JoNova

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Tuesday Open Thread

7.6 out of 10 based on 20 ratings

207 comments to Tuesday Open Thread

  • #
    Peter Fitzroy

    Cyclones, Hurricanes, Typhoons, the 2020-21 seasons were bad for these weather events. Currently FNQ is being hammered by what is considered an abnormally early cyclone.

    Perth both swelters and breathes smoke from their surrounding fires.

    237

    • #
      TdeF

      I remember six weeks in Perth where the temperature was 100F every day. Last night our BOM talked about a ‘scorcher’ at 35C? That same very hot summer long ago, we also had a week in Adelaide where the temperature never went under 98F, day and night. People abandoned their houses and slept on the lawns. Airconditioning was unknown.

      So where is that Global Warming?

      And why are there so many people still claiming CO2 causes heating and ignoring that warming causes CO2 to come out of the oceans in which 98% of all CO2 is dissolved? If the weather is not warming but the oceans are warming, what other conclusion is there? And how can the oceans be warmed by CO2 but not the atmosphere? It’s all made up science.

      As for the US election, there is great media pressure to accept a fait accompli in the greatest ripoff of a democratic election in modern times. Sanctioned and sponsored and hidden by all the people who claimed Trump stole the last one.

      It’s not as if the Democrats did not question five previous elections in Congress, especially the last one. But for some reason the conservatives are not supposed to question anything. That is the exclusive right of the Democrats who are never beaten, just robbed.

      And why were all the media polls wrong? As usual. More blatant voter manipulation.

      461

    • #
      robert rosicka

      You have a strange definition of “Hammered” and if you spent any time in WA down south you’d find this is there fire season.
      As for a few hot days it is summer Poiter !

      140

    • #
      robert rosicka

      Cyclone season runs from November to April ! Geez you’re right this one is early !

      151

      • #

        And talking of cyclones generally, and the reportage they attract from the ABC, this morning we were told by our so-called ‘most trusted’ news source in Oz that the recent cyclone in Fiji was ‘one of the most powerful EVER’. Ludicrous.

        120

    • #
      GD

      Perth both swelters and breathes smoke from their surrounding fires.

      And at the start of 2021, Victoria shivers with cold weather and rain. I know, it is CO2 that is causing this, particularly CO2 from factories and machines.

      Because the planet can detect the difference between CO2 produced by nature and CO2 produced by humans.

      280

    • #
      bobl

      What? It’s January, cyclone season started back in November. If anything the monsoon trough is late in forming. I don’t think 40+ days are particularly unusual in Perth on New Year’s Day. A few years ago when I was working in WA it was well over 40 on NYD and we were right on the ocean in Rockingham.

      200

    • #
      GD

      Cyclones, Hurricanes, Typhoons, the 2020-21 seasons were bad for these weather events.

      Not in Australia.

      150

    • #
      TedM

      Please look at the data PF and don’t just parrot off Greenie scuttlebutt. We like to look at facts here.

      210

      • #
        Peter Fitzroy

        Facts? No you and the rest of the posters here ignore them.

        I’m just following your lead

        120

        • #
          GD

          Facts? No you and the rest of the posters here ignore them. I’m just following your lead

          Now, why would you do that?

          Are you presenting arguments and ideas or are you just trolling?

          I suspect the latter.

          160

        • #
          Broadie

          Pete, Mate! Help is at hand.
          The pain you are feeling is Cognitive Dissonance. Must hurt bad, fortunately the cure is simple. Open your eyes!

          Why do you think the useful idiots deny comment on their blogs while Jo endures our need for recognition and consensus?

          If you have a problem with a comment, bring facts!
          In the meantime, Let us Reset!

          Reset back to before John Howard looked to make a name for himself by banning honest people from the protection offered by US Constitution’s 2nd Amendment.

          Reset us to back to before we had the trash forced into Arts Law faculties due to a difficulty with Math pre-selected to represent us.

          Reset us back to before we had to wear bike helmets and fill our hospital wards with paraplegic heads covered in lycra. Remember when you could jump on a bike and ride to work and not get hat hair or caught and dragged by plastic straps attached to your head.

          So PF, the old joke!
          You!
          Your Mate!
          Your BBQ!
          Get out of our lives!

          61

          • #
            Ross

            Sounds like your life is hell, Broadie. Perhaps you should google: ‘How to correctly wear a bicycle helmet’.
            Me? I don’t find them that difficult.
            [To all; I’m letting this comment from Ross through even though dozens of Ross’s other boring and useless comments have been sent directly to trash. Treat Ross appropriately for the worth of his comments please? I’d really hate for him to go away.]ED [Sarc]ED

            02

    • #
      Hanrahan

      Currently FNQ is being hammered by what is considered an abnormally early cyclone.

      Who told you that? There was a tiny little cyclone in the gulf I never heard of ’til I saw it on a chart as an ex-cyclone. The current map shows a few lows of 1003 to 1005 across the top that the BOM doesn’t even call a monsoon trough. Why do you lie when you know you will be caught out?

