JoNova

A science presenter, writer, speaker & former TV host; author of The Skeptic's Handbook (over 200,000 copies distributed & available in 15 languages).


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Tuesday Open Thread

7.6 out of 10 based on 12 ratings

124 comments to Tuesday Open Thread

  • #
    Stanley

    Numero uno?

    61

  • #
    David Maddison

    Australia has been in a state of self-destruction for a long time, but the pace will accelerate dramatically under the Alba-sleazy regime.

    And, as shown during the covid lockups, particularly in Vicdanistan, Australian Governments are prepared to use extreme force to enforce their un-Australian and dictatorial decrees. Dissent of any kind will not be tolerated.

    252

    • #
      Ted1

      Maybe. See how far they get.

      The do-ers don’t have much time to fight. They have work to do.

      If the do-ers lose their work, then they will have time to fight.

      Just try to make sure that the do-ers can see the wall before they hit it.

      110

    • #
      Ted1

      Banner headline at 5:30 PM: “QUEENSLAND BLACKOUTS AVERTED AS GENERATORS ORDERED TO KEEP RUNNING”.

      How marvellously Marxist!

      I take it that generators were “ordered” to postpone scheduled maintenance.

      For how long?

      70

  • #
    Brenda Spence

    This doesnt give a good prognosis for “vaxxinees”

    (Natural News) EXCLUSIVE: Today we are publishing a series of lab microscopy photos of bizarre clots which are now being routinely found in adults who “suddenly died,” usually in a number of months following covid vaccinations.

    https://www.naturalnews.com/2022-06-12-blood-clots-microscopy-suddenly-died.html

    101

    • #
      David Maddison

      I have no doubt that the poorly tested/untested covid “vaccines” are toxic, dangerous and in certain cases deadly, and responsible for many cases of SADS, but to suggest that the body was programmed to make clots resembling the structures of electronic circuits is going too far.

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      • #
        Ian

        “but to suggest that the body was programmed to make clots resembling the structures of electronic circuits is going too far.”

        Which vaccine generated the greatest number of deaths? Was there a relationship between the number of vaccinations and subsequent death?

        25

        • #
          Gary

          I heard it was mostly to do with the dosage, but who really knows? Moderna was supposedly the worst with 100mcg for adults, compared to something like 30mcg in Pfizer. Another confounding factor was that no account was taken of body weight: eg an 11-year and 364-day-old girl who weighed 45 kg would get 10 MCG, but 30 MCG the day after on her birthday – the same as an 18 y.o., 90 kg male rugby player.

          71

        • #
          Ian

          David Madidson are you unable to answer my questions or is the relevant information not available to you? I’d have thought the article would have provided the relevant info and as it appears not tw=o have done leaves one wondering about the veracity of its claims

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        • #
          yarpos

          He probably doesn’t realize how important you are and he has a service level agreement to meet.

          111

        • #
          Graeme#4

          Actually David puts in quite an effort in the technical field, and I for one appreciate what he is doing.

          30

    • #
      OldOzzie

      COVID is making flu and other common viruses act in unfamiliar ways

      Washington: At one point last month, children were admitted to Yale New Haven Children’s Hospital with a startling range of seven respiratory viruses.

      They had adenovirus and rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus and human metapneumovirus, influenza and parainfluenza, as well as the coronavirus – which many specialists say is to blame for the unusual surges.

      “That’s not typical for any time of year and certainly not typical in May and June,” said Thomas Murray, an infection-control expert and associate professor of pediatrics at Yale. Some children admitted to the hospital were co-infected with two viruses and a few with three, he said.

      More than two years into the coronavirus pandemic, familiar viruses are acting in unfamiliar ways. Respiratory syncytial virus, known as RSV, typically limits its suffocating assaults to the winter months.

      Rhinovirus, cause of the common cold, rarely sends people to the hospital.

      And the flu, which seemed to be making a comeback in December after being a no-show the year before, disappeared again in January once the Omicron variant of the coronavirus took hold.

      Now the flu is back, but the strain doesn’t have a common lineage known as Yamagata, which hasn’t been spotted since early 2020. It could have gone extinct or may be lying in wait to attack our unsuspecting immune systems, researchers said.

      130

      • #
        Ted1

        How many tests did that take?

        10

      • #
        OldOzzie

        Bruce of Newcastle says:
        June 14, 2022 at 4:08 pm

        Scientists discover some Fully Vaccinated Children are suffering Sepsis & Autoimmune Disease when exposed to Covid-19

        This was a sad tale I saw today:

        Safe And Effective (14 Jun)

        “We’re all sick, or if we’re not sick we are recovering from being sick, or we are about to get sick. People are getting Covid twice, or recovering from Covid, then getting some other sickness pretty much straight away, or they are not recovering; their sickness is lingering into days of double digits (one person I know has been sick for 54 days!). The sick wonder with dread if they have the extended mix of the sickness, the long version: The Sickness – Uncut? They wonder if this is now them, forever.”

        And this one.

        Canadian PM Trudeau tests positive for COVID a second time (13 Jun)

        He’s double vaccinated and boosted. The other time he had it was only back in January.

        I think this sort of thing should cease after people stop getting boosters, then give it 12 months or so for their T-cells to regenerate. But in some unlucky people it looks like they’re in for a fair bit of illness until then.

        100

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  • #
    el+gordo

    It appears 96% of gas miners in Australia are foreign owned companies.

    100

    • #
      Ted1

      I have been watching that and lamenting it for sixty years, with capital generally. We sold it all for cash and spent the cash on Luddite work practices. The Luddites never understood that it’s not the work that runs out, it’s the money.

      If the general population understood the opportunities they have wasted they would all jump off a cliff. In the sixties we went ahead in leaps and bounds, only to hand over the management to Hawke and Whitlam to destroy it all.

      81

    • #
      James Murphy

      1st June 2022: BHP (oil & gas) and Woodside merged to become the largest energy company listed on the ASX.

      70

      • #
        Ted1

        Thanks to Peter Costello’s insistence that the head office remain in Australia.

        But who owns the shares?

        41

        • #
          James Murphy

          Yes, I know it’s not proof of much, but better than oil companies who set up new offices in Australia and import the entire workforce, like some I could mention.

          50

    • #
      • #
        el+gordo

        Its disgraceful, what do you suggest we do?

        02

        • #
          Dave

          Build more coal HELE powered stations and Nuclear!

          And get rid of renewables.

          111

          • #
            el+gordo

            Realistically, new gas fired power stations are the best we can hope for at the moment. When its recognised that CO2 doesn’t cause warming, we can then build Hele coal fired power stations.

            Leave out nuclear.

            41

  • #
    OldOzzie

    Top Ender says:
    June 14, 2022 at 12:57 pm

    Judith Sloan in fine cutting fashion on the energy situation:

    Drive to renewables won’t bring energy prices down soon

    JUDITH SLOAN

    Even before the election there were signs the coming three years would be a difficult time for any government. The combination of higher prices for petrol, electricity and food and escalating mortgage rates means many households will find their budgets squeezed.

    The challenges for the Labor government are extensive and weighty. The national electricity market is under considerable stress, but government actions are constrained by the election pledges made to reduce emissions by 43 per cent by 2030 and to increase the share of renewables in the system to 83 per cent. The expectation was that household power bills would be lower by $275 by 2025 and by nearly $400 by the end of the decade.

    The government is under pressure from the Greens and the teals to lift its emissions reduction target but Labor is likely to resist. It was refreshing to see newly installed Resources Minister Madeleine King speaking sense about the need to repair coal-fired power stations quickly to provide reliable (and less costly) power.

    Needless to say, this incensed Greens leader Adam Bandt. His solution to the problems in the NEM is to hasten the rollout of renewables, citing the example of electricity in the ACT as a success story of 100 per cent renewables.

    Had he bothered to look more closely at the situation in the ACT, he might have been more circumspect. The ACT is the size of a handkerchief and has a population of just more than 400,000. No large-scale electricity is generated there; the ACT is effectively part of the NSW system.

    It is also worth examining the potential impact of Labor’s proposed Rewiring the Nation program in which a $20bn off-budget fund will be created to subsidise the construction of a tapestry of transmission lines to link renewable energy projects to the grid.

    The claim is the availability of cheap renewable energy is being thwarted because the regulatory process of approval is bogged down and there has been insufficient investment in transmission lines to the sites that could provide cheap electricity, albeit intermittently. Bear in mind that a regulated asset – one approved by the regulator – means the owner of the transmission line is guaranteed a rate of return, with costs passed on to all consumers.

    But here’s the problem – if a renewable project (or set of projects) produces power only 20 or 30 per cent of the time (the sun has a nasty habit of setting), then the attached transmission line will similarly bear that inefficiency even though the costs are the same as a line with a high usage. In other words, there is a potential for prices to be driven higher because of this policy.

    The bottom line is we are a long way from the affordable and reliable electricity system we had when the NEM was created at the start of the century. Electricity prices have risen in real terms over the past decade and a half and are now high by international standards, although there are other countries with high prices too, including Germany and Britain. With the engineers sidelined, many ill-considered decisions have led us to this predicament. It won’t be easy to fix.

    JUDITH SLOAN
    CONTRIBUTING ECONOMICS EDITOR

    311

    • #
      RickWill

      This is crazy worrying about coal and gas plants. There is 8.5GW of installed wind capacity and 17GW of installed solar capacity. Just turn those f…ers up to full throttle, throw in the Snowy and Tassie hydros with top up from the big batteries and they can meet the 30GW peak demand easily to keep the lights on.

      Why is there any fuss at all about prices? The W&S have a negative marginal cost. If they just urned them up they could pay us to take their green energy.

      Where are the Teals. They know all this already. Just put them in charge.

      Look at the miracle in Canberra. They are getting an electricity price reduction because they were smart enough to go 100% “renewable”. How is that the ACT electricity retailer is the only one smart enough to SEE the future? The other States must be populated with morons.

      Where Gee Eye to sing the praises of Canberra?

      112

      • #
        Graeme M

        Mind you, the ACT gets the benefit of stable supply thanks to coal and gas generators (well, up to now at least) without paying for it.

        90

      • #
        yarpos

        Idiots like Bandt actually think only “RE” power flows from the power outlets in Canberra, while in Queanbeyan they get all that nasty coal and gas power that infest the NSW grid. He must believe in fairy dust.

        131

  • #
    OldOzzie

    Vox: Stop telling kids that climate change will destroy their world

    As I’ve written about before, climate change is going to be bad, and it will hold back humanity from thriving as much as we should this century. It will likely cause mass migration and displacement and extinctions of many species.

    What it won’t do, however, is make the Earth unlivable, or even mean that our children live in a world poorer than the one we grew up in.

    “There might not be a world to live in when she grows up. What use is school without a future?” one page describes Thunberg as thinking. Even as a setup for Thunberg’s rise as an activist, I’m not thrilled about that message. Some kids might hear that and be inspired to speak before the United Nations, but most kids are going to hear that and be scared and disempowered.

    That pessimistic message seems to be sinking in for the young. A 2021 study funded by the campaign and research group Avaaz polled 10,000 people between 16 and 25, and found that over half thought that humanity was “doomed” because of climate change.

    There’s something twisted and cruel about people who seem to go out of their way to tell kids that they are all doomed.

    171

    • #
      Steve of Cornubia

      I was shopping in Toymate earlier today, looking for a gift for my granddaughter. I wanted to buy her something educational, perhaps a science or chemistry set. While perusing the shelves, I came across a large box emblazoned with the words ‘Climate Change’, inside which was apparently some sort of learning set.

      What is it with lefties that makes them focus so much on destroying the happiness and mental health of tiny children?

      170

      • #
        Hanrahan

        They should take the kids out of town, or to a beach, talk to some oldies and ask what effects of CC they have seen. Personally I have seen none.

        I have just come back from a walk, and the beach, so close to town was clean and growing. I reckon there is 100 m more sand than I remember. Cyclone Althea was 50 years ago and there has been nothing destructive since.

        120

        • #
          Ted1

          Was it really 50 years?

          Indeed it was.

          Time to stop counting.

          60

          • #
            Greg in NZ

            Semi-troppo Tasman low forming this weekend between QLD & NZ – solstice La Niña swell factory for NSW & QLD while we may be rained-off work come Monday.

            Meanwhile in Western Australia, freezing snow is expected on the summit of Bluff Knoll as a semi-Antarctic Bight low sucks up a cold southerly…

            I love *climate change* – it brings the best of both worlds!

            80

          • #
            GlenM

            Althea chased us and our Kombi down the QLD coast. Then you noticed the Bruce Highway was below the level of the adjoining countryside. The toads were in their prime.

            30

  • #
    OldOzzie

    Question to Blog Techo’s re F1 engine problems and fuel seal/fuel problems this season

    Is it related to F1 decision to move to ethanol based fuel this year casing problems?

    Mercedes engine chief explains why move to E10 fuel demanded ‘fundamental relook’ at power unit

    and

    F1 moves to E10 fuel: a look at how engines change and the loss of power
A look at how engines change and the loss of power

    given

    Negative Effects of Ethanol in Gasoline

    When fuel absorbs water and brings it into an engine, there is a chance that rust will form on the interior of the engine. For obvious reasons, this is bad for any piece of equipment. The particles that get into the gas from rust flakes will clog up the fuel filter sooner or later. These flakes can also damage the pistons, rings, seals, and any number of other components of the engine.
    Ethanol increases gasoline vapor pressure, which may cause a vapor lock in the carburetor. This fuel starvation will prevent an engine from starting. This is an issue in higher altitudes and hot weather. Make sure to store gasoline with an ethanol mixture properly and to use it in a timely fashion.

    Gasoline with ethanol decreases the life of the engine and its parts. The alcohol can cause engine seals to break down more quickly. Having a cleaning agent like this constantly in a small engine that was not engineered for this fuel mixture simply ages it at a faster rate.

    The ethanol in E10 gas breaks down quickly. An area representative for the garden equipment company MTD informed me that E10 begins to break down within three weeks. This breakdown creates clumps in the gasoline mixture which may clog the filter, carburetor, or fuel line. To help prevent this a person can purchase a gas preservative product such as Sta-Bil and add it as directed to their gas. This will help prolong the life of the gas and keep it from harming your small engine as much.

    When I wrote this article ten years ago, people at a local area small engine repair shop told me that the E10 breaking down was the major cause of equipment being sent in. Inspection, diagnosis, repair, and testing generally cost between $50.00 and $60.00 even when the issue was simply bad gas. This repair shop would drain the system and add new gas that has a stabilizer in it after diagnosing the issue.


    90

    • #
      yarpos

      Of course changing fuel means you need to review everything in a top flight racing operation. E10 is hardly new technology though, its been around a very long time. Perhaps the mix with the more extreme environment brings out new issues. People like NHRA, NASCAR and Supercars in OZ have been operating alcohol engines and E85 engines for a long time also.

      I dont use E10 in anything, only because it solves no problems and may create some in older cars I have or have had. I find it easier to just not use it, then I can take fuel from anything and use it as I like.

      50

    • #
      Saighdear

      well I’m not a fan of all this Bio fuels either : for the reasons (2) of taking food crops to produce fuel ( ie food cropping land being misappropriated ( but then again we build houses and factories on the land, too ) ) and that the water element of the fuel allows fungal infections to choke and spoil both the fuel or Lube oils as well as the subsequential damage to the machinery. The world is being run by juvenile delinquents. These folk have never played as a child to learn from “models” to KNOW how the real world performs. They have never LEARNT and APPLIED their aDsorbed knowledge. Had they played better they may have better aBsorbed their education to integrate the assimilations of knowledge w ith the real world. But such IS the real world now – a bit of some drug-fuelled fantasy land.
      So we are encouraged to wear our engines out quicker and C O N S U M E more raw materials in their upkeep and replacement ….. and that’s being GREEN ? and as for the Additives … ever read the label of CONTENTS ? ….. ‘.. in the State of California….’ just about says it all. ALL our Diesels are pre-Ad-Blue ( Nitrogen plant food fertiliser) and non of the Petrols have Cats either. they are Old school , work hard, run clean ( MOT Emissions seem not to be functioning when testing our engines ….. do I need F1 & Co. to research modern fuels ? Does LH need a ring in his nose ? Only our Bulls and the odd Boar have that.

      60

  • #
    crakar24

    Link to microscopy description of clots found in expired vaccinated people

    https://www.naturalnews.com/2022-06-12-blood-clots-microscopy-suddenly-died.html

    Link to pod cast explaining the photos taken

    https://www.naturalnews.com/hrr/mp3/HRR-2022-06-13-Situation-Update.mp3

    I shudder to think what will happen if all MRNA vaccinated people have these

    72

  • #
    OldOzzie

    Climate-Change Censorship: Phase Two

    Now Gina McCarthy tells Big Tech to stifle debate global-warming policy responses.

    By The WSJ Editorial Board

    Progressives first demanded that social media platforms silence critics of climate alarmism. Now White House national climate adviser Gina McCarthy wants them to censor content on the costs of a force-fed green energy transition.

    A few years ago, Facebook enlisted third-party “fact checkers” to review news stories about climate.

    That didn’t satisfy Democratic Senators who howled about a “loophole” for opinion pieces. Facebook then began appending fact-checks to op-eds, including by our contributors Bjorn Lomborg and Steven Koonin, that criticized apocalyptic climate models and studies. The goal was to restrict readership.

    Now progressives are moving to censorship phase two, which is shutting down debate over climate “solutions.” “Now it’s not so much denying the problem,” Ms. McCarthy said in an Axios interview last Thursday. “What the industry is now doing is seeding doubt about the costs associated with [green energy] and whether they work or not.”

    Ms. McCarthy cited the week-long power outage in Texas in February 2021. “The first thing we read in the paper was” that the blackouts occurred “because of those wind turbines,” she said. “That became the mantra.” In fact, most of the media immediately blamed climate change and fossil fuels.

    We were among the few to point out that wind energy plunged as temperatures dropped and turbines froze. Gas-fired plants couldn’t make up for the wind shortfall despite running all-out, and then some went down too. Ms. McCarthy doesn’t want to admit the inconvenient truth that renewable energy sources are making the grid increasingly unreliable.

    Comparing fossil-fuel companies to Big Tobacco, she complained that “dark money” is being used to “fool” the public about “the benefits of clean energy.” “We need the tech companies to really jump in,” she said, because highlighting the costs of green energy is “equally dangerous to denial because we have to move fast.” Got that, Mark Zuckerberg ?

    Merely pointing out technical limitations of lithium-ion batteries could be “disinformation.” Asked whether climate disinformation posed a threat to public health, Ms. McCarthy replied “absolutely” while adding hilariously that “President Biden doesn’t focus on, and neither do I on, bashing the fossil-fuel companies.” The Axios interviewer smiled and nodded along.

    Some conservative scholars argue that Big Tech companies could be sued as “state actors” for violating users’ First Amendment speech rights when they censor content at the behest of government officials.

    Ms. McCarthy is helping make their case.

    91

  • #
    David Maddison

    This is not news but to show you how disconnected from reality Australian “leaders” are, this (link below) is the proposal to turn the perfectly functional, low cost open cut coal mine next to the now-demolished Hazelwood Power Station into a lake.

    We should be digging up the coal and burning it to make low cost, reliable electricity. Not destroying the mine to make it into a lake.

    In fact, the cooling pond of the power station used to provide a beautifully heated lake for all-year-round water sports plus it was also stocked with tropical fish.

    https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/hazelwood-coal-mine-in-the-latrobe-valley-could-become-a-lake-after-mining-ceases-20160930-grsh68.html

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    • #
      OldOzzie

      “We’re now in 2022. What can possibly be constructed on scale to replace 60 per cent of the current energy supply in Victoria in three years?” said Mr Dimery.

      “If it’s out there … show me, tell me how you’re going to do it. Otherwise we’re gambling with energy reliability, energy security and energy pricing to consumers, and I don’t think that’s a wise bet.

      “You can’t just jump off the pier with this stuff, you’ve got to ease your way into it.”

      Mr Dimery was speaking just ahead of departing for Europe, where he will hold talks as part of Alinta’s investigations into switching Loy Yang B to run on biomass, rather than brown coal.

      He could not provide details of the plans due to confidentiality arrangements, but said government support would be needed to set up the supply chain for the biomass fuel.

      “The big issue to solve really will be supply chain: that would require government support. There’s no way we’d be able to economically establish a supply chain just for Loy Yang B in the Australian context.” he said.

      So Instead of

      We should be digging up the coal and burning it to make low cost, reliable electricity. Not destroying the mine to make it into a lake.

      we get BioMass from Overseas and the Australian Taxpayer will subside the transportation. also leaving Australian Energy at Risk to Supply Chain from Overseas – DUMB

      161

      • #
        Serp

        Beyond just dumb, criminal.

        110

      • #
        David Maddison

        Thanks for posting OldOzzie.

        So it looks like energy-rich Australia is going to import trees to burn, cut down from old growth forests in the US or elsewhere, just like Drax Power Station does in Once Great Britain?

        How utterly insane!

        Why don’t we just burn the trees already here in the form of coal, or just cut down our own forests?

        101

      • #
        David Maddison

        If Australia goes the route of burning imported biomass in power stations built next to presently working coal mines, then what more complete proof is needed that Australia has truly lost the plot?

        Meanwhile, whilst importing biomass, we will no doubt continue to export coal….

        Insane!

        141

        • #
          Hanrahan

          Has anyone suggested that we should? The little bit being burned in Qld would be bagasse in sugar mills.

          60

          • #
            yarpos

            I have a nice black and white photo of my Grandad driving a cane train in QLD, he had an interesting life.

            70

        • #
          Hanrahan

          Sorry David, I was reading up the page and didn’t see OOs post.

          60

  • #
    OldOzzie

    John Sheldrick says:
    June 14, 2022 at 1:44 pm

    Take climate change. The better educated you are, the more likely you are to accept the science, believe we should be acting, and not be worried about either losing your job in the mine or paying a bit more for power.

    With acknowledgments to Peter Smith of Quadrant Online – In the Realm of the King of Lies

    “The airhead Teals didn’t get in because of the strength of their arguments. They rode in on the general gullibility of a population, which has succumbed to climate-related lies; just as the same population dutifully and uselessly masked up.

    I’m not talking, by the way, about the unproven hypothesis that man-made CO2 is the predominant cause of the mild warming since, say, 1875, or that continued warming might cause problems. That’s at least a contestable proposition. I’m talking about the surrounding gabble. The ten years to extinction trope, which is constantly updated to ten years hence as each year passes. They don’t think we notice. And, for the most part, they’re probably right.

    Dud prediction after dud prediction. Tim Flannery’s, ‘the dams will never fill’ prediction has gone down in Australian folklore, thanks to Sky News saving the video from deletion. But his wayward prediction is one of many. Snow is a thing of the past. ‘Drowning’ Pacific Islands. More widespread and intense droughts, floods, famines, bushfires, cyclones. Millions of climate refugees. None of it bears scrutiny. Lies. And deliberately constructed to serve an agenda”.

    161

    • #
      RickWill

      The better educated you are,

      It is so sad that the words “educated”: and “indoctrinated” are used synonymously. No educated person would believe the nonsense about Global Warming or Climate Change.

      The simple fact is that open ocean surfaces CANNOT EXCEED 30C over an annual cycle. No climate model incorporates this fundamental physical constraint so they are ALL WRONG.

      It is quite amazing that Climate indoctrinated individuals, who present as skeptics, do not comprehend this fundamental fact.

      It is there for everyone who cares to take notice to see the limit at work every day of every year:
      https://www.tropicaltidbits.com/analysis/ocean/cdas-sflux_sst_global_1.png

      160

    • #
      yarpos

      sadly its more common to have a qualification than an education these days

      thinking uncritically within a defined box and just turning up is all it takes

      70

  • #
    DOC

    I don’t get the definitive part that the climate is changing due to man. Few people argue that it is changing, but it always has; so what? People have always adapted to climate (as per Bjorn Lomborg, but for some reason he is cancelled in Australia and Australian universities).

    From the start of this movement even the advocates were saying AGW is an unproven theory. They stated that the world must move now to combat Agw because that would be more economic than facing a hotter world in ‘the future’.

    There was no talk of ‘adaptation’. It was ‘their way or the highway’! There was no third way (adaptation) allowed to be considered. It is apparent adaptation did not meet the ends towards which the activists wanted to drive the world. Already, most people would be questioning that basic premise that what we are being forced into is actually cheaper than adapting to any change over time as might be needed.

    When demands for proof of theory were made, or qualified people demanded to see the original measured data (remember the emails of the University of East Anglia where the university itself decided there was nothing to see in the emails) and testing of theory, little was forthcoming. The activists themselves set themselves a time for when the proof of theory would be evident. That was a century on; nobody joining the argument would be alive to know whether it’s a fact or a con.
    That timing later was extended to a millenium if necessary by which time the planet could have been reduced to a heap of ashes by a nuclear war or a volcanic disaster and nobody would worry about ‘AGW’.

    To counter the obvious weakness in such a story, we now see the reports coming from the IPPC or UN or any other interests in where this activity is leading us (and ? the gravy train) we now see on occasion experts on climate (that allow no debate on their ‘facts’) coming out and saying they are now a ‘lot more certain’ that the theory is correct ie they are still aware the theory is unproven and so have to shore up their occupation.

    The matter is sold as ‘Climate Change’ now. The ‘anthropogenic’is actually being forced from the lexicon. This is simply a legal setup to safeguard those forcing the changes and those providing data to keep the ball rolling.

    Many people now automatically believe that any warming climate change is due to them; the matter no longer has to be argued because the idea is ingrained from a very, very young age. That, as you say Old Ozzie, has the children terrorised for their futures as though they are facing a planet on fire. The fact that somehow the climate has changed between extremes of cold and less extreme warmth without the help of human beings and fossil fuels, forever, is not presented to them to balance their views nor to stimulate their young minds to question it. The current theory of climate change is unbalanced by saying it still just a theory that cannot tolerate scientific argument nor perusing by the scientific method. As such, it is medieval!

    I am open minded on the subject and totally unconvinced by the censored methodology it uses to force just one sided ideas down our throats.

    I want the entire matter forced to open debate between professional scientific experts in all fields. Exclude all fringe dwelling organisations that can maliciously use an undebated, unproven theory to push their own political dreams. In the USA in particular we are seeing the virulence, the violence that is utilized by activism trying to force major change on that society. It happens in their politics, in big business and in the communities even to the point of violent demonstration. It is of greater concern to me that the sectarian poison that now exists in the pursuit of these radical movements will eventually explode into violent, open conflict well before the turn of the century, the date given that something in the climate might change. It will happen in the USA, Canada, the EU and here. We have already seen the violence officially tolerated on our streets at the hands of law enforcement and activists when such change is pushed on us by our political parties backing enforcement of their own ideologies.

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      OldOzzie

      I don’t get the definitive part that the climate is changing due to man.

      Few people argue that it is changing, but it always has; so what? People have always adapted to climate (as per Bjorn Lomborg, but for some reason he is cancelled in Australia and Australian universities).

      My standard response to Teals/Climate Change Lovers

      Have you ever been to Lark Quarry Conservation Park? – The direct route to Dinosaur Stampede National Monument from Winton is via the Winton-Jundah Road. It is 110km to Lark Quarry Conservation Park.- well there are no Dinosaurs now – The Climate changed, and Humans were not involved

      A TERRIFYING ENCOUNTER FROZEN IN TIME…

      Stampede!

      95 million years ago Lark Quarry was part of a great river plain, with sandy channels, swamps, and lakes brimming with freshwater mussels, lungfish, and crocodiles. Rainfall was over a metre per year, so the surrounding lowland forest was lush and green..

      On the day our drama unfolds, some 95 million years ago, herds of small two-legged dinosaurs came to drink at the lake. There were at least 150 dinosaurs of two different kinds – carnivorous coelurosaurs about the size of chickens, and slightly larger plant-eating ornithopods, some of them as large as emus.

      A huge meat-eating theropod, smaller than a Tyrannosaurus, approached the lake. It slowed, saw the other dinosaurs gathered at the water’s edge and began to stalk, then turned and charged. The stampeding herd of smaller dinosaurs left a chaotic mass of footprints in the mud as they ran to escape.

      Fossilised …

      The site where the dinosaur footprints were found was once a streambed leading into a lake. The water level had dropped, exposing mudflats. When the dinosaurs stampeded, they left perfect footprints in the half-dried and still plastic mud.

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        Tarquin+Wombat-Carruthers

        I was there earlier this month! Fantastic experience!

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        Bruce

        I was there last year!

        The really interesting question is: “How did all those tiny footprints and the big ones get preserved in MUD?

        If, as surmised, the mud was near water, the next mob of thirsty beasties would have trampled it.

        If not, how long do footprints in mud remain visible in “modern” mud?

        What are the consequences of a moderate shower, or rising water?

        Assuming the footprints were undisturbed and the mud dried, under how much later material would the swamp need to be buried to metamorphose the mud into serious rock”

        Being without tertiary education, I took a stab.

        The tiny dinosaurs were not running away from the nasty carnivorous dinosaur. They were all running away from something a LOT bigger and louder. Something that rapidly buried the area under a thick layer of fine, and probably very HOT dust.

        All was not geologically or cosmologically “sweetness and light” in those days, (and not much has since changed, except the climate, the entire biosphere……

        Bear in mind that this piece of the past is set in stone on top of a hill that protrudes several hundred feet above the surrounding countryside. These “jump-ups” are littered all over inland Australia. There has been some serious erosion since the footprints were made, buried, “fossilized” and then “uplifted?”, and finally re-exposed.

        The “Inland sea” was once a reality, and Australia was FAR away from its current location and somewhat different in shape. Consider for a moment why there are stands of Antarctic Beech living in South-East Queensland

        A visit to some of the North American fossil fields is a mind-boggling experience. Consider the significant number of complete skeletons of prehistoric wildlife stacked en masse in places. A notable feature is the completeness of the skeletons and another is that many have the neck and head arched backwards and the tail arched forward over the spine.

        Thus, they died and were NOT dismembered by scavengers. They died in large numbers, as did, apparently, the scavengers. The bodies were soon afterwards washed into waterways and deposited in fine silt. The evidence of lack of scavenging is the completeness of the fossilized skeletons. After death, the connective tissues start to shrink, thus the arching of the neck and tail.

        Lots of interesting things from the past.

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          Serp

          Plenty of real catastrophes making plastic the planet and instantaneously entombing its available inhabitants; Velikovsky expatiated on these events in his Earth In Upheaval way back in 1956.

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    David Maddison

    Please see Tony Heller’s two latest videos about data fraud in the US temperature record.

    Preferably watch them on the free speech platforms but I only have YT links at the moment.

    Powerful and incriminating.

    Part 1 https://youtu.be/2y1MPPprzX4 under 8 mins
    Part 2 https://youtu.be/WwEy7QhUgIY under 8 mins

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    another ian

    Tucker Carlson on Red Flag laws and gun crime – or anything but!

    https://youtu.be/PLW40seir8w

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    Andrew McRae

    Power uncertainty to hit five states this afternoon and tomorrow
    Market notices published on the AEMO website are warning of possible power interruptions in Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia and Tasmania.

    Pretty soon we will need a Power Uncertainty report at the end of the nightly news, just after the weather report.
    “A large mass of power uncertainty will sweep across the south eastern states this evening, becoming heavier at midday tomorrow and decreasing by 6pm Thursday.” Of course any similarity between the Power Uncertainty report and the weather report will be purely random co-incidence. On commercial stations it will be sponsored by Tesla Powerwall.

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      el+gordo

      All of a sudden we have become a Third World country.

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        David Maddison

        All of a sudden we have become a Third World country.

        The process of civilisation takes centuries.

        The process of decivilisation can happen in days or weeks.

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        yarpos

        We have been a 3rd world country with delusions of adequacy for a while now. Its just that its starting to show.

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      Chad

      Unlikely that power will be critical tonight since Vic and SA have seem a big pick up in Wind generation..2-3GW more than yesterday.
      Qld has enough gas to carry it through.
      .

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    David Maddison

    Given the huge lead times to build coal, gas or nuclear power stations, and even more so in Australia, where good things happen at a glacial pace (if at all), what options does Australia have for power generation?

    As soon as it’s realised that Australia needs more power generation, the only viable generators that can be bought online quickly are gas turbines, the smaller versions of which are containerised, but we will need a lot of them to make up power deficits, and the cost for acquisition and fuel will be huge.

    Apart from severe rationing and/or even higher prices, what other options are there?

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      crakar24

      None, well maybe small modular reactors can be dispersed around the country when in need to “plug a gap” but they are ten years away so as i said we have no options available to us.

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      OldOzzie

      WA reveals plan to shut coal-fired power stations

      In a landmark announcement this afternoon, Premier Mark McGowan and Energy Minister Bill Johnston revealed state-owned power provider Synergy would shut its remaining coal-fired plants by 2029.

      Mr McGowan said the change was needed because the proliferation of renewable energy sources meant coal power was becoming more expensive.

      He said without a shift, household power bills could rise by around $1,200 a year by 2030.

      About 1,200 staff from Collie and the surrounding areas will be affected by the decision, although the government, industry and unions are aiming to retrain or re-employ workers as part of a “just transition” program.

      Synergy currently owns and runs two coal power stations, the 854MW Muja plant and the 340MW Collie asset, both of which are near Collie about 200km south of Perth.

      The government had already announced its planned closure of dates of October this year and 2024 for some older units at Muja.

      Renewable projects to ramp up

      Under the decision announced today, Collie will be closed by October 2027 while the remaining units at Muja will be shuttered just two years later, by October 2029.

      The exits will leave one coal-fired power plant operating in WA – the privately-owned Bluewaters generator which is also near Collie.

      As part of the shake-up, the government will spend $3.5 billion over 10 years building renewable energy capacity to replace the lost generation.

      This will feature about 800MW of new wind capacity along with more than 2000MWh of storage, including fast-start lithium-ion batteries.

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        David Maddison

        Mr McGowan said the change was needed because the proliferation of renewable energy sources meant coal power was becoming more expensive.

        I’m sick of hearing this obvious and oft repeated lie.

        Regardless of the complexity of pricing structures, all that matters is the price paid by the consumer.

        In 100% of cases I am aware of, and I have asked for any exceptions to this rule:

        More unreliables = higher cost to consumers.

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        yarpos

        Once again , no observation of the bleeding obvious, no lessons learnt. One wonders what he is trying to “fix”

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        Chad

        Since when will 800MW , ($1.0 bn), of wind turbines, replace 1200 MW of coal generation ?
        No amount of batteries will help that shortfall .

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      Chad

      There is no quick fix for lack of base load generation.
      The Military have mobile emergency generator sets on ships for use in emergency zones, but they are small fry compared to the necessary multi-GW we need.
      The russians have a Nuclear powered generator on a big ship they could lend us…
      ……if only we were on better terms !

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        OldOzzie

        The russians have a Nuclear powered generator on a big ship they could lend us…

        ……if only we were on better terms !

        Australia answers NATO call on Russia, China threat

        Australia will be asked to back a transformation of the NATO alliance to toughen defences against Russia and confront strategic competition with China at a summit later this month that will expand the 30-member alliance in response to the invasion of Ukraine.

        Prime Minister Anthony Albanese is considering whether to attend the summit in Madrid on June 29 and 30 as part of a show of support from Asia Pacific partners including leaders from Japan, South Korea and New Zealand.

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          OldOzzie

          Meanwhile – Inside the secretive world of shipping Russia’s tainted oil

          The volume of fuel collected from Russian ports by vessels owned, managed or flagged in Greece, Cyprus or Malta has tripled since the start of the conflict according to Refinitiv data analysed by Global Witness, a human rights NGO.

          “If that’s not profiteering, I’m not quite sure what is,” says Louis Wilson from Global Witness.

          But time may be running out. Last week the European Union said it would ban seaborne Russian oil imports, which represent more than two thirds of all deliveries of Putin’s crude to the bloc, by the end of the year. Greece, Malta and Cyprus pushed back against the move.

          It is a difficult step for a Continent so dependent on Russian energy, but one that has seemed increasingly inevitable as the conflict dragged on.

          “It’s a moral issue,” says Bjarne Schieldrop, a commodities analyst at Swedish bank SEB. “For Europe, it’s very hard to swallow that we are giving money to Russia every day, and they can continue to bombard and destroy.”

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            yarpos

            Its only “tainted” within the little club that calls itself the international community. Meanwhile the rest of the world (the bulk of humanity) moves on.

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        David Maddison

        The Russian floating nuclear power station produces only 70MW of electricity. Not nearly enough to cover Australia’s deficit.

        In any case, the Greens would rather us freeze in the dark. They wouldn’t get permission to dock anywhere.

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      RickWill

      Power barges can be a quick solution. More them near a substation and connect the gas or coal supply.

      This has been a solution used in New York and other third world locations for some time.

      This is Russias 70MWe nuclear barge:
      https://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/2018/05/04/nuclear-plant-floating-norway-rosatom/

      The largest power barge is rated at 486MWe:
      https://www.nigeriaelectricityhub.com/2015/10/09/alstom-to-supply-transformers-for-worlds-largest-floating-power-plant/

      The barges can be built quite quickly but I expect there is a growing demand given the delusion in the Net-Zero worriers.

      Just before the GFC, the waiting time for large diesel engines was 3 years. It also took three years to build a coal fired steam boiler for a turbine rated at 300MWe.

      China could probably build and supply a coal fired power barge at lower cost than upgrading an existing coal power station in Australia. Coal probably be supplied faster than Australia could be a coal loader to supply the barge and a substation to accept the power. Be wary of Chinese weld quality though.

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      OldOzzie

      Damn – I am tired of being Wet, Soggy and Cold here in Sydney

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        Greg in NZ

        Huzzah! Warm tropical trade winds – and currents – here in the Far North, I’m happy with that.

        Buddy texted from the Deep South to say he was surfing with snow on the beach… that’s why I don’t live there anymore, brrrrr…

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        yarpos

        Never mind , summer is coming and then you can be wet , soggy and sweaty.

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    David Maddison

    Australia is facing an existential crisis, but nothing to do with the climate.

    Australia is being deliberately and systematically starved of energy, the lifeblood of civilisation.

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    David Maddison

    This is a very interesting video about Eartha Kitt.

    https://youtu.be/MKRxdXfkb3M

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      Honk R Smith

      When I worked as a musician, I was on stage with her once.
      It was me, a drummer, bassist, and her musical director at piano.
      The leader of the big band I was in, unbeknownst to us, had hired the rhythm section out for all the entertainers on the bill.
      Eartha Kitt, George Burns, and a female impersonator named Jimmy Johnson (I think).
      We arrived in early afternoon, immediately sat down for intense rehearsals with the musical directors for each of the stars.
      A short break in which I could not find food or drink, and 3 or more hours of the show backing the stars and the band I came with.
      Our drummer had done show work in NYC, his experience saved us from a train wreck.
      All three stars were fantastic.
      I recall Eartha giving me dirty look, (she was good at that), because I made a mistake since I barley knew what I was doing.
      The female impersonator closed the show and was really good doing Cher and Marilyn Monroe.
      Eight or nine intense hours straight, not counting traveling, no break to speak of.
      I think I made $125
      It’s long way to the top if you want to Rock n’ Roll.
      Of course, I only experienced the long way part.

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        Honk R Smith

        Should add for the record …
        Eartha Kitt’s regal charismatic magnetism was palpable.
        Also unsurpassed professionalism.

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    David Maddison

    If you are interested in watches, in this video an amateur horologist fixes a saltwater damaged Rolex watch Rolex refused to look at.

    https://youtu.be/xasm3GFL7mM

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    David Maddison

    News posted one hour ago.

    https://www.news.com.au/finance/money/costs/national-disgrace-australias-blackout-threat-growswith-east-coast-facing-outages-in-hours/news-story/45646915f06d631b8e14c630af0e6b78

    Australia’s blackout threat grows with five states facing outages within hours

    The east coast of Australia could be plunged into darkness within hours as the nation’s energy crisis rages on, amid a warning five states could face blackouts.

    Alexis Carey
    June 14, 2022 – 5:01PM

    Australia’s power shortages now threaten five states after the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) warned of possible power interruptions from late this afternoon.

    An update published on the AEMO website cautioned of maximum power load interruptions in Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia and Tasmania.

    The warnings were initially sent for the east coast of Queensland and NSW, but have now spread to hundreds of thousands of additional households across the nation.

    SEE LINK FOR REST

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    another ian

    Mark Steyn 0n monkeypox and SADS

    https://youtu.be/HyRmQqdZZZs

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    rowjay

    Last century, SE Australian grid power production was essentially coal-fired. Peak electricity usage was in the summer months when cooling using air conditioners caused the increase. Less grid power was needed during the winter months as reverse cycle air conditioners were not terribly efficient on frosty mornings, and wood or gas took care of heating requirements. The Autumn shoulder period when cooling or electrical heating was not required were the traditional coal-fired generator scheduled maintenance periods.

    A real-world example of electrical/gas usage is the ACT, where gas still provides 55-60% of the Territories winter energy needs. A similar situation exists in southern NSW and Victoria. This means that if a 100% renewables/no gas scenario was adopted, the peak power usage period for SE Australia would now be winter, and the peak would likely be double the summer peak when renewables are most compromised by short, cloudy days and common wind stagnation events.

    What a mess!

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      robert rosicka

      Just seen on sky news that the NSW government were offered the purchase of Earring power station but declined citing “it was socially unacceptable” , not having enough power to keep the lights on must therefore be socially acceptable .

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    another ian

    Andrew Bolt on the brave new world

    https://youtu.be/VlIfdLE8nQw

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    b.nice

    OUCH ! says the stock market ! 🙁

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    CHRIS

    Eartha Kitt….nobody

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    OldOzzie

    Davey Boy says:
    June 15, 2022 at 3:07 am

    Some early morning reading, from The Breaking Up: Australia’s history since 1788
    (Bit of a text wall, I wonder if it will post…)

    IT SEEMED LIKE A GOOD IDEA AT THE TIME.
    By Roslyn Ross

    Why are Aboriginal remote communities such cesspits of dysfunction? It cannot be blamed on a lack of money, attention or time invested in solving their problems.

    Davey Boy an excellent post – I have saved in Notes with correct paras for future reference

    A Couple of bits struck a chord from personal experience

    So, houses are built for those in Aboriginal communities without taking into account that if someone dies in a house, in such primitive tribal communities, no-one can sleep in that house anymore. Aboriginal cultures in 1788 were highly superstitious, as indeed were all humans at stone-age levels of existence, and these superstitions have endured in those communities which are the least assimilated into the modern world. Leaving a simple Wurlie now inhabited by the ghost of someone dead, and whipping up a new one with a few branches and bark, is a very different matter to replacing a community of abandoned houses. Whose fault is it that the houses are now deemed uninhabitable because of superstitition?

    As another example of what can go wrong when you paste the modern world onto an old one: stoves are provided in kitchens. Without taking into account that the normal cooking practices are to throw an animal onto the fire and so, they do the same thing with the cooker, turning on all the hobs, putting the animal on top, and very soon it is so full of animal fats and juices it no longer works. Those using the cooker have, seemingly, no idea this will destroy it and certainly no idea how to fix it, if indeed they could embrace such a concept of repair in a world where ‘ask and it shall be given’ is how things work. Another broken piece of modern equipment littering the land as water pumps do in Africa. And for the same reasons, no-one thought it through. But they did mean well, and everyone agreed it was a good idea at the time.

    When mining companies want to build useful structures in a community, like a school and health centre, they will have to deal with individual ‘needs’ and wants which will be about money and Toyotas.

    Generally, the outcome for the Aboriginal community will be a school or a health centre, not both, and the rest in money and cars. Without such concessions no agreement can ever be reached and no mine will ever be built. The school and health centre would of course meet the needs of everyone in the community and the money and cars will meet the needs of a few in the community – the most powerful. Remote areas of Australia are littered with trashed Toyotas. They are our ‘water pump’ equivalent. Perhaps a charity can be set up to teach the locals to repair and restore them. What does it matter when there will be another car gifted? What does it matter when only today is relevant?

    This is why the local Aboriginal community for the Argyle Diamond Mine in the Kimberley region of WA, despite forty years of substantial royalties in the many millions, achieved very little, if anything beyond some heady personal gains. And when the mine closed recently, were bemoaning the loss of such monies and the penury it would bring. They had forty years to put millions to good use and they did not. Why? Because they did not and do not think in such a way and their tribal structures and systems do not allow such thinking.
    Jo,

    the complete post by Roslyn Ross – IT SEEMED LIKE A GOOD IDEA AT THE TIME.

    deserves a thread of its own

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    OldOzzie

    Slithering and Pandering on the Road to Ruin

    Britain and Australia have quite a bit in common politically at the minute, and each nation’s Tory supporters can learn from the experience of the other. A little comparison might be in order.

    One thing that British Tories can absorb from the May 21 Australian election is that conservative voters like their conservative politicians to be, at least occasionally, conservative. The Australian Liberals are now largely run by so-called “moderates” (aka Wets) who are progressive, globalist, statist, fiscally incontinent, woke and green. Conservatives, especially social conservatives and climate sceptics, are railroaded out of an increasingly factionalised party. COVID sceptics simply did not get a look-in anywhere, with Liberal critics of the COVID State able to be counted on one hand.

    The famed Liberal “broad church” of John Howard, who left office in 2007, has all but vanished. (The recent election, ironically, saw the departure of several of these moderates, defeated in inner-city electorates by even greener, more woke, mainly middle-aged, middle-class women “independents”). Morrison, while not himself especially green or woke, and incorrectly regarded by some on the left here as a conservative, allowed these leftist factional players and their ideologies to run over the more conservative values which previously had a home with the Liberals. This saw him abandoned by all.

    An enduring lesson of Australian politics is that right wing politicians (and journalists) who attempt to cultivate their ideological opponents never win them over, but always bleed away their own support base. Differentiate yourself from your opposition, and do so on things that matter to voters, that is key. Minor parties in Australia have dubbed the two major parties here the Lib-Lab duopoly and similar epithets. James Allan, borrowing a phrase that I, in turn, borrowed from someone else, has said that the Liberals have not been “Labor-lite”, they have been Labor-heavy. So too with Boris. Does anyone in Britain think he is a conservative (whatever else he might be)? As Allison Pearson tartly observes:

    We thought we were voting for Winston Churchill and we got the shifty offspring of Edward Heath and Greta Thunberg.

    What Australian Liberals can learn from Boris’s slide into the electoral mire is that, if you cannot be conservative, at least be clear about what you stand for, and be competent at governing. Clearly Bungling Boris has been none of these.

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    Hanrahan

    A few dats ago I discussed gold and bitcoin remarking that they were both exactly where they were at Xmas 2021. Well waddayano, today the DOW hit the same mark.

    There must be something about asset classes to be gleaned from this.

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    Furiously+Curious

    Worried about blackouts? It looks like these have arrived just in time. Grid or solar charging. 2nd generation, still a few gremlins. US designed, made in China, quality materials and maybe early enough to not have too many corners cut by Chinese. Would probably be useful if things get really wonky. Watched a few you tube reviews, pretty positive, 6-12 mths usage. My query is about how long can they hold charge if they are turned off waiting for blackouts? If left on, the smaller one does discharge overnight! I’m tempted. Not in favour of sitting around in the dark. So how bad is it going to get? I dont know how practical for camping – very useful, but eminently knickable.

    https://www.bluettipower.com.au/pages/bluetti-eofy-sal
    https://www.bluettipower.com.au/products/bluetti-ep500-ep500pro-home-battery-backup?variant=42773705523448
    https://www.bluettipower.com.au/products/bluetti-ac200p-solar-panel

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      Chad

      Those are expensive and poor choice options for blackout backup.
      They are ok for camping/caravans etc where the power usage is minimal, but if you want to keep any significant domestic appliances operational for even just one night…then you need to look elseware.
      Even that 2000Wh unit would barely keep a domestic fridge, TV, or a small heater ,and a few lights on overnight. And forget about cooking anything, or running hot water systems.
      And , of course you have to recharge it somehow if the grid stays off more than one night.
      Best option is still to have a ICE genset..3-5 KVA , ($2k) and a gas fueld camp cooker for food and heating water.
      If you want battery back up, there are better, cheaper , more powerful systems available that can be permanently installed to automatically pick up the load when the grid shuts off.
      There are very good reasons why we must fight for a reliable grid supply !

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      yarpos

      Like a lot of this stuff (solar/wind/battery) it probably fills a niche really well. If you want ease of transport, dont want to power too much, can handle recharging , want it to be quiet/silent is fine. Thousands of caravanners are doing this all the time.

      If you want real back up to sustain a fairly normal life in a house, without spending a lot, then Chads basic set up sounds more realistic and is roughly how we are set up. Works for us. If I did it again I would go slightly bigger with the generator as I would like it to have more headroom for prolonged operations. The thing you need to be clear on then is fuel supply.

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    OldOzzie

    We were promised violence after Supreme Court leak. They weren’t kidding

    Once is an accident. Twice is a coincidence. Three is a trend. More than a dozen is a coordinated campaign whose message is: You are next.

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      yarpos

      When they say they want democracy and justice they really mean they want only their kind of democracy and justice; and you all better like it.

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