in the vault. This is safest, cheapest possible fission reactor design. And it is basically a copy of design that was built and tested in the US 50 years ago.

        The IMSR (Integral Molten Salt Reactor) 440W reactor is roughly 12 feet by 24 feet and can be trucked to site. It has a lifetime of seven years, at which time it will be drained and replaced with a new IMSR. The old vessel is not high level radioactive source. It can be trucked to below ground long term storage. No long term issues. The old molten salt is stored in thick wall air cooled vessels.

        The life time of the IMSR is limited to seven years, because that is the life of the small, carved graphite core of the reactor. If temperature limits are exceeded in the reactor, the graphite core will crack and pieces fall to the bottom of the reactor, stopping the fission reaction in the reactor. The graphite core is required to slow the neutrons down to enable the fission reaction to occur with 5% enriched uranium.

        Comment: A fast fission reactor does not require a moderator as it uses 20% enrich uranium. The problem with a fast, fuel rod fission reactor is if coolant is lost/fails, the fuel rods melt and there can be a dirty fission explosion. That is not possible in commercial fission reactors as they are limited to 5% enriched uranium which regardless of failure cannot produce a fission explosion.

        The tiny IMSR can contains six heat exchangers and six small screw pumps to increase circulation in the small vessel. In a PWR reactor the dangerous radioactive gases accumulate in the 50,000 thin wall tubes, some of which crack releasing radiation in the cooling water and out in to environment.

        The Integral Molten Salt reactor, the reactor salt does not leave the reactor. Heat is transferred via a heat exchanged which is in the reactor. A second short salt link, with the same salt as is used in the reactor takes the heat to a second heat exchanger which uses standard solar salts which are used in every heat application. The standard salt is then used to transfer the fission reactor heat, as far as mile from the reactor, via the standard salt to a third heat exchanger which is used to transfer the heat to water to produce steam to make electricity

        The radioactive noble gases float up to the space on top of the IMSR reactor and are removed continually and stored in thick wall pressure vessels and later disposed of safely.

        This company has three sites selected to install the new IMSR and is currently waiting as the US nuclear regulatory agency reviews, their design.

        Terrestrial IMSR Good Summary 11 minutes

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-MIypP_uBSA

        The optimum fission reactor was tested and built 50 year ago.

        The optimum fission reactor design:

        1) Does not require a containment building to contain explosions, it operates at atmospheric pressure. The Uranium is contained in a salt that is absolutely stable. There is no water to cause chemical explosions. There are no possible chemical explosions or pressure explosions. The liquid melts at 400C and boils at 1400C. The reactor operates at 700C.

        2) It is simple, small (can be trucked to site 440 MW unit), and can be massed produced in any technical country.

        3) It operates at 600C (47% thermal efficiency) rather than 315C (36% thermal efficiency, 315C is the highest possible temperature for a PWR) opening up trillion of dollars of heat applications. The standard heat source for industrial application is natural gas systems that operate at 600C.

        4) It is six times more fuel efficient because it uses liquid fuel rather than fuel rods and cannot blow up or melt down because it uses liquid fuel. It produces 6 times less long life radioactive waste. Fuel rod reactors require three times more uranium in them that the IMSR because the zircon cladding on the fuel rods and the supports to hold the 50,000 fuel rods absorbs neutrons.

        5) It has no exothermic reactions (it uses only one liquid that is safe in any operating mode) including loss of power or loss of controls to the reactor. It is walk away safe because it can be passively cooled using convection without pumps.

        6) It is sealed so it is possible to have zero radiation leaks

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          Peter C

          Lots of information there William, thank you.

          What about the corrosive effects of high temperature radioactive molten salt? Is containment a problem?

          00

  • #
    Neville

    BTW that Shellenberger link above has horizontal arrows to pan through vast numbers of graphs and all types of data on energy around the world. PLEASE check out the data.
    And I do trust his sources today, but wouldn’t have trusted him a few years ago when he was in his FULL ON left wing extremist mode helping out the Obama, Biden donkeys. And of course their clueless BS merchant friend and so called SCIENCE adviser Holdren.

    Thanks again to Dr Pielke jnr for exposing these donkeys and today he and Shellenberger work closely together trying to expose the mitigation fra-d and con tricks. And both have recently testified before Congress for the Republican party.

    30

  • #
    Neville

    Nuclear power is very safe and very reliable and Dr Hansen tells us that it has saved about 1.8 mil lives compared to FFs.
    But how many MORE lives have been saved because we’ve now moved into an era of much higher life Exp of about 72 for the 7.8 bn people around the world?
    And don’t forget that we’ve seen an increase of 4.1 bn people since 1970 and all much healthier and wealthier as well + urban living has increased around the globe.
    Yet AOC and Greta tell us we only have a few years to live and both + DEMS are urging Biden to declare a Climate EMERGENCY ASAP.
    Just unbelievable but true. OH and FF energy is still above 80% of world TOTAL energy.

    30

  • #
    TdeF

    Facebook has just banned Australian news content. So they have joined the Chinese Communist Party in banning (‘cancelling’) Australia. The Chinese government also now believes our universities are second rate, which is convenient with the borders closed anyway. And of course Wu Flu came on a frozen chook planted by the US army. And who believes the US election was not rigged by the same people?

    Facebook, Google, Amazon, Microsoft, Apple may have to face a commercial storm they could not have believed. They are not a government but rich opportunists who may go the way of the East India Company faced with country level blockades. And only geriatric Joe to protect them.

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    • #
      WXcycles

      Facebook has been banned from my PC, phone, mind and life, since its inception so I’m OK with not being impacted at all.