      Althea hit Townsville on Christmas eve morning and Tracy hit Darwin Christmas night. Nothing “early” about a new year cyclone.

      290

    • #
    • #
      Jonesy

      Meanwhile, here in Melbourne we are waiting for any summer. Yesterday, had the fire going in the house and had to wear a jumper all day. Last two days have traversed Victoria from Horsham to Moe. Temp did get to 17 for me today. Just a little bit of climate change..PLEASE. I’m freezing my butt off!

      270

      • #
        GD

        Jonesy, I’ve run my gas heater most nights through December. Much more than I’ve had to in the last ten years I’ve been here.

        Four seasons in a day has turned into eleven months Winter, maybe one month Summer, hopefully in January or February.

        On top of that, you keep voting for Dictator Dan.

        What is wrong with you Melbourne people?

        70

        • #
          James

          How cold is it getting at night? In northern NY the winter has been mild. Most days have been getting up to freezing with lows around -6 degrees C. My woodstove keep the house at about 18 to 20 degrees C without to much trouble. No need for supplemental heat!

          00

        • #
          Graeme No.3

          G.D.
          I drove through Hahndorf** in the Adelaide Hills on Monday and saw trees with autumn leaves. In the past few years this colour change has happened at the end of February.

          Actually partly through and then took the back road as the main street was very busy with tourists (mostly with coats or jumpers n).

          00

      • #
        TdeF

        Agreed. I remember scorching summers in Melbourne. It was a crime to send children to school in the first two weeks of February. Then in the 1980s I remember one summer where all but three days in January were over 30. The BOM says 2020 was the hottest year ever, but they live in a different universe. Now if we get a hot afternoon, it is amazing and followed the same afternoon by a thunderstorm where the temperature plummets 20C.

        But we are told Global Warming causes Climate Change except there is none. And those rapid sea rises? Where?
        Plus the BOM is exaggerating every weather event to get funding and buy favor with the left of politics, while Australia is being crippled by the move to useless electricity, replaceables.

        Meanwhile China adds more additional CO2 generation every year than our entire output. And they complain about us. Now how do hamburgers cause Climate Change again?

        160

    • #
      Ted O'Brien.

      You might consider it early. I’d call it a month or two late.

      30

    • #
      el gordo

      The trend in tropical cyclones since the 1970s has been on a downward trajectory, clearly related to global warming.

      http://www.bom.gov.au/cyclone/climatology/trends.shtml

      70

    • #
      yarpos

      Really got the hyperbole generator wound up today.

      70

    • #
      MP

      BS Peta, I was in it, gentle breeze as it glided overhead. Tracy, Althea were Christmas cyclones nothing unusual to see here, except it was declared a cyclone with max wind strength at 64kph at its centre(cat 1 starts at 119 kph constant, not gusts) Gusts to 100 kph, no clearly defined eye. Its a Tropical low pressure system, even the rain was 64mm in the last 24 hrs, that’s a sun shower in the tropics during the wet season. Coast is getting a bit more, it floods every bloody year.
      The cyclone that went through the islands, declared cat 5, was barely cat 3 according to wind finder, which I know to be close as I tracked the one that went through Kowanyama on BOM and wind finder using the Mornington island then Kowanyama Airport wind speed as a calibration tool.
      BOM declared it a cat 4 it was just cat 1, destruction in its wake, 2 trees fell over the power lines and I think the wind speed indicator of trampoline distance, was two yards.

      Watch on wind finder when the next is declared and use the towns actual wind speed indicator as a guide if it crosses the coast. The same is happening in the states, pushing the doom, climate change bad. They have added another Cat to the scale, that’s 9 out of 10 cats.

      90

    • #
      FijiDave

      what is considered an abnormally early cyclone

      Weasel word “considered”.

      By whom?

      40

    • #
      Chris

      Not so! Perth has been warm to hot the last week or so but not extraordinarily so. Those of us who work out doors are still working outdoors. As for bushfires, at the moment they are nothing much and we certainly haven’t seen any smoke. It’s just normal summer weather, please don’t pretend it is something it is not.

      110

    • #
      MrGrimNasty

      Peter, Atlantic season was active, elsewhere was quiet which means globally ACE was completely ordinary. No EF5 tornadoes in the US, yet again. In the fullest records available, there is clearly no correlation with man’s CO2 emissions.

      https://wattsupwiththat.com/2021/01/01/global-hurricane-activity-below-average-in-2020/

      Additionally, ‘global warming’ has been completely absent from the entire S.Hemi for some time, with neutral/negative mean 2m surface temperature anomalies (cf 1979-200). There is nothing unusual – no large anomalies – with the land or ocean temperatures in Australia, 3/4 of the land is currently cooler than ‘normal, so anything you are getting in Australia is just weather.

      Antarctic sea ice extent staged a big resurgence this year, although just recently it has dropped back, it is still above last year.

      Sorry for being factual.

      60

    • #
      Analitik

      Cyclones, Hurricanes, Typhoons, the 2020-21 seasons were bad for these weather events. Currently FNQ is being hammered by what is considered an abnormally early cyclone.

      Perth both swelters and breathes smoke from their surrounding fires.

      Dogs and cats living together… MASS HYSTERIA

      40

    • #
      Strop

      Peter, Cyclone Tracy was Christmas 1974. So don’t get too excited about cyclones occurring in January.
      Perth hot in summer. Gee, what a shock.

      How about you explain why 70km east of Melbourne it’s so green the CFA still has not introduced fire restrictions which are usually in place by the start of December?

      50

    • #
      Damo

      It’s great you remind us what a broken record sounds like, some of us really like the sound of vinyl!

      30

    • #

      @Peter Fitzroy: cyclone season up here is November to April. This last one crossed from the Gulf of Carpentaria and dropped to a rain depression so no one is getting “hammered”. On the other hand, there is a bit of rain, and the depression is still slowly rotating and is currently near to stationary. Spent cyclones and monsoons do have a tendency to get “stuck” which can be a problem. The last big one was Yasi. Nothing much since, apart from Debbie which was hyped, but hardly a tropical low when it went over Proserpine. The associated “damage” there was largely the result of inadequate construction.

      30

    • #
      John of Cloverdale

      1962 Jan; 2021 Jan
      1st 40.5; 1st 33.9
      2nd 39.4; 2nd 32.9
      3rd 38.9; 3rd 32.3
      4th 37.8; 4th 32.5
      5th 37.9; 5th 33.7
      Source:BoM climate page and latest Perth Observation Page.
      Just imagine Perth in 1962 with no A/C in the schools, home and office.

      40

    • #
      Ian George

      ‘There has been a decrease in the number of tropical cyclones observed in the Australian region since 1982.’

      http://www.bom.gov.au/state-of-the-climate/

      And Perth had its coldest temp for Dec in 2020 at 6.6C.

      http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/dwo/202012/html/IDCJDW6111.202012.shtml

      10

  • #
    GD

    Cyclones, Hurricanes, Typhoons, the 2020-21 seasons were bad for these weather events

    And that is somehow mankind’s fault?

    80

    • #
      robert rosicka

      Repent GD , give up red meat and fossil fuel and head for Nimbin .

      110

    • #
      el gordo

      ‘Currently FNQ is being hammered …’

      According to BoM.

      ‘… there are currently no predictions that this tropical low will redevelop to tropical cyclone strength if it moves over the Coral Sea. Heavy rainfall for parts of Queensland’s north is expected to continue in the coming days due to ex-TC Imogen and a weak monsoon trough which extends from the tropical low into the Coral Sea.’

      110

      • #
        Peter Fitzroy

        This was the worst year for tropical storms, but…

        And to your point – I would say that heavy rainfall is exactly equal to ‘hammered’ if you had been in one, you would know.

        But like everything else, you pretend that the trends are not there, you pretend that science has nothing to say, and you pretend that man does not have an influence

        217

        • #
          el gordo

          Sir, I was clobbered with a super cell yesterday and the wind was ferocious, 15 mm rain fell in ten minutes.

          The BoM link is unequivocal, global warming in this part of the world has seen a gradual decline in TC ever since the Great Climate Shift of 1976. As you know, that is when the PDO shifted to its warm phase.

          There are large numbers of lukewarm scientists on a gravy train and its fair to say I have lost faith with the Establishment.

          The influence of humanity over climate change is negligible, natural variables rule and I can prove it. Lay your bets ladies and gentlemen.

          140

          • #
            RickWill

            You may be interested in the data here:
            http://climatlas.com/tropical/global_annual_ace.png

            From a cyclone energy perspective, the Southern Hemisphere has been trending down while the Northern Hemisphere has been trending up. The total has little to no trend over the 50 years of the data. That is to be expected as cyclones are one of the major ocean energy release mechanisms that provide the thermostatic control on the tropical ocean temperature.

            Around 26C sea surface temperature, the atmosphere goes into cloudburst mode. By 28C, the shutters are effectively closed. The surface sees very little sun and begins to cool after 30C when more heat is lost to outgoing long wave than solar energy absorbed by the surface.

            There is no “Greenhouse Effect” and CO2 does absolutely NOTHING. The whole “Greenhouse Effect” fairytale is unphysical claptrap.

            The fact that three disparate oceans all have the same maximum surface temperature should give most people a clue. The fact there is only one body of water regarded as sea surface that regularly exceeds 32C, the Persian Gulf, should also give a clue. Can you guess where there is tropical water warmer than 28C, but higher than 10 degrees north, that has never experienced a cyclonic storm?

            110

            • #
              el gordo

              Thanks for the link, it shouldn’t surprise us that the hemispheres are out of sync. In looking for the mechanisms, ocean oscillations need to be considered, along with associated teleconnections.

              Armed with key words I’ll go on a googling exercise.

              30

          • #
            Kalm Keith

            “The influence of humanity over climate change is negligible, natural variables rule and I can prove it.”

            I like that bit.

            70

        • #
          Another Ian

          “This was the worst year for tropical storms, but…”

          From Peter’s crystal ball on 2021?

          40

        • #
          Environment Skeptic

          Consistent rain throughout the year has filled most of the dams across greater Sydney, and lest we forget that excellent growing conditions in 2020 resulted in record breaking yields for farmers nationally. Lets get some perspective please!

          https://www.graincentral.com/news/australia-on-track-for-second-biggest-grain-crop-anz/

          https://www.waternsw.com.au/supply/Greater-Sydney/greater-sydneys-dam-levels

          10

        • #

          PF has got it bad. I’ve been here since ’89. Nothing has hammered since Yasi. The trend is hugely downwards. BoM exaggerate. It will probably go up again eventually.

          40

      • #
        yarpos

        “Hammered” is just parroting the MSM reports, just the usual superficial meme regurgitation

        40

  • #
    Boris

    I replied to Jo’s comment regarding my “junk” post regarding PCR testing inadequacy. But since it’s 4 or 5 blog posts down no one will read it let alone coming out of moderation, so I copy & post it here.

    https://cormandrostenreview.com/retraction-request-letter-to-eurosurveillance-editorial-board/

    There are ten fatal problems with the Corman-Drosten paper which we will outline and explain in greater detail in the following sections.

    The first and major issue is that the novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (in the publication named 2019-nCoV and in February 2020 named SARS-CoV-2 by an international consortium of virus experts) is based on in silico (theoretical) sequences, supplied by a laboratory in China [1], because at the time neither control material of infectious (“live”) or inactivated SARS-CoV-2 nor isolated genomic RNA of the virus was available to the authors.

    To date no validation has been performed by the authorship based on isolated SARS-CoV-2 viruses or full length RNA thereof….

    Jo,

    This might be a good start on the PCR protocol flaws described in this paper.

    Might even be good material for an investigstive post by you or AG,here.

    Cheers

    PS hopefully this post will not be moderated

    91

    • #
      Serp

      It’s a snark hunt. Newly minted virus with known genome and yet nobody has any bits of the live virus for assaying ultraviolet frequencies. We’re being offered a post modern vaccine which does not confer immunity! …whilst sterilising not more than seventy percent of women for an as yet undetermined time. And there’ll be a host of other side-effects spawned as the inevitable consequence of the global indemnity granted the pharmaceutical cartel –they’ve been granted licence for unrestrained clandestine experimentation on whole populations. Lord alone knows what will be left of humanity by the end of this decade.

      80

    • #

      I read it. What is the issue? I can comment if you have an explicit question.

      11

      • #

        This might help for a start it is Australia’s list of approved kits (not all are PCR).

        https://www.tga.gov.au/covid-19-test-kits-included-artg-legal-supply-australia

        There are, globally, hundreds of PCR test kits and approximately none of them use the method you linked to. They all have their own sets of specific primers, reagents and variations on recommended amplification conditions.

        Mind blown?

        Every one of them has detected infected people and following this many thousands of further tests using genomic sequencing has found the ncov virus that causes covid19.

        Tell me where the controversy is?

        00

      • #
        Boris

        From my perspective the 10 flaws are listed and described in detail in the paper with the expected problems and misinterpretations, including confirmation issues if used as a protocol. This will make it impossible to:

        * be sure the particles detected are SARS-CoV-2
        * avoid operator error/likely prone to operator errors (due to ambiguity in some details)
        * gather reliable data

        The test calibration was designed using Chinese provided codes or alleged SARS-CoV-2 not living viruses from infected humans. That is a pretty big problem, don’t you think? See the summary and conclusions below.

        https://cormandrostenreview.com/report/

        SUMMARY CATALOGUE OF ERRORS FOUND IN THE PAPER
        The Corman-Drosten paper contains the following specific errors:

        1. There exists no specified reason to use these extremely high concentrations of primers in this protocol. The described concentrations lead to increased nonspecific bindings and PCR product amplifications, making the test unsuitable as a specific diagnostic tool to identify the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

        2. Six unspecified wobbly positions will introduce an enormous variability in the real world laboratory implementations of this test; the confusing nonspecific description in the Corman-Drosten paper is not suitable as a Standard Operational Protocol making the test unsuitable as a specific diagnostic tool to identify the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

        3. The test cannot discriminate between the whole virus and viral fragments. Therefore, the test cannot be used as a diagnostic for intact (infectious) viruses, making the test unsuitable as a specific diagnostic tool to identify the SARS-CoV-2 virus and make inferences about the presence of an infection.

        4. A difference of 10° C with respect to the annealing temperature Tm for primer pair1 (RdRp_SARSr_F and RdRp_SARSr_R) also makes the test unsuitable as a specific diagnostic tool to identify the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

        5. A severe error is the omission of a Ct value at which a sample is considered positive and negative. This Ct value is also not found in follow-up submissions making the test unsuitable as a specific diagnostic tool to identify the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

        6. The PCR products have not been validated at the molecular level. This fact makes the protocol useless as a specific diagnostic tool to identify the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

        7. The PCR test contains neither a unique positive control to evaluate its specificity for SARS-CoV-2 nor a negative control to exclude the presence of other coronaviruses, making the test unsuitable as a specific diagnostic tool to identify the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

        8. The test design in the Corman-Drosten paper is so vague and flawed that one can go in dozens of different directions; nothing is standardized and there is no SOP. This highly questions the scientific validity of the test and makes it unsuitable as a specific diagnostic tool to identify the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

        9. Most likely, the Corman-Drosten paper was not peer-reviewed making the test unsuitable as a specific diagnostic tool to identify the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

        10. We find severe conflicts of interest for at least four authors, in addition to the fact that two of the authors of the Corman-Drosten paper (Christian Drosten and Chantal Reusken) are members of the editorial board of Eurosurveillance. A conflict of interest was added on July 29 2020 (Olfert Landt is CEO of TIB-Molbiol; Marco Kaiser is senior researcher at GenExpress and serves as scientific advisor for TIB-Molbiol), that was not declared in the original version (and still is missing in the PubMed version); TIB-Molbiol is the company which was “the first” to produce PCR kits (Light Mix) based on the protocol published in the Corman-Drosten manuscript, and according to their own words, they distributed these PCR-test kits before the publication was even submitted [20]; further, Victor Corman & Christian Drosten failed to mention their second affiliation: the commercial test laboratory “Labor Berlin”. Both are responsible for the virus diagnostics there [21] and the company operates in the realm of real time PCR-testing.

        In light of our re-examination of the test protocol to identify SARS-CoV-2 described in the Corman-Drosten paper we have identified concerning errors and inherent fallacies which render the SARS-CoV-2 PCR test useless.

        CONCLUSION
        The decision as to which test protocols are published and made widely available lies squarely in the hands of Eurosurveillance. A decision to recognise the errors apparent in the Corman-Drosten paper has the benefit to greatly minimise human cost and suffering going forward.

        Is it not in the best interest of Eurosurveillance to retract this paper? Our conclusion is clear. In the face of all the tremendous PCR-protocol design flaws and errors described here, we conclude: There is not much of a choice left in the framework of scientific integrity and responsibility.

        If the protocol produces false numbers – more than likely inflated positives, a false picture for everyone, especially, the media and the fearful general public who leave it up to the so called ‘experts’ & ‘leaders’ to decide on policies. So far their policies have destroy countless small businesses, middle class lives, liberty etc.

        Even if it’s used in the EU and the US and not in Australia it creates a picture that makes people & naïve politicians easily manipulated.

        20

        • #

          It is not a problem. No one follows this paper so no issue.

          and quit with the conspiracy trash. I wont engage with that.

          10

          • #
            Boris

            In adequate reply that doesn’t address the flaws.

            It’s all ok because [you] said so….

            Your post is trash.

            10

            • #

              Sorry? You seem to have an agenda which is making you find obscure things and apply them generally.

              This paper is not followed as a recipe by any the tests used in the US or Europe. That is where the story ends. If you have any specific issues with PCR testing I am happy to address them.

              and you can also read this

              Authors’ response: Plenty of coronaviruses but no SARS-CoV-2

              By:Reusken, CB (Reusken, Chantal B.)[ 1 ] ; Haagmans, B (Haagmans, Bart)[ 2 ] ; Meijer, A (Meijer, Adam)[ 1 ] ; Corman, VM (Corman, Victor M.)[ 3,4 ] ; Papa, A (Papa, Anna)[ 5 ] ; Charrel, R (Charrel, Remi)[ 6 ] ; Drosten, C (Drosten, Christian)[ 3,4 ] ; Koopmans, M (Koopmans, Marion)[ 2 ]
              View Web of Science ResearcherID and ORCID

              EUROSURVEILLANCE

              Volume: 25

              Issue: 8

              Pages: 26-27

              Article Number: 2000197

              DOI: 10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2020.25.8.2000197

              Published: FEB 27 2020

              Document Type:Letter

              View Journal Impact

              00

              • #
                Boris

                I have no agenda, only an opinion on what I can see before me.

                This is not obscure, the list of authors is pretty impressive as is the list of consortium members. The original paper Corman-Drosten et al. Eurosurveillance 2020 was the first protocol used in widespread testing approved by the WHO, it was on their website alone as the only protocol that many nations used. It’s still used as a reference from the WHO website.

                https://www.who.int/docs/default-source/coronaviruse/protocol-v2-1.pdf

                Scientists and doctors have posted their comments in response. Here are a few of their comments

                Comments
                Drs. M.J. Ortiz Buijsse (biochemist) says:
                November 28, 2020 at 4:25 pm
                Dear scientists,
                After reading your retraction request letter and your review paper regarding the Corman-Drosten paper, I am shocked about the facts and circumstances that you have presented.
                It seems obvious to me, that this Corman-Drosten paper should be retracted immediately, and it should not have been used as a basis (and used as reference) to the PCR of SarsCov2 in public screening, as is (unfortunately) happening around the world.

                drs. willem engel (bio pharmaceutical scientist) says:
                November 28, 2020 at 11:31 pm
                We already suspected the fraud around the PCR tests. This letter shows it should be immediately stopped, the practise of large scale testing without any correct protocol or CE certificate. We also suspect it is a specific as we have found 100% for other pathogens as well , namely the Aspergillus fungus, which is know to cause pneumonia

                Mitch Lever says:
                November 30, 2020 at 3:23 am
                May I suggest if you are not doing it already, you get active on writing and submitting your own paper rebutting the whole nonsense across the board.

                That is what I am doing. Coincidentally I am also focussing on ten problems.

                If they don’t retract it that may not be so bad because it will stay there as a living example of how science can be perverted, which could be the topic of many future published rebuttals, and example for students of molecular biology of what not to do.

                Wh Botha says:
                December 2, 2020 at 6:35 pm
                The perpetrators should be held accountable for probably the biggest fraud executed on humanity of all time, and there should be a commission appointed to recover billions in losses.

                Remko Lems (MSc, Bioinformatician) says:
                November 30, 2020 at 11:24 am
                I am both ashamed (Corman-Drosten paper) and proud (Dr. Borger) to be a Dutch scientist… This letter and subsequent paper marks the turnkey event in the history of mankind.

                The facts and circumstances presented by the ICSLS paper/letter is astonishing to say the least versus most certainly the international implications of the flawed Corman-Drosten paper and the uptake of major institutions worldwide.

                My sincerest respect to the ICSLS team! Finally, a bright light at the end of the tunnel.

                There are many others…

                Finally, in this day and age anyone using the pejorative dismissal “conspiracy” to shut down discussion is either unable to think or, is being disingenuous.

                10

        • #
          Lucky

          The vague imprecise nature of the standard used for comparison seems to be a legit problem along with that of recognizing fragments (of what?) as the target.
          Is this usual in medical testing practice?

          An easy way to gives the test more cred, for the purpose of an opinion on a patient wrt their likelihood of developing symptoms or of spreading, as required in Florida for example, would be to require the Ct to be in the report.
          That this is rare is an indicator of what the test is really being used for.

          The pcr test is a very good tool, if it is used correctly. That is, for detection of extremely small quantities of what may be a specific virus.

          00

  • #

    Pardon my ignorance but do the Americans have something like our Royal Commission process where witnesses can be subpoenaed to testify under oath? This would be a nice hot potato for Trump to hand over to Biden as they pass in the corridor.

    80

    • #
      Tilba Tilba

      […] do the Americans have something like our Royal Commission process where witnesses can be subpoenaed to testify under oath?

      Not precisely the same, but pretty close – the Mueller Investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election was a royal commission in everything but name. They produce a report, make recommendations, and point prosecutors at the people to indict … just like they do here.

      There is also the Grand Jury system … but that is more like a criminal or civil pre-trial investigation in the court process.

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    RickWill

    Interesting year for my household energy for 2020.

    Solar output for the year was 2802kWh. This is down about 10% on previous years. Peak recorded was still above rated 3kW.

    Recorder area insolation down from 4kWh/day average for last three years to 3.8kWh in 2020. The garden reflects the good rainfall and reduced sunshine with very good crops of fruit and trees still lush and green.

    I trimmed an overhanging tree which would have helped the solar panels a little. However a near neighbour installed a 6kW system and that has impacted the line voltage. Every sunny day from August onward. the voltage reached 253V, the level where my system starts to back off.

    Lunchtime overvolatege must now be a serious issue across the country. It was reported today that the investment in rooftop solar is now exceeding the investment in grid scale weather dependent generators.

    I was able to collect enough wood from my son’s property and my own that I already have sufficient wood for heating in 2021. Overall the household energy account had a minimum of $34 in August. This is the first year I have not needed to pay for household energy.

    The regulator is still calling for policy certainty (more subsidies) to keep the “renewables” industry in positive investment but the falling wholesale electricity prices are not conducive to that. Also the grid scale WDGs are being hit by the costs of system stability. The battery is benefitting from the latter so expect to see more battery investment. The HPR battery made enough last February when the interconnector to Victoria was out to buy a replacement in just two weeks – no wonder they are increasing capacity.

    The wholesale price of electricity is certainly reducing. I would be interested to know if anyone is seeing that reduction reflected at the retail level. The system stability costs are levied outside the wholesale price setting and some is levied directly on retailers. It is not easy to get an actual retail price so not easy to see if it has actually come down.

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      yarpos

      Seemed pretty typical this year so far at 38 South. I dont have the magic panels that deliver more than rated , but I have microinverters so I really only see the real AC output at the management system. I may be magic and dont know it.

      Although many in our little village have solar its still very low density, and I have never seen more than 248V. My retailer contacted me regarding lower rates. It netted out at a 3% reduction, poles and wires daily charge up, consumption slightly down both peak and off peak/controlled load.

      30

      • #
        RickWill

        My inverter captures the daily peak. If the panels are normal to the sun at any time of the year, I would be surprised if they did not exceed their rating now and then.

        The panels are typically rated at 25C and 1000W/sq.m insolation while the efficiency alters by about 0.7%/C. So a cool day with passing cloud will give peak above rating with good orientation. My panels are close to normal to the sun at this time of the year around 1pm. If it has been overcast in the morning and cloud lifts in the early afternoon, I know I am likely to see higher than rated output for a few minutes until the panels actually warm up from the sun. The top of atmosphere insolation in the Southern Hemisphere peaks at 1420W/sq.m. There will be a bit lost through clear sky but the surface level will be higher than 1000W/sq.m.

        The peak temperature today on the nearest weather station in SE Melbourne reached a scorching 15.1C. But it was overcast the entire day. If there had been a break in the clouds, the panels would be around 7% higher output for 1000w/sq.m than their rating.

        You should expect to see the connection fee going up as there is lots to do to get the system capable of safely digesting the growing lunchtime output while still meeting demand on the hot evenings yet to come.

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      Chad

      #
      RickWill
      January 5, 2021 at 4:27 pm ·

      . The battery is benefitting from the latter so expect to see more battery investment. The HPR battery made enough last February when the interconnector to Victoria was out to buy a replacement in just two weeks – no wonder they are increasing capacity.

      The wholesale price of electricity is certainly reducing. I would be interested to know if anyone is seeing that reduction reflected at the retail level. The system stability costs are levied outside the wholesale price setting and some is levied directly on retailers. It is not easy to get an actual retail price so not easy to see if it has actually come down.

      Victoria is already installing another Big Battery….NSW intending to follow.!
      They dont generate power, but they do generate lots of income !
      Wholesale prices are of no significance to the consumer, unit cost is dominated by other factors such that it is easy to see 5-10c /kWh difference between alternative providers.
      How much is the current average WS price ? .. $50-$60/MWh ? ……
      ….even if that dropped to $10/MWh, it would not be noticeable to most consumers who are effectively paying $200 – $300 $/MWh !

      30

    • #
      Robber

      Rick, In Vic the Essential Services Commission sets Victorian Default Offers VDO) for each distribution area. These are the maximum retail prices permitted.
      For western Vic where Powercor is the distributor, from Jan 2021 the maximum prices are:

      Supply charge $1.2918/day, Usage $0.2240/kWhr

      In 2020 the VDO rates were $1.2619/day and $0.2640/kWhr.
      In 2019 the VDO rates were $1.2333/day and $0.2403/kWhr.

      So usage charges have come down in 2021 after an increase in 2020, reflecting lower wholesale generator prices, but daily charges reflecting mainly network costs continue to increase.

      For a house with annual usage of 4,000 kWhr:
      2019 cost $450 + $961 = $1,411
      2020 cost $462 + $1056 = $1,518
      2021 cost $472 + $896 = $1,368

      In practice, most retailers offer lower rates. I am currently looking at an offer of 15% off both the daily and the usage charges. (further complicated by the fact that the offer includes peak and offpeak usage rates).

      30

      • #
        Chad

        Robber
        January 6, 2021 at 6:46 am ·
        Rick, In Vic the Essential Services Commission sets Victorian Default Offers VDO) for each distribution area. These are the maximum retail prices permitted.
        For western Vic where Powercor is the distributor, from Jan 2021 the maximum prices are:

        Supply charge $1.2918/day, Usage $0.2240/kWhr

        In 2020 the VDO rates were $1.2619/day and $0.2640/kWhr.
        In 2019 the VDO rates were $1.2333/day and $0.2403/kWhr.

        So usage charges have come down in 2021 after an increase in 2020, reflecting lower wholesale generator prices

        Are you suggesting the wholesale price in WVic has reduced 4C/kWh ($40/MWh) since last year ?
        What are the actual Wholesale costs currently, and how much extra Wind power did WVic install last year to achieve that reduction ?

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        • #
          Chad

          From last years data.. Vic w/sale cost (inc Retail margin of 10+% ) was 30
          5 of total charges ..so say 20% of that $0.26 /kWh,..or 5.2C /kWh .
          Its not feasible that they reduced that by 4.0C such that w/Sale cost is less than 2.0c/kwh ?
          Oddly, in NSW the W/sale+ Retail proportion is only 20% of the total,…but the total is typically higherat 25-30.0 C/kWh…..suggesting a pure W/sale cost of <3.0C/kWh ?
          Thank you COAL !
          Ironically the state with the highest % of W/sale cost is TAS.. (..almost all Hydro, RE ),.. at 50+% ?

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    dinn, rob

    to help you sleep at night see this video by Josh Phillipp https://balance10.blogspot.com/2021/01/to-help-you-sleep-at-night-see-this.html

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  • #
    Peter C

    Georgia AG resigns abruptly and without explanation!

    Rachel Maddow reports the story and thinks somehow it must be Trumps fault.
    https://www.msnbc.com/rachel-maddow/watch/u-s-attorney-in-georgia-abruptly-resigns-after-trump-scorns-unnamed-never-trumper-98795077709

    Likely she is correct in a way. Pressure was probably applied. What Rachel cannot understand is the that AG may be in serious trouble.

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    el gordo

    The Eemian was hotter than the Holocene, yet CO2 was lower, which sort of brings into sharp focus the sensitivity of CO2.

    ‘During the last interglacial (~116 to 128 thousand years ago), when CO2 peaked at just 280 ppm but surface temperatures were so much warmer that much less water was locked up on land as ice, sea levels were “at least ~7 m to ~9 m above present” and they “could have been as high as 11-13 m above present” at some locations.’ (Notrickszone)

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      Serp

      Surely “sensitivity” needs replacing by “irrelevance” in your first sentence el gordo?

      There’s nothing to prove, carbon dioxide is a red herring thought up by Maurice Strong’s gang.

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      • #
        el gordo

        I’ve been hanging out at a lukewarm blog and Judith Curry is almost ready to join us: ‘Emissions are down, but atmospheric CO2 keeps rising. The CO2 ‘control knob’ appears to be not very sensitive.’

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    Tilba Tilba

    A cool, windy, and very damp Tuesday in the Paris of the South (aka Melbourne) after a similar Sunday and Monday … it is the mildest summer (so far) I can remember. The La Niña is doing its thing – and of course most of Australia welcomes every drop of above-normal rain that it can get.

    There is a reasonable argument that Australia’s Aboriginal Peoples were forced to continue as semi-nomadic hunter-gatherers because the weather in even the favoured regions was way too unpredictable and variable for farming – droughts or floods. Even many modern-day farmers with high-tech support find it pretty difficult.

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      el gordo

      Over 60,000 years they had occupied most of Australia, clans developed and being hunter gatherers there was a lot of walkabout when food was scarce. Generally people settled in a particular area if resources were plentiful.

      The people of Sydney became permanent residence once sea level stopped rising.

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        Tilba Tilba

        Sure … I agree with all of that – many ceased being seasonally nomadic anywhere and everywhere that food supplies were steady and year-round. I love to just imagine the abundance of oysters, mussels, and fish just in Sydney Harbour for instance.

        Even when I was a kid in the 60s the fishing was hugely better right along the NSW Coast, and fishing fleets were everywhere … nearly all gone now.

        And I was just making the point that the highly erratic nature of our weather – driven by El Nino and La Nina – made farming a huge gamble, and not the best way to make a living.

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        • #
          el gordo

          True, the European settlers were dumbfounded by the cyclic nature of the Australian climate, drought, bushfire and floods. In the good years there were abundant crops and plenty of food for the livestock, so they moved further west where marginal land showed promise, but the next El Nino put an end to that.

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        Peter C

        The people of Sydney became permanent residence once sea level stopped rising.

        When was that? And how did it affect the Sydney area?

        30

        • #
          el gordo

          Sydney Harbour was a creek at the Last Glacial Maximum, 18,000 years ago, and more than likely uninhabitable. Sea level rose very quickly once the Holocene gained momentum.

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            Kalm Keith

            Twenty thousand years ago sea levels were approx 125 metres lower than now and likely the ocean front was 19km or so further out.

            Sea level rise was very rapid once the big melt started and no doubt the original inhabitants were pushed back that 19km and more as seas topped out six metres or so above current levels.

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          • #
            Tilba Tilba

            Sea level rose very quickly once the Holocene gained momentum.

            Indeed – and probably the source of the Noachian Great Flood myths found in many religions. Similarly, being driven from the Garden of Eden may recall race memory of good coastal lands being swamped by seawater.

            It’s well established that human occupation of Australia had happened by 65,000 years ago … with occupation of all regions of the continent by current modern Aboriginal Peoples by at least 40,000 years ago.

            Obviously the oldest fossil / skeletal remains found would be very unlikely to be the oldest possible find. Anyway … the continent was first inhabited a very long time ago.

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            • #
              Chad

              the continent was first inhabited a very long time ago.

              ….as was most of the Planets land mass’s
              What point are we trying to make here ?

              20

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        Kalm Keith

        There is some doubt as to whether the occupants of Australia sixty thousand years ago are related to the current “original Australians” who were here when Captain Cook arrived.

        Sea levels have fallen 1.2 metres in the last 2,000 years and this has opened up a lot of coastal areas to habitation that were previously under water.

        Sea levels have dropped by up to six metres in the last 7,000 years and oscillated down though three cycles to get to where we are now.

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        Analitik

        Over 60,000 years they had occupied most of Australia

        That is the extreme extrapolation of the dating of some cave paintings. And the earliest paintings would almost certainly have been produced by the race which ended as the Tasmanian Aