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A science presenter, writer, speaker & former TV host; author of The Skeptic's Handbook (over 200,000 copies distributed & available in 15 languages).


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Advert in The Australian describes what real climate change looks like

An advert today describes the real climate change we should afraid of, discusses how past CO2 levels did not cause dangerous global warming, and extra CO2 has a smaller and smaller effect, then connects failed climate models with rising electricity bills.

Climate Study Group, Ice Age, Advert.

Click to enlarge.

The text….

Really dangerous climate change — The next ice age

Prudent Australian farmers take into account past climate events and provide for the risk of potential droughts and floods. No such past climate events have been taken into account with climate models based on theory and assumptions to predict the future. Unfortunately the predictions of  temperature from all the climate models have a record of exceeding the measured temperatures by a large margin for the last twenty years.

Model failures demonstrate the underlying theory and assumptions used are not supported by the results. This conclusion is further supported by evidence that the planet has continued to warm, with interruptions to the trend, independent of CO2 levels since the last Ice Age. For example the planet cooled from 1940 to 1976 while CO2 levels continued to rise. The absence of dangerous global warming is also relevant when past levels of CO2 were at least four times the present level.

The direct effect of higher CO2 levels as shown in the graph illustrates the diminishing global warming impact as CO2 levels increase. Climate models magnify this diminishing effect with a multiplier that results in increasing global warming.

The failure of models to predict future climate however does not support the multiplier assumption.

The dangerous global warming threat from using fossil fuels is therefore not supported either by climate models or evidence from past global climate experience.

As William Kininmonth, former Head of the National Climate Centre of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology has observed, regard for earlier climate events is required to understand the future. It is clear from past Ice Ages that the next Ice Age should be the most serious climate event for humanity. During the Ice Age 22,000 years ago there was extensive permanent ice cover up to two kilometers thick. Sea levels fell 126 metres and there was mass extinction of species.

Nor has there been an appreciation that in the past carbon and energy stored in fossil fuels was CO2 and energy from the sun absorbed by various plant forms before conversion into fossil fuels.

There was no dangerous global warming prior to this period.

Accordingly the same CO2 when released from burning fossil fuels cannot be the cause of dangerous global warming as it did not do so in the first place.

Indeed the return of CO2, a plant food, to the atmosphere will benefit the planet with improved plant and forest growth. A benefit which satellites have already detected.

Nevertheless accepting the outcome of failed climate models has brought about policies which have made Australian power unreliable and moved costs from near the lowest to near the highest in the world despite subsidies of more than $3 billion per annum.

Families are struggling to meet their rising electricity bills. Jobs are threatened with industry in difficulty due to the increased cost of electricity.

There is an urgent need to bring power costs down. To do so Australia must follow other countries that are planning and installing 1200 clean high efficiency coal fired plants.

Australian industry will face competition in the domestic and export markets from companies having the significant advantage of low cost and reliable base power from these new plants.

 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 9.3/10 (153 votes cast)
Advert in The Australian describes what real climate change looks like, 9.3 out of 10 based on 153 ratings

Tiny Url for this post: http://tinyurl.com/y7nzfnk5

243 comments to Advert in The Australian describes what real climate change looks like

  • #
    Whalehunt Fun

    At last.

    331

    • #
      Will Janoschka

      “At last.”
      At last what? This seems many times more ridiculous than the original CAGW SCAM! :-)

      236

      • #
        Ted O'Brien.

        Thanks, Will. I wondered if I was asleep still. But thanks just the same to somebody who has invested heavily in trying hard.

        12

        • #
          Will Janoschka

          If you look at the chart in the ad of CO2 effects; a chart produced by NASA Giss and endorsed by NOAA and NCAR\UCAR you will see a claimed flux in the direction of Earth’s surface at 29W/m² produced by 400ppmv of atmospheric CO2. And claim(s) that such was produced by the ModTran computer program. There is ablolutly no such flux, none, nada.
          As you can see such is used by well meaning luke-warmers trying to say it is not as bad as the Clim-catastrophe SCAMMERS claim. Nonsense! Somehow they ‘believe the scammers claim that ModTran program can somehow produce a flux value’!! It cannot do so in any way! All that ModTran can do is calculate the spectral attenuation by the airmass of the amplitude or spatial modulation (the signal) over a slant path. It can never do flux!
          This design limitation was carefully explained to James Hanson an his band at NASA Giss, but this did not go well with the political/business plan to disable the US coal industry in favor of Jimmie’s natural gas interests\investments. Now you have such accepted by near all government funded academic Meteorologists, including the luke-warmers that have no clue about this atmosphere at all. Such a menagerie of total incompetence is almost beyond belief!
          All the best!-will-

          10

  • #
    pat

    having not found a single article in The Guardian in the weeks since Marohasy/Pigeon found BoM anomalies, BoM review was ordered, & report was released, we now get two articles on today’s date…the first attacking The Australian!

    21 Sept: Guardian: Graham Readfearn: Bureau of Meteorology attacks pushed by ‘fever swamp’ of climate denial
    Rob Vertessy, who retired as the BOM’s director in 2016, has hit back at ‘time wasters’ and ‘amateurs’ who are given a forum by the Australian
    For Rob Vertessy, the attacks on his government agency became tedious and time-consuming and no less irritating because they were coming from a motivated group of “amateurs”…

    Over that time, Vertessy’s agency was under consistent attack from climate science denialists who would claim, often through the news and opinion pages of the Australian, that the weather bureau was deliberately manipulating its climate records to make recent warming seem worse than it really was.
    “From my perspective, people like this, running interference on the national weather agency, are unproductive and it’s actually dangerous,” Vertessy told me. “Every minute a BoM executive spends on this nonsense is a minute lost to managing risk and protecting the community. It is a real problem.”

    Now, the agency is under another wave of attack through the pages of the Rupert Murdoch-owned broadsheet, which is publishing claims made by Jennifer Marohasy, of the “free market” conservative thinktank the Institute of Public Affairs…

    The current non-story centres on two of the bureau’s 695 automatic weather stations (AWS). As temperatures reached -10.4C in Thredbo and Goulburn in July, a hardware card in the AWS stopped working. This event, detected by the bureau, kick-started several internal quality control processes.
    The bureau found four other hardware cards in areas where things can get chilly and replaced them. The cards should not have been used, as they could become faulty at low temperatures.
    That’s essentially it. But the Australian and the IPA and the network of climate science denial blogs have once again screamed scandal…

    So when a shock jock or a thinktank employee claims the bureau is trying to cook the books, how should the public react?
    What needs to be front of mind, Vertessy says, is that there is “virtually complete consensus on the extent to which the planet has warmed and why, since the beginning of the industrial revolution”.
    “The facts are just unequivocal because they have been replicated so many times, by so many teams, using multiple independent methods.”
    He says if the bureau “was really making a hash of managing its climate data” then it would be documented in scientific “journals and at symposia” but “that’s clearly not happening”…

    “The data absolutely confirms that we have already seen consequences from climate change, certainly in the way the climate system is behaving. There’s just zero doubt about it any more.
    “Looking into the future is of course more fraught, but that strongly suggests that we are on a very dangerous trajectory.”
    He says while making predictions of the future clearly comes with uncertainties, the planet is on “a very dangerous trajectory”…
    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/planet-oz/2017/sep/21/attacks-on-bureau-of-meteorology-pushed-by-fever-swamp-of-climate-denial-former-director-says

    21 Sept: Guardian: Michael Slezak: Former weather bureau chief says agency debilitated by climate deniers’ attacks
    Rob Vertessy says attacks such as the claim the bureau was ‘fabricating temperature records’ are dangerous and wrong
    Misleading attacks on Australia’s Bureau of Meteorology by climate deniers in the Australian are “debilitating” to the agency and limiting its ability to predict risks and protect the community, the former head of the bureau has told the Guardian…
    Vertessy: “As the costs of climate change accumulate in the years ahead, I can see that leaders of this climate change denial movement will really be seen as culpable.”…
    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/sep/21/former-weather-bureau-chief-says-agency-debilitated-by-climate-deniers-attacks

    242

    • #
    • #
      Rollo

      Vertessy told me. “Every minute a BoM executive spends on this nonsense is a minute lost to managing risk and protecting the community. It is a real problem.”

      We should be ashamed of ourselves. These hard working dedicated people are trying to save the planet whilst people on this blog make disparaging remarks about The Science.

      354

      • #
        Chris In Hervey Bay

        Hey Rollo, you forgot the sarc tag.

        202

      • #
        Leonard Lane

        Who is Vertessy?

        80

        • #
          Will Janoschka

          “Who is Vertessy?”

          One of those kicked out of the fine ASTROLOGY Guild for being a loudmouth overbearing inept local weather meteorologist rather than a competent considerate stargazer.

          121

        • #
          Rereke Whakkaro

          I assume somebody of self importance, who expects us to grovel before him, because we did not recognise his self importance. Life is tough sometimes.

          201

        • #
          D.O.

          Rob Vertessy was a director of the Bureau of Meteorology Australia. Disappeared after a vote on a new Bureau enterprise agreement was voted on, and staff in the majority said “No” to the new agreement. The enterprise agreement is still in the pipeline. The “poor” staff have now endured a wage freeze now for four years. May be the minister was not to happy with his performance as he left the bureau soon after the votes failure to gain agreement with staff. So the minister maybe did not extend his contract when it expired and selected a new person as a temporary director Vicki Middleton. Finally Dr Andrew Johnson is now the Director after the job was advertised.

          20

    • #
      Fred

      That’s why climate gate was so important it showed us how these different climate scientists colluded to make climate science a consensus of [snip "corrupt"].

      71

    • #
      scaper...

      Readfern got hammered by Monckton years ago in a debate. So badly he quit his job. The little germ!

      253

    • #
      Asp

      “Every minute a BoM executive spends on this nonsense is a minute lost to managing risk and protecting the community. It is a real problem.”
      And I always thought that the scope of the BoM was to record and collate weather information and to forecast weather. I am not aware at what point the government of Australia tasked them with ‘managing risk and protecting the community’.

      483

      • #
        Hivemind

        You’ll probably find that what they really mean is:

        “a minute lost to creating new and more inventive ways to cool the past and warm the present to create an ever increasing funding stream.”

        50

    • #
      TdeF

      Reasonable questions from informed parties who represent the people paying the billions for accurate data. Calling them amateurs is not a response. It is an emotional and contemptuous attack on a reasonable line of questioning of a public utility by members of the public and not uninformed. Then the argument from authority and ‘everybody knows’. The how dare you response is not right for an accountable body, or are they simply another ABC? Unaccountable even to themselves.

      The most outrageous event in the recent history of the BOM was the hiring of 350 full time researchers into “Climate Science” by the CSIRO? Why didn’t they just ask the BOM? Or does the minister also totally lack faith in the BOM?

      It really does need an explanation for hundreds of millions of dollars being spent on research by Australian ministers and ignoring the BOM. Then they had to form a special committee to act as liason between the two bodies. Why? Why was any of this huge waste of money necessary.

      If Climate Change was such universally agreed and settled science, why did the government even hire one person? Where were the howls of protest from the BOM on the waste of billions duplicating settled science?

      There are so many questions unanswered and we are told we should not be asking questions? That’s a licence to do as you please.

      342

    • #
      Will Janoschka

      “Marohasy/Pigeon found BoM anomalies,”

      BoM => Bureau of Meteorology!
      HA! your politicians refuse to understand that your meteorological folk (BoM) are but those dispatched (thrown out) of the useful fine astrological guild as being arrogant incompetent a**-holes! Ask your Queen! She knows.

      101

    • #
      Peter C

      The capacity of Vertesy to argue that Black is White is astounding.

      “The data absolutely confirms that we have already seen consequences from climate change, certainly in the way the climate system is behaving. There’s just zero doubt about it any more.

      As the costs of climate change accumulate in the years ahead, I can see that leaders of this climate change denial movement will really be seen as culpable.”…

      No the data does not show that. Only the adjusted data shows warming, and then only by a small amount. There is doubt in many peoples minds, especially if they are sceptical. Dr Vertesy is the one with no capacity to doubt.

      Vertesy and his ilk are causing massive costs and damage to Australians right now. Where is the culpability for that?

      121

      • #
        Manfred

        Only the adjusted data shows warming, and then only by a small amount.

        … inseparable from the centennial SD of temperature, and thereby properly fulfilling the UN definition of “climate variability” (the entirely natural variation of climate),

        The UN defines “climate change” as solely due to ALL indirect and direct anthropogenic influence. Until Gaia is purged of humanity, there is always “climate change” and an inevitable and perpetual justification for morally and economically bankrupt eco-Marxist ideological intervention.

        31

    • #
      Another Ian

      ” “As the costs of climate change accumulate in the years ahead, I can see that leaders of this climate change denial movement will really be seen as culpable.”…”

      Alternative view is that the likes of Vertessy will find themselves “like a Christian Scientist with appendicitis” (to use Tom Lehrer’s description of a predicament)

      20

  • #
    Rereke Whakaaro

    I can remember trudging to school through snow storms like that. They were dangerous times.

    If you wanted to cross the road, you were in danger of being hit by a car that couldn’t stop.

    If you decided to not cross the road, you were in danger of being hit by a car that failed to take the corner.

    If you did finally get to school, you found that most of the teachers couldn’t get there, so we had to amuse ourselves.

    So most of us managed to injure ourselves by falling over trying to play soccer in an asphalt playground that was covered in snow.

    Ah, happy days …

    252

    • #
      RoHa

      Trudging seven miles to school, and twelve miles home, no doubt. Uphill both ways.

      253

    • #
      Annie

      We used to make slides and had great fun. We also had chilblains on our toes…nasty. :(

      51

    • #
      Grant (NZ)

      Interestingly, we have been living at our current location for 16 years. In that time we have had 4 or 5 reasonable falls of snow. Each time the snow has been heavier – this year we were completely blanketed in white on 13th July. People who loved in the district in the 1960s report that there was more frequent and heavier snow back then – enough for kids at the local primary school to make a snowman that lasted more than a day. I wonder if next year I will be able to open a ski field at home.

      111

      • #
        KinkyKeith

        So, people who “loved” in the sixties had kids?

        110

      • #
        sophocles

        Give it a few more years. If you can’t within the next ten years then warming must really be here to stay.

        KK asked:

        So, people who “loved” in the sixties had kids?

        Nah. Figment of your imagination, the kids just growed.

        100

    • #
      JPN

      Rereke
      When I was growing up in Northern Ontario in the 1950s we had lots of snow each winter. That picture is probably showing just the beginnings of the snow storm, not much snow there at all. We had a week of -40 degrees weather. -40 degrees is the same in both F & C scales so I didn’t add that.
      I remember one year when we had to climb over a snow mound at the side of the road that was about 2 M. high to get to the bus on the other side. The show plow had been by and that was the result. Now that was snow.
      On another occasion, some years later the snow blower had come by and buried all the cars at the side of the road on the Naval Airbase that where I was stationed. There was jut a lump of snow here and there to show where the cars were.
      My sister said that one day a couple of years ago it reached -45 deg C.in Sudbury. Now that is cold.
      I am so happy to live on the south coast of NSW!
      Cheers.
      John

      80

    • #
      toorightmate

      Rereke,
      Did cars exist when you went to school?

      Why didn’t the dinosaur cross the road?
      Because roads hadn’t been invented.

      The sheep was stuck in the fence wires your honour.

      100

    • #
      Manfred

      Indeed RW…..you’ll be quoting Laurie Lee next, from “Cider with Rosie

      The scene that I particularly remembered was the one where Laurie’s sisters send him off for his first day at school wrapped in scarves with a hot potato in his pocket.

      I remember standing as a shivering seven year old at the bus stop with the snow to my waist, waiting for a school bus that would deliver us to the foot of a hill, after which it was one for all and all for one. Of course my mind was on other considerably more important things like the nice looking girl called Enid standing to one side. She was so nice looking I thought she deserved a kiss. The next day her very much larger than life mother also attended the bus stop accompanying her daughter. It was neither a pretty sight nor a happy moment, as I recall. Eternal hellfire and damnation don’t come close. Ahhh, for the simple times and a simple life.

      51

    • #
      Lionell Griffith

      The dangers of climate change that once was called “winter weather”.

      30

  • #
    Dennis

    Time Magazine featured this on the front cover in 1975 or 1976.

    It was a major article inside that a new mini ice age was coming because of a decline in solar activity (Maunder Minimum?).

    Only when Maurice Strong & Comrades started their global warming scare campaign did the cooling prediction disappear.

    92

    • #
      Rereke Whakaaro

      We keep on referring back to this … it is the gift that keeps on giving:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1kGB5MMIAVA

      There were four programs in the mini series.

      It is especially poignant, because most of the Global Warming alarmists appeared in these programs at one time or another.

      112

      • #
        Henryk

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gDqQZJfx_1U&list=RDgDqQZJfx_1U&index=1

        [We like to see something in your words describing what the link contains. It helps readers to decide whether to follow the link or not.

        In this case the audio is not in English and if I knew that I wouldn't waste my time going there. Thanks] AZ

        05

        • #
          Manfred

          In this case the audio is not in English and if I knew that I wouldn’t waste my time going there. Thanks] AZ

          Is not the International flavour found within this internet community one of its chief appeals and strengths?

          Schneekatastrophe 1978-1979 in Schleswig-Holstein und die Konsequenzen daraus

          (Snow disaster 1978 – 1979 in Schleswig-Holstein and the ensuing consequences), which included large scale power outages, clearance operations, required the military to be brought in, closed the Kiel canal to shipping, etc..)

          Faszinierend Henryk. Danke vielmals.

          20

          • #
            Robert Rosicka

            As AZ has pointed out it would be good to know what your looking at and not everyone has a second language.
            Having the NBN means loading these clips is so slow these days a heads up gives me an informed choice .

            40

            • #
              Manfred

              RR, AZ made a valid point. A head’s up would be useful. What I found contentious (and cited) was the subjective comment, “I wouldn’t waste my time going there.”
              One is compelled to utilise German and French at times in various journeys around the scientific literature. Valid science and commentary are not the sole province of English.

              [Just for clarification and not for reasons of criticism -- I do not speak French, though I can recognize it when I hear it. And I think it's more a matter of courtesy to readers rather than disdain for another language, to give a heads up warning. It does take some time and effort to go there, find out I can't understand it and then close that page again. Believe it or not, moderators do read the comments while doing moderation duty.] AZ

              20

  • #
    Dennis

    Can anybody supply the feathers?

    I can boil up the tar.

    83

    • #
      Annie

      You can’t have my chooks yet.

      81

      • #
        scaper...

        I believe Dennis requires turkey feathers.

        71

        • #
          Dennis

          MSM Parrot feathers would do

          72

          • #
            OriginalSteve

            Hmmm…..most of the warmist media are a bunch of turkeys, in need of a good pl…

            No…I shan’t go there…. :-)

            90

            • #
              Dennis

              They’re mostly socialists who share their feathers for feather bedding

              61

              • #
                Dennis

                Featherbedding, labour union practices that require the employer to pay for the performance of what he considers to be unnecessary work or for work that is not in fact performed or to employ workers who are not needed. The existence of featherbedding in any specific instance is usually disputed and depends on what is considered reasonable. Work rules that require large work crews or that restrict the amount of work a worker can do in a given time period may be considered featherbedding.

                Featherbedding provisions in labour contracts may result from the continuation of work rules that were once efficient but that have become obsolete because of changed technology. A union may insist on the continuation of such work rules to ensure the employment security of its members. In some cases unions have obtained passage of building codes and other legislation ostensibly designed to ensure public safety but actually embodying featherbedding practices.

                71

        • #
          Annie

          Maybe goose?

          30

      • #
        Will Janoschka

        “You can’t have my chooks yet.”
        IF you have lots we wish to borrow only two young feathers from each. Consider it an investment.

        40

      • #
        Manfred

        Ahhh, chooks.
        Possibly one of the more entertaining commentaries evah written about chooks (and the World) may be read in, “Let There Be Lite” written by Rupert Morgan.

        00

    • #
      Lionell Griffith

      There are far better uses for tar and feathers.

      30

  • #
    el gordo

    The Climate Study Group is composed of seven men, Tom Quirk is the only name I recognise. Good effort.

    I nominate William Kininmonth, former Head of the National Climate Centre of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, to be on our red team.

    122

  • #
    John F. Hultquist

    During the Ice Age 22,000 years ago . . . there was mass extinction of species.

    I don’t care who you are, you should not make stuff up. That task is reserved to atoms and writers of fantasy.

    57

    • #

      Why should you care who he is? And yes some extinctions over a long period of time plus range expansions, contractions, changes and good old natural variation do not fit the definition of a mass extinction. In fact it is what happens all the time in the natural world.

      But that pales into insignificance with this truly horrendous sentence

      Nor has there been an appreciation that in the past carbon and energy stored in fossil fuels was CO2 and energy from the sun absorbed by various plant forms before conversion into fossil fuels.

      I don’t care what you believe regarding climate change but I challenge anyone to both decipher this.

      216

      • #
        • #
          AndyG55

          Gees, gee, I know English is your second language…

          … but that really is pretty straightforward.

          Coal is made from CO2 from the past, when atmospheric CO2 concentration was much higher.

          capeesh !!

          142

      • #
        John F. Hultquist

        I will not take that challenge !

        31

      • #
        Ian Hill

        It means that fossil fuels are renewable – it just takes a long time!

        172

        • #

          OK then, that is good enough for me. Inserting “fossil fuels are renewable – it just takes a long time!” makes no sense to me when read in place but that doesn’t mean I think you are wrong. Maybe some others have an opinion.

          59

        • #
          RexAlan

          I’ve been telling the warmists over and over that burning coal is simply recycling CO2 that in the past was part of the atmosphere. If they look puzzled I explain where coal comes from. I then ask whether they think recycling is good. Gotcha.

          130

          • #
            Rereke Whakkaro

            Yes, that’s the problem with the young Greens, today. Everything has to be immediate. They have no appreciation that natural processes take time. I blame twitter for that. No depth of thought is possible.

            170

            • #
              Manfred

              ….nor intended. The twattersphere perfectly fits the attention span of a flea, aka. the time allowed for a typical MSM sound-bite.

              10

          • #
            Wayne Job

            The big problem with making coal is that a major catastrophe such that causes an extinction event has to happen to bury an amazon type forest to make coal. Brown coal such as we have in Victoria is recent in geological time scales.

            80

      • #
        Bob Fernley-Jones

        Gee Aye,

        I think what they were trying to say is that the energy from the sun is involved in the growth mechanism for plant life and that plants are the geological basis for ‘fossil fuels’. Plant growth involves chlorophyll and photosynthesis and over aeons, plants (AKA carbon-based life forms) were converted into ‘fossil fuels’ under massive geological forces. In the original plant growth process, carbon dioxide gas (= one molecule of carbon combined with two molecules of oxygen = CO2) was taken from the atmosphere and built up as the carbon component in plant life. The oxygen gas molecular component in the source gas CO2 was split off and increasingly shed into the atmosphere, thus eventually making animal life possible. In the process, the CO2 was progressively reduced from its early antagonistic levels to the trace levels of late; which are now measured in parts per million.
        Fortunately, in the developed world we have escaped widespread poverty and much disease by long being able to employ what is known as chemical energy from burning fossil fuels. The chemistry involved is that the carbon component in fossil fuels is recombined with oxygen via combustion, as is enabled by the current rather high level of oxygen in the atmosphere; 20 % I think. (In carbohydrates the hydrogen component is released as H2O or water vapour).

        In effect, electromagnetic energy from the sun was stored in plants as chemical energy. I recommend that you should study ‘conservation and conversion of energy’. This is only a precis but I suggest you might be more tolerant that it’s not easy to express all this complexity in an ad of this small size.

        Look, I’m not a chemist but this is my elementary understanding as a retired mechanical engineer. Have I got anything wrong?

        170

        • #
          Will Janoschka

          Bob Fernley-Jones writes:
          “In effect, electromagnetic energy from the sun was stored in plants as chemical energy. “I recommend that you should study ‘conservation and conversion of energy’. This is only a precis but I suggest you might be more tolerant that it’s not easy to express all this complexity in an ad of this small size.”

          Gee Aye is but a troll at this site!
          For retired engineer:
          First review of ‘modern’ interpretation of Force, power, distance and accumulation of power called ‘energy’.
          Force; the push\pull is potential to do; but not the actual doing (work = force x distance). A horse pulling on a tree does no work only sweats lots! Same horse pulling mostly moving plow for one hour does a horsepower hour of ‘work’ (plowed area). Now measured in Joules or Watt-seconds at the rate of 2684520 Joules per horsepower hour!
          That huge weird conversion factor is but intent to defraud you! Most know that one horse in one hour eats lotsa oats and s**ts lotsa stinky. Please try to calculate Joules per square foot of plowed area! How much stinky in same sq ft? This is never energy, but only work!! More later if interested

          “Look, I’m not a chemist but this is my elementary understanding as a retired mechanical engineer. Have I got anything wrong?”

          Of course! something is always wrong for a competent engineer! Is this SCAM worth trying to fix? NO! Let it die!

          41

        • #
          toorightmate

          Bob,
          How in heaven’s name do you expect Gee Aye to understand this?

          60

        • #
          Gee Aye

          what they were trying to say

          Yep. I think they were trying to say that too. Next time they pollute the media, maybe they could remove the doubt by writing better.

          00

    • #
      el gordo

      “During the Ice Age 22,000 years ago . . . there was mass extinction of species.”

      Humans survived glaciation and wiped out the mega fauna along the way.

      70

      • #
        Roger

        Hi Gordo, I think current thinking is that US megafauna were lost because of a major asteroid strike coupled with a catastrophic flooding hundreds of feet deep from the fireball melting parts of the 1-2 km thick ice sheet.

        There seem to be many conflicting theories but it suits some to pin the blame on mankind regardless of a lack of evidence ….. sounds familiar …. AGW ……

        110

        • #
          el gordo

          There are conflicting theories and I’ll search for a definitive answer.

          The ordinary kangaroos survived the ice age and human hunting, so you maybe correct.

          ‘The diprotodon, one of Australia’s megafauna, may have survived on the Liverpool Plains of New South Wales until about 7000 years ago. If people have been in Australia for up to 60 000 years, then megafauna must have co-existed with humans for at least 30 000 years.

          Australian Museum

          50

          • #
            Rereke Whakkaro

            … people have been in Australia for 60 000 years …

            No wonder the place is so dusty. I mean, 60,000 years of dust balls! Does nobody do any cleaning?

            50

            • #
              el gordo

              Can’t find the labour.

              I live on the central tablelands of NSW and in the depths of the LGM sand dunes ran all the way to the Blue Mountains, it was a cold dry desert.

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          • #
            TdeF

            The megafauna lasted many millions of years. They all vanished 50,000 years ago. Of course we know why. The rainfall halved too. We know why. However it is a political issue to discuss the reasons and even Tim Flannery would agree. This is his actual area expertise.

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            • #
              el gordo

              In Australia the evidence still points to man as a cause of extinction, his fire burning practice and hunting, its the only thing to differentiate from the previous glaciations which megafauna survived.

              20

      • #
        sophocles

        Whatever it was that created the Younger Dryas did a better and more thorough job of wiping out the megafauna. There are all those snap frozen mammoths in north Siberia.

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      • #
        Robert Rosicka

        Extinction is the norm survival is the exception, well it has been since there was primordial ooze to crawl out from .

        30

      • #
        David

        wiped out the mega fauna along the way

        If they hadn’t Flim Flam would have had nothing to study and would have burdened us with his nonsense years earlier.

        50

        • #
          el gordo

          The useless and very expensive desalination plants are a constant reminder of human folly. History won’t be kind to him.

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  • #

    Whether it’s an ice age or a spice age, we’ll be well and truly in strife before then because of what is being done to our energy supplies.

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    Interested

    Excellent!
    In recent times, I’ve been wondering about legal challenges against global warming alarmists – both individual and institutional. Over in America, various legal actions have been instigated by leftist state attorneys in an attempt to punish companies like Exxon-Mobil for ‘knowingly’ causing damaging climate change while deliberately keeping the public ignorant of the facts.

    Anyone with half a brain will realise that these attorneys are living in cloud-cuckoo land, since there is no evidence which would stand up in a court of law for any increase in damages relating directly to rising CO2. These lawyers have evidently swallowed the climate alarmist doctrine uncritically, without realising (or perhaps purposely ignoring) that the so-called ‘scientific consensus’ is a political construct rather than anything based on legitimate data.

    But the opposite scenario is almost certainly true in our case. There is ample evidence that damages have occurred in Australia as a result of the relentless pushing of the climate-change agenda by various groups, which has resulted in economic decisions detrimental both to corporate profits and to our wealth as a nation.
    The destabilisation of our electricity grid with inputs from unreliable wind and solar power is the most obvious outcome of these wrong-headed decisions. This destabilisation has artificially elevated electricity prices, jeopardised industrial output (e.g. aluminium smelting), and subjected many people to the inconvenience and financial loss of multiple power outages.
    And many more such blackouts and consequent losses are now inevitable in the months to come.

    It’s time people like Chief Scientist Alan Finkel, Professor Will Steffen, Tim “Flim Flam” Flannery, and other prominent climate alarmists in the public eye like Dr Karl Kruszelnicki and newspaper editors who spout one-sided warmist propaganda, are held to account for the actual damage their unsubstantiated prognostications have caused and continue to cause to ordinary Australians.

    If we’re not to be permitted to publicly debate the global warming issue with these influential fools and charlatans on SBS and Auntie ABC, and thus refute their false claims in the full glare of public scrutiny, then let’s make use of the legal system to force them to face the truth.
    I have no idea how to go about initiating such a response but I would certainly be prepared to put my money where my mouth is.
    Does anyone else here feel the same?
    Does anyone here have any legal expertise?
    Is anyone else here sick enough of the lies and falsehoods to want to contribute to such a class action?
    These mongrels have had it their own way too long!
    Why don’t we show them a little bit of people power?

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    • #

      well I have some legal expertise… what you are talking about could not be achieved through the legal system with a class action. You’d need to set a precedent of what I am not sure since your brief as stated is vague, and then bring cases individually showing that their actions fall within the newly set precedent.

      Probably quicker to wait for it to sort itself out.

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      • #
        Lawrie

        If I employ a financiral planner and he advises me to buy certain investments and those investments go south he can be sued. A doctor who is incompetent and causes the wrong limb to be amputated can be sued. Companies are sued if a product they sell turns out to be dangerous. It is all lumped under consumer law. Flannery promoted himself as a climate guru and was paid to give governments advice so he could be sued especially for his later predictions when his original predictions were being falsified. The doctoring of data and the loss of unsupportive data which provides the basis for advice upon which decisions are made and monies expended surely is a criminal offence.

        BoM employees are traumatised, supposedly, because amateur scientists keep criticising their work but maybe they are traumatised knowing that soon they will be exposed as frauds. If the latter keep up the pressure until someone cracks.

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      • #
        Roger

        What these DA’s seem to have overlooked, or perhaps chosen to ignore in their thirst for climate PR, is their States have issued driver permits for fossil fuelled vehicles, have built and maintained roads for them to use, have used electricity from fossil fuel etc etc. And done so throughout the life of the IPCC and all of its published reports.

        As such they are complicit in enabling and encouraging the fossil fuel use that they now try and blame on oil companies.

        The law suits are laughable. At best they would be considered baseless and perhaps vexatious in the UK.

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      • #
        Greg Cavanagh

        The American legal system uses precedent.
        We in Australia use the Westminster system, truth and law is what is sought, not weather a previous judge accepted it.

        10

        • #
        • #
          Gee Aye

          Ok… I had to at least refute this a bit better than by stunned stammering

          Here is wiki but please google English case law or similar

          English law is the common law legal system governing England and Wales, comprising criminal law and civil law. English law has no formal codification: the essence of English common law is that it is made by judges sitting in courts applying statute, and legal precedent (stare decisis) from previous cases.

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    • #
    • #
      Rereke Whakkaro

      Yeah, well it is coming up to Christmas, and that is only secondary to Thanksgiving, so the said “Climate Attorneys” will be looking for a revenue stream that will ensure that their Christmas festivities will not look deficient when compared to the Christmas festivities of their, “Sue Trump” colleagues. Quite understandable. In that part of the world, appearance is everything.

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    • #
      TdeF

      There is a good case that the RET is illegal though, outside the power of the government to legislate as it forces the people of Australia to pay strangers for nothing at all. It is not a tax and the government can only raise taxes or fines or fees for service. No democratic government has the right to force you to pay a third party for anything.

      As for the CO2 causes damage to the environment, you would have to prove first that the 50% increase in CO2 was man made. I can prove it is not. CO2 levels are set by ocean temperature and nothing else. 98% of CO2 is in the ocean, so the varying amount of outgassing sets the CO2 levels in the very thin atmosphere above in an equilibrium governed at every point by Henry’s law. Higher temperature, more CO2. Lower temperature, less CO2.

      Every scientist (with a basic knowledge of physical chemistry) knows this. Chemistry is all about stoichometry (addition) and equilibrium. However you would think no one knew this stuff. There was a level of CO2 before the industrial revolution. There has always been a level of CO2. It is outrageous that anyone suggests the 50% increase is due to the industrial revolution, long before you get to the disproven argument that increase CO2 increases temperature dramatically. Without water assistance, it cannot be true.

      The best thing the warmists could do is sue an oil company. The man made Global Warming fake science would be shot down in minutes.

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    • #
      el gordo

      ‘Does anyone else here feel the same?’

      A legal approach maybe premature, we first need a red and blue team debate throughout the MSM on the facts of climate change.

      In Australia politicians will demand a Royal Commission into the whole sorry affair and then we can start building coal fired power stations again.

      A class action against Councils on sea level rise should be productive, but generally they will all escape litigation through the ‘precautionary principle’.

      00

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    pat

    for fun:

    PICS: 20 Sept: CBC: ‘It’s been coming down in bucketfuls’: Jasper ski area sees unprecedented early-season snowfall
    ‘I have never, never seen this kind of snow at the end of September,’ says Marmot Basin spokesperson
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/marmot-basin-jasper-park-snow-1.4299662

    the state of academia:

    19 Sept: Hartford Courant: Matt Ormseth: Leonardo DiCaprio Speaks At Yale Climate Change Conference, Urges Change
    Kerry introduced the “Titanic” star with a quip: “Who better to talk about climate change,” he asked, “than a man who has witnessed an iceberg breaking apart in the middle of the ocean?”
    At one point, Kerry held up a vial of air from the South Pole — “the cleanest air on earth,” he called it — at which DiCaprio joked, “Let me get a hit of that,” drawing laughter from the 2,500 in attendance…

    He admitted that climate change has become “somewhat of an obsession” after traveling around the world last year to film “Before the Flood,” a documentary on the effects of climate change.
    Kerry introduced the “Titanic” star with a quip: “Who better to talk about climate change,” he asked, “than a man who has witnessed an iceberg breaking apart in the middle of the ocean?”
    “When you start talking about chemically changing our planet in an irreversible fashion, that will threaten all life on earth, that was like the most surreal science fiction movie I could ever imagine,” he said…

    Tuesday’s conference came at a time when catastrophic storms in the Gulf of Mexico have people wondering if climate change was to blame, and the devastating hurricanes were mentioned early and often in DiCaprio’s visit.
    “We just broke three records in the last couple weeks: Irma, the most high-velocity cyclonic effect in a hurricane, winds over 185 miles per hour for over 24 hours; Harvey, the greatest amount of rainfall in history in one storm; and then the fires that are decimating the western part of the country,” Kerry said. “The evidence is overwhelming.”
    DiCaprio said that while climate change was not the sole cause of this year’s cataclysmic storms, the scientific community believes “it’s making them more extreme and more destructive.”…

    Yale students said DiCaprio’s name was enough to provoke campuswide interest in the conference, and keep climate change in the conversation.
    “They’re bringing a celebrity here because a lot of people are here to see him,” said Alex Briasco-Stewart, a freshman from Wayland, Mass. “And through attracting that audience, they can push that message out.”
    “I think it’s an important issue,” he said of climate change. “And I think seeing Leonardo DiCaprio’s cool.”
    http://www.courant.com/news/connecticut/hc-yale-climate-change-conference-20170919-story.html

    11

  • #
    pat

    21 Sept: Reuters: Gary McWilliams: California cities sue big oil firms over climate change
    California cities San Francisco and Oakland filed separate lawsuits against five oil companies on Wednesday seeking billions of dollars to protect against rising sea levels they blamed on climate change, according to public documents.

    The lawsuits, filed in state courts in San Francisco and Alameda Counties, alleged Chevron Corp, ConocoPhillips, Exxon Mobil Corp, BP Plc, and Royal Dutch Shell Plc, created a public nuisance and asked for funds to finance infrastructure to deal with rising sea levels.

    According to a news release from San Francisco city officials, the lawsuits mirror 1980s-era lawsuits against tobacco companies. They allege the oil giants “knowingly and recklessly created an ongoing public nuisance that is causing harm now and in the future risks catastrophic harm to human life and property.”
    “Should this litigation proceed, it will only serve special interests at the expense of broader policy, regulatory, and economic priorities,” said Chevron spokeswoman Melissa Ritchie.

    Shell said in statement the issue should be addressed by government policy and cultural change, not by courts.
    Exxon called the lawsuits’ claims without merit, and said it would defend itself. ConocoPhillips declined to comment. BP did not respond to a request for comment.
    “Congress and the Trump administration are AWOL on climate change,” said Ken Kimmell, president of the Union of Concerned Scientists, saying the courts were the appropriate venue to address rising sea levels and other climate impacts.

    The lawsuits are the latest in a growing body of legal action against oil companies over climate change.

    Marin and San Mateo counties and Imperial Beach, California, in July brought similar public nuisance and failure to warn lawsuits alleging climate change impacts. Those three lawsuits sued the same five plus other oil companies and coal producers…
    https://www.reuters.com/article/legal-us-usa-oil-climatesuits/california-cities-sue-big-oil-firms-over-climate-change-idUSKCN1BV2QM

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    • #
      Grant (NZ)

      That’s like me suing Ford because someone driving a Ford cut me off in traffic. The oil companies did not burn all their products themselves.

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    • #
      TdeF

      As my comment above. Great. The oil companies have a real chance to destroy the man made Global Warming myth in court. This they have been reluctant to do, while coal companies suffered. Carbon taxes and imposts after all are paid by the public, not by oil and gas companies. Everyone is getting record high prices thanks to Global Warming, so no one wants to challenge it. There is a casual conspiracy between oil companies and the Greens. After all, it’s not as if you can stop using coal and gas and petrol anyway!

      71

      • #
        TdeF

        Anyone who thinks the oil and gas companies are the friends of the earth would be wrong. The three major competing energy systems are oil/petrol/diesel, gas, coal and nuclear. One group’s loss is the other’s gain.

        All are limited and all seeking to increase prices, especially in the wake of the Saudi’s halving oil prices and the US utilization of shale gas instead of imported Saudi oil. The idea that the seven sisters will fight the myth of man made global warming is misplaced.

        The Greens are the useful idiots of the piece and everyone hates coal because it is cheap, plentiful and clean and many countries have it. Gas kept in the ground forces up gas prices. Brown coal (Germany, Australia) is particular hated. Capitalism on a roll, bankers making bundles, governments creaming taxes, all thanks to the man made Global Warming invention.

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        • #
          KinkyKeith

          And there TdeF you have given the core motivation for so many wars and political schemas: Profit Margin.

          The black hand of banking and market manipulation has far more power than any group of voters anywhere.

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        • #
          el gordo

          ‘Brown coal (Germany, Australia) is particular hated.’

          NSW has lots of really black coal.

          30

  • #
    pat

    22 Sept: ABC: NSW weather: Record-breaking 40-degree temperature expected this weekend
    Posted 58 minutes ago
    New South Wales has never had a 40-degree day in September and that may be about to change this weekend as temperatures soar around the state.

    Simon Lewis from the weather bureau says the unseasonal hot weather will be most obvious in the state’s west.
    “The highest we’ve recorded anywhere in NSW in September is 39.6 [degrees Celsius] and there’s a few places out in the far west, including Wanaaring and Wilcannia, that are a chance of getting 40C on Saturday,” Mr Lewis from the Bureau of Meteorology said.
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-09-22/hot-spring-as-weekend-may-break-september-nsw-heat-records/8974050

    20 Sept: ABC: Brisbane weather: City and Ipswich set to sizzle through scorcher weekend
    By Meghna Bali
    The Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) has predicted temperatures in Brisbane over the weekend could reach 33 degrees and Ipswich could soar to a high of 38 degrees…
    Brisbane temperatures in September last year averaged at 24.9 degrees, the highest reaching 28.8 degrees…
    While a summer storm was not ruled out, (BOM forecaster Sam) Campbell said rainfall was unlikely given how dry the air mass would be.

    ???”Spring is a transition month so you’ll see a mix of cooler days and quite warmer days,” he said…
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-09-20/brisbane-ipswich-set-for-hot-weekend-weather/8961426

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    • #
      Graeme No.3

      I can remember a couple of days in September reaching 38℃ from my time in Sydney (1979-2003). It would seem unlikely that western Sydney was the warmest spot in all of NSW.

      51

      • #
        Dennis

        I was there 1980 to 2001

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      • #
        David

        Still is. Just for a different reason.

        20

        • #
          Dennis

          One morning as I entered that district heading to my office a small van drove down the left of vehicles stop starting towards a railway underpass. It barged in front of my car and I sounded the horn. The heavily bearded driver wearing white robe and with a skull cap leapt out and approached the driver side window, and banged on the glass with the handle of a dagger, a grinned. Children in van watching.

          A couple of blokes in a truck alongside heading the opposite direction shouted at the robe wearer (language unacceptable here) and he went back to his van. I reported it to the police and gave the van registration number to them. They did not seem very interested.

          20

  • #
    pat

    20 Sept: RiverineHeraldAustralia: Heavy rain and storms likely from November to January
    by Peter Nelson
    The first 16 days in Benalla this month has been the coldest in September since 1969.
    The mean temperature of 9.3 degrees was the lowest since the 8.6 was recorded in Benalla for the first 16 days of September 1969…

    Tatura with minus 2.2 had it’s lowest September reading since 1995. Hay and Deniliquin both had their coldest September morning for 110 years, whilst Forbes with minus 3.1 had it’s coldest September morning for 141 years.
    Temora with minus 4.1 last Sunday morning was a new record low for September, breaking the 1966 record of minus 3.9…
    http://www.riverineherald.com.au/rural/2017/09/20/110561/heavy-rain-and-storms-likely-from-november-to-january

    21 Sept: WeatherNation: September Colder than Normal for Northeast
    According to NOAA’s Northeast Regional Climate Center (NRCC), September, so far, has been colder than normal for much of the northeastern United States. The center, located at Cornell University, within the University’s atmospheric science department, found that temperatures generally ranged from 6°F below normal to normal, with the coldest areas being in West Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and New York.

    In Huntington, West Virginia for example, the temperatures from September 1st through the 15th average 6°F below normal. Temperatures for the same time period from Erie and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania averaged 5°F and 4.8°F below normal, respectively…
    You can read more about the Northeast September chill in the NRCC’s blog post here (LINK).
    http://www.weathernationtv.com/news/september-colder-normal-northeast/

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  • #
    pat

    celebrity Phys.org?

    20 Sept: Phys.org: Alastair Himmer: The godfather of eco-bling: Brando’s Tahitian paradise
    Guests at “The Brando” help fund research projects by paying up to $10,000 a night to stay in the elegant thatched villas overlooking a turquoise lagoon.
    As Pippa Middleton soaks up the rays on honeymoon or Obama seeks inspiration to write his memoirs, scientists quietly go about their work testing ocean acidification to study the effects on coral bleaching.
    Behind the butler service and Michelin-star cuisine, the resort has built on Brando’s own vision for a sustainable environment, to become one of the most eco-friendly hotels in the world, running on solar power and coconut oil…

    Luxury eco-resorts offer high-rollers a chance to offset any guilt they might feel over their carbon-heavy lifestyles.
    “Often these upscale resorts lead the way. They have a much higher profit margin so they’re able to do things that make their destinations more protected.”
    “But they pass on knowledge to the mass market too,” (Rochelle Turner, research director at the World Travel and Tourism Council) added. “Even backpackers are learning from what is happening at the high end.”

    Tetiaroa is ideal for ecological research, according to Frank Murphy, executive director of the Tetiaroa Society, to which DiCaprio and Depp donate.
    “We’re perched here on one the most vulnerable spots on earth. It’s kind of the canary in the coal mine for climate change so we better be doing our damnedest to figure out what’s going on,” he said.
    “The El Nino years we’ve had over the past 20 years gives us a glimpse into what will happen with global warming.”
    https://phys.org/news/2017-09-godfather-eco-bling-brando-tahitian-paradise.html

    lol:

    19 Sept: PageSix: AP: Robert De Niro urges UN to help rebuild Barbuda post-Irma
    “We must act together to help the most vulnerable,” De Niro said. “The recovery process will be a long, hard road. Barbudans must be a part of it, their homes repaired stronger, rebuilt stronger, new homes stronger. The immediate needs — power, water, food, medical care, animals sheltered — must be met.”

    De Niro and James Packer, son of the late Australian media mogul Kerry Packer, bought the K Club Resort last year and renamed it the Paradise Found Nobu Resort.
    De Niro spoke of all the “warm and friendly” people he has gotten to know on Barbuda who were “looking forward to a new resort and jobs and future for them and their children.” He did not say how the hurricane affected the resort.

    The governor general of Antigua and Barbuda, Rodney Williams, told the meeting that when Irma thundered through, “immediately Barbuda was rendered uninhabitable.”…
    He noted that the entire population has been moved to nearby Antigua. “For the first time in over 300 years, there is today not a single human being living on Barbuda.”…
    https://pagesix.com/2017/09/19/robert-de-niro-urges-un-to-help-rebuild-barbuda-post-irma/

    2015: AOL: Rosie Vare: Robert De Niro has plans to refurbish luxury hotel in Barbuda
    K-Club was visited by Princess Diana on many occasions
    According to The Telegraph the initial agreement includes a five-star hotel, a marina, casino licences, a ‘high-end eco lodge’ and a new airport for executive jets.
    However, the land is currently owned by some 1,500 of the island’s residents and their stakehold in the island is their birth right and has been enshrined in local law…
    The new plans for the resort would mean the public possession of the land would have to be given up. Some are worried that the 400 acre plot is being sold off on a 198 year lease for just US$ 6.2 million…
    One island politician asked: “At the end of the day, the people of Barbuda are asking what’s in it for us?”…

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  • #
    Dennis

    I can’t wait for an explanation from Kevin Turnbull.

    42

  • #
    Asp

    But the AGW drummer is getting a real workout now. On the ABC today, I heard about the huge fire risk that NSW is facing this weekend, with September temperatures being hottest on record again. The bushfire risk is exacerbated due to NSW having sustained the driest winter on record.
    Previously, a wet winter contributed the high fire risk in the following summer due to increase fuel load, but I suppose times have changed somewhat in the past decade or two.

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    • #
      Dennis

      I drove to WA last year to view the best wildflowers display in decades. Lots of soaking rain – and CO2.

      Of course “the bush” has been growing thick in recent years, and naturally, as dry conditions prevail, the risk of fires is high.

      Then again, if only the extreme Greens had not convinced authorities to go easy on burning off and other fire hazard reduction works, as the Australian Aborigines practised for tens of thousands of years, the risk would not be quite so high.

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      • #
        Dennis

        This morning I drove to Cape Hawke in the Great Lakes District midcoast NSW, the site of a WW2 lookout and defence facility, now a national park (As PM Abbott once remarked, we now have more national park lands than taxpayers can afford to look after). I have not been there for about five years and was surprised to see tangled vegetation and tall trees blocking what were excellent views of the ocean and Wallis Lake back to the Dividing Range (Barrington Tops where it often snows).

        It was a jungle up there where 5 years ago it was nowhere near as jungle-like.

        Good rains and essential for life CO2.

        11

    • #
      Dennis

      By the way, is that “record” the same old that ABC plays over and over?

      93

    • #
      Rereke Whakkaro

      I was told that the Australian Bush requires fire, for the next generation of seeds to germinate.

      I learnt this from a tour bus driver, who seemed to know his stuff, as a Bushman. For example, he spotted a number of young people who were skinny-dipping in a lake, and pointed out that there were poisonous snakes in the lake in which they were swimming. That in itself was worth the cost of the ticket.

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      • #
        Another Ian

        RW

        Have you read Bill Gammage’s “The biggest esyate on earth: how aborigines made Australia”?

        31

      • #
        Dennis

        There is a theory that the Australian Aborigines arrived here about 120,000 years ago because it was around that time that the bush vegetation that needs fire occasionally to survive.

        The earlier trees were pine like (Wollombi? Pine) that was discovered in a remote area valley a decade or so ago and since has been cultivated for enthusiasts to buy and grow on their own properties.

        11

      • #
        KinkyKeith

        Most red belly black snakes will run if given an opening.

        Not too sure about Brown’s, they’re a bit more of a mystery.

        10

        • #
          Greg Cavanagh

          We were driving the country roads west of Rockhampton when we spotted a huge brown snake crossing the road. We stopped just short of it. I reared up and attacked the front fender of the 4X4. We wound the windows up quick smart and backed the vehicle up. The snake just stayed there upright for about 30 seconds before finally slithering off into the grass.

          I’ve got red belly blacks in my back yard. When you spot one, just leave it alone and give it space. It’ll wander off soon enough. They are not aggressive unless you do something stupid, like try and kill it.

          20

        • #
          Dennis

          A mate told me that his wife was standing watching cattle being treated in a holding yard if the far west of NSW and a Brown Snake was sighted by him heading towards here, he grabbed a gun and shot it. He said most will avoid humans if they can but some become territorial and will go on the attack.

          20

    • #
      el gordo

      ‘I suppose times have changed somewhat in the past decade or two.’

      The high pressure belt in the southern hemisphere intensified over those two decades, deflecting cold fronts and winter rains.

      11

  • #
    pat

    22 Sept: Sydney Uni: Bob Brown receives an honorary Doctor of Science
    University of Sydney alumnus calls for global democracy
    Australian Greens co-founder Bob Brown is receiving an honorary doctorate in recognition of his leadership and success advocating for environmental conservation, some 50 years after completing his Bachelor of Medicine in 1968…
    Bob Brown, who will deliver an occasional address, said ahead of the ceremony that he was honoured to be receiving the doctorate and that what Trunkey Creek Public School began in 1950 the University of Sydney had completed in 1968.

    “I learned that planet Earth is in our own hands, that there will be no divine intervention and that history, as H.G. Wells put it, is a race between education and disaster.
    “Might this University become a champion of the egalitarian logic of a global parliament? A democratically elected global parliament is an essential factor for turning eight billion people from consuming ourselves out of the one house and home we have… or else fighting ourselves to extinction.”…
    http://sydney.edu.au/news-opinion/news/2017/09/22/bob-brown-receives-honorary-doctorate.html

    didn’t you help bring about global governance already, Bob. it sure feels like it:

    22 Sept: Australian: Simon Benson: Australian electricity bills double those of Canada
    Australian households are paying 60 per cent more for their power than those in the US and double their Canadian counterparts after enjoying the third-lowest electricity prices of any OECD nation a decade ago.

    A report from the International Energy Agency has ranked Australian household electricity costs as the 11th most expensive of 30 countries, reflecting the spiralling prices of the past 10 years, which are also now damaging the nation’s commercial competitiveness.

    In 2007, the IEA ranked Australia as the fifth-cheapest for consumers with an average price of 9c a kilowatt hour, below the US and comparable nations…

    The IEA report showed that the many countries which had embarked on large renewable programs over the past decade, such as Germany, were now the most expensive for consumers…READ ON
    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/mining-energy/australian-electricity-bills-double-those-of-canada/news-story/d14285dabf1a797bc7ca463e4f71857d

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  • #
    Dennis

    Re the silent red tick.

    I heard that Colonel Klink was faced with a prisoner who walked around the prison saying: tick tick tick ….

    The Colonel cautioned him: we have ways of making you tock

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    • #
      Power Grab

      I don’t specifically remember that joke, but it sounds like something those writers would have come up with!

      10

  • #
    Konrad

    I’m not sure the next full Ice Age is something to worry about yet.

    However the next Little Ice Age may be about to occur. One thing we lack is good climate records for what happened during the maunder minimum in the southern hemisphere. We should de-fund the AGW nonsense and research the agricultural implications of a deep solar minimum instead.

    251

    • #
      sophocles

      Konrad! Stop it! You’re being rational.

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    • #
      el gordo

      Konrad its the going into a mini ice age which we should take seriously because of its potential to cause havoc.

      We already have a picture of what happened in the Northern Hemisphere in the late 13th century, but in Australia its not so clear cut.

      50

      • #
        Dennis

        I remember reading that during the mini ice age period Australian Aborigines in southern areas built stone huts and wore animal skins for warmth. Further north cold weather was not a major problem.

        20

        • #
          el gordo

          Kangaroo and possum skins were fashionable in Tasmania and further north along the Great Dividing Range

          In the top end Lake Carpentaria was a melting pot of humanity and temperatures were warmer than down south.

          00

        • #
          el gordo

          My bad, I forgot we were talking about the LIA, Lake Carpentaria was an earlier epoch.

          The LIA in Port Jackson had little impact on the local inhabitants.

          00

  • #
    Bertram

    I have, reluctantly, concluded that The Guardian is simply evil. I can see no other reason for their ceaseless misanthropy based on continual lying, half truths and personal vilifications.

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      Peter C

      Could be. However I think they are totally misguided. They cannot even see that their ceaseless misanthropy is based on continual lying, half truths and personal vilifications.

      Much the same can be said of the Fairfax papers, the ABC and many of the US papers and TV networks.

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    pat

    a sceptic gone?

    22 Sept: Australian: AAP: Malcolm Roberts a British citizen at time of election, High Court rules
    The High Court has ruled One Nation’s Malcolm Roberts was a dual British and Australian citizen at the time he was nominated for election.
    Justice Patrick Keane on Friday afternoon ruled Senator Roberts, who believed he had renounced his British citizenship before last year’s election, was a citizen of the UK at the time of his nomination…
    (LINK) Read the High Court ruling here…
    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/malcolm-roberts-a-british-citizen-at-time-of-election-high-court-rules/news-story/e84ac440cd0f30d584b2ab5462abfe37

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      TdeF

      Yes, which means he committed a statutory crime signing the form improperly and a 1 year jail sentence applies.

      So did they all. This is no trivial matter. Just another form, but most members of the public would take it very seriously, as would any court. This is not whether the Constitution of Australia is outdated or times have changed. It is about not telling the truth for one of the most senior jobs in the country.

      It is a clear offence to take money and a top job when you are disqualified. Anyone could have delayed signing until you sent an email and received a confirmation, but you would not want to give up useful rights and then fail to be elected, so just sign anyway. Who will notice or care? Everyone does it.

      To ignore the law is utterly wrong from the people who say they are qualified to write it. Roberts knew better. As did lawyers Xenophon and Waters and everyone else, some on the Labor side not yet examined. Lawyers advise people on their rights when signing forms. They train in writing and reading them. Ignorance is not an excuse.

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        Robert Rosicka

        I suppose this now sets the precedent and even Barnaby will be in trouble , one in all in I say .

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          TdeF

          I am surprised that the commentators think Barnaby only has to rerun the election and get back. This is a statutory jail sentence of 1 year. Hanson did her time. Even suspended, the conviction stands and Barnaby and others are ineligible to sit for any parliament. Why should they walk free when others are punished? Is it one law for politicians and one law for everyone else?

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            Dennis

            In my opinion there is a huge difference between being born in Australia, raised and educated in Australia but through one migrant parent having a birthright to New Zealand citizenship, which must be registered with the New Zealand Government to activate it, and a migrant to Australia taking up citizenship here and failing to revoke a foreign country citizenship.

            30

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      KinkyKeith

      Pat

      Would it be fair to say that many past members of parliament have similarly to Mr Roberts, been dual citizens.

      20

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      philthegeek

      Lol! Roberts?? Stick a fork in him , he’s done. :)

      Seems to have shaped up as a bit of a sad confused man with a poor grasp of objective reality.

      12

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        el gordo

        He’s only human and politicians are generally pathetic, but let’s wait and see how the High Court handles this. We may have an election on our hands if the whole bunch fall under a Bondi tram.

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    pat

    another scalp:

    both pieces behind paywall:

    Minerals Council chief Brendan Pearson steps down after BHP fallout
    The Australian-2 hours ago
    BHP’s falling out with the Minerals Council of Australia has claimed the scalp of the lobby group’s chief executive, Brendan Pearson

    BHP Billiton distances itself from MCA’s position on climate change
    3 days ago – BHP Billiton distances itself from MCA’s position on climate change … officially split from the Minerals Council of Australia’s climate change position … calls for a Clean Energy Target and stressing emissions-reduction is critical …

    excerpts from above:

    21 Sept: Energy & Mines: BHP distances itself from MCA’s position on climate change
    Mining firm BHP Billiton reiterated calls for a Clean Energy Target and emissions-reduction strategies on Tuesday. The move comes as shareholders consider a resolution that calls for BHP to pull out of industry groups whose climate and energy policy views are inconsistent with the company’s own.
    The resolution was submitted by the Australasian Centre For Corporate Responsibility and backed by 0.0045 percent of BHP shares. BHP is urging shareholders to vote down the resolution, however…

    While BHP will likely remain in the MCA, the company will publish a list of significant differences between its own views on climate and energy policy and those of the industry associations it belongs to by December, according to a statement posted to the firm’s website.
    “We support a strong bias to action and we support the recommendations included in the Finkel Review,” Henry said.
    Read the full article in The Australian (LINK)
    http://energyandmines.com/2017/09/bhp-billiton-distances-itself-from-mcas-position-on-climate-change/

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  • #
    Peter C

    Who are the Climate Change Group?

    They are quite low profile and seem content to make their submissions either directly to the government or via advertisements in the Australian. Did they try for The Age? I assume that they paid for the advertisement themselves.

    To me they are unsung Heroes of the Climate War.

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      el gordo

      It has been rumoured that they are a shadowy group under the umbrella of the Institute of Public Affairs and connected to the Liberal Party, but I cannot confirm this.

      Here are their name: John Chambers, Andrew Miller, Richard Morgan, Bob Officer, Mark Rayner, Graham Sellars-Jones and Tom Quirk.

      They all have a lot of letters after their names, indicative of a solid education.

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      Will Janoschka

      “To me they are unsung Heroes of the Climate War.”
      Can you please explain such War? I see only Bankster bougeoisie vs peon proletariat. This has nothing to do with any physical science.

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    Robert Rosicka

    If they support the finkel review they shouldn’t whinge when Roxby downs gets blacked out .

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  • #

    I have a house with walls to keep out wind, insects and other intruders. But my house also has a roof in case it rains or the sun is too strong.

    This is a very simple notion: one prepares for all things, not one thing, or a few things. As simple a notion as that is, it escapes many of the most educated in relation to actual climate change.

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    pat

    a good one for sending to everyone on your mailing list:

    22 Sept: Edmonton Journal: Lawrence Solomon: Paris is dead. The global warming deniers have won
    Shortly after Trump announced the pullout, stats from the Global Coal Plant Tracker portal confirmed that coal is on a tear, with 1600 plants planned or under construction in 62 countries. The champion of this coal-building binge is China, which boasts 11 of the world’s 20 largest coal-plant developers, and which is building 700 of the 1600 new plants, many in foreign countries, including high-population countries such as Egypt and Pakistan that until now have burned little or no coal.

    All told, the plants underway represent a phenomenal 43 per cent increase in coal-fired power capacity, making Trump’s case that China and other Third World countries are eating the West’s lunch, using climate change as a club to kneecap us with expensive power while enriching themselves…

    At the same time that growth in coal is soaring, that of renewables is sagging. As reported by Bloomberg New Energy Finance, renewables investment fell in 2016 by 18 per cent over the peak year of 2015, and nine per cent over 2014. In the first two quarters of 2017, the trend continued downward, with double-digit year-over-year declines in each of the first two quarters. Even that paints a falsely rosy picture, since the numbers were propped up by vanity projects, such as the showy solar plants built in Abu Dhabi and Dubai. In the U.K., renewable investment declined by 90 per cent.

    None of the Bloomberg data represents hard economic data, however, since virtually all renewables facilities are built with funny money — government subsidies of various kinds. As those subsidies come off, a process that has begun, new investment will approach zero per cent, and the renewables industry will collapse…

    A slew of failures by climate scientists also points to the unreliability of doom and gloom predictions. One recent admission comes from Oxford’s Myles Allen, an author of a recent study in Nature Geoscience: “We haven’t seen that rapid acceleration in warming after 2000 that we see in the models,” he stated, saying that erroneous models produced results that “were on the hot side,” leading to forecasts of warming and inundations of Pacific islands that aren’t happening. Other eye-openers came in the discovery that the Pacific Ocean is cooling, the Arctic ice is expanding, the polar bears are thriving and temperatures did indeed stop climbing over 15 years…

    None of these revelations, which came out after Trump’s decision to withdraw from Paris, would have surprised him — Trump knew from the get-go that the global warming scare is all hype. As the Daily Caller and the Wall Street Journal both reported in April, Obama administration officials are admitting they faked scientific evidence to manipulate public opinion. “What you saw coming out of the press releases about climate data, climate analysis, was, I’d say, misleading, sometimes just wrong,” former Energy Department Undersecretary Steven Koonin told the Journal, in explaining how spin was used, for example, to mislead the public into thinking hurricanes have become more frequent. “Everyone’s got an agenda,” conceded NASA’s Gavin Schmidt when asked how the wild comments of his predecessor could be believed.

    The evidence against Paris continues to mount. Paris remains dead.
    http://edmontonjournal.com/opinion/lawrence-solomon-paris-is-dead-the-global-warming-deniers-have-won/wcm/42b7e0db-063b-453b-924b-39baebeef584

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    Dave in the States

    Love the graph on the advert, but how many average readers of it will understand the implications?

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    ScotsmanInUtah

    Cold is not a good future climate

    Jo I liked this article alot, as many of your articles do (obviously not all) , but mostly in where our climate it is NOT going.

    The threat from a future cold climate is obviously a far more serious threat.
    I do not understand why all the Scientists making observations in the Antarctic and the Artic are not concerned abut this fundamental truth.

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    • #
      Power Grab

      Shhhhh…

      Don’t tell the people they need to prepare for colder weather and poor growing conditions.

      I mean, you do want to allow most of them to die off when it gets really cold, don’t you? That’s one big reason we need to jack up the price of heating fuel: So they can’t afford to pay both highly-inflated food prices and fuel prices.

      And while we wait for that to happen, it will make the bankers ever so much happier if more people are unable to keep their expenses under control. They will have to borrow more, don’cha know?

      Oh, and of course you wouldn’t want the people to be able to stay healthy and reduce the amount of money they spend on so-called “health care”.

      You know we will always have the medicos on our side. They get paid whether the patient lives, or not.

      This should be your motto until further notice: “Get all you can. Can all you get. Sit on the can. Poison the rest.”

      Oh, by the way, you can also count on the media to put a favorable spin on the bad situations, and an unfavorable spin on anything good that happens. If they can’t find a big enough crisis to report on, they will help make one.

      /SARC!!!

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    Reasonable Skeptic

    I have always been puzzled how people could be so easily panicked. If you had posed a basic question to an environmentalist how to help the planet, their response would be to increase CO2 in the atmosphere.

    What does CO2 do? Does it make it warmer or colder? Warmer. Warmer is preferred because it better supports life. Does it help plants grow or not? It helps plants grow which will lead to healthier natural environments. The cost might be an acceleration in SLR which may have a negative impact on coastal cities, but that would happen over decades and centuries and man can adapt as required.

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    • #
      el gordo

      The level of sea level rise is unremarkable and with global cooling approaching should plateau.

      CO2 doesn’t make the atmosphere warmer or cooler, there is no positive feedback happening anywhere at the moment.

      Its worth noting that CO2 levels were low during the Medieval Warm Period, which was warmer than present, and went even lower during the Little Ice Age.

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    • #
      sophocles

      The cost might be an acceleration in SLR

      How? All those healthy growing plants will be using more water (to grow) than they used to.
      That’s water that would have gone into SLR. There’s no sign of “an acceleration in sea level rise. Where would it come from? Greenland is still building its ice cap, Antarctica is still adding to its terra-tonnages, and, it’s worse than you thought, most of the land based glaciers which were declining and melting at the turn of the century,are beginning to advance again. Further falls in Sea Level are more likely.

      Send me a (snail-mail) letter when the rise returns.

      10

      • #
        KinkyKeith

        Most people conveniently ignore the fact that sea level has dropped from its post melt maximum after the last ice age.

        Over the last 7,000 or so years sea level has dropped by 4 to 6 meters overall.

        The current interglacial (warm period) wont last much longer, in geological terms, and then we start to ice up again and sea levels fall as icefields build up.

        Enjoy the warmth while it lasts because after the freeze it will be another 80,000 years before it returns.

        KK

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  • #
    David Maddison

    O/T

    This $500,000 study claims there are 22,000 suitable sites for pumped hydro storage in Australia.

    “No matter where you are in Australia, you will find a good pumped hydro site not very far away from where you, or your wind or your solar farm is located,” he said.

    Well you don’t expect an answer like “impractical” for that amount of money do you?

    http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2017-09-21/pumped-hydro-renewable-energy-sites-australia-anu-research/8966530?pfmredir=sm

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      KinkyKeith

      The economy of scale in having 22,000 small active solar or wind powered pumps would make the electricity from this system the most expensive in the world.

      The real solution, if they must do this.

      Build one large dam with one solar and one wind unit and one output turbine, much more cost effective.

      But still way too expensive.

      Appalling waste of taxpayers dollars.

      KK

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      • #
        FarmerDoug2

        “…Appalling waste of taxpayer dollars. ”
        Sounds familiar.

        30

      • #
        sophocles

        What’s wrong with a big coal-fired station?
        Lessee now:
        • Cheaper to build
        • Probably quicker to build
        • More reliable
        • Stable (no intermittency)
        • Runs when its cloudy
        • Runs when its windy
        • Runs 24 hrs per day, 7 days per week, 52 weeks per year.

        The only problem I can see, is the mono-coloured electrons: not a green one to be seen.

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    • #
      Graeme No.3

      Facinating how typical ABC readers can solve all the technical problems without knowing anything about the subject.

      All the old claims are there “renewables are free energy”, “it would be easy” “Australia could run on 100% renewables” even “Australia could export power to the world”.

      Probably explains why our electricity supply is in crisis, and our politicians don’t understand that.

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      • #
        sophocles

        “Australia could export power to the world”.

        Sheer genius. :-)

        Quick, export that person to Germany. Angela Merkel needs such genius. And the average IQ of both countries could rise …

        30

        • #
          Dennis

          That’s what happened when New Zealanders started migrating to Australia, the NZ PM Muldoon told Australian PM Fraser.

          21

    • #
      Robert Rosicka

      How would they know if the sites were really suitable unless they have done hydrological surveys and core drilling to assess what lies beneath the surface , best no to put a dam on a fault line and 22000 sites would takes years to survey .

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  • #
    C. Paul Barreira

    A cooling period, some have it, will begin during the present days. Nothing I’ve seen suggests that it will be remotely comparable with the Little Ice Age of the seventeenth century, let alone the Ice Age of 22,000 years ago. (Konrad #19 also notes the problem.)

    If well-heeled critics of government policy wish (and rightly so) to attack current Australian State and Federal policies, regulations and laws, then they must stick to the present situation.

    The photograph, with the heading are about as much as most will read. Both are nonsense; they have as much use for our day as an episode of Spooks (series 5, episode 10) on so-called climate change. But guess which one the public will believe—or even see.

    It bears comparison with an article some months ago on Catallaxy Files regarding private debt in Australia. The problem was stated well enough; the proffered solutions included the absurd and irrelevant.

    Energy production in Australia is a truly serious problem. This advertisement has not risen to the challenge.

    Pat #12 and Asp #16 reveal the alternative forms of advertisement, the sort that are repeated ad nauseum. Pat # 17 points to the universities’ rigid lockstep with CAGW. Vertessy need have no fears for his daily time and motion.

    What you might call mixed drinks—and a missed opportunity.

    30

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      el gordo

      ‘Nothing I’ve seen suggests that it will be remotely comparable with the Little Ice Age of the seventeenth century …’

      True but it is similar to the early 13th century, before we entered the LIA

      After mid century the thermal gradient between latitudes 50° and 60–65°N produced great wind storms in the North Atlantic and sea floods on surrounding areas, I expect to see a repeat performance in the decades ahead.

      I agree they should have left out the catastrophism of the LGM.

      10

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    pat

    21 Sept: Washington Times: Climate scientist rebuts Hollywood hurricane hype: ‘This is what weather looks like’
    Roy Spencer’s e-Book, ‘Inevitable Disaster’ refutes link between global warming, hurricanes
    by Valerie Richardson
    CLICK TO EXPAND ARTICLE TO READ IN FULL
    http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2017/sep/21/climate-scientist-rebuts-hollywood-hurricane-hype/

    10

  • #

    Applying conservation – ie thrift and understanding – to our present place and circumstances will equip us for future changes. Yet how often we hear our Green Betters suggest the wildest and most wasteful “solutions” and get themselves applauded.

    De Grasse Tyson, the Musik Man and whoever is currently doing the Hawking voice box can suggest escape to Mars as a sensible reaction to the weather extremes and other probs which have always afflicted humanity, even in this happy little interglacial which can’t last.

    I don’t know where all the billions for “space” go but they certainly don’t go to the understanding of the innards and deep hydrosphere of a very close but still largely unvisited planet called Earth. I agree that warming periods, while good for many regions, aren’t good for all. But it is coolings which have jolted civilisations (Old Kingdom, Bronze cultures etc) and one good blow from a Laki or Tambora would end most aviation and much agriculture world wide for long enough to make us very uncomfortable indeed.

    But I’d rather be in Iceland in 1783 than Mars on its best day. And I’d rather we burnt through a trillion understanding what happened in Iceland in 1783. Because one day there really won’t be enough sunshine here on Earth.

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    pat

    Carbon Brief excerpted the following Reuters’ story, but had this line added to the para ending in “campaign rally”: “The country already has close to 50% renewable power.” it is no longer in the Reuters’ piece below:

    PV Buzz has the Reuters’ article but, when you open the link, the ***line in the search result has been removed:

    Conservative Piñera, Chile presidential candidate calls for all …
    PV Buzz 19 hours ago – Conservative Piñera, Chile presidential candidate calls for all-renewable grid … ***The country already has close to 50% renewable power.
    https://www.carbonbrief.org/daily-brief/us-administration-officials-meet-develop-climate-strategy

    selling wind and solar, as always:

    22 Sept: Reuters: Conservative Chile presidential candidate calls for all-renewable grid
    Reporting by Antonio de la Jara, writing by Luc Cohen, Editing by Rosalba O’Brien
    Chilean presidential candidate Sebastian Piñera, who is leading in the polls for this November’s elections, pledged on Thursday to move the South American country toward a fully renewable electricity grid by 2040.
    Conservative Piñera, who previously served as Chile’s president from 2010 to 2014, said that if elected he would seek to build on heavy investments the country has made in wind and solar energy.
    “The goal is that by 2040, Chile has a 100 percent clean and renewable electricity grid and a 100 percent electric public transit system,” Piñera said at a campaign rally.

    Chile is an obvious target for green energy firms. It imports most of the oil and gas it uses, but its desert climate and long coastline makes solar and wind power a viable prospect, especially as prices for renewables have plunged.
    A Piñera victory would be welcomed by the copper-producing country’s business community, which blames current center-left President Michelle Bachelet for stoking market uncertainty in one of Latin America’s most free-market economies…
    Guillier and Sanchez have both also spoken in favor of boosting renewable energy, though neither has given a specific time-frame for moving toward an all-clean grid.
    http://www.reuters.com/article/us-chile-election-energy/conservative-chile-presidential-candidate-calls-for-all-renewable-grid-idUSKCN1BW2PL?feedType=RSS&feedName=environmentNews

    a bit outdated, but:

    Wikipedia: Renewable energy in Chile is a fast growing sector that in 2014 provided 9% of the country’s electricity.

    International Hydropower Assocn: Chile
    (This country profile is featured in the 2017 Hydropower Status Report)
    As it continues to grow, it is expected that Chile’s energy demand will increase from roughly 75 TWh today, to over 100 TWh by 2020. The country will have to add over 8 GW of new generation capacity by 2020 in order to meet the expected expansion in demand…
    There is currently a total of 7,055 MW of installed hydropower capacity in Chile. The majority is concentrated in the Maule and Bío Bío regions, where the plants export production to Santiago. The National Energy Strategy (ENE) has targets for 45-48 per cent of electricity generation to be sourced from hydropower by 2024. The strategy also estimates that Chile’s hydro energy potential could easily exceed 12.5 GW…
    https://www.hydropower.org/country-profiles/chile

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    • #

      pat mentions this: (my bolding here)

      As it continues to grow, it is expected that Chile’s energy demand will increase from roughly 75 TWh today, to over 100 TWh by 2020.

      The population of Chile is (around) 18.5 Million so around 75.5% of the population of Australia.

      That power consumption in Chile is that quoted 75TWH.

      The total power consumption here in Australia is 250TWH. (200TWH True Power)

      So while we have a marginally larger population, we consume 3.5 times (plus) the power that Chile consumes.

      The difference between an already Developed Country and one which is classified as still Developing.

      They either aspire to reach our level of development, or we can go back and join them. The choice is as stark as that.

      Tony.

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    pat

    22 Sept: National Post: Rex Murphy: All global warming predictions are infallible… until they’re not
    Could even a smidgen of the skepticism some have been urging, some of the warnings that science and politics are a terrible blend, be justified?
    There is a disturbance in the troposphere, much perturbation. The little Gore molecules that do so much to keep everybody in the climate change industry in a sweat are slacking off. The results are—let me coin a word—undeniable. The world’s leading climate entrepreneur’s new PowerPoint agitprop, An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power, hasn’t stirred the waters or warmed the air…READ ALL
    (HUNDREDS OF COMMENTS)
    http://nationalpost.com/opinion/rex-murphy-all-global-warming-predictions-are-infallible-until-theyre-not

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    Dennis

    Global cooling published by The Australian newspaper, ignored by other MSM, and today The Weekend Australian reports that authorities are on alert as a heat wave develops – temperature set to rise above 30 degrees C.

    Run for cover folks, it’s global warming continued.

    22

  • #
    Dennis

    How does this BoM reporting stand when compared to them changing temperature figures to create a warming trend?

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-09-23/sydney-sizzles-as-september-heat-record-broken-in-nsw/8976800

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  • #
    Greg Cavanagh

    Oh, and the End of the World is TODAY.
    Maybe they’ll be correct this time?

    20

    • #
      Dennis

      Nibiru or Marduk, the missing planet, according to Babylonian and Sumerian tablet history records.

      But I understood that it has a 3,600 year orbit around the Sun and circles from out wide to closer in and avoids hitting Earth.

      Whatever, NASA claims it doesn’t exist. Others claim it blew up and became the asteroid belt?

      20

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    Dennis

    Twilight Of Abundance – why life in the 21st century will be nasty, brutish, and short.

    David Archibald author.

    10

  • #
    Louis Hissink

    One needs to remember that the people in charge all, without exception one suspects, believe in central planning as an efficacious policy and which includes weather/climate planning.

    An excess of group narcissism seems to be in play.

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  • #
    Stephen Wells

    Yes the diminishing logarithmic absorption properties of CO2.
    Doesn’t quite fit with Carl Sagan’s original warning of a “runaway greenhouse effect”, when proposing that CO2 was responsible for the surface temperatures on the planet Venus, does it?
    The mathematics just won’t fit the theory. And if Venus surface temperatures are not caused by CO2 or a “greenhouse effect”, then neither are our surface temperatures

    11

    • #
      Harry Twinotter

      Stephen Wells.

      No, the “runaway” hypothesis for Venus is a good one. The same physics and mathematics applies to Earth’s atmosphere, although the Equilibrium Climate Sensitivity (ECS) is an open question with most of the evidence pointing to around 3C per doubling.

      Even the IPA’s graph (MODTRAN) in that ad shows global warming clearly. I didn’t check the figures myself, but they look about right.

      00

      • #
        KinkyKeith

        If it wasn’t so pathetic I’d be tempted to laugh.

        Everybody knows that if you double 3C° you end up with 6.

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    Harry Twinotter

    Are they crazy? That ad is gibberish!

    10

    • #
      AndyG55

      Gibberish.. then its in a language you speak fluently, right twotter.!

      I’m sure that will be the best response you can offer, though.

      02