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  • #
    Neville

    David Middleton tells the truth about the Texas energy grid collapse and it certainly wasn’t due to the collapse of FF + Nuclear generation.
    And he supplies the graph data to prove it from the suppliers for Feb.

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2021/02/17/the-day-after-tomorrow-ercot-fail-edition/

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  • #
    Furiously curious

    No one seems to ever mention covid deaths in Australia anymore. That’s quite strange, as we really love cases. I looked it up. Since 20/10/20 we have had 4 deaths. Since 30/11/20 we have had 1. Since 29/12/20 we have had zero 0 none. Oh the terror! What about banning rock fishing?
    And also no one is mentioning that vaccines are not a cure. People are still going to catch it. — “Who cares. There’s money in vaccines.”

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    • #
      wal1957

      Now you’ve jinxed us!
      Someone will sneeze and we’ll be put in lockdown again!

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      yarpos

      For reasons only known to Channel 9 when we watch the Open Tennis here in VIC its part of a stream for QLD. Last nigh their was some smarmy talking head talking about the Governments vaccine plans and how they will “keep every Queenslander safe” They really do thrive on BS.

      80

      • #
        Tilba Tilba

        On the Gold Coast at them moment (soon to return to Dan Andrews Land) – and the tennis broadcast is all Up the Putty here too – primarily because of the one-hour time difference – but not all networks put all their programs on a one-hour delay. It can confuse the holidaying digger.

        Speaking of Up the Putty – I was not impressed by the Iron Curtain Sheila (Muchova) getting a “medical time-out” because her “head was spinning” when down 0-6, 0-2. Sure looked more like a “tactical time-out”.

        60

        • #
          Nadia bin Du Natan

          You are not a bad lefty you know. You are not even illogical. Its just that you are as gullible as anyone can be.

          Don’t go back to that Victorian Mordor. Stay on the Gold Coast. You got away. You don’t go back there voluntarily. Not if you don’t need to.

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          • #
            Tilba Tilba

            Don’t go back to that Victorian Mordor. Stay on the Gold Coast. You got away. You don’t go back there voluntarily. Not if you don’t need to.

            We must – MsT can earn a motza every day relief teaching, and while she wishes to do so, we return. Melbourne is an excellent city to adapt to – but being an old Sydney boy, I do miss proper football.

            Besides – the Gold Coast is entering its wet season (Feb-April) – not its best time.

            20

        • #
          yarpos

          “Up the Putty” havent heard that for a decade or several

          9 has probably the worst use interface in the history of streaming , setting aside the QLD thing, the good news is the stream is very solid with nary a glitch

          20

          • #
            Hanrahan

            It certainly is an old saying. I assume I learnt it from Dad [am I allowed to use such gender specific nouns today?] who was a Great War survivor.

            Today’s kinder kids use worse language than our soldiers did in either war. My Dad never swore, nor did I ’til I went to a boarding school.

            20

    • #
      David-of-Cooyal-in-Oz

      At last there is an article with some measure of precision about the much touted vaccines:
      ” Some worry the AstraZeneca vaccine has an efficacy of about 70 per cent compared with the Pfizer vaccine’s 94 per cent. What is lost in these comparisons is that both are highly protective, virtually 100 per cent against severe disease, hospitalisation and death. So, even if you should get a breakthrough infection after vaccination, it will likely be at worst a milder infection which can be managed at home. ”
      The popular IPCC term “highly likely” is used to define the vaccines’ value in preventing spread of the disease by a vaccinated person.

      From today’s SMH, p25:
      https://www.smh.com.au/national/worried-about-the-vaccine-don-t-be-we-will-be-well-protected-20210215-p572i1.html?btis

      Seems to me we can do as well, maybe better with just vitamin D??
      And way back in March Dr Zelenko described his approach as: ” Don’t die, don’t go into ICU, don’t go into hospital”, and achieved that with his protocol based on early treatment with zinc and HCQ. And he included vitamin D.
      Cheers
      Dave B

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        Klem

        Virtually every cold and flu season the same thing happens, our top health officials encourage everyone to get a flu shot because this years new vaccines have 95% efficacy. But the following year they will review the results and conclude that last years vaccine was only about 60% effective. Then they will tell us this years vaccine is 95% efficacy all over again. It’s like clockwork every flu season. They should be ashamed of themselves.

        Our health officials lost their credibility years ago, but the MSM praise them every year like they are our heroes and saviors.

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    David Maddison

    Here is a selection of Tweets from Leftist “intellectuals” about Rush Limbaugh’ s passing. Absolutely disgraceful, but I wouldn’t think of anything better from a Leftist.

    https://www.dailywire.com/news/here-are-the-professors-disparaging-rush-limbaughs-passing

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    • #
      yarpos

      as usual it says more about them than anything at all about Limbaugh.

      160

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      Tilba Tilba

      I seem to recall hundreds – if not thousands – of fairly disrespectful comments about George Floyd too, after his murder.

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      • #
        Nadia bin Du Natan

        That was a false flag operation, designed to generate maximum division.

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      • #
        robert rosicka

        Exactly what did the Jury decide Tilba I seem to forget ?

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        Hanrahan

        George Floyd was a seriously flawed character who likely died a self inflicted death. There is no equivalence.

        Remember “Ding dong the witch is dead” when Maggie Thatcher died?

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        James Murphy

        By all accounts, George Floyd took the Fentanyl himself, so how is that murder?

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      • #
        Tilba Tilba

        That was a false flag operation, designed to generate maximum division.

        LOL. George Floyd held the cop’s knee to his throat, then held his breath until he expired!

        I love the way that everything that embarrasses or exposes the right-wing is called a “false flag”. It’s hilarious – easy Get Out Of Jail Free card.

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    • #
      Maptram

      Sarah Parcak, an anthropology professor at the University of Alabama-Birmingham, said she hoped that Limbaugh suffered until his last breath. “When a terrible piece of scum who caused immeasurable harm to millions dies, there is no sympathy,” Parcak said. “Only a desire that they suffered until their last breath.”

      It’s not clear whether Parcak was referring to the millions who died when she said “Only a desire that they suffered until their last breath” or whether she was referring to Limbaugh using the non gender specific language of the left.

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      • #
        Annie

        Pretty unpleasant, whoever was meant.

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      • #
        John R Smith

        This is why I’m afraid the Left is on the way to creating a political cleansing like something out of Tudor England.
        Their politics is a religious fervor causing them to say stuff like this.
        Here in the US, ‘insurrection’ equals heresy.
        (Even though we use to celebrate insurrection every July 4 with BBQs.)
        I expect some high tech/AI version of the Rack.
        Maybe when can call it ‘the Zuck’.

        50

    • #
      James

      Does working in academia cause people to become miserable and psychotic? It would seem that way.

      40

  • #
    Susan Fraser

    https://babylonbee.com/news/the-babylon-bee-guide-to-being-woke

    Any one up for satire? Wander over to babylonbee.com

    ‘Headline news’ relevant to harsh covid lockdown measures include: “France wants the Statue of Liberty Back”

    …and, if we’re not sure what ‘woke’ behaviour looks like, there’s the handy Babylon-Bee Guide to being woke”

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  • #
    RickWill

    Rio Tinto is paying a record dividend of $7.16 per share – $9bn back to shareholders.

    With iron ore at USD162/tonne it is simply a licence to print money, which appears they are doing.

    Each wind turbine uses about 100t of steel per MW. I figure a gas turbine is almost the reverse with 100MW for a tonne of steel. Of course the turbine needs a pipeline for its fuel supply while the wind turbine gets energy out of the air but both require power lines to accept their output. And the wind turbine needs a lot more concrete than steel.

    If you are a Rio or BHP shareholder you would be nuts to not back these steel consuming monsters.

    I think Texans are right now wishing they had a few coal fired plants and a decent pile of coal to draw down. Their 30GW of wind turbines comprise about 3Mt of steel. Right now 3Mt of coal would be looking a lot sweeter.

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    • #
      Tilba Tilba

      Each wind turbine uses about 100t of steel per MW. I figure a gas turbine is almost the reverse with 100MW for a tonne of steel. Of course the turbine needs a pipeline for its fuel supply while the wind turbine gets energy out of the air but both require power lines to accept their output. And the wind turbine needs a lot more concrete than steel.

      This is selective use of information. You need to compare the cost of wind turbines v the cost of NG power stations over a long period (the life of the infrastructure). The cost of fuel and the environmental (AGW) costs must be included too.

      The widespread (and prolonged) outages in Texas during this extreme event were caused mostly by the failure of NG power stations at low temps, PLUS a huge spike in demand because of the cold.

      There is no clear evidence that coal-fired power stations would not have failed either … and more importantly, are they able to operate economically (let alone environmentally) for the 99% of any decade when Texas is a warm place with far less peak load?

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      • #
        Geoff Sherrington

        TT,
        We absolutely know about the engineering as reliability of coal fired plants. If they failed in Texas, likely that some silly green rules were applied, like mandated use of electrical heating to remove ice, when gas was used before, but burning gas gives CO2 therefore evil.
        You have a major logic problem when you opine that AGW costs must be included in cost comparisons. It is the inclusion of AGW considerations that has caused the Texas unreliability. It would not have been nearly so severe if experienced engineers were allowed to design and use equipment that they wanted, not stuff forced on them by the woke. Like, every engineer knows solar panels are useless when snow covers them. Geoff S

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        • #
          Curious George

          The AGW cost is best estimated by an extrapolation of the actually incurred AGW costs. So far all zeros to my best knowledge.

          01

      • #
        yarpos

        No clear evidence that something might have happened with something that isnt there is really what you want to run with?

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  • #
    Frost Giant Rebellion

    There may be a mis-apprehension that, that when the little ice age comes, it comes on slowly and is something that you might decide to warn your grandchildren about. For some reason the little ice age isn’t apparent right away. I’d wonder if we can purloin Zoe’s understanding of the earth as a proto-star, and independent heat generator, to explain the delay factor.

    But once the cold times come they come on very strong. Perhaps in Australia, a continent somewhat glacier-free, this is not an immediately threatening idea. But for the people of Europe the last time around, it was about as scary as could be imagined. And not a slow-acting thing at all. Not just a matter of putting on another layer of clothing. Its not the weather any more. Its climate change. I don’t mean CO2-release. I mean CLIMATE-CHANGE climate-change. Actual climate-change independent of the Orwellian leftist language.

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    • #
      el gordo

      The LIA started in 1260 AD, so we have to go back to see what happened and prepare ourselves for what is coming. Large icebergs in the North Atlantic would be the first cab off the rank.

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        Nadia bin Du Natan

        When the glaciers came off the mountains you would have people praying in front of the great white wall of ice to try and get it to stop. But it would snap trees on the way down then pulverise whole towns. Maybe this time around we will just cut it up into pieces and transport it for cheap refrigeration.

        If our understanding of glacial periods is correct, and supposing there hasn’t been a recent polar shift to confuse the mainstream on this matter …. then what we would expect is one little ice age after another, with a more than 50% chance of the next one being worse than the last. But we may be able to avoid a full blown glacial period simply by making sure the Gulf Stream is not obstructed.

        Water is more viscous when cold and this might explain why cold periods are easy to get into and hard to get out of. The mathematical formula associated with Stefan Boltzmann’s law is one of the few formulae attempting to describe nature that works to the fourth power. What this implies is that to spread joules out is to retain them. So we are really going down this time, and its pretty inconceivable that we can climb out of the cold spell clear to the end of the century.

        10

    • #
      Kalm Keith

      “understanding of the earth as a proto-star, ”

      Where did that come from?

      The Earth has residual energy in the last section to cool: the core.

      30

      • #
        Frost Giant Rebellion

        Residual cooling hey? See how you fall back on NASA creation myths?

        01

        • #
          Kalm Keith

          There might be a little bit of nuclear power there but a “proto star”.

          Things are getting out of hand.

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          • #
            Frost Giant Rebellion

            Only if you are sticking with a NASA fantasy involving hydrogen self-segregation and hydrogen self-compression. If you just let these cosmological bedtime stories lodge into your psyche then there really can be no progress.

            10

  • #
    David Wojick

    My latest article:
    https://www.cfact.org/2021/02/16/american-k-12-science-education-gone-bad/

    Something besides Texas, Covid and Biden. Science education is taking a sharp left turn. In the US at least so I wonder about elsewhere? Stuff like this tends to spread.

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  • #
    robert rosicka

    Not sure if Flannery knows but lake Argyle has risen 1.8 metres in 10 days , still a lot of run off in the catchment and the monsoons are still hanging around so here’s hoping it gets high enough to spill which is roughly another 6 metres.

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    • #
      Hanrahan

      The east coast monsoons have been a nothing burger. But as usual the Burdekin Falls Dam is overflowing.

      We really do need the Hells Gate Dam.

      70

      • #
        Dennis

        We need the Coalition’s, CSIRO endorsed, extension of the Ord River Irrigation Area from WA through the NT and into NQ with dams on all the rivers to harvest wet season rains but not capture all of the rainfall.

        A new export food bowl the area of Western Europe attracting new towns and cities, airports, railways, roads, support businesses and jobs.

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        • #
          Kalm Keith

          That’s what would be great for Australia and Australians.

          The reality is that there are politicians in Australia.

          Based on past performance? The chances are?

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        • #
          robert rosicka

          Yes Dennis and Keith truly a visionary project ,we just lack a leader with vision .

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          • #
            Dennis

            Robert, what it always boils down to is numbers in Parliament.

            The Abbott Government election campaign in 2013 included the new irrigation farming project, together with then Queensland Premier Newman the Labor Queensland “wild rivers” legislation was overturned, that prohibited any development of the NQ rivers, but then the Turnbull Government took over and lost interest. Well, had no interest, after all new farming land and dams are not UN Agenda 30 friendly projects and the socialist globalists, Coalition version LINO and NINO, do only what the UN demands.

            The Morrison Government is handicapped by LINO and NINO MPs and having such a slim majority in both Houses of Parliament. The Greens and the Union Labor side won’t support nation building.

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            • #
              robert rosicka

              Agree Dennis , they keep increasing the migrant flow but forget about the need for water until we have a dry year and even then it’s blamed on CAGW .

              50

            • #
              James

              Australia is a pretend democracy. If the PM does not follow the NWO, then Newspoll generates 52 weeks of bad polling with the help of the Australian Bolshevik Corp and they get replaced!

              40

        • #
          Hanrahan

          Qld does not need WA water and none of the east coast rivers flood regularly, the Mighty Burdekin excepted, that’s a myth that lives in the minds of southerners.

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          • #
            robert rosicka

            QLD might not need it but inland NSW and Vic even wouldn’t say no to extra water .

            30

            • #
              Hanrahan

              That’s NSW and Vic’s problem. Let the project live or die on THEIR case. Don’t saddle us with costs and don’t steal our water.

              10

          • #
            Tilba Tilba

            Queensland west of the Divide has had a lot of drought over the last century – there is always somewhere between Toowoomba and Camooweal that is bone dry.

            40

            • #
              Hanrahan

              How do you think that can be prevented in the future?

              Details about WHICH river is to be diverted and how and how much are required.

              10

              • #
                OldOzzie

                THE BRADFIELD SCHEME

                The Greatest Scheme of All

                Dr. J. J. C. Bradfield CMG D.Sc. M.E. (1867-1943), born at Sandgate, Queensland and educated at Ipswich and the University of Sydney, designed the Sydney Harbour Bridge; was the consulting engineer on the Story bridge across the Brisbane River; helped design and plan the University of Queensland; engineered the building of Sydney’s electric railway system; and was deputy Chancellor of the University of Sydney from 1942 until his death.

                He was associated with a great range of engineering work including the Cataract Dam near Sydney and the Burrinjuck Dam, which formed part of the Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area.

                But Dr. Bradfield is possibly better known for something that he did not build, his magnificent plan for the watering of the inland Australia which he presented to the Queensland government in 1938, following a lifelong interest in irrigation and water conservation.

                The arid interior of the Australian continent and intermittent flow of the vast river system that drains towards Lake Eyre have acted as a challenge to many men with dreams who sought to make the dry lands blossom.

                These dreams have two recurring features… the filling of the dry bed of Lake Eyre in the centre of Australia in the hope that evaporation from the water surface would increase rainfall in the vicinity, and the diversion of Queensland coastal rivers to feed the watercourses of the inland system.

                Dr. Bradfield’s plan involved diverting the waters of the upper reaches of the Johnson, Tully, Herbert, Burdekin and Flinders Rivers one into the other, then into the Thompson, thence into Lake Eyre, refilling it and, with evaporation, creating a climate change and rainfall throughout inland Australia.

                The Lake Eyre Basin has a total catchment of approximately one fifth of Australia’s landmass (1.17 million square kilometres), with an average annual rainfall of no more that 230 millimetres… less than 10 inches.

                On the other hand, the tropical north-eastern section of Queensland is a land of many rivers draining an area of 970,000 square kilometres with an average rainfall of 790 millimetres. It contains the highest rainfall areas in Australia.

                It was such an obvious waste of Australia’s most valuable asset, WATER, that drove Dr. Bradfield to spend some of his later years riding through Queensland’s “super wet” belt, surveying his dream.

                On horseback, and armed with only the most basic of surveying equipment, Dr. Bradfield fought his way through the dense rainforests of the mountains behind Innisfail and Ingham, to come up with the design for his grand plan. Such was his skill that later engineers and surveyors could find very little fault with the overall concept of his plan, and the sites he picked for his dams.

                AUSTRALIA’S WATER FUTURE

                A NATIONAL WATER GRID

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                el gordo

                ‘How do you think that can be prevented in the future?’

                A pipeline from Lake Argyle to western Queensland and NSW should drought proof the food bowl.

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              Harves

              What? You mean there was drought before Michael Mann??😳

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          Kalm Keith

          If a large proportion of the Australian social security budget was allocated to this project and appropriate incentives attached to get people to go there, we might go forward to a happier land.

          Something like post WW11 where people worked on government projects and felt good about it.

          KK

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          Tilba Tilba

          A new export food bowl the area of Western Europe attracting new towns and cities, airports, railways, roads, support businesses and jobs.

          LOL. I sincerely invite you to go and spend say Jan-Feb in Kununurra Katherine, Borroloola, or Normanton. The weather is unspeakable – hellishly hot and often suffocating in humidity … with very little relief over the whole year. It is awful, and unattractive.

          There are very good reasons why almost all that country is uninhabited by whitefellas – and why it will remain so – especially if global warming pushes it up a degree or two. And the Ord River Scheme took decades to develop, and there are still very few products that can grow up there economically – without being artificially subsidised.

          All that country is only marginal for cattle – and little else.

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            Dennis

            Have you visited Kununurra WA and the Ord River Irrigation Area that would be the foundation for expansion to the east?

            Are there no crops grown in Asia Pacific outside of Australia?

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              Tilba Tilba

              Have you visited Kununurra WA and the Ord River Irrigation Area that would be the foundation for expansion to the east?

              Indeed – been there a few times.

              It is very impressive to see vast fields of strawberries and melons, and laser-straight irrigation lines, but there are huge downsides, such as the ones I have already noted, plus bugs in monocultures, distance to markets, limited soil fertility, and more.

              At one point there was a lunatic plan to develop huge sugar plantations heading east from the Ord … at a time when sugar outside of the tropical poor nations is a sunset industry, and the price is permanently low.

              There have been other suggestions to grow certain trees to provide concentrated cattle feed, biomass for biofuels, and similar boondoggles.

              It is not the part of the world to artificially create stuff. And nobody would willingly live there.

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            robert rosicka

            Either you haven’t been to any of these areas Tilba or your very very soft , best time to be there because the Barra are on the chew and there’s very few nomads not to mentions caravan parks are cheap off season.
            We want the water not the produce .

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              Tilba Tilba

              Get back to me when you’ve had three months in Katherine say October onwards.

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                robert rosicka

                Son was born and bred a territorian, but we love Karumba and Just North of Broome and spend a bit of time there .
                Humidity you get used to within two days and I actually like it , as I said only time to go fishing for Barramundi is during the wet .

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              Tilba Tilba

              Humidity you get used to within two days and I actually like it , as I said only time to go fishing for Barramundi is during the wet.

              With more than ten years in Darwin, I didn’t mind the humidity, but it’s not for everyone. And the band from say Derby in the west to Townsville in the east is far worse for heat – it’s punishing.

              Yes – holidaying in the Wet Season can be good, if you are on or near the sea … but Kununurra and the stretch across to Normanton are NOT on the sea, and that region will never support agriculture, let alone cities.

              And the cost of diverting water is huge. Half the freshwater in Australia that flows to the sea goes down the Fitzroy River – but there is no feasible or economic way to capture it and send it to a decent region.

              East of Kununurra there are no decent rivers anyway.

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            Hanrahan

            There will always be a market for grass fed beef as the healthy alternative to lot fed beef.

            I don’t think it would take massive amounts of water to allow graziers to keep stock alive during drought. The cycle of destocking, even breeders, and then buying back at higher prices when the drought breaks kills the industry. providing enough water to keep breeders on the property would be a godsend.

            If supplying individual graziers with water is impractical having irrigated farmland which can provide locally grown hay would help. Transport costs of bailed hay is a killer.

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              Tilba Tilba

              There will always be a market for grass fed beef as the healthy alternative to lot fed beef.

              Indeed … we love grass-fed free-range beef. If you’ve ever travelled in America, the steaks they call “tender” are mushy – like eating marshmallows, or perhaps a bit of burnt pillow.

              I agree with the remainder of your post. Although I used to meet the old Territory cattlemen who reckoned they could run a viable cattle station on 3″ a year … I dunno …

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              • #
                Hanrahan

                Although I used to meet the old Territory cattlemen who reckoned they could run a viable cattle station on 3″ a year … I dunno …

                He’s prolly right but the problem is, in the physical world it is only the absolutes that matter.

                A flood one year followed by a few dry years cannot be averaged, that’s a fool’s errand.

                The same holds true for power generation.

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              Nadia bin Du Natan

              The key to water in agriculture is water retention features. Swales, check dams. This sort of thing. I like that big scheme above. But it should be augmented by sculpturing the land. We can hydrate the continent if we want to.

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    Hanrahan

    What does an athlete look like? Depends on the prism you view things through I guess.

    On on hand we have 43 yr old [?] Tom Brady who has survived in a tough sport to become arguably the greatest quarterback of all time BUT he is white and once had a MAGA hat in his locker.

    On the other we have 39 yr old Serena Williams, built like a kiwi [fat a$$ed chook], a pampered tantrum thrower but with amazing longevity in a tough sport.

    The two have nothing in common but success. Who do you think is the best role model?

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    Kalm Keith

    Ping.

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    Dennis

    Extract from WUWT;

    “The Australian Federal Government’s hold on power is precarious. In the House of representatives their majority is 2 – the government holds 77 out of 151 seats. So the two members who have said they will rebel is potentially enough to stop bills being passed.

    The hold in the Senate is even more precarious – the government controls a minority of senate seats, 36 out of 76, and needs at least three allies from other parties to pass bills. Some of the usual senate allies like the One Nation senators Pauline Hanson and Malcolm Roberts are outspoken climate skeptics.

    The government might be able to get a bill passed with the help of opposition parties – but opposition politicians would demand a heavy price for their support, and it would be a huge and possibly politically fatal embarrassment for the Prime Minister to have to turn to his opponents, to overcome opposition from his own party. And of course, some opposition MPs represent coal mining districts – so the decision of what to support is just as much of a dilemma for them, as it is for the government.”

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    Geoff Sherrington

    TT,
    We absolutely know about the engineering as reliability of coal fired plants. If they failed in Texas, likely that some silly green rules were applied, like mandated use of electrical heating to remove ice, when gas was used before, but burning gas gives CO2 therefore evil.
    You have a major logic problem when you opine that AGW costs must be included in cost comparisons. It is the inclusion of AGW considerations that has caused the Texas unreliability. It would not have been nearly so severe if experienced engineers were allowed to design and use equipment that they wanted, not stuff forced on them by the woke. Like, every engineer knows solar panels are useless when snow covers them. Geoff S

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    williamx

    Facebook has now removed/banned/censored, all AUS government and media news on their platform in Australia.

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      GD

      Anyone who gets their Government news, weather news, and world political news through Facebook needs their head read.

      Just access the relevant websites, such as BoM.com.au.

      Why on Earth would you go to Facebook for this information?

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        Hanrahan

        My oldest son, a usually productive member of society, probably has never bought a paper in his life [yeah, I know “If you don’t read the paper you are uninformed. If you do you are misinformed”] he never watches TV or search widely on the net, his opinions are 100% shaped by social media. In spite of working in the mines he has a distinct green tinge.

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    Serp

    http://quadrant.org.au/opinion/victoriastan/2021/02/daniel-andrews-bad-case-of-china-envy/ is an account of the ongoing suppression of Avi Yemeni’s newsgathering efforts. It would be no surprise to discover the premier has a team working on permanently expelling this journalist from the state of Victoria.

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    Jojodogfacedboy

    Tomorrow’s the big day when the US Supreme Court confirms that Biden was Constitutionally Disqualified and President Trump is back in office.
    A couple days ago collector’s coins where issued 45th President Trump and one has General Flynn “A Real America Hero”
    Melania Trump has her First Lady Twitter account active as well.

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    Eddie

    Has the Barcelona Vitamin D study just been withdrawn from the Lancet pre-print server?

    “Abstract

    Dear Preprints with the Lancet Readers,

    We have removed this preprint due to concerns about the description of the research in this paper. This has led us to initiate an investigation into this study.

    The comments that have been posted on this preprint will remain available on this page. Please note that this comment thread is now closed to further posts.”

    https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3771318

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    Anton

    Given that virus research at molecular level is obviously close to biowarfare, I have often wondered why the USA wished to collaborate with China in this field, as it did under Obama (although Chinese safety standards were so low that the USA eventually pulled out and the French helped China complete the program). The following link suggests why: the USA wanted the results of this research, and preferred to build the necessary laboratory in China both to keep it out of sight of prying eyes in America and because the viruses best suited to the study were native to Chinese bats.

    https://www.tabletmag.com/sections/science/articles/plague-on-both-our-houses

    The work was done in Wuhan, where SARS-CoV-2 was first observed. This virus is uniquely well adapted to human-to-human transmission despite coming from animal species. These are two of several pointers to its being a laboratory creation (for gain-of-function research, as the article explains). Sequence analysis supports this conclusion. Also explicable by this claim is why Trump did not go all-out against China with an it’s-your-fault claim for compensation, and did not air publicly the molecular arguments for the artificiality of SARS-CoV-2. His uncharacteristic silence is nothing to do with the power of the USA’s China lobby or with a Chinese threat of some kind. The USA was compromised too, and the Chinese would be able to prove it from collaborative documents signed by both.

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    another ian

    Worth reading IMO

    “Why I Am a Climate Realist”

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2021/02/18/why-i-am-a-climate-realist/

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    OldOzzie

    ‘Official Socialism’ skulking beneath the cover of Covid

    Henry Ergas

    As COVID-19 hit these shores, the country’s medical bureaucrats must have felt like the members of a small and rapidly diminishing cargo cult when they finally glimpsed ships on the horizon.

    Propelled onto centre stage, obscure officials suddenly acquired a notoriety rivalling that of ex-royals. With the nation hanging in suspense, their daily reading of the tea leaves received the weight antiquity reserved for the oracle at Delphi, determining whether we could go to work, eat out or travel. And as they lurched between shutting states down and opening them again, most of us, who a year ago could scarcely pronounce “epidemiologist” (much less spell it correctly), quietly accepted their verdict, getting on with life and trusting that governments would do their best.

    No doubt, circumstances partly shaped that response. COVID-19 is potentially lethal and relatively contagious; particularly when it first appeared, there were good reasons to fear the threats it posed.

    There is, to begin with, a long-term rise in society’s aversion to risk that is apparent not just in social behaviour but in the very words we use. In effect, “security”, as it evolved from the Latin, originally referred not to the absence of risk but to its stoical acceptance as an inescapable aspect of the human condition.
    [snip]

    Kierkegaard, looking back on traditional monarchy, expressed the point succinctly: “Simply asking whether the king is a genius, with the implication that in such a case he is to be obeyed, is already lèse-majesté, for the question casts doubt on his authority.”

    [snip]
    That authoritarianism need not be of the brutal Chinese variety. On the contrary, as Tocqueville warned nearly two centuries ago, its more likely form in democracies involves the rise of “an immense, tutelary power”, which by constantly seeming “regular, provident, and caring, keeps [its citizens] irrevocably fixed in childhood, softening their wills rather than breaking them, and thereby reducing the people to a herd of timid and industrious animals, of which the government is the loving shepherd”.

    [SNIP]

    [Please don’t copy whole articles. We cannot publish them whole without permission.- Jo]

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    • #

      On the other hand:
      Life is far more worth living now than it was 150 years ago when 1 in 5 people died before they reached five. So a reassessment of risk makes a lot of sense. People in their 70s and 80s even travel the world and live the kind of life that kings couldn’t for most of history.

      I normally admire Ergas but he has little to offer here other than irrelevant discussion of government styles and personality tests. Discussing obedience, when he admits he knows nothing of scientific points, is “just so” reasoning to support an uninformed gut hunch. We don’t learn anything useful.

      Those of us who did study epidemiology know that the best way to protect freedom in a pandemic is to look at the data. That means hospitalization rates. Long term illness. Genetic risk. Transmissions. Data on cluster spreaders (can we predict the 1 in 10 who will be a supersporeader?). Research on anti-virals. Plan to prevent the lockdowns rather than wait for them and pointlessly protest too late.

      We should always question authority, we should always read the best of both sides, but if we can’t be bothered doing the homework to understand the topic then perhaps don’t write Op-Eds in national newspapers.

      Nothing will test liberty as much as war and pandemic. The answer to how much loss of freedom is justifiable will not be found in political history.

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      Tilba Tilba

      No doubt, circumstances partly shaped that response. COVID-19 is potentially lethal and relatively contagious; particularly when it first appeared, there were good reasons to fear the threats it posed.

      No Mr Ergas … I think you’re wrong. Circumstances totally shaped the response by medical experts and epidemiologists. Contrary to the rather paranoid views exhibited by Ergas and a hundred others, medical officers are appointed – and authorised to make public health calls – by legislation lawfully passed in democratic parliaments. It is their job.

      The claim of “creeping socialism” is laughable, and I also expect our Mr Ergas would be the first to scream blue murder and demand heads roll if his own kids fell sick or died as a result of neglect or inaction by state medical officers and other authorities. Some issues simply don’t have two sides to an argument.

      How these characters get a big say in the public square is a genuine mystery.

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      Hanrahan

      That’s a two year old report. As usual it has been pigeon holed.

      I like the Mitchell R. proposal, it is closer to existing infrastructure, the water could be diverted to the Black Soil Plains in W. Qld. or it could be used in its own delta area. Googleearth shows a large undeveloped delta which you would expect to be deep alluvial soil which is good for farming.

      Not mentioned is stage II of the Burdekin Falls Dam. I think there is still a lot of the Burdekin/Houghton R. deltas yet to be developed.

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        another ian

        H

        “the water could be diverted to the Black Soil Plains in W. Qld”

        For Gawd’s sake check the soil salt levels of those before you act on that

        10

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      Tilba Tilba

      The CSIRO Report talks about what is “possible” – how the economics stack up, and who’s going to pay for it … these are huge questions.

      I believe that if large-scale water diversion in the tropical northern half did stack up economically, it would have happened by now; even the Ord River Scheme has not ever repaid the cost – not close.

      Personally I think we should be looking at small-scale irrigation projects in lots of places closer to the coast – basically in every state plus the NT. I don’t think “making the desert bloom” is our destiny … we’re not tiny like Israel.

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    Hanrahan

    NYT backtracks on Officer Sicknick’s death. They are now saying that their story that he was hit with a fire extinguisher MAY not be true. Their original story was supposed to be from anonymous police sources, that too has been backtracked.

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    Harves

    I recall the usual useful fools on this forum parroting leftist talking points including that someone had been arrested for the officer’s murder.

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    greggg

    ‘Poland fights Big Tech with push to block social media censorship’

    ‘Under the new legislation, any platform that bans a user would face fines of $13.5 million unless the content is also illegal under Polish law.’

    https://www.foxnews.com/world/poland-fights-big-tech-push-block-social-media-censorship

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    another ian

    “Inconceivable”

    Check the flow diagram

    http://www.smalldeadanimals.com/2021/02/18/inconceivable/

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    williamx

    Ok friends,

    As you all well know, I am not a physicist, or for that matter a scientist.
    I have an engineering background.

    So I am asking your better minds to help inform me.

    My question is: Does planetary alignment and the gravitational effect of the planets in our solar system, affect the distance planet earth is from the sun?

    My second question is: If so, do the planets in our solar system, then have then an affect on our climate?

    My third question is: If question 1 is true, does the climate modelling take that into account?

    Please help me as I can’t find an answer anywhere.

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      robert rosicka

      William I’m none of those things either and as far as I’m aware the whole CAGW premise is based on a theory that CO2 alone is heating the planet .
      Planets I believe cause cycles in our climate and it’s the sun not CO2 that determines if we freeze or boil .

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      Nadia bin Du Natan

      William I don’t know about the planetary alignment affecting our distance from the sun. But Theodor Landscheidt used to put great stock in planetary position when making his predictions. He would relate the planets position to the position of the sun, in relation to a hypothetical “centre of gravity” of the sun and relate that to the strength of the solar wind. Theodor died in 2004 and at first people were at a bit of a loss to try and build on what he had done. But I think there has been some progress on that side of things. Others try and relate planetary alignment and comets and things to the rate at which the “solar capacitor” is being discharged.

      So yes if you wish to follow up on your thinking I would go to people who have been trying to build on Landscheidt.

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      Tilba Tilba

      The Milankovitch Cycles certainly affect climate over time-spans of many millennia. Not sure the alignment of the planets matter at all … sounds more like astrology than astronomy or climatology.

      00

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    another ian


    DID MURDOCH REALLY WANT HIS NEWS LIMITED?”

    https://richardsonpost.com/paulzanetti/20705/did-murdoch-really-want-his-news-limited/

    Looks like a “nice bloke” that Zuck

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      Tilba Tilba

      Two execrable human specimens having a stoush … thank goodness I don’t read any News media, never watch Fox News or Sky News – and don’t use Facebook.

      The Australian Government have probably been forced into the position they are now in … there are risks inherent in upsetting big tech and Murdoch.

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    Thank you Australia !

    Australian media finally breaks the silence and speaks about the obvious:
    President Joe Biden has dementia, and is not mentally fit for his job.

    https://electioncircus.blogspot.com/2021/02/australian-media-breals-silence-and.html

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      Tilba Tilba

      Yeah well … better check your sources.

      It’s not “Australian media” in any serious sense … it is failed ex-politician Cory Bernardi – a right-winger with a vanity spot on a right-wing network (Sky News).

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    another ian

    FWIW

    “This was found on another website and I was hoping the person who submitted it would do so here @ SDA. He fully deserves the credit. It’s about COVID-19.

    From Chris:
    “I posted this on Farcebook and have already had one person tell me to shut up and be happy to be a guinea pig for something that may help others even though we’re told that getting the vaccine will not do anything that a vaccine is supposed to so. I give up, bring on the asteroid because we, as a species, are just too stupid to survive”…

    IF I GET VACCINATED…
    ●”If I get vaccinated can I stop wearing a mask(s)?”
    Government: “NO”
    ●”If I get vaccinated will the restaurants, bars, schools, fitness clubs, hair salons, etc. reopen, and will people be able to get back to work like normal?
    Government: “NO”
    ●”If I get vaccinated will I be resistant to Covid?”
    Government: “Maybe. We don’t know exactly, but probably not.”
    ●”If I get vaccinated, at least I won’t be contagious to others – right?”
    Government: “NO. the vaccine doesn’t stop transmission.”
    ●”If I get vaccinated, how long will the vaccine last?”
    Government: “No one knows. All Covid “vaccines” are still in the experimental stage.”
    ● “If I get vaccinated, can I stop social distancing?”
    Government: “NO”
    ● “If my parents, grandparents and myself all get vaccinated can we hug each other again?”
    Government: “NO”
    ● “So what’s the benefit of getting vaccinated?”
    Government: “Hoping that the virus won’t kill you.”
    ●”Are you sure the vaccine won’t injure or kill me?”
    Government: “NO”
    ●”If statistically the virus won’t kill me (99.7% survival rate), why should I get vaccinated?”
    Government: “To protect others.”
    ●”So if I get vaccinated, I can protect 100% of people I come in contact with?”
    Government: “NO”
    ● “If I experience a severe adverse reaction, long-term effects (still unknown), or die from the vaccine will I (or my family) be compensated from the vaccine manufacture or the Government?”
    Government: “NO – the government and vaccine manufactures have 100% zero liability regarding this experimental drug”
    So to summarise, the Covid19 “vaccine”…
    Does not provide immunity
    Does not eliminate the virus
    Does not prevent death
    Does not guarantee you won’t get it
    Does not stop you from passing it on to others
    Does not eliminate the need for travel bans
    Does not eliminate the need for business closures
    Does not eliminate the need for lockdowns
    Does not eliminate the need for masking
    I am not anti-vaccine. I am pro-choice.
    Want the vaccine? Help yourself.
    Just don’t tell me your choice must also be my choice.”

    http://www.smalldeadanimals.com/2021/02/20/february-20-2021-reader-tips/#comment-1412811

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      Serp

      …and that’s not all.

      I want to see more Sibel Edmonds and Governor De Santis fuami.org style agitation from Florida to wind back this pointless and lethal webbing up of the population.

      Emergency powers such as Andrews wants to make permanent in Victoria need to be explicitly repealed everywhere.

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    Serp

    Just read Ross Clark’s The Denial: A satirical novel of climate change a Spectator hack’s insights into the idiocy of zero carbon; at less than two hundred pages it’s a quick and rewarding read.

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    CHRIS

    The major influence on CC is solar activity, and the various cycles this encompasses. The Earth is very lucky to exist in a very narrow band of ‘life creation’. If the Earth was just a few million kms closer or further from the Sun, or if the Sun’s radiation output were 2-3% more or less than it is now, then we would not be here…and this is what the arrogant God-Complex trash of the Church of Climatology should be aware of.

    00