JoNova

A science presenter, writer, speaker & former TV host; author of The Skeptic's Handbook (over 200,000 copies distributed & available in 15 languages).


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Weekend Unthreaded

8.3 out of 10 based on 19 ratings

366 comments to Weekend Unthreaded

  • #

    A week back now, I was checking some of my Bookmarks looking for information on generators and at one of the sites, GE, I noticed they had completely updated their site, and I read it through and found some new information about coal fired power generation.

    As usual, it led me to write a new Post on the subject. The more I looked, the more I found to write about, and that led to three separate Posts, and rather than release them all at once, I’m releasing the Intro as the first Post, and at three day intervals, the next two Posts.

    This new Post is about the future for coal fired power.

    Is it true that coal fired power is becoming a dying enterprise, a stranded asset?

    It isn’t true at all, but it’s more complex than just saying that.

    The new thing I found is the latest step up in coal fired power technology, Advanced UltraSuperCritical (A-USC) coal fired power generation. They have been working on it for years now in research, and now GE has finally perfected it, and have actually constructed new plants utilising the technology, and yes, you guessed correctly, one of the first of these new plants to open is in China.

    Each step up in that HELE process results in less CO2 emissions. It’s to do with thermal efficiency, and the higher temperature they burn the coal, and the higher temperature and pressure they ’make’ the steam to drive the turbine, which then drives the generator.

    Each one percent increase in that thermal efficiency results in a two percent reduction in CO2 emissions, so this is effectively a major way to reduce those CO2 emissions.

    Okay, so thermal efficiency. The current World average for thermal efficiency, just in coal fired power plants alone is 34%, and this are nearly all Critical plants, (70s/80s technology) three technology steps lower than A-USC. This new advancement to A-USC takes that thermal efficiency out to 49%, so this results in a substantial reduction of CO2 emissions, and A-USC is a thermal efficiency step of a little more than 4% to 5% over the previous USC.

    Now, at the same time as GE developed this, they also worked on the Digital controls of the whole process as well, vastly increasing digital monitoring of the whole Unit.

    Perhaps one of the perceived problems of coal fired power is its inability to ramp up and down quickly. What this digital monitoring has achieved is that these A-USC units can ramp up to full power generation in under a half an hour from cold startup of the boiler, and here, GE have used a 1350MW generator.
    GE has done their usual technology sharing deal with the Chinese, who will now be moving into construction of these new tech plants, having already opened one of them.

    So, the three Posts I’m writing deal with all aspects of this, the Intro dealing with the current situation with coal fired power. The second Post deals with what is actually happening in China with respect to their coal fired power and their active use of this new tech to lower CO2 emissions, even retro fitting older plants, and the third Post will deal solely with this new and major technological advance, A-USC.

    Trust me on this. Coal fired power has a long future ahead of it, no matter what we are being told.

    Link to Post- Coal Fired Power Dying – Not So Fast – Part One – Introduction
    Tony.

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    • #
      TdeF

      It’s all to do with the top temperature as the most efficient engine has an efficiency which is 1-Thot/Tcold (temperature in degrees Kelvin) or 1-(Thot+273)/(Tcold+273) in Centigrade. Increase the temperature at the top of the cycle and efficiency goes up. The same with a car engine.

      And this is the one great benefit of the insane concept that CO2 is ‘pollution’, that we will preserve fossil fuels longer.

      At the same time, remember that the switch to natural gas means this scarce resource will be depleted far faster in Australia, say in the Hunter valley and natural gas is essential to make fertilizer. Which means we will have to start importing what we currently make, changing Australia from an energy rich country to an energy dependent country while we export our gas and oil and coal. The same as with America before and after Donald Trump.

      That is the real aim of the carbon neutrality mob. It is nothing to do with the climate. As for an ’emergency’, where is it? Or has it been an continuous ’emergency’ for 33 years, which is self evident nonsense.

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      • #
        Curious George

        Increasing a Thot would soon give you a negative efficiency. The formula should be 1 – Tcold/Thot.

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        • #
          TdeF

          Yes, oops. My point is that few people know there is an absolute limit set by the laws of thermodynamics to the efficiency of any engine turning heat into ‘work’ such as electricity or the motion of a car. And as you add 273 to both, even 50% efficiency requires a high temperature of 273C. And 75% efficiency or (1-1/4) requires a temperature of 4*273 or 1092C, far beyond possibility for most iron based boilers.

          “Siemens currently offer steam turbines that can accept steam at 30 MPa and 600 C; Shanghai Electric sell a turbine that accepts steam at 25 MPa and 600 C. This compares with Queensland’s oldest power plant, Gladstone, which operates at 17 MPa and 540 C. Shanghai Electric claim efficiencies of up to 45.4%.”

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          • #
            TdeF

            I wonder if we could lower the temperature of the entire boiler area to -50C, even -100C and dramatically increase the efficiency? It’s certainly a great argument for coal in the coldest parts of any country, say Sweden or Tasmania. Lowering the environmental temperature is far more effective in increasing efficiency than pushing the upper limits. And less energy is required than a ‘hydrogen’ society.

            1-(-100+273)/(540+273) = 0.8 or 80% efficiency, double the current efficiencies or the same power for half the coal and half the CO2.

            That is where Tony gets his 2% saving in Coal and thus CO2 for a 1% change in efficiency as the current thermal efficiency is around half, 45%.

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            • #
              TdeF

              Let me explain that further. With an efficiency of only 50% in converting coal and its heat to electrical energy, half the coal is wasted. It’s very inefficient. An increase in efficiency of converting coal to power means 1% more electricity but also 2% less coal for the same power. And by the rules of combustion, 2% less CO2.

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              • #
                AC Osborn

                Half the coal is wasted if you can’t use the heat for another purpose.
                In Aus you don’t have much need for distributed heating, but in the Northern hemisphere it can and is utilised.

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        • #
          Deano

          Please to see there are no ‘Thot jokes’ made here on this high-class forum.

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    • #
      David Wojick

      I wonder how they do NOx control, since that typically involves burning at lower temperatures?

      “Formation of thermal NO depends on combustion temperature. Above1,538C (2,800F),
      NOx formation rises exponentially with increasing temperature.”

      https://www.ifc.org/wps/wcm/connect/cc73468c-17d6-4966-a595-2b13a3d187de/HandbookNitrogenOxidesPollutionPreventionAndControl.pdf?MOD=AJPERES&CVID=jkD0Cke

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    • #
      Robert Swan

      Each one percent increase in that thermal efficiency results in a two percent reduction in CO2 emissions

      Afraid I don’t like this sort of claim. Sounds to be based on the same kind of simplistic modelling that gave us the silly alarmism in the first place; that linear regression == truth. Perhaps the 2:1 ratio is the marginal rate of improvement at today’s efficiency levels, but it’s pretty clear that increasing thermal efficiency by 50% couldn’t possibly lead to 100% reduction in CO2. The world just isn’t very linear.

      And sadly, without a 100% reduction in CO2, the zealots will still see coal generation as evil. Coal fired power probably does “have a long future ahead of it”, but maybe not in all countries.

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    • #
      Ross

      Dont know if its of any interest TonyfromOz but I got the following from a CSIRO website or similar back in 2019.

      “Developing advance carbon power technologies
      CSIRO are developing an alternative pathway to low emissions electricity from coal and other sources of carbon through two advanced carbon power technologies – the Direct Injection Carbon Engine (DICE) and the Direct Carbon Fuel Cell (DCFC). DICE and DCFC are suitable for large scale electricity generation and decentralised applications at industrial or remote locations.
      Benefits of this technology include increased efficiencies in electricity generation; significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions even without CO2 capture and storage; delivery of power in a shorter timeframe and at a smaller scale than conventional coal technologies; and diverse fuel potential including black and brown coal, as well as biomass, tar and plastics.

      Pilot-scale demonstrations of advanced carbon power
      CSIRO have demonstrated at laboratory and pilot scale that DICE and DCFC could deliver generation efficiencies of more than 50 per cent and 65 per cent respectively. This is a significant gain when compared to existing coal-fired power stations, which operate at 33 to 38 per cent.
      Other outcomes:achieved efficiencies similar to diesel operation
      * suitable MRC has been produced from 17 coals (black, brown, tailings and biochar)
      * solutions have been developed for adapting fuel systems and managing engine wear
      * developed a new method of coal processing to produce MRC fuel by reinventing the physical cleaning process.”

      So, would CSIRO be still working on advance coal electricity generating projects or have they now gone fully woke?

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    • #
      Ian

      As electricity costs are one of the main concerns about power supplies are you anticipating discussing the costs of the coal required for these power stations?

      Will the new power stations have to use anthracite which is about twice the price of the bituminous (black) coal currently used by most power stations

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    • #
      PeterPetrum

      Thanks Tony. I trad your first instalment with interests and look forward to the subsequent ones.

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    • #
      John Watt

      What I would like to do is to get a “square one ” physics based analysis into this discussion. I refer to the decade-old analysis by Dr John Nicol in which he demonstrates that CO2 is not capable of producing the catastrophic climate outcomes that IEA and others are using to scare us into abandoning an energy supply system that has served our economy well for decades. Why are we adopting this ill-considered path? Does it make us feel good about “saving the planet”. Are some of us in the position to profit from the replacement of the energy system and /or the premature replacement of the vehicles on our roads? Laziness/greed on a grand scale? A better course for our scientists would be to find the real drivers of the planet’s climate. Blaming CO2 is just a lazy cop out. Who knows perhaps those fossil-fired behemoths will be very useful come the next ice age!

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      • #
        AC Osborn

        Efficiency for efficiency’s sake is worthwhile as it extends the Fuels you currently have.

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      • #
        OriginalSteve

        John,

        There appears no logical reason to replace coal etc.

        Ive mentioned previously that many of the globalists who appear to be driving this whole heist, appear to adhere to a pagan Satanic earth worshipping religion.

        This us a bit for most people to get thier heads around, and I speak as a Christian, but one who came to christianity later in life and so had a previous life to use as a reference point.

        Ergo, as youve seen in canada, they are happy to impound churches if you fall foul if arbitrary covid regulations. Deliberate destruction of our fossil fuelled power and heating systems will lead to mass death, if the vaccine doesn’t do it first.

        This appears to be a religious push by people who hate humanity by and large. Its the only explanation that fits. Satan hates humanity as humans are made in Gods image, ergo he now has a buch of powerful useful idiots to try for a global extinction event to take as many with him as possible, before he himself is judged by God and deleted. And if I’m right, its going to get way worse , if you know your scripture….

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    • #
      Serge Wright

      I’m reasonably sure that the LNP would build a HELE coal plant if CCS technology was available and cost effective, however they don’t have the political courage to do so otherwise, which is why they have provided some funds for CCS research in the budget. It’s also unlikely that CCS will ever become cost effective, however it would still be cheaper than RE plus storage.

      Of course the great irony with emissions politics is a small and stable emitter such as Australia faces a constant media led political barrage to go to net-zero, whilst China, already the largest emitter by a country mile is somehow allowed to crank up their emissions without limits for another decade. The message sent by the climate crazies is that you need to be an emitter of gigantic proportions and then it’s somehow all ok to use coal and FF. Personally, I think Morrison should leverage off the China position far more and simply align us to China’s emissions strategy and deflect the left wing media attack by stating that we will exactly follow the technology path as chosen by China to get to net zero, along with their actual emissions reductions time frame, meaning we could also increase emissions up to 2030 and then reduce in lock step by the same % afterwards. If the Marxist green media (ie: ABC) complain, he can suggest that they can help their cause by getting China to reduce faster.

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      • #
        Serp

        ABC is a laughing stock unable to have any journalists in China but never mentioning it with the China bureau chief Sarah Ferguson cooling her heels in New York.

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      • #
        Murray Shaw

        CCS is best done as nature intended via plants. CCS via mechanical means is subject to great cost, leakage, breakdown and a myriad of other problems.
        Nature has been the overall controller of the balance of CO2 in the atmosphere, and what a wide spectrum of levels we have observed in the historical data. All achieved without the intervention of man.

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        • #
          Analitik

          Yep, I’ve been advocating that we fully commit to following China’s CO2 YoY % emissions change on a trailing 2 year basis.

          20

  • #
    CHRIS

    I support you, Tony…but the big problem is how to get this information through to the general populace, when politicians of ALL persuasions do not have the guts (or intelligence) to address this fact in a positive light. Coial power should always have a future in our society (along with so-called “renewable” energy.

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    • #
      Dennis

      Discussion on Sky News recently covered how so many politicians are beholden to benefactors and dare not speak out against, say, a benefactor/lobbyist who has renewable energy business interests or represents business interests.

      Factional alliances are another example of how a politician is handcuffed and obliged to toe the line, whatever that might be.

      This is not confined to a particular political party.

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      • #
        Sceptical Sam

        Yes Dennis. However, the people know better.

        That’s why the Labor Party took a massive haircut in the recent Upper Hunter state bye election.

        That’s also why the Australian Labor Party is still in opposition at the Federal level. It will remain there for as long as it continues to believe the climate nonsense.

        The people know what’s what. The voter is not a fool.

        The Labor Party lives in a delusional world where they think inner urban greenies have the same mindset as the workers who make the wheels turn. Even their union support base is abandoning them.

        I wish they would wake up. I doubt they will.

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        • #
          Serp

          Somewhere I read that the ALP could dig itself out of the hole if Fitzgibbon was given a run in the leadership. Albanese’s the oddest coot to lead federal Labor in living memory.

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          • #
            Yarpos

            Shortern then Albanese. Exactly what traits does the Labor Party value in its leaders these days? Whatever they are a serious re examination may be in order.

            20

      • #
        Broadie

        Answer capture ‘The Great Reset’ and reset the Politicians status back to basic concept of a Democracy in that it is the peoples voice.
        Politicians should be compensated and not remunerated, restricted to two consecutive terms and no electoral funding for the puppet masters behind them.

        Remember all they are elected to do is tweak a few pieces of paper drafted by Public Servants. The last 30 years has shown that the people in our parliaments either do not read or do not understand what they are voting for.

        You use to be able to buy a thing that sat on you dash board they does what they are capable of now, nodding!

        40

    • #
      Analitik

      The general populace is not highly mathematically literate so this sort of proof will not sway them. I even know an engineer (civil) who believes in CAGW and stated “we can’t keep subsidizing coal” when I brought up how deluded the solar not coal protesters in our neighborhood were.

      Nothing short of the upcoming increase in urban blackouts and price spikes with the closure of Liddell next year (& exacerbated by the Callide repair down time) will convince the general populace that they have been conned regarding renewables.

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      • #
        TdeF

        I have met professional engineers who believe it. To them a rapidly heating planet is a reasonable proposition. That mankind is increasing CO2 in the air is also self evident, if scientists say so. And every ‘scientist’ quoted by the media says so.

        What is disturbing is that these ‘scientists’ are nothing of the sort, Professor Tim Flannery being a prime example, a man whose undergraduate degree was in English and not science. And real scientists are quiet or ignored by the Press. Otherwise how did Australia find itself with Professor Flannery as our government appointed Chief Climate Scientist? And why wasn’t a meteorologist appointed?

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        • #
          TdeF

          And other scientists cannot speak out without retiring, forcibly as with Dr. Peter Ridd, head of Physics at James Cook University and currently waiting on his appeal to the High Court of Australia, no less. You are cancelled if you speak out.

          The fundamental lie being that the increase in CO2 is man made, which is demonstrably false by simple measurement of Carbon 14 which doe not exist in fossil fuels. This has been published and unquestioned science since 1956. Carbon ‘neutrality’ is a farce.

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          • #
            Ted O'Brien.

            The fundamental lie is that CO2 is harmful.

            The determining factor in policy decisions should be on the straightforward basis of cost/benefit, free of political interference.

            That mains the price of coal fired power should be the marginal cost, not the cost after taxes and other impositions. It is marginal cost product that is being foregone to accommodate wind and solar.

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            • #
              TdeF

              Perhaps more fundamental is that we control CO2 levels somehow, that CO2 of all gases is not rapidly absorbed by the vast oceans and in rapid temperature controlled equilibrium. After all 98% of all CO2 is dissolved in the oceans where it is 50x more soluble than oxygen. And fish breathe. Our human output is entirely negligible so the necessary lie is that CO2 is trapped in the atmosphere, that we humans can make it go up and down. And that the alleged problems with deadly CO2 are entirely our fault.

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        • #
          Mal

          Atmospheric physicist would have been more appropriate

          50

          • #
            TdeF

            Yes, but James Hansen claims that and he is an upper atmosphere physicist which is why he was so concerned about the effects of the upper atmosphere. His main subject at NASA was the planet Venus. However the weather as we know it, the climate, is all in the lower atmosphere and that is the study area of most of meteorology. Nothing which has happened in the last 150 years is at all unusual. It is hard to imagine that anyone can get away with claiming there is a ‘Climate Emergency’. It’s a last desperate attempt to pretend there is any problem, or at least any problem we can fix.

            So they have settled on ‘carbon neutrality‘ which has as much scientific basis as the fradulent ‘Precautionary Principle‘ as argued by geneticist Sir Paul Nurse, former head of the Royal Society.

            Their only argument is that they are in a science field, so they are scientists and know all about the weather. I was aghast to hear Professor Tim Flannery giving his opinions on Nuclear Power. Or the rainfall in Queensland. Or even his promoted hot rocks scheme ‘The technology is straightforward’, where the Australian government did $93Million cold.

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            • #
              Sceptical Sam

              James Hansen?

              Why are we even referring to him?

              The man’s a fool. Intelligent, but a fool nevertheless.

              He’s the fool who, in 1988, said New York City’s “West Side Highway – which runs along side the Hudson River – will be under water” within 20 to 40 years.

              Well 20 years passed us by 13 years ago. The 40 year timeframe comes along in 7 year’s time.

              Yep. The man’s a proven fool.

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            • #
              Sceptical Sam

              But not a scientist.

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        • #
          OriginalSteve

          i have chastised engineers for believing in CAGW . They should know better. No excuse.

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          • #
            OriginalSteve

            Interesting video/podcast:

            “Nobel Prize winner AIDS pioneer Luc Montagnier, who passionately argues that the RNA vaccine is creating mutant variants meant to produce extreme symptoms and death.”

            https://www.trunews.com/stream/hiv-research-pioneer-luc-montagnier-warns-vaccines-are-causing-new-pandemic

            20

          • #
            yarpos

            I wouldnt, they are as susceptible as anyone else. Why would an civil, mechanical, electrical engineer have knowledge of the climate fiasco unless its a special interest? What peeves me is when an EE tells me that wind and solar work as the basis of a 1st world power grid. Usually they are the socks and sandals variety that thinks its viable for the whole world to be off grid and still have technology.

            40

      • #
        Serp

        I’m not expecting our MSM is going to tell the illiterated populace that it has been conned and innumerated people are unable to work it out for themselves; Australia is the nonpareil of happy hunting grounds for the mountebanks and spivs profiteering on renewables.

        Ultimately the critical deficiencies will no longer be managable by the electrical network engineers and the hucksters will have disappeared and that cretinised populace will need somehow to rebuild its country.

        50

  • #
    Furiously Curious

    This takes our understanding of the present cultural situation to another level. It is an hour +, podcast which lays the blame for our loco wokies at the feet of the mass production of university graduates, and the resentment they feel when coming out with their degree, and finding they are not appreciated, and there are no jobs. They like to think they are an elite, but aren’t willing to take risks like true entrepreneurs. They think that as the system is not working for them, they should pull down the whole thing, and as they are pretty intelligent, they can make a real mess. It explains the hatred I’ve always felt oozing out of these people, and the stunning mindf…s they generate.
    Really this is a mind blowing podcast. It looks like a very interesting site, but I will have to listen X2 to get through much of it!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jFreheCDxgI&list=FLCp1Xh9SPuYsLEOfOJh5_jQ&index=1&t=15s

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    • #
      another ian

      An example

      “THE TWO DAY COURSE

      There’s a blight upon the country that’s really quite degrading,
      Invented by the bureaucrats to stop their jobs from fading.
      A nasty imposition that has now been put in force,
      It’s become an obligation to attend a two day course.

      There are courses by the hundred to improve your education,
      It’s now become essential that you get accreditation.
      You will need that piece of paper or you’ll really be in strife,
      Although what you will be learning, you’ve been doing all your life.

      In the drought of ’69 I cut scrub from dawn till dark,
      And fence posts by the thousand I have hewn from ironbark.
      Now it’s hard for me to fathom that I could break the law,
      If I dare to start the motor of my trusty old chainsaw.

      Take chemical applications, that’s something I know best,
      By now I must have sprayed every single living pest.
      From cattle ticks to buffalo fly, from burrs to rubber vine,
      Now a course must be attended or I’ll risk a whopping fine.

      Just ask those who know me, if I know how to use a gun!
      From every sort of weapon, I’ve shot bullets by the ton.
      Though I’ve been proficient since I reached the age of ten,
      It seems this is something that I have to learn again.

      I’ve studied on computers, learnt how to market crops,
      Benchmarking and QA, I’ve been to those workshops.
      Breedplan is something I now understand in full,
      It took me two days to learn how to scrotum test a bull.

      My stock are getting poorer from the general lack of care,
      And all my bores and fences are in sad need of repair.
      You may think I’m lazy, but that simply isn’t true,
      I’d go to work tomorrow, but there’s another course to do.

      The bank would like to see me, for the funds are getting low,
      And I’d like to get the time to plant the crops I need to grow.
      My wife and kids all miss me, ’cause I’m hardly ever there,
      I’d love to stay at home, but there’s this course in cattlecare.

      If I continue in this vein, I’ll surely end up broke,
      All these accreditations are really just a joke.
      I’d rather wrestle with scrub bulls or ride on bucking horses,
      Than be subjected to these two day !!#*!!*# courses.’

      P.A. Barton, “Huntley” Clermont

      Reminds me that I have to complete another one on line

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    • #
      John R Smith

      One the leftist myths is the pretense that elitism doesn’t exist.
      Georgetown, ugh!
      The elite just made a strategic shift in the groups that they pretend to include,
      In a weird way, DJT exposed it.

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      • #
        OriginalSteve

        A lot of the Left whether elite or not, are just useful idiots for the purposes of the globalists.

        Dangle a few trinkets of power and money and see how fast they adopt the cause-du-jour.

        Double edged sword though…if you sell out that easy, why should you be trusted for anything else?

        And there is the rub….

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  • #
    tonyb

    I hear Melbourne is in its FOURTH lockdown. The lockdowns sound pretty severe bearing in mind the scale of the problem. Always seems to be related to quarantine hotels. Shouldnt they be better guarded or in more secure locations?

    Do Melbournians consider the restrictions to be house arrest or are they happy to be closed down yet again?

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    • #
      Analitik

      The zero index case was someone who was in hotel quarantine in South Australia. He caught it there but was not symptomatic until after he came back to Victoria.

      The lack of personal responsibility of one of those who later caught the disease and did most of the spreading shows how futile these lockdowns are and why we must learn to live/cope with covid-19 like we do with other diseases.

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      • #
        Rick

        Or simply install an Ivermectin program and the whole problem just disappears almost overnight.
        No vaccines required, no crowded hospitals, no runaway death toll.
        Keep your eye on India where they are doing wonderful things with it.

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    • #
      GD

      Do Melbournians consider the restrictions to be house arrest

      Absolutely. Statewide lockdown for a handful of people with the virus in Melbourne is way over the top.

      As it stands, my sister and I aren’t allowed to visit our 90yr old Mum in her care facility in Melbourne. And there are many more restrictions.

      The Andrews Labor government has proven to be both incompetent, and negligent with its handling of the Covid response.

      It has been especially negligent in its duty of care with the deaths of over 800 people, but the powers that be will never hold Andrews and his cronies accountable.

      Now, this latest lockdown could be the final straw for those businesses, cafes, and restaurants that have clung to life during the 2020 lockdowns only to be hit with this latest whammy from our socialist government intent more on control than competent health management.

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      • #
        Yonniestone.

        Spot on GD and we aren’t even in Melbourne, last Thursday after working all morning and having no idea what happened in Melbourne I walk into a business with staff freaking out over me not wearing a mask and not knowing about the news, seriously people need to get a grip, and then back at work we have a truck pull in delivering from Melbourne with the driver not wearing a mask until someone finally noticed.

        We had the medical information and cheap treatments over a year ago that would have put a stop to all the unnecessary financial, mental and personal pain inflicted by our political and bureaucratic monsters but no crisis will go to waste while psychopaths inhabit the halls of our institutions.

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        • #
          Yonniestone

          Anyone want to know what Victorians think of government shutdowns should be watching outsiders on Sky News now.

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          • #
            Annie

            Saw the clip of Brett Sutton; what a waffling nonentity.

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            • #
              Geoff Sherrington

              Annie,
              So why not do more than just whinge?
              A month ago I wrote to the Medical Journal of Australia, formally asking them to retract a May 2020 paper by Dr Sutton and 3 colleagues at the Vic Dept of Health. It was not a scientific or medical paper so much as an advertisemnt for the measures that Dept was planning to show its virtues by imposing restrictive measures in the name of climate change.
              Others who like this idea are free to do likewise. Geoff S

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          • #
            Annie

            One benefit of no church is being able to watch the full two hours of Outsiders instead of trying to stay awake to watch the truncated version too late in the evening!

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            • #
              Yonniestone.

              Quite a few Outsiders clips get put up on YouTube later Annie, sorry about your church too but we know how much lefties hate Chistianity don’t we.

              70

              • #
                Annie

                I manage the encore version usually and also see video clips.The trouble with the encore version is that you miss good stuff you don’t know you’ve missed! If you know what I mean.
                As to my comment above, my OH when he read it told me that I’m a heathen!!!
                More seriously, lefties certainly do hate Christianity, not to mention patriotism, decent standards of behaviour, normality. I don’t attribute that sort of thing to the old Labour/Labor parties but they have transformed into something very strange, it seems to me.

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              • #
                Annie

                Ah, in moderation! Was it [email protected] or h3athen?

                20

      • #
        TdeF

        Our Communist dictator functionary of the Communist Chinese government, Daniel Andrews needed the lock down.

        On June 6th, the man who tried to legislate absolute power of arrest and indefinite detention to himself and nearly succeeded, wants to get another 6 months without parliament. Nothing like this has happened since Idi Amin and before that, Munich in 1933.

        The current lockdown is his obvious cover for the need to run his government as a one man dictatorship. We even have a 5km limit on travel. Why is not explained.

        Meanwhile the parliamentarians have been home on full pay. And the opposition has been nowhere to be seen for a year and a half.

        Nothing to see here folks, we have a blatant communist dictatorship who signed a private deal with the Chinese Communist Party but you can be locked up for saying it. Meanwhile he allowed a BLM march through the centre of Melbourne in the middle of the pandemic but still cannot allow Australian troops on ANZAC day. Or to monitor his private companies running the lockdown.

        It is not about lockdown. It is about using the Victorian Police as your private army to stifle dissent.

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          Raven

          Ooops . . must have triggered Moderation.

          10

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          OriginalSteve

          So what are Victorians are going to do?

          To acquiesce, is to endorse prolonged systemic ab*se, is it not?

          20

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            yarpos

            Only if they see it that way. Your world view (probably close to mine on this topic) is clearly not shared by most VICs who grumble and comply.

            I have noticed this lockdown is fairly loosey goosey in our region with just superficial compliance. Dans army in blue seem relaxed.

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      YallaYPoora Kid

      We are more than a year into the pandemic. Victoria is still experiencing the incompetence of the health processes that were evident a year ago ie slow response to an outbreak and sub-optimal performance of the contact tracing tools.

      Other States of Australia have evolved their tracing tools to be efficient though both the tool itself and also the compliance by the businesses and the public to use them thus enabling their efficiency.
      The stupidity is that each State decided to develop their own tool with varying degrees of success. Victoria has been an ignorant socialist utopia that allowed everyone to do what they want using either paper sign-ins or use of the defective AR code tool. The result is where we are today or should I say where we were 12 months ago – harsh lockdown with many businesses closed and people restricted in movement.

      To answer your question – no one likes it. Unfortunately the left wing flunkies adore and accept their socialist leader for being a failure and for sadistically locking them up for a forth (and tragically maybe not last) time.

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        Harves

        Actually, from what I see, most Public servants and people whose jobs are not at risk still support this incompetent Govt. Happy locked up in their safe spaces getting full pay. Oh, did you know tens of thousands of public servants are getting a weekly ‘allowance’ on top of their salary for the inconvenience of being able to ‘work’ in their pyjamas.

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        yarpos

        They do seem to be constantly caught flat footed and in panic response mode. It seems that in quiet periods they do little to prepare or build capability at a basic operational level , instead favouring grandstanding over infrastructue example.

        A micro example. Last week , before this latest blow up, my daughter in Wangaratta was unwell. As she is in a customer facing job she thought she would go and get a test done. Goes to the testing centre and its closed and they are telling people to go 45mins North (Albury) or South (Benalla) to get tested. So great , you are symptomatic and they want you to venture off into other communities of similar size.

        Any organization that repeatedly relies on heroic efforts is fundamentally flawed. These guys seem to make it somehow a positive that they continually need to make massive efforts and inflict pain on the public to clean up the mess they create themselves.

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      Ronin

      The number of Victoriastanians escaping the gulag answers your query.

      20

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        Annie

        The number of caravans on the road on Thursday was remarkable; escaping from Melbourne/Victoria. I lost count while driving to Seymour and back.
        We, upcountry, have no so-called cases and yet are being told to wear masks, even outside! That’s plainly crackers.
        One thing, I always need to cover my nose and mouth with a scarf when it is cold, as it is atm. A little cloth mask came in useful for that purpose during a walk in the cold; much easier than a scarf!

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          robert rosicka

          Hume Highway was also very busy with Caravan traffic Annie , unfortunately once your out of this state there is few options though .
          I’m hearing reports from WA where if you’re from Victoriastan (number plates) some road houses are not allowing you to get out of the car , they put your fuel in and get anything you need then send you on your way.
          One camp ground in the Kimberly kicked out every Victorian regardless of how long they had been out of the state along with other guests then did a deep clean and won’t let any one from vic back in .

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          TdeF

          The 5km limit makes no sense. It is about exercising control over the population. This Chinese virus is being used to cement Daniel Andrews power. I will be he extends it past 6th June to show that he is needed to make unfettered executive decisions. This is a naked power grab, again.

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            yarpos

            Makes sense to them , they are limiting movement and spread in their minds, simple enough. Its really the basic lockdown idea thats the main thing, rather than nit picking parameters.

            Its seems they have one big hammer, and thats the only tool they know how to use. I think basically because its the least work for them.

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              Old Goat

              Yarpos – correct . A huge toolbox with only one tool.You could argue that Brett Sutton is that tool…..Vaccination will not stop transmission , only migitigate the severity.I will get the vaccine and take Vit D but it’s ivermectin for me if I get it.

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            OriginalSteve

            Cov19 is a carefully concocted play to steal our liberties.

            Push back now or we’re done for…..

            Teach kids to question the official line.

            Its our new Big Lie.

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      • #
        yarpos

        Normal time of year for northern tourism even if its just Mildura. About a quarter of our car club is out of town over winter. If you are talking permanent migration nobody would really know at the moment what current net levels are as there is a bit of a delay. In 2019 the ABS says net interstate migration was +10,650

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    • #
      Yarpos

      Nobody here will really represent what all Melbournians think (its a statewide lockdown by the way not just city)

      There is a wide spectrum of response ranging from the luvvies that like to be controlled and told what to do, through the virtue signallers, apathetic compliers, grumblers and a tiny % of protesters.

      The surprise to me is the demonstration of how docile and compliant we are as a nation. Its all been going on so long that a couple of State govts have even been voted in, although they are the most jingoistic States where hard border closure are lapped up by a good chunk of the parochial masses.

      That was the other interesting point, how rapidly we turn our backs on each other. Yep, “we are all in this together” notice how they stopped playing that a while ago?

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    Analitik

    The laws of physics mean that you cannot have four positively charged amino acids in a row. The only way you can get this is if you artificially manufacture it

    Daily Mail article highlights how the SARS-CoV-2 virus must have been genetically engineered h/t ZeroHedge

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9629563/Chinese-scientists-created-COVID-19-lab-tried-cover-tracks-new-study-claims.html

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    • #
      Yarpos

      Artificial manufacture suspends the Laws of Physics?

      30

    • #
      Ian

      Pity Obama’ s decision not to fund Gain of Function experiments was reversed during Trump’s presidency

      21

      • #
        Analitik

        Set up by Fauci, through a NGO to obscure the funding path from the elected. So bureaucrats going off the reservation.

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    Lucky

    Who are you?

    This was a question posed on this site recently by one commentator to another. I am curious as to what it really means lacking knowledge of which word has the emphasis.

    I think it relates to the subset of the modern progressivist movement known as credentialism. Under credentialism no one can do or say anything unless related paper qualifications are held. This is of course an outcome of growing influence of the education industry which will provide courses for required paperwork whether certificate, diploma, degree or accreditation always growing in scale.
    It fits the mind set of communitarians where group/community approbation is essential for everything, as well as central and east Europeans who love bureaucracy, recall war films where half the characters have to show papers and the other half demand- your papers. – Stand by for the Vax Passport.

    Under credentialism, readers and listeners can rely on the speaker being approved to expound, such as by having an approved Climate Science degree or psychobabble license. Note, suitable courses at Jimbo U still have vacancies, the mass of north Asean students avoid these hard topics in favor of the soft engineering and science subjects only useful to design fossil fuel powered electricity stations.

    The opposite is free speech where anyone can say anything. Readers/listeners struggling under free speech have to work in order to evaluate what is said on its merits and in context. This is the unfortunate state of affairs prevailing on joannenova.com at present. The work of actual thinking is needed to respond in a proper manner. Regrettable.

    Clearly, this site should have a licensing system giving contributors opportunity to express only according to the levels and range of approved qualifications that they hold.

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    David Wojick

    Behind the curtain of Social Cost (my latest)

    This is not just about HFC social cost. It is about all GHG social cost fantasies.

    The beginning: After considerable delay, EPA’s proposed HFC phaseout regulations have been posted for public comment. I earlier looked at the serious technical problems with this proposal, which the various adversely impacted industries will have to comment on. Here I want to talk about the climate change aspect, where the deep problems go way beyond this HFC case.

    This is the first major EPA regulation to be based entirely on the fantasy of stopping climate change. It is also a cap and trade system, so there is plenty to be concerned about. What follows is just skimming the surface, but it introduces a number of the nastiest issues. My focus is the so-called Social Cost of HFCs (SC-HFC, or sometimes just SC). The vast sweep of this concept is breathtaking. Here is how EPA puts it in their Regulatory Impact Analysis:

    “SC-HFC includes the value of all climate change impacts, including (but not limited to) changes in net agricultural productivity, human health effects, property damage from increased flood risk and natural disasters, disruption of energy systems, risk of conflict, environmental migration, and the value of ecosystem services.”

    Wow! That is a lot to figure out, right? Note that they left out the damages from seal level rise, which they also include in SC. Moreover, EPA claims to measure all these various economic impacts for the next 300 years. I am not making this up.

    They come up with stupendous numbers. EPA claims that the regulated reduction in HFC production between now and 2050 will avoid almost $300 billion in far future damages. Mind you that is just the discounted present value of the damages. The actual damages, which must be many trillions of dollars, are never given for consideration. Neither is when they will occur.

    So to begin with, the nature and timing of all these fantastic damages is hidden behind a dark curtain. We have no way to assess them, even though the regulations are costly, disruptive and burdensome. For all we know, these damages are illusory. In regulation speak they may be arbitrary and capricious, made up numbers. EPA cannot simply say, “Here are the total damages discounted to present value. Trust us.” They must show how, when, where and why these enormous damages occur.

    Lots more in the article. We really need to see behind the social cost curtain.

    This URL is confused but it works: https://www.cfact.org/2021/05/25/major-february-global-temperature-drop-reveals-the-real-climate-control-knob-5/

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      PeterS

      Social cost? Ultimately the sinister plot is to make those who fail to follow a variety of false agendas to pay with their lives. It starts at the womb. For example, black live matters, except when it’s in the womb.

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        Ronin

        The biggest hazard to blacks is……. other blacks.

        [Could use some explanation. I assume this is related to victims of crime. – Jo]

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          William Astley

          Ronin,

          I look at the US 2018 violent attack statistics from a different perspective. What does it tell us? Is violence in the US increasing? Why is the increase in US violent crime the highest in regions where Democratic control has become sort of one party… Like New York, or Chicago, or LA.

          The statistics show there is too much violent crime in the US (and ‘it’ the ‘BLM’ anarchist violence and the intimidation of officials, is spreading to other countries like France) and the violence is increasing because of the Democratic party of America. For example, the Democratic party officially… I kid you not, official worldwide support, including flying a BLM flag at every US embassy, supports the BLM anarchist movement.

          What is the motivation to fly a hateful group’s flag, by the US? Stop violence in the US? No way.

          The BLM are an officially funded violent protest group. Burning vehicles, burning buildings, frightening people, attacking conservatives, attacking and harassing US officials at their homes, and on and on.

          https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2021/05/30/photos-u-s-embassies-consulates-worldwide-fly-black-lives-matter-flag-blm/

          And most of the violent crime is same skin color, attacking the same skin color. Except for Asians.

          From Ronin’s link.
          “As the data in Table 14 of the 2018 report show, whites in 2018 were the victims in 3,581,360 violent incidents. In those incidents, 62.1% of the offenders were white, 15.3% were black, 10.2% were Hispanic, and 2.2% were Asian.

          For blacks, they were victims in 563,940 violent incidents in 2018. In those incidents, 10.6% of their offenders were white, 70.3% were black, 7.9% were Hispanic, and <0.1% were As
          For Hispanics, they were victims in 734,410 violent incidents and for their offenders, 28.2% were white, 15.3% were black, 45.4% were other Hispanics; and only 0.6% were Asian.

          For Asians, they were victims in 182,230 violent incidents in 2018. Among their offenders, 24.1% were white, 27.5% were black, 7.0% were Hispanic, and 24.1% were Asian.

          For Asians, the largest percentage of their offenders were black.

          For Hispanics, the largest percentage of their offenders were other Hispanics.

          For blacks, the majority of their offenders were black."

          And for whites, the majority of their offenders were white.

          Among the violent incidents analyzed by the Justice Department, the crimes included rape, sexual assault, robbery, violent crime involving a weapon, domestic violence, and stranger violence. Homicides were not included because the DOJ interviewed the victims to gather its data.

          According to the U.S. Census Bureau, whites make up 76.3% of the population; blacks comprise 13.4%; Hispanics, 18.5%; and Asians, 5.9%. The total population, as of 2019, was 328,239,523.

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      Pauly

      David,
      One of the technical issues I always have with sweeping and vague policy statements is the risk of double counting “social cost”. Has anyone actually measured the total “Social Cost of GHGs”?

      The reality is that anyone can claim large social costs to one cause, but without clear and verifiable attribution, or an agreed total value, those large costs are meaningless. And as different causes progress through “regulatory impact analysis”, is there anyone keeping track of the accumulated costs?

      Does anyone at the EPA care about the potential for double counting these costs?

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      • #
        David Wojick

        Given that these fantasy costs are over the next 300 years they have not been measured.

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    dinn, rob

    4 articles on Sars 2:
    1) At one point virus expert Cui Jie related how being bit by a bat was “like being jabbed with a needle,” according to Taiwan News….Before the outbreak of the pandemic Shi Zhengli wrote: “The odds of directly infecting humans is very small.”… It is suspected that virus expert Huang Yanling first contracted the virus in the fall of 2019, (then disappeared.) “In most cases, only ordinary protection will be utilized,” Shi admitted at the time of their risky research, the outlet said. https://www.foxnews.com/world/scientists-wuhan-lab-covid-probe-bitten-bats
    ……………………………………..
    2) https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9629563/Chinese-scientists-created-COVID-19-lab-tried-cover-tracks-new-study-claims.html
    …………………
    3) visit to Wuhan Institute of Biological Products (WIBP)–bioweapons, anyone?
    https://balance10.blogspot.com/2021/05/visit-to-wuhan-institute-of-biological.html
    ……………………………………………….
    4) Sars 2 hide and seek game https://balance10.blogspot.com/2021/05/sars-2-hide-and-seek-game.html
    ………………..

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    Plain Jane

    I dont get it about all the cooking channels on TV? I know that, appearing out of seemingly nowhere, and being government subsidized, they must be part of the great global reset, but I cant see where the sinister link is. Any ideas?

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      PeterS

      They might become sinister once they start cooking human meat and organs, which does happen elsewhere even today.

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      TedM

      They are designed to bore all intelligent clear thinking people to death. Extremely sinister.

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      Yonniestone.

      What sort of crock pot theory is this?

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      Richard Owen No.3

      Jane:
      It has to keep people’s minds off the next step – 1.5 metre distancing even during sex.

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      Yarpos

      We havent watched mainstream force fed TV for many years so this trend has passed us by.

      You would think learning at least basic cooking skills would be a good thing. Given the proliferation of food delivery services I doubt its happening in the city at least

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      gowest

      Simple – no-one wears a mask..

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      greggg

      Maybe they’ll start cooking only vegan meals?
      I reckon the police shows are to get people used to being in a police state.

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    Ian George

    Jo
    You may be interested to know (if you don’t already) that Australia has now FOUR official temps of 50C and over with the addition of Wilcannia in Jan ’39 now added (50.0C).
    I’ve been following the data since Craig Kelly found a 50C at Brewarrina (and which the BoM agreed was genuine).
    So now we have 4 x 50C+ temps – one in 1939, two in 1960 and one in 1998. Still waiting for Brewarrina’s temp to be recognised (I think that was in 1932).

    http://www.bom.gov.au/cgi-bin/climate/extremes/daily_extremes.cgi?period=%2Fcgi-bin%2Fclimate%2Fextremes%2Fdaily_extremes.cgi&climtab=tmax_high&area=aus&year=2021&mon=1&day=28

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    David-of-Cooyal-in-Oz

    In case you’re interested, my latest blood test results have come back and my vitamin D levels are up a bit, which is good, but a bit surprising as I haven’t increased my intake since the previous test. I’ll keep up the current 10,000 IU per day.
    May 25, 2021 66.8 ng/ml
    Feb 19, 2021 60.0 ng/ml
    Sep 24, 2020 42.4 ng/ml measured. Then increased intake to 10,000 IU per day.
    … On 6,000 IU per day.
    (The conversion factor is 2.5, so my 60 ng/ml = 150 nmol/L.)
    My earliest previously known number, considered “satisfactory” in 2018, was 23.2 ng/ml.
    Cheers
    Dave B

    PS For completeness: I’m also following the Zelenko protocol as closely as I can, substituting Quercetin for the unavailable HCQ, and zinc. And I support the vitamin D with vitamin K2 and iron. D

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    • #
      AC Osborn

      Have you had a bit more sunshine?

      10

      • #
        David-of-Cooyal-in-Oz

        G’day AC O,
        That’s a possibility, as we’ve had no rain here for several weeks, and I’ve been outside working most mornings. But I wear long sleeved shirt, long trousers and a hat as protection against various paddock nasties, so have discounted sunshine as a source for my vitamin D.
        Also, I’ve read a couple of different stories of how to get vitamin D from sunshine: one is that you have to be outside, virtually naked, for about an hour around midday (about maximum skin cancer time); and the other is that you get enough through your eyes. My starting, 2018, number supports the first and contradicts the second. (I’ve lived in this same location at about 31 degrees south, since 1992.)
        The net effect is that I attribute my current decent blood level to my supplement regime, but acknowledge that may not be completely true.
        Cheers
        Dave B

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          sophocles

          we’ve had no rain here for several weeks,

          Canterbury (South Island, NZ) is having a surfeit. I’ll tell them to send it back for you.
          Just make sure you use it all up before letting it come back here …

          At midday. a white skin (aka European) would only need about half an hour max to make a good quantity of Vit D. It’s what I draw over winter and I reduce slowly after October (to not burn).

          Add time for skin colouring.

          It’s best to monitor uptake with a few Vit D tests during the year. It tells you how much supplementation you do or don’t need. Just don’t burn.

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      Lucky

      There is a dose calculator on
      https://www.grassrootshealth.net/project/dcalculator/
      which helps you to go from your measured level to your target.
      It would assume steady state, not the situation for you as you are building up. Blood levels of vit D take weeks to settle (except for sunshine generated?).
      10,000 IU per day is probably too much, there is a risk of calcium(?) depletion.

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        David-of-Cooyal-in-Oz

        Thanks Lucky,
        I just tried your calculator using my 68 as starting point and giving 80 ng/ml as my target. It happily gave 10,000 IU as a daily dose, and 25,000 for 4 days as a “loading dose”.
        On my reading, the 10,000 IU per day “upper limit” is a historical, almost arbitrary figure, which I think meant “we’ve tested it to 10,000 without any signs of adverse reactions, but we can’t say how safe it is above 10,000”. Recent papers have described inputs much higher without problem. I started my program with some trepidation before I found the later papers, but haven’t gone above the 10,000 partly because it seemed, and seems adequate, but also because I’ve only been able to get 1000 IU capsules. I can handle 5 in the morning and 5 in the afternoon, but even one more and I’d feel like I was drowning in pills.
        Also, when I started out I opted for the slow increase rather than a loading dose as we’d had no local transmissions or cases, so I thought I had time on my side.
        But if I thought I was heading into an at-risk location I would increase.
        Cheers
        Dave B

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        • #

          Obsession with “daily supplements” is on a par with obsession with wearing a mask.

          It just makes your immune system lazy, and useless.

          People need to understand they can’t avoid covid19, and don’t need to. When confronted with it — when you first start feeling the beginning of getting sick — just hit it QUICKLY and it will die, without ever making you actually get seriously sick. Of course, for most people, they will never be consciously affected by it, it is that weak; so I am talking mainly to old folks like myself (and scaring the kids and middle-agers makes you as bad as the ghouls locking you down).

          Of course, you have to know how to “hit it” quickly, oldsters. It can’t be done, generally speaking, with merely “supplemental” dosing; you’re kidding yourself, shamefully. I stick to Echinacea with Goldenseal, every 20 to 30 minutes (NOT “3 times a day”, supplemental dosing). It took me a week to rid myself of the incipient symptoms of covid19 sickness, back at the end of January 2020, and just 2 days at the end of March 2020 (n.b.: all before the political lockdowns even started). I am 73, by the way; maybe people would take my recommendations more to heart if I were over 80, and really vulnerable to this prissy, man-made disease.

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      Plain Jane

      David you can get many things online including HCl. Just have to worry it might not turn up or get confiscated, and it can take a while. But I found it is good known brands.

      00

      • #
        David-of-Cooyal-in-Oz

        Gee Jane, I hope you mean HCQ, as HCl is hydrochloric acid, and not my cup of tea at all.
        I’ve avoided the import problem by buying quercetin locally. It is also a zinc ionophore, as is HCQ, and Dr Zelenko mentions it the latest version I’ve seen of his protocol.
        Cheers
        Dave B

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    • #
      sophocles

      if you’re digesting your food comfortably, you don’t need extra HCl — your stomach is making enough of it. (It’s one of the reasons we (as in mammalian animals) need salt — NaCl.

      Although I’m all in favour for Greens to ban Chlorine but just for themselves 😀

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  • #
    el gordo

    How is it physically possible to avoid a sonic boom?

    Ratcliffe told Fox News: “When we talk about sightings, we are talking about objects that have been seen by navy or air force pilots, or have been picked up by satellite imagery, that frankly engage in actions that are difficult to explain, movements that are hard to replicate, that we don’t have the technology for, or travelling at speeds that exceed the sound barrier without a sonic boom … Usually, we have multiple sensors that are picking up these things.” (SMH)

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    • #
      John R Smith

      The ability to become mass-less?
      So it wouldn’t be physical?
      So after decades of ridiculing people and denying it all, the gubmint is coming clean?
      Doubt it.
      Most of us here because governments have manipulated people into believing what ain’t necessarily so.

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    • #
      John R Smith

      What was it … 1903 Wright brothers to jets in 1945.
      US Stealth aircraft tech is close to 40 years old.
      What do they have now?
      I suspect these alleged UAP sightings aren’t unknown, they’re just secret.
      Unless you think Joe Biden is actually running things.
      Heavy implications for energy production.
      To paraphrase the great Mongo …
      “we are only pawns in game of life.”

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        el gordo

        There has been chatter that the Russians are behind it, but that is unlikely. I’m punting that we are not alone in the universe and this jewel in the habitable zone is too good to pass up.

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        • #
          Hanrahan

          Who’s to say this would be pleasant, green and watery to an alien.

          Some things I know to be beyond me so I do not concern myself. Most certainly there is nothing I could do even if I believed.

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            el gordo

            We can be sure they have fingers and are bipedal, only the tyranny of distance has to be overcome.

            ‘We also learned recently that of order half of all sunlike stars host an Earth-size planet in their habitable zone, allowing for liquid water and for the chemistry of life.’ (Scientific America)

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          GlenM

          Most likely inter-dimensional. A shift between our physical reality and another unaccounted one.

          10

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      Klem

      It seems a bit hard to believe that with millions of high quality cameras in everyone’s pockets, along with military grade cameras that can resolve newspaper text from space, that we still do not have any clear images of UFOs as yet.

      Funny about that huh?

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        el gordo

        There might be a good reason for the poor quality images.

        ‘The interdimensional hypothesis (IDH or IH), is an idea advanced by Ufologists such as Jacques Vallée that says unidentified flying objects (UFOs) and related events involve visitations from other “realities” or “dimensions” that coexist separately alongside our own. It is not necessarily an alternative to the extraterrestrial hypothesis (ETH) since the two hypotheses are not mutually exclusive so both could be true simultaneously.

        ‘IDH also holds that UFOs are a modern manifestation of a phenomenon that has occurred throughout recorded human history, which in prior ages were ascribed to mythological or supernatural creatures.’ (wiki)

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        • #
          yarpos

          I guess you can explain anything if you just have another dimension argument readyr

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        • #
          Kalm Keith

          Which reminds me about “fluid flow”.

          The Reynolds Number used extensively in engineering applications relating to moving fluids through pipes has an interesting property;

          It is Dimensionless.

          Which begs the question, if that’s so how can it exist.

          10

          • #
            Analitik

            The dimension units cancel out.
            It’s like a height vs femur length ratio – it ends up just as s number.

            20

      • #
        Rick

        Yeah. Just like the situation with SpaceX primary boosters landing back on earth. Every time a live feed covering the last few seconds is shown, the feed cuts out. Amazing.
        Another thing I’ve noticed is the lack of any visible man made satellites (exception being the ISS) these days. I recall as a kid in Perth in the 60’s lying on my back lawn at night and watching them go over, typically about 6 or 7 an hour. And there weren’t that of them then.
        These days there must be thousands of them in orbit if we can believe what we’re told, yet try catching sight of a single one. Not a chance.
        Some things don’t add up.

        10

        • #
          yarpos

          Pretty easy to see the freight train of Starlink sats when they pass over 🙂

          We sometimes sit out on our driveway (country, no lights, cow paddock opposite) and watch the stars and passing stuff

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      Richard Ilfeld

      One possibility is that there was no sonic boom.
      Wen one starts to ask questions, one has to be open to all questions.
      One question is whether there might be a difference between encounters with
      spacecraft and little green men in the southwest desert, where adult beverages might
      also have been consumed; and ‘swarms’ appearing on military sensors.

      I am 100% sure our adversaries are expending a lot of effort to probe our sensory and defensive systems.
      And we theirs. The idea the some number of these unidentified images on military sensors might be
      adversarial tests spoofing the equipment is as easy to accept as a race of aliens who have discovered an
      ability to manipulate physics that we have not.

      When the press speculation is all one direction look elsewhere; their recent record of failure is unblemished.

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    Hanrahan

    The Ontario government lost $42M selling cannabis in the last year
    That’s not a bad effort.

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/ontario-cannabis-loss-1.5282994

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    • #
      another ian

      H

      IIRC they set a price which the illegals can easily undercut.

      As the Labour potential minister for transport in “How to win an election or at least not lose by much” had it –

      “It’s all a matter of plannin'”

      Can’t remember his name but the Conservative equivalent was Sir Orson Carte

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      Yonniestone.

      They should’ve known no one can beat the MSN when it comes to dealing a depressive substance.

      70

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      el gordo

      Regulation is fine but it should be left to the market to decide on price, which of course will be taxed like any other commodity.

      00

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      Klem

      Now that dope is legal, half the fun is gone from it. Dope is a high-schoolers drug, after all. Its childish and boring.

      Just sayin’

      20

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      yarpos

      Ontario must be a hell of a place. I’m thinking maybe sister State/Province type arrangements with Victoria and maybe Oregon/Washington. You could throw in NZ cause they are only little. Hold a greenie/PC/SJW/etc love fest conference once a year. Just imagine what that brains trust could throw out in terms of society and planet saving initiatives!!!

      80

      • #
        Analitik

        Ontario is where they are forcing nuclear power stations to vent steam to accommodate huge numbers of wind turbines.

        So yes, a definite idealogical link with Victoria, there although they did get rid of their gay, leftist premier, Kathleen Wynne AR the last election so maybe more like South Australia

        30

        • #
          Raving

          Ford’s unforgivable sin was to close play ground while keeping schools open, to close camp grounds while opening golf courses, for giving police powers to stop and inquire whilst not imposing curfew

          He does have political savvy. He knows the worth of phrase such as “2 fries short of a Happy Meal” and “a buck a beer”

          (Hmmm, not sure what beer costs in Aus)

          00

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      John Hultquist

      Sounds like they are just starting up. Maybe this was a one-off.

      Meanwhile, in Washington State the money keeps rolling in. I think the State takes 50% of sales.
      https://www.502data.com/

      “502” is the number given to the initiative, Washington law.

      00

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      MP

      That’s the first time in the history of drug dealing, the dealer ever lost money. Unless they consume the product, which explains the Canadian government, or the Victorian Government did not pay their bills, which may explain Dan’s little fall.

      00

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    OriginalSteve

    So, no one has answered my question about whether a sopace storm is like an EMP.

    The reasoin I mention this is a Defence of the Country question – any country that has nukes doenst need to hit a country directly to disable them. North Korea have often stated they will hit the US with an EMP, and Australia is an allay and closer to them. Also add in the Chinese current billigerence toward Australia ( half of it panic and bluster, the other half a potential threat ) . If a weak space event damaged a power plant, ergo imagine the damage a nuke EMP above australia could do. Are we set up to handle such an event?

    Tony, are there any groups of experienced people who could help/step in and bring plants back on line if we did have a wider “Callide” event? I’d imagine there would be many retired engineers/sparkies/linies who could assist? SHould we suffer and EMP event, these people would be sorely needed, as the authorities would be quite busy…..
    We would also need ex-soldiers as security details for the plants.

    50

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    David Maddison

    I hate how wind and solar subsidy farms are always described by their nameplate capacity and not their actual annual average power output which is about a quarter to one third of that.

    And even then it’s useless, expensive, wildly fluctuating, unpredictable power.

    There should also be a figure representing the quality of the power.

    Power from proper stable generators like coal, gas, nuclear and traditional properly engineered hydro (not Snowy Hydro 2.0) would get a high rating.

    The output from wind and solar subsidy farms would get a low rating due to erratic nature and the overall uselessness of the power for anything but harvesting subsidies from the poor to transfer to the Elites who own the subsidy-harvesting machines.

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      another ian

      Time for “Lemon Laws for Spasmodic Energy”

      If you were sold a vehicle with an advertised 100 kw engine that only actually gave 30 kw you have them

      90

    • #

      David Maddison writes this: (my bolding here)

      I hate how wind and solar subsidy farms are always described by their nameplate capacity and not their actual annual average power output which is about a quarter to one third of that.

      For some perspective on this.

      They are now in realms of 1350MW Generators for coal fired power.

      So that’s one single Unit at a single plant, and there are a couple of them already in operation in China and Turkey.

      For the equivalent yearly power output from wind generation, then you would need a Nameplate of 4500MW. Current large scale huge wind tower/turbines are around 4MW and a large scale wind plant would have 100 of these towers, so that’s a 400MW Large scale wind plant, and there are only two wind plants in Australia of this 400MW Nameplate size.

      So for the same yearly power output, you would need 12 of these large scale wind plants.

      The coal fired plant has a projected life span of 50 years and the wind turbines 25 years at absolute best case scenario.

      So, for lifetime power delivery of the coal fired plant, that’s 24 wind plants. Even if the coal fired plant has down time, you are still looking in the region of 20 wind plants for lifetime power generation.

      One coal fired plant – 20 wind plants.

      Coal fired plant power on tap. Wind plant power availability 30%.

      (a single 1350MW Generator plant is going to be rare, as most options now are for a twin Unit plant of 660MW, but the output would be similar)

      Tony.

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      Ronin

      S&W should be charged a nuisance fee for upsetting the grid.

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  • #
    el gordo

    Richard Willoughby is aware that AR5 didn’t model clouds and has a suggestion.

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2021/05/29/ocean-temperature-limit-corrections-and-part-4/

    10

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    David Maddison

    You know things are REALLY BAD, when even Far Left, anthropogenic global warming fraud believing Renew Economy thinks Snowy Hydro 2 will be a disaster.

    What is the next disaster to be foisted upon Australia after the useless submarines, NBN, paying $1 billion not to build a road in Vicdanistan, the desal plants and NDIS to name just a few?

    https://reneweconomy.com.au/aemos-integrated-system-plan-does-it-leave-snowy-2-0-high-and-dry-32930/

    Also, the Left oriented National Parks Association of NSW also thinks SH2 will be disastrous.

    https://npansw.org.au/campaigns-2/protect-our-parks/kosciuszko-national-park/snowy-2-0/

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    el gordo

    Now that blocking is costing us money, we need to find out the cause.

    ‘An extreme period of rainfall hit the East Coast of Australia from March 18 to 24, 2021 – resulting in intense river and surface water flooding. The rainfall resulted from a blocking high-pressure system in the Tasman Sea and a low-pressure system off northwest Australia, which fed large volumes of moist tropical air into eastern Australia.

    ‘The NSW coast experienced the highest recorded rainfall since national records began in 1900, with some locations along the mid-north coast of New South Wales recording 600 to 800 millimetres of rain. (Insurance Business Mag)

    42

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      el gordo

      … but wait, look over there.

      “The recent drought in the Pantanal was caused by a meteorological phenomenon we call atmospheric blocking. A high-pressure area prevented the formation of rainclouds throughout the central-western portion of South America. Temperatures were very high and relative humidity very low,” José Marengo, a researcher at CEMADEN and principal investigator for the study, told Agência FAPESP.’ (MirageNews)

      10

    • #
      el gordo

      All the unusual weather over recent times, said to be caused by global warming, are in fact caused by blocking.

      ‘Blocking is most common in spring, the Met Office says, but is often most associated with dramatic heatwaves in summer and severe cold during winter.

      ‘For example, blocking was a driver of the heat and drought of the UK’s 1976 summer, the deadly European summer heatwave of 2003, Siberia’s heatwaves and wildfires in the summer of 2013, and Europe’s extreme cold winter of 2009-10. A blocking pattern – in different positions – brought the US a record-breaking warm March in 2012 and record-breaking cold March in 2013.’ (Carbon Brief)

      00

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    David Maddison

    For the last year ever since President Trump’s experts advised that the China Virus likely escaped from a Wuhan Lab (or worse, was genetically manipulated) the Leftist media has been saying that the Chinese Communists are very nice people and would never allow that to happen.

    Conservatives and those on the rational side of science were accused of being “tin foil hat conspiracy theirists”, “Nazis” and all the usual ad hominems we’ve come to expect from the Left.

    Social(ist) Media would even censor or ban people that dared suggest that the virus escaped from a lab (or worse), including the then President of the United States.

    Now, Facebook has announced they will no longer be censoring posts that mention these facts, not since Fauci; and President Imposter Biden’s controllers have been saying the same thing.

    Conservative Mark Dice commented on this:

    https://youtu.be/llAq1fUtF8c (8 mins.)

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    David Maddison

    Leftists are TERRIFIED of any alternate opinion or fact that they don’t agree with.

    Conservatives are much more relaxed and accepting of different ideas.

    Sadly, the Left now dominate schools and universities where there was once a plethora of alternative ideas to digest and there is now just a mono-culture of single Marxist-oriented ideas and those who disagree are severely punished

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  • #
    another ian

    “Ivermectin, The Drug That Cracked COVID and Treated President Trump”

    https://theconservativetreehouse.com/2021/05/29/ivermectin-the-drug-that-cracked-covid-and-treated-president-trump/

    The “Egg on Face Problem explained

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      yarpos

      The little graphic on the components of the liberal brain at the end of the article is a bit of creative genius and very funny.

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      OriginalSteve

      There is one comment that says what Ive been saying for a while ( paraphrasing ) :

      “When you realize the vaccine wasnt brought in for covid,
      But rather covid was brought in for the vaccine.

      Once you understand that, everything makes sense”

      Exactly….

      If you follow stories in one victoristan news paper, you see what appears to be the underlying theme of “yes, vaccination numbers are right up”, like it was a clear confirmation that was the ultimate aim.

      Why?

      I think the ugly and simple truth is that lockdowns and the conditions that make people dispair are being manufactured ( “manufactured” is a word used deliberately ) so that they think ( wrongly ) that once they take the vaccine the problems will stop.

      Wrong.

      There was no problem to start with really – the whole “pandemic” has been carefully crafted and run through the media.

      This is why when videos started surfacing of hospital ERs not being overrun by covid patients ( depsite being told it was like the Westen Front conditions ) that the Lefty social media companies started aggressively shutting down citizen investigative journalist posters and discrediting such people as fast as they could go.

      Its been a 100% sc*m, from the word go. Yes its not a nice bug, but it has a 98-99% survival rate. Thats not a pandemic. Thats just the flu.

      The whole purpose is to frighten the “sheep” up the race, into the slaughter house.

      So far, the evil, Satanic pagan globalists have managed to break the will of a lot of people, so they foolishly roll over and submit to the abuse. Dont be fooled by them.

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    another ian

    “Brilliant Move, California Restaurant Charges Customers Wearing Masks Extra $5”

    https://theconservativetreehouse.com/2021/05/29/brilliant-move-california-restaurant-charges-customers-wearing-masks-extra-5/

    Check the reasoning

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      Rick

      They should charge them $100. Anyone stupid enough to think a porous paper mask can protect them in a restaurant would be stupid enough to believe anything you told them. Just dress it up as an eco project or government program and Bob’s yer uncle – instant compensation for covid restrictions.

      30

  • #
    Hanrahan

    Give with one hand, take with the other.

    Viictoriastan is the first state to tax EVs on a kilometre basis. They have passed a bill taxing them 2.5c/km* to make up for the fuel tax they don’t pay thus not contributing to road maintenance. Great! I hear you say.

    The petrol/diesel tax is federal, ’tis they missing out on revenue so this is just another state tax. Also the $3,000 rebate on the purchase of an EV stays so the state gives away three grand up front and gets it back over years IF the vehicle stays registered and does 150,000 km. Unlikely. In the US data shows EV owners are only doing 5,000 m/y. That’s a long payback time. Many high performance Teslas will be wrecked before then.

    * Plug in hybrids are taxed @ 2c/km.

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      David Maddison

      Good find.

      50

    • #
      Dennis

      The retail price difference between a fully Electric Vehicle and a comparable Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle would pay for petrol and service book maintenance expenses for many years before the EV owner would reduce operating costs, and that is a more complicated formula than most EV sales people are willing to discuss, like replacing battery bank as a cost of fuel/energy, road use tax equivalent to liquid fuel road tax, etc.

      80

      • #
        OldOzzie

        Dennis
        May 30, 2021 at 12:52 pm · Reply

        The retail price difference between a fully Electric Vehicle and a comparable Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle would pay for petrol and service book maintenance expenses for many years

        Currently looking a new vehicle for my wife, now for next year, as 2006 Honda Jazz 102,00Km, owned since 2006, stills drives like new.

        Never bothered with Honda Service intervals, as applied the same approach to 2004 Honda Jazz which we sold in 2017 for Kia Rondo 7 seater for youngest daughter and family, of Mobil One Fully Synthetic Motor Oil every 10K Km, as only less tha 7000Km per year, have changed CVT Fluid every 10k Km and use Only BP or Shell Preium 98 Unleaded Fuel.

        One of the target vehicles is Toyota Yaris Cross GXL – for NSW in White Non-Hybrid FWD CVT Drive Away Price $34,241
        – with Hybrid – Drive Away Price $36,357

        Difference $2,116 – Fuel economy (combined) Petrol 5.4L/100km Hybrid 3.8L/100km

        10 years – Petrol 70,000 @ 5.4l per 100km at $1.60 per l =$6,048 Hybrid @ 3.8l per 100km at $1.60 = $4,256

        Difference $1792 less than $2116 original difference = $324

        Cheaper to buy non-hybrid

        And you don’t have to worry about cost of possible Hybrid Battery Replacement

        100

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          yarpos

          but , but you havent factored in the feels. Surely the feel good virtue signal and imagined planet saving aspects have a value that far exceeds mere money.

          we have been looking at options to eventually by a small car to replace our Subie. We end up in the same place as you really. The complexity of the hybrids concerns me a little also, but I think that is just me needing to get used to it. Bit like how I felt about CVTs at first.

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            OldOzzie

            Yarpos,

            had read re problems with Honda’s CVT with low city driving, went with replace CVT Fluid every 10K Kms on both Jazzes – really happy with CVT and having driven a number of DCT’s, steering clear of all cars with DCT – I note VW with Golf 8 just released, have gone away from DCT to 8 speed auto.

            Funnily enough cost of CVT Fluid was around $200 each 10K Km and now at last Service $128 inlcuding complete flush and then refill which I have always had done.

            Love CVT, it is amazing how quickly the Jazz can get of the mark from Traffic lights when I floor it.

            40

            • #
              yarpos

              Ive been very impressed by the interaction of the CVT with the adaptive cruise control. Up hill and down dale , maintains speed and just adjusts revs with no jerky changes and maintains distance with other cars. Makes long distances much less tiring.

              10

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          Analitik

          So why sell the Jazz?

          40

          • #
            Chad

            And if you are focused on costs,…why buy dealer new, and why Toyota ?
            Much better value, and vehicle choice options are around,.
            I guess you have other factors in mind though ?

            20

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            OldOzzie

            Analitik
            May 31, 2021 at 8:30 am · Reply

            So why sell the Jazz?

            Good question – in theory chasing newer safety features on Yaris Cross GXL FWD, Kia Seltos Sport+ FWD and Madza CX30 Pure with extra Vison Technology, but I must admit the cuurent Jazz stills drives like new so fair question So why sell the Jazz? – at the moment no answer, so will keep driving.

            30

        • #
          RickWill

          You should talk to a Toyota service specialist. A friend who services Toyata vehicles at a large dealership said he still has one of the original Prius that has original battery with no cell replacements. He has replaced cells in others but never full battery. He also pointed out that brake maintenance is much less and engine maintenance is probably lower because it does not run when sitting in highway carparks.

          Hybrids are very popular for Taxi’s not only for their low fuel consumption. The maintenance costs are low as well.

          A compelling aspect of a vehicle that is miserly on fuel is the range. My son has got over 1000km from a tank of fuel in his Toyota C-HR hybrid in mixed city highway driving. My diesel gets over 800km in mixed driving and I have made Melbourne to Newcastle towing a light trailer with it. I filled the tank four time in 2020 but Covid was a factor in that.

          30

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          Raving

          EVs are a real winner when it comes to reducing air pollution in a dense urban setting.

          Pollution derived from generatintg electricity for these vehicles is a seperate concern

          10

  • #
    David Maddison

    I was aware of the numerous bird chopper fires overseas but I wasn’t aware we had one in Australia.

    Here is some video of the aftermath although sadly no video of the fire.

    It was at was at the Windy Hill Wind Subsidy Farm, Ravenshoe, Queensland. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windy_Hill_Wind_Farm?wprov=sfla1

    I never heard about this in the lame stream media.

    Video at: https://youtu.be/P_QGN6CURzY

    It is now over 20 years well past its short useful life.

    30

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    Liberator

    Another EV car seller says to the Aussie Gov’t, “give us money so we can sell EV cars to you that no one clearly wants. I say you should be able to sell these in Australia without incentives.

    So Norway sells EV’s well because it has incentives on EV’s and disincentives on petrol cars, “we have very high taxes on petroleum combustible engine cars.”

    So in Norways case they are kinda forcing the consumer to buy EV’s, they are not being adopted because people want to use then, they really have no choice. Well they do have a choice but are being pushed to EV’s because of incentives and disincentives.

    “goal that all new cars sold by 2025 should be zero-emission, offering hefty tax breaks, reduced parking and tolls to drivers of green vehicles.”

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-05-30/nissan-says-australia-missing-out-electric-vehicle-market/100173124

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      yarpos

      Norway is also blessed with a stable well supplied grid that can support EVS. Comparing Norway and Australia is apples and oranges on steroids.

      90

    • #
      Hanrahan

      The irony is Norway can afford these subsidies because they are raking it in from North Sea oil royalties.

      120

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      Graeme#4

      But when Norwegians want to drive to other countries, they leave their EVs home and travel in fossil-fuel ICEs.

      90

  • #
    Travis T. Jones

    “The unexpected discovery of a whale skeleton hundreds of miles from the sea and more than 200 feet above sea level in1849 is a reminder of how much sea level can change.”

    Discovering the Charlotte Whale

    https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/148329/discovering-the-charlotte-whale

    Who denies the last ice age?

    40

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      Dennis

      Ancient coral reef remains in South Australia’s inland region from a period long ago when the land was covered by sea.

      40

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        Graeme#4

        Just under the hard limestone cap rock of the Nullarbor Plain, 65m ASL, is a 10m deep layer of compacted mud containing the obvious fossilised remains of many sea creatures.

        20

    • #
      yarpos

      Combine all that with submerged cities all over the world and you have quite a bit of range dont you.

      The climate numpties like to think the world is supposed to be stable because all that happened “before their time”

      https://thefanatic.net/submerged-cities-in-different-parts-of-the-world/

      40

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      Flok

      Up in highlands of Papua New Guinea just over 12,000 feet above sea level there are millions of seashells fossils. One geologist said they were over 10 million years old.

      00

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    David Maddison

    Melbourne just had the coldest May morning since 1949.

    Did BoM forget to alter the historical figure?

    130

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    another ian

    “Just you wait”

    30

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    another ian

    “Why is ivermectin success never reported in the mainstream news?”

    Asks Steve McIntyre

    https://catallaxyfiles.com/2021/05/29/why-is-this-never-reported-in-the-mainstream-press/comment-page-1/#comment-3867691

    60

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    OldOzzie

    Victorian Lockdown – the People must be online in their misery

    Interesting Pattern

    Run AVG VPN which uses Melbourne as optimal location

    Using Aussie Braodband Okla Spped Test on 100/40 Mbps HFC Max Plan

    Current Without VPN Normal Ping 7ms Download 108.2 Mbps Upload 38.2 Mbps

    With VPN Melbourne pre lockdown usually Ping 37ms Download 97.8 Mbps Upload 37.8 Mbps – not much loss

    Current Since Lockdown Melbourne Ping 37ms Download 41.0 Mbps Upload 27.8 Mbps

    30

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      Dennis

      The VicGov stand ins held a media conference this morning to complain that the Federal Government is refusing to fund Victorians who have been thrown out of work again, and businesses unable to trade, due to the latest statewide shutdown.

      In other words we the taxpayers of states that remain open, and in NSW a Government sensible and business like that refrains from shutting down the whole State and creating chaos and financial hardship, according to the incompetent VicGov, should fund their lack of management and control of the coronavirus, indefinitely?

      Of course it’s the PM’s fault, isn’t everything the fault of the Federal Government he leads, according to the Opposition muck rakers?

      Cleary Labor Victoria is a chaotic, dysfunctional and incompetent rabble.

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        yarpos

        and sadly I suspect they will get voted in again

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          Serp

          Until this latest lockdown I shared that view but the tide is turning now that Victorians are confronted by more of the same idiocy.

          Somebody should apply to fuami.org for the registration of a Victorian affiliation.

          On second thoughts, surely there’s a kadaicha man somewhere in the woke corridors of Spring Street who can point a bone at the premier and metamorphose him into Ron DeSantis.

          60

          • #
            another ian

            “On second thoughts, surely there’s a kadaicha man somewhere in the woke corridors of Spring Street who can point a bone at the premier and metamorphose him into Ron DeSantis.”

            Doing a Pascoe there?

            Though the traditional way and the continued absence – –

            40

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        Kalm Keith

        Yes.

        00

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        RickWill

        My wife made the point that Australia is lucky Bass Strait exists. She suggested that all the numbnuts roll downhill from the rest of Australia and end up in Victoria. She made that comment when a fellow with heavy Covid symptoms was found in an injection queue and had not been tested for Covid.

        Imagine how bad Tassie would be if all the numbnuts could just keep rolling south.

        00

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          yarpos

          cant really get into the interstate hubris, each State gets a turn if you wait long enough

          00

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        OldOzzie

        Rita Panahi: Federal funding would leave the whole country to pay for our stuff-ups

        The federal government is right to knock back Victoria’s plea for lockdown cash. Why should the rest of the country pay for our leader’s stuff-ups?

        Victoria isn’t just the lockdown state, it is fast becoming the welfare state with the Dan Andrews government again extending its hand for further federal funding.

        Acting premier James Merlino and treasurer Tim Pallas unleashed an almighty tantrum on Sunday slamming the Scott Morrison government for failing to provide additional funding in response to Lockdown 4.

        Merlino said Victorians should be “angry” with the prime minister and federal treasurer Josh Frydenberg.

        “Victorian workers deserve more from the federal government, and I am beyond disappointed that the answer from the Prime Minister and from the Treasurer has been not to talk in further detail about the package,” he said.

        “For the Prime Minister and the federal Treasurer to say ‘no’ is a disgrace and it should make every Victorian angry.”

        But why should the rest of the country pay for the Victorian government’s malfeasance and disproportionate response?

        Victoria has already received more assistance per capita than any other state and it’s a little rich for the Andrews government to expect further compensation after locking down the state instead of relying on its contact tracing regime as NSW has repeatedly done.

        NSW premier Gladys Berejiklian has been criticised by other state premiers along with the usual media troglodytes for refusing to lockdown when faced with a growing cluster of infections.

        But each and every time the state has safely and expertly contained the virus without needlessly destroying people’s livelihoods and liberties.

        It would be a mistake to reward the Victorian government’s incompetence and panic stricken lunacy with more taxpayer dollars.

        The decision to lockdown the state rests entirely with state Labor and it must be responsible for compensating the business community.

        The $250 million business support package announced on Sunday is hopelessly inadequate.

        It’s just another devastating blow for the state economy and long suffering businesses, investors and private sector workers.

        Victoria could follow the example set by NSW in allowing a first class contact tracing system to contain the virus but it has on four occasions opted for the most destructive response in its arsenal; lockdown.

        That decision only makes sense if Victoria’s revamped contact tracing program is still not up to standard.

        10

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          yarpos

          A standardised one didnt even exist till last week. Once again a day late and a dollar short.

          00

        • #

          The federal government is right to knock back Victoria’s plea for lockdown cash. Why should the rest of the country pay for our leader’s stuff-ups?

          They shouldn’t!

          10

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      John R Smith

      Stop climate change.
      Stop death.
      Seems a logical progression to me.

      (To prefer traditional physical reality over virtual reality is Cyberbigotry. Stop Cyberism. NPC Lives Matter.)

      10

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    David Maddison

    Where will it end?

    I am not at all confident that the obsession with wind, solar and the end of the world due to supposed anthropogenic global warming will end anytime soon.

    It has assumed the status of a cult and they tend to end in either mass suicide or mass murder of their members by their leaders…or some other means of self-imposed destruction.

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      Analitik

      I’m hoping it will end when people in the cities experience the direct effects of the “transition to renewables” after Liddell closes. The increase in urban blackouts and inevitable rise in retail electricity prices will make then finally face up to the renewables lie which is linked firmly to the CAGW meme.

      Loss in faith in one will undermine belief in the other. I really don’t see how the gaslighting and deflecting can remain effective when the suburban masses are sufficiently inconvenienced and even suffer damages and loss (both materially and quite likely even lives).

      20

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    David Maddison

    The psychology of cults. How is this significantly different to Klimate Kultists?

    (See link for full text.)

    https://www.onlinepsychologydegree.info/what-to-know-about-the-psychology-of-cults/

    Cults are attractive because they promote an illusion of comfort.

    Cults satisfy the human desire for absolute answers.

    Those with low self-esteem are more likely to be persuaded by a cult environment.

    New recruits are “love bombed.”

    Women are more likely than men to join a cult.

    Many cult members have rejected religion.

    Cults maintain their power by promoting an “us vs. them” mentality.

    Cult leaders are masters at mind control.

    Cult members often have no idea they’re in a cult.

    Cult life can have a dangerous and lasting effect.

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    David Maddison

    To demonstrate how dumbed down and how willing to follow a cult a majority of Victoriastani people are, you can actually buy bed linen and accessories with the idolatrous image of the Chief Medical officer upon them.

    It’s unbelievable!

    https://www.redbubble.com/i/throw-blanket/Prof-Brett-Sutton-by-ashleyecarr/53557411.16D0B

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    another ian

    “My Rooster Earl is More of an Expert than Dr. Fauci”

    https://www.americasfrontlinedoctors.org/blog/my-rooster-earl-is-more-of-an-expert-than-dr-fauci

    Via a comment at SDA

    20

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    another ian

    “Covid19 has revealed the fragility of sane society.”

    A comment at SDA

    10

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      yarpos

      Its been said by many, in many different ways, that our civilization is just a thin veneer.

      2020 and this year has segmented Australia into tribes, made many govt dependent and continues to drive wedges in, the latest being vaccines. With people fighting over toilet rolls when they arent even a problem its not hard to imagine how quickly the facade of civil society would drop in the face of real shortages of things that really matter.

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        Ronin

        I’ve seen them in action when there has been a pretend fuel shortage, it isn’t pretty, some people revert to savages pretty quick.

        40

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        Hanrahan

        So you are thinking Mad Max, not the Neville Shute civility in On The Beach.

        00

        • #
          yarpos

          Yes , in the former there is a belief that you can survive if you steal enough and eliminate opposition. In the latter, everyone is toast anyway.

          00

  • #
    OriginalSteve

    Oh looky…now in Victoriastan, no doubt others will follow….purpose built.

    1000 people…will people become re-educated while inside?

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-05-30/vic-victoria-opens-tender-for-new-quarantine-facility/100177296

    “The Victorian project would create four “quarantine blocks” of 250 beds each, grouped into “suburbs” of 1,000 beds, according to the tender documents.

    “Each quarantine block would have its own entry and departure points, dubbed the red zone and the green zone, so newcomers did not cross paths with people who had completed their quarantine.

    “Covered walkways would allow staff to move around within each block, and each would have a separate staff and training area so workers from different blocks do not mix.

    60

    • #
      Ronin

      Modelled on Auschwitz. ??

      100

    • #
      yarpos

      Quarantine stations used to be the norm. Its only in our recent high tech arrogance that we decided to let them go. One some nice real estate some of them.

      60

    • #
      Klem

      Why would the government need these internment camps when the Covid scare is nearly over?

      Perhaps these gulags will be used for those who dare to question the Great Reset. This is what they mean by Build Back Better.

      00

      • #
        el gordo

        We need a camp at Tullamarine and every other state will do the same because the pandemic maybe around for years.

        00

    • #
      Robber

      Checksum. 1000 beds in this new purpose built quarantine facility, to provide quarantine for 2 weeks.
      So that’s 500 people per week who could be quarantined.
      NSW has been processing 3,000 people per week through quarantine in hotels, Victoria 1,300, SA 500, Qld 1,000, NT 1,000, WA 500.
      More “gold standard” work from the Vic government, with the Federal government to pay of course.
      But Vic still not doing its fair share.

      30

      • #
        yarpos

        I must point out a flawed assumption there Robber.

        You only get 1000 a week at 100% efficiency and its a Govt operated facility (VIC Govt that)
        Id suggest 50-75% is far more likely. Assorted stuff ups, outbreaks, lack of care and lack of consequences will bring efficiency down.

        Re the State numbers there is nothing to say that this would be the only facility that would be operating. Its possible they might use this for the risky destinations (atm India) and leave hotels for other places deemed lower risk. Or perhaps the non vaxxed vs the vaxxed?

        10

    • #
      Analitik

      Just a reminder that this was the quarantine model that Jo advocated last year when Covid-19 spread beyond Wuhan.

      11

  • #
    OriginalSteve

    Smart…15% who think …

    Blood clots, also known as a stroke if in the brain, a known vaccine side affect.

    Just cant imagine why people would say no…./sarc

    https://www.news.com.au/national/victoria/news/up-to-15-per-cent-of-victorian-aged-care-residents-opting-out-of-vaccine/news-story/c759ec83e6b3045e42299f20560e311e

    “A significant number of aged care residents in Victoria are choosing to opt out of the coronavirus vaccine, according to the Health Minister.

    “Up to 15 per cent of residents in aged care haven’t been vaccinated because they or family members haven’t consented to the jab, Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt said on Sunday afternoon.

    100

    • #
      Hanrahan

      If you planned on getting the AZ jab, why not start a course of aspirin before, continuing after?

      I cannot give medical advice but I believe there are good reasons NOT to take aspirin long term.

      30

      • #

        Asprin is a bad idea and doesn’t help. Immunglobuline is a documentated treatment, but not in advance

        00

      • #
        Lucky

        I will be following that (non) advice by not taking that aspirin, nor its pre or post concurrences.

        00

      • #
        yarpos

        Been taking aspirin for 3 decades. Will probably continue as they eventually find us at the back of the queue.

        00

        • #
          Hanrahan

          For reasons unrelated to anything discussed here I give my lady a low dose aspirin every day, Cartia™, to thin the blood a little. It seems more suitable for long term use.

          20

          • #
            Chad

            I recall a medical report last year that said anybody on prescription blood thinners were much better prepared for any Covid effects…let alone the vaccines !

            30

  • #
    John R Smith

    Reset and build back better.
    The greatest leap forward.
    Has the potential to out perform the first many fold.
    Maybe Willygates has figured out that governments will be desperate to procure land to sequester something besides crops.

    00

  • #
    • #
      yarpos

      Excellent , surprised they persisted for 7 years. One of the leaders of the original movement not to join the EU used to put out a pamphlet every couple of years. It looked at recent developments in the EU and why it was still the right course to stay separate.

      One of the great tools in any negotiation is the ability and willingness to walk away.

      50

      • #
        PeterS

        One of the great tools in any negotiation is the ability and willingness to walk away.

        So true. So, sometimes no deal is far better than a bad deal. It depends on the circumstances. In this case no deal is far better.

        10

  • #
    Raving

    One of the joys of raving is to rediscover the obvious.

    Fossil fuels are valuable. They represent compact dense material of stored energy. They are a good and desirable thing. We use coal to unpack the energy contained therein to make transmissible electric power..

    Thus we consume valuable fossil fuel to convert power which is valuable in other forms. The point here beingthat fossil fuel is not so much ‘evil’ as its inherent value is underrated.

    It is neither expensive nor high tech, nor difficult to extract CO2 from the atmosphere and accelerate its resequestering back into fossil fuel. See https://cbmjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1750-0680-3-1 for an example. It just takes land, good crop growth and some money to complete the back end of the carbon cycle

    So by all means use renewable resources but remember that their advantage is only in their usage being less costly then the valuable fossil fuel alternatives. In some circumstances and with current technological advance than can be the case

    We think coal isnt valuable because its abundant and cheap to mine. Tree growth is also abundant and burying trees to accelerate turning them into fossil fuel isnt so expensive either

    Think of it this way. Each year the Keeling curve has a sawtoothpattern as vegetation takes up and releases atmospheric carbon.Forest trees that arentburied mostly end up gettibg burned. There are a lot of forest fires each year! Burying the wood is fast, easy, natural and stops or slows the release of carbon by rotting or burning. Massive amounts of wood were buried during advances during glaciation

    Grow crops to bury them . Burn coal when a dense compact form ofenergy release is required … or use uranium or hydroelectric or solar or wind or thorium or whatever.

    And if you want to mine and work coal on the cheap , its your neighbors and the world at large which pays the hidden cost of conpleting the cycle.

    Please note: The same cost of completing the cycle pertains to the manufacture distribution and recycling of renewable products. Out of sight and out of mind is no differebt that half a carbon cycle

    Fossil fuels and renewal energy products alike are wonderful things. when we defer to the global garbage dump to return and recycle them, we pay the shared cost of slow return

    16

    • #
      Chad

      #
      Raving
      May 30, 2021 at 10:09 pm · Each year the Keeling curve has a sawtoothpattern as vegetation takes up and releases atmospheric carbon………

      Just an FYI….
      That statement is the traditional thinking,…but there are good reasons to rethink that explanation.
      More likely related to Ocean temperatures ?
      I will DDG some links for you.

      30

  • #
    David Maddison

    I would appreciate a critical appraisal of the data presented at the following link.

    The claim is that as soon as C-19 vaccination is started, there is a dramatic increase in cases, including more lethal ones.

    French Medical Doctor: COVID-19 Injections Increasing DEATHS and New Infections – The Evidence is Overwhelming

    Covid-19 Vaccines Lead to New Infections and Mortality: The Evidence is Overwhelming

    by Dr. Gérard Delépine

    https://vaccineimpact.com/2021/french-medical-doctor-covid-19-injections-increasing-deaths-and-new-infections-the-evidence-is-overwhelming/

    60

    • #
      Ross

      Anecdotally – my 91 year old father in aged care facility. During 2020 had numerous state lockdowns and more visitor restrictions, higher staff hygiene requirements etc. The facility didn’t lose a resident for all of 2020. Started the vax jabs in January and within a month 3 residents died. My father has had persistent cold like symptoms ever since. Getting the vaccine is a big metabolic load on the body particularly for older people. Everyone I know who has had the AZ COVID vaccine has been very sick immediately afterwards with flu like symptoms. Not unexpected as they are supposed to initiate an immune response. I dont think in Australia we are learning about all this adverse reactions stats. For an adverse reaction to be recorded by the TGA, there are 5 boxes that need to be ticked. So, we are only hearing about the worst blood clot problems.

      80

    • #
      Serp

      I’ve seen the same information elsewhere and only yesterday advised my mother this could be in the pipeline.

      Dan’s bruisers will be welding our doors shut. And you thought a hundred and eleven days was bad; I’ve said all along this bloke wants us locked down till the state election next year.

      60

  • #
    Travis T. Jones

    Get ready to laugh …

    1.5℃ wasn’t plucked from thin air

    The inclusion of the 1.5℃ warming limit came after a long push by vulnerable, small-island and least developed countries for whom reaching that goal is their best chance for survival.
    The were backed by other climate-vulnerable nations and a coalition of high-ambition countries.
    The 1.5℃ limit wasn’t plucked from thin air – it was informed by the best available science.
    Between 2013 and 2015, an extensive United Nations review process determined that limiting warming to 2℃ this century cannot avoid dangerous [global warming].

    https://theconversation.com/the-1-5-global-warming-limit-is-not-impossible-but-without-political-action-it-soon-will-be-159297

    Wait. What?

    CBS News’ Interview with Climate Scientist Exposes the Whole Ruse

    https://townhall.com/tipsheet/mattvespa/2021/05/29/cbs-news-interview-with-climate-scientist-exposes-the-whole-ruse-n2590152

    CBS “climate specialist”: It’s critical the Earth not warm 1.5 degrees Celsius

    CBS anchor: Why?

    Climate specialist: Well b/c that’s the number “we chose”

    60

  • #
    David Maddison

    Princeton Drops Greek, Latin Language Requirements For Classics Majors To ‘Address Systemic Racism.’

    MAY 30, 2021NATALIE WINTERS

    https://thenationalpulse.com/breaking/princeton-drops-classics-requirements-to-address-racism/

    30

  • #
    David Maddison

    I don’t normally listen to TV “news” (lies) but uncharacteristically, I have it on in the background this AM.

    Is this where the Sheeple get their information?

    No wonder most of them are so dumbed down!

    60

  • #
    another ian

    “This is a real wind drought

    Posted on May 30, 2021 by Rafe Champion

    This is about as low as it gets across the whole of the NEM (National Energy Market) that integrates the grids of the SE states, including Tasmania and Queensland.”

    https://catallaxyfiles.com/2021/05/30/this-is-a-real-wind-drought/

    50

    • #
      Robber

      From 1-6pm on Sunday, across the entire AEMO grid, Wind delivered less than 500 MW from a nameplate capacity of 8,587 MW. Peak demand 27,500 MW.
      SA survived because of Gas. The other States because of coal, gas and hydro.
      And on occasion those big batteries have delivered 70 MW for about 30 minutes.

      50

      • #
        Forrest Gardener

        The big batteries are a success for their owners. Buy when electricity is cheap. Sell when it is expensive. Risk free arbitrage.

        40

        • #
          Analitik

          They don’t have enough capacity for that.

          The big batteries make money providing frequency support services (basically small injections or absorptions of power at rapid request) because the grid has been destabilized by renewables so frequency drops and surges have become commonplace.

          10

  • #
    another ian

    Willis reviews a “ground breaking paper”

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2021/05/30/geocarbsulf/

    10

  • #
    another ian

    “$20 Billion to Rip Up Highways, To Reduce Climate Change and Division Caused by Road Traffic”

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2021/05/30/20-billion-to-rip-up-highways-to-reduce-climate-change-and-division-caused-by-road-traffic/

    20

  • #
    OldOzzie

    The Game-Changer from My Exclusive Interview with Former President Donald J. Trump

    Wayne Allyn Root|Posted: May 30, 2021 12:01 AM

    Now, to my interview. We covered a ton of important topics — including the rigged and stolen election, COVID-19, China and the witch hunt against Trump.

    But all of that pales in comparison to the most important idea that came out of our talk. A solution. A way to save America. A way to take back America.

    A game-changer.

    Trump appeared to be fascinated by my idea. He’d clearly never heard it before. But Trump wasn’t the only one who liked the idea. I received thousands of emails and texts overnight. And virtually every one of them said this idea was brilliant and could change the course of history. This idea gets conservatives excited and motivated again. So, I know I’ve struck a chord.

    Are you ready to hear it? Are you ready to change history?

    I want Trump to run for a House seat in 2022. Pick a winnable Republican district in Florida — where the president is beloved. I promise 74 million-plus Trump voters will get excited. They will volunteer, donate, spread the word and, yes, many will move to your district in Florida to help elect you, Mr. President.

    This isn’t about one House seat. With Trump campaigning and leading the battle, Republicans will sweep to victory in 2022 with the biggest GOP voter turnout in history. We will win a GOP House landslide by 40 to 60 seats — just like in 2010 and 2014.

    Now, to the important part of my plan. The GOP Congress then elects Trump as speaker of the House — the second most powerful job in America. From that platform, Trump rules Washington, D.C., for the next two years. He is President Joe Biden’s worst nightmare.

    Speaker of the House Trump can open a dozen criminal investigations against Biden. He can lead the impeachment of Biden (how ironic would that be?). He can block every single Biden bill. He will stop the Biden agenda dead in its tracks.

    And don’t forget, Speaker of the House Trump can sit behind Biden for each State of the Union address. I can’t wait to watch that.

    I told Trump he will become an American folk hero. His legend will grow even bigger. His brand and actions will dominate Washington politics leading into 2024. From that platform, folk hero Trump wins the presidency again in 2024 — after first saving America from the Biden disaster.

    Trump was clearly fascinated by the idea. He should be. It’s a game-changer for Trump, for the GOP and for America.

    The seed has been planted. I hope and pray I just changed the course of history. God bless Trump, and God bless America.

    161

    • #
      RickWill

      Imagine how hard it would be to stop Trump winning a senate seat in Florida. It will be China’s worst nightmare to have Trump back in two years when they thought they would be rid of him. Gets him back in focus.

      10

  • #

    In the hours following the Callide, umm, ‘incident’, the State Premier, and her Energy Minister gave (in front of the cameras) Pressers playing it down, and saying the plant would be back in operation soon.

    Here we are, now six days after the incident, and ALL FOUR Units at the plant are still offline, and there are other Units also offline in Queensland, undergoing maintenance in the typical lead in to Winter when it’s all hands on deck.

    For a State that relies so heavily on coal fired power, it can only deliver a maximum of 4450MW from a total Nameplate of 8149MW, just 55% of it’s coal fired power total.

    No wonder they are struggling.

    ‘Nothing to see here.’

    Makes you wonder how bad it really was, eh!

    Tony.

    100

    • #
      Peter Fitzroy

      Capacity Factor for coal in QLD rapidly approaching the Capacity Factor for Hydro LOL

      19

      • #
        Kalm Keith

        Very insightful.

        LOL 🙂

        10

      • #
        • #
          Peter Fitzroy

          Sorry Robert we are talking capacity factor, and despite what you would like to believe it is not 100%

          According to the Australian Energy Council, in 2015-16 the capacity factor of coal generators in Queensland was 54.9%. In 2017, Green Energy Markets found that solar panels in Queensland were operating at an average capacity factor of around 23%.

          14

          • #
            robert rosicka

            The old bait and switch we were talking about hydro! So what is the capacity factor for QLD hydro Peter ?

            40

            • #
              Peter Fitzroy

              Hydro is 34%, sorry to burst your bubble

              06

              • #

                Oh, tut tut, Peter Fitzroy, tell the whole story please, and please, at least tell the truth.

                The total Capacity, that’s every Hydro plant in Queensland is only 714MW.

                The total power delivered to the grid by Queensland Hydro last year was just 871GWH, and that was only 1.5% of all Queensland’s generated power from every source.

                That 871GWH gave Queensland Hydro a Capacity Factor of 13.9%

                Naughty naughty.

                Isn’t it wonderful to have actual factual data available for me to comprehensively $h00t you down.

                At least (as is mostly the case with your comments) it gave me a laugh.

                Tony.

                180

              • #
                robert rosicka

                No no burst away , so 34% of 223Mw is “rapidly approaching the capacity factor for coal” is it ?

                10

              • #
                robert rosicka

                Didn’t realise the capacity was that high must have left some boxes unticked and typo should be MW.

                10

              • #
                Peter Fitzroy

                you do understand about what is meant by the term “Capacity Factor” Tony (Anton)?

                Hint it is a percentage based on the nameplate for the sector so you have wind, coal, hydro all with their own capacity factors. It is not calculated the way you did

                Perhaps you could read this?
                https://www.energycouncil.com.au/analysis/capacity-factors-understanding-the-misunderstood/

                Of course if your wilfully trying to decieve, then keep on with these untruths

                011

              • #

                Queensland, furiously racing towards 50% renewables by 2030.

                Currently, all renewables sit at 16.8% of all generated power.

                Tony.

                100

              • #

                you do understand about what is meant by the term “Capacity Factor” Tony (Anton)?

                You’re having a lend, surely.

                Tony.

                100

              • #

                Peter Fitzroy,

                For someone who feels no embarrassment, you sure open yourself up every time you comment.

                It’s YOU who has not understood what was written at the article you linked to, and then misinterpreted it, and then because of your misunderstanding, then proceeded to misrepresent it, and call me a [email protected]

                For the figures you quoted, (the 54.9% Capacity Factor, (CF) and then referring that to coal fired power) the article says ….. PRINCIPAL generation plants throughout Australia.

                That’s EVERY power plant delivering power to the grid in each State, and NOT specifically the coal fired plants you have misrepresented it to be.

                Then, under that, in Figure 1, it shows Queensland coal fired power plants operating at a CF of 67%, so you even failed to read your own article you linked to.

                And hey, data from 2015. And now, here we are in 2021.

                When it comes to CF, I do the CF for each individual source, religiously using the actual data, as shown below in Comment 53.1.2.1.2 directly under these nested comments.

                I know that you never apologise, (even for consistently calling me a [email protected]) but hey, that won’t stop me from pointing out YOUR errors every time.

                You must be so embarrassed, and that’s enough for me.

                Tony.

                100

              • #
                Dave

                WOW!

                Isn’t 570MW of Hydro from Splityard Creek Dam Hydro all supplied by Coal Power?

                They pump from Wivenhoe to Splityard and then harness the electricity flow back into Wivenhoe again!

                So Peter, all that 570MW is pure Renewable in your eyes – or something?

                Are you Malcolm Turnbull per chance!

                60

          • #

            Oh, and again, Peter Fitzroy, please tell the truth.

            The Capacity Factor for coal fired power in Queensland for 2020 was just a little under 70%, and it delivered 79.1% of all Queensland’s generated power.

            The Capacity Factor for Solar plants in Queensland for 2020 was 16.8% and it delivered 5.3% of all Queensland’s generated power.

            The Capacity Factor for Rooftop Solar Power in Queensland for 2020 was 14.8% and it delivered 7.7% of all Queensland’s generated power.

            The Capacity Factor for wind power in Queensland for 2020 was 24.1% and it delivered 2.3% of all Queensland’s generated power.

            Note here I said 2020.

            Tony.

            140

    • #
      David Maddison

      Could the delay be deliberate to make coal look bad?

      50

      • #
        el gordo

        Its a challenge to keep the lights on, but we’ll manage somehow.

        ‘TransGrid to link NSW to SA renewables. A giant $2.4bn interconnector to be built following TransGrid approval is tipped to cut $64 a year from NSW power bills.’ (Oz)

        03

        • #
          Analitik

          Yeah, because it’s proven that more renewables drives down the cost of electricity. They said so on the ABC and SBS

          10

      • #
        MP

        Naa, They are getting you used to unpredictable power.
        The Unions have probably kicked in and prevented the restart of the available turbines on safety issues. normally how they roll.

        30

  • #
    David Maddison

    Notice how the resident Leftists rarely if ever contribute to “unthreaded” segments?

    Probably because they have no independent thoughts…

    60

    • #
      Kalm Keith

      Their combined Capacity Phactor for independent comment does seem to fall on unspecified threads where independent thought is tested.

      And coming from a low of 0.97% on regular threads that’s not good.

      10

  • #
    Terence

    When addressing important issues, you can count on government and its agencies to take the high cost route.

    Which invariably involves lousy management.

    However business and small business in particular usually take the low cost, high management input route.

    For example, the cotton industry knew that reducing transmission losses; reservoir and channel losses through seepage and evaporation, is almost impossible except at the margin.

    Similarly when the oil crisis hit in the 70’s car manufacturers knew reducing friction losses would not offer significant gains in efficiency.

    So they reduced the weight of the cars; no more metal bumper bars.

    Hence the cotton industry increased yields per megalitre through plant breeding and agronomy practices in the field.

    In fact the water use efficiency almost doubled as the typical farmer grew twice as much cotton with the same amount of water.

    Same old, same old; massive infrastructure spending on solar panels and wind turbines much funded by government debt instead of focusing on increasing the efficiency of coal fired power plants.

    My bet is that business will win eventually. We will be left with the debt and the problems of dumping massive tonnages of wind turbines and solar panels.

    70

    • #
      el gordo

      In an Australian context, there has been a lot of work done to improve water usage throughout the Murray Darling Basin, but the cotton industry faulted in the droughty conditions. It took La Nina to bring back full production.

      I propose the best way to drought proof the MDB and western Queensland is a fresh water pipeline from the highlands of Papua New Guinea.

      14

      • #
        Chad

        el gordo
        May 31, 2021 at 11:56 am ·
        I propose the best way to drought proof the MDB and western Queensland is a fresh water pipeline from the highlands of Papua New Guinea.

        Why PNG, ?……there is plenty of water in Northern Qld and NT without making an International exercise out of it .!
        The solutions are well known and often resusitated, but fall upon the stony ground of Political malpractice.!

        60

  • #
    Travis T. Jones

    SMH, 31 May, 2021:

    How a fight about the Great Barrier Reef has become a free speech test

    “After hearing just three hours of arguments later this month, a bench of High Court judges may rule on a defining free speech question: what right do scholars and scientists have to say unpopular, even offensive, things?

    It is the peak of a five-year battle for the man at its centre, Peter Ridd, who was fired from his job as a physics professor at James Cook University after attacking the scientific consensus on [global warming] and the Great Barrier Reef.”

    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/how-a-fight-about-the-great-barrier-reef-has-become-a-free-speech-test-20210528-p57w3f.html

    20

  • #
    David Maddison

    This is excellent!

    Resurgence of lab theory casts doubt on ‘expert’ certainty

    Nick Cater The Australian May 31, 2021

    It is hardly the first time the experts have had egg on their faces. Nor is it their most costly mistake. Yet the upending of the conventional wisdom on the origins of Covid-19 is a reputational blow from which the experts and their media disciples do not deserve to recover. In February last year, 27 so-called prominent public health scientists signed a statement published in the Lancet condemning “conspiracy theories suggesting that Covid-19 does not have a natural origin”. They referenced a dozen academic and official papers concluding the pathogen originated in wildlife. The evidence they cited was gossamer-thin, compiled mostly by deeply conflicted Chinese scientists, including a number attached to the Wuhan Institute of Virology.

    It is hard not to marvel at the experts’ audacity in dismissing the lab theory so quickly, given the weight of circumstantial evidence already to hand. It had been public knowledge for at least a month that China’s most advanced biowarfare development facility was a few blocks away from the Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market. Senior Chinese military officials had made no secret that they regarded biological weapons as a potential offensive capability. The claim that it had been transmitted to humans through consumption of pangolin or bat soup was already wearing thin and the evasive and misleading behaviour of Chinese officials made it impossible to take their word seriously.

    ABC’s Norman Swan in May 2020, was “on the outer bounds of possibility, but really so unlikely that you could say … it’s not the case”. Paul Barry devoted two editions of Media Watch that month to attack the journalism of The Australian’s investigations writer, Sharri Markson, claiming “almost every virus expert had dismissed the lab escape theory”.

    Now Barry has reluctantly admitted the lab theory has legs, what does that do for his credibility and the reputation of his employer? What weight should we now give, for example, to his assertion in February 2020 that “most bushfire experts agree” bushfires and other extreme weather events were the result of global warming? Or his claim in 2013 that “the world’s medical establishment” and “heart experts around the world” agreed fat and cholesterol caused heart disease? Given the direction of the medical debate even then, such certainty was unwarranted.

    The habitual flaw in the reporting is not the theory journalists favour, but the single-minded zeal with which they adopt it and the certainty with which they rule out other possible explanations. Scientific paradigms usually take decades to collapse, like the link between cholesterol and heart disease, giving scientists and commentators time to adapt their views. Covid-19, however, has accelerated the process into overdrive, leaving peddlers of false certainty nowhere to hide.

    The embarrassing performance of the experts and their disciples in the media during the Covid-19 crisis is an important theme in Niall Ferguson’s latest book, Doom: The Politics of Catastrophe. Their approach to knowledge resembles that of the first-century Gnostics who drew certainty from personal and esoteric insights and despised traditional teachings. The ability to apprehend the truth without the need for critical reflection, as German political scientist Eric Voeglin noted, is “the special gift of a spiritual and cognitive elite”, people who claim “absolute cognitive mastery of reality”.

    The damage caused by such elites in the past is not limited to utopian believers in communism and fascism. Between the 1960s and 80s they became gripped by the certainty of global overpopulation and set out to “control” reproduction in developing countries. The Indian government of Indira Gandhi carried out more than eight million sterilisations, leading to the death of 20,000. The UN supported China’s brutal one-child policy, the societal consequences of which are still playing out.

    The networking of human society has created the arteries for contagion, writes Ferguson. Bad ideas have spread rapidly, made worse by blinkered thinking uncomfortable with uncertainty.

    “In recent years we may have allowed one risk — namely climate change — to draw our attention away from the others,” writes Ferguson. “In January, even as a global pandemic was getting under way — as flights laden with infected people were leaving Wuhan for destinations all over the world — the discussions at the World Economic Forum were focused almost entirely on questions of environmental responsibility, social justice and governance.”

    All of this has occurred in an era when humankind has supposedly crossed the threshold from superstition to science. Yet, as Ferguson says, “modern societies are highly susceptible to surrogate religions and magic, leading to new forms of irrational activity that, on close inspection, are quite similar to pre-1700 behaviours”.

    Moral faith is more commonly determined from politics than religion. Journalists succumbed to the temptation to lay all the blame for the pandemic on former president Donald Trump. “This was the kind of error Tolstoy mocks in War and Peace: the tendency to attach too much importance in the historical process to individual leaders,” says Ferguson. “In reality, there were multiple points of failure in 2020.”

    The distillation of complex problems into single-cause challenges with simple solutions is the hallmark of the expert class. Future generations may wonder how the scientifically advanced world community of 2020-21 became convinced it could control something as complicated as a pandemic through the brutality of a lockdown and a magic vaccine. They may regret our expert class remained stubbornly incurious to the virus’s human origins.

    In searching for a redemptive note to end his book, Ferguson suggests the chronic failures of institutions and bureaucracies in the US might trigger disruption and a return to progress. “By killing those parts of our system that failed this test, Covid-19 might just make us stronger,” he writes.

    We can but hope.

    1/ Norman Swan is currently the face of the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program. Picture: YouTube

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    MP

    Why, why, why. scratch that, I read your comments.
    Mate started in Peru, no quarantine just his neg test from OZ before travel, when he got there they told him he could not go to site unless injected so they flew him back to Georgia USA, no quarantine and the idiot got the J&J, said it was like he got hit by a truck and put him on his back for two days. No lottery ticket, hamburger, donuts or ice cream.

    I waiting for the zombie apocalypse, I am going to go mad max on all your *rses 🙂

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    robert rosicka

    Still waiting for confirmation but I’m hearing that Dominion has lost its law suit against Rudy Gulliani .

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      MP

      And most of those are Trumpsters and people like me wanting a chuckle a the trash that comes from his mouth.

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    el gordo

    A simple formula to evaluate the role of CO2 in a paleo climate setting.

    https://judithcurry.com/2021/05/29/simplified-climate-modelling-part-1-the-role-of-co2-in-paleoclimate/

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    el gordo

    Beijing now says three children are good to go, but with a burgeoning middle class this is unlikely to become popular.

    ‘China will allow each couple to have three children in a major policy overhaul to address the challenges of its ageing population.

    ‘The decision was announced after a Communist Party Politburo meeting chaired by President Xi Jinping on Monday. The statement said major steps were needed to address the deepening problem of the ageing population.’ (SCMP)

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    Hanrahan

    When elephants fight the grass gets trampled.

    Musk has not been discrete, he announced that he is playing with bitcoin. The elite are supposed to work out of the public limelight.

    I’ve been watching the bitcoin price and every time it takes a tumble punters with cojones of steel or $hit for brains “buy the dips”. It has worked for so long no one can contemplate it failing but as is well known “it works until it doesn’t”.

    The only ones ahead of the game this month are those few who bought 12 hours ago.

    There are bitcoin millionaires and others sitting on mere six figure profits. How long will they hold their nerve and risk being a Joe Six Pack AGAIN? They should be dancing close to the door.

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    OriginalSteve

    Jo

    This is really interesting. Not sure if its being used for humans, but seems worth looking at?

    https://now.tufts.edu/articles/harnessing-antibodies-pathogen-hunters

    “Shoemaker works specifically with antibodies from camelids (animals like alpacas), which have a simpler structure than most other mammalian antibodies and can much more easily be re-engineered for use in therapies or diagnostic tests.

    ““We can link two or more antibodies together as a single protein,” says Chuck Shoemaker. “We can design them to target almost any disease agent—from cancer cells to infectious pathogens—with high potency and specificity.”
    “We can link two or more antibodies together as a single protein,” says Chuck Shoemaker. “We can design them to target almost any disease agent—from cancer cells to infectious pathogens—with high potency and specificity.”

    “In order to make these molecules, Shoemaker immunizes an alpaca against a specific pathogen, then takes a blood sample that contains its antibody-producing cells. He then extracts the DNA that codes for those antibodies, edits it in the lab, and use it to create enhanced new antibody molecules.

    ““Using that method, we can link two or more antibodies together as a single protein. Such molecules can then perform new functions not possible with conventional antibodies,” he says. “We can design them to target almost any disease agent—from cancer cells to infectious pathogens—with high potency and specificity.”

    “The antibodies themselves don’t always do the dirty work. Their job is often to act as a kind of homing device that can guide other molecules in the body to a specific target. But the fact that they can latch onto a specific target themselves isn’t small potatoes—in fact, it can sometimes be enough to stop a disease in its tracks, Shoemaker says. If his lab-made antibodies attach themselves to the business end of a toxic molecule, he notes, they can effectively stop that molecule from interacting with anything else, rendering it harmless.

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    CHRIS

    I’m sitting back and waiting for Bitcoin and it’s lame offspring to completely collapse, which will happen. I liken Bitcoin to the Tulip Craze of the middle ages…which is why I own gold (bullion, not shares in gold mining companies). I am confident that gold will win out in the end (because it is real, unlike Bitcoin).

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      el gordo

      Three quarters of the world’s cryptocurrencies are mined in China, because it requires a lot of energy, so in the new world order the gold standard may weaken over time.

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    el gordo

    Over 63% of heat related deaths not caused by global warming.

    ‘Research of 30 million deaths, spanning almost three decades in 42 countries, found 37 per cent of heat-related mortality could be attributed to climate change.’ (SMH)

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      Raving

      Got to wonder about the percentage of cold related deaths caused by energy poverty, not to mention the heat related deaths caused by energy poverty

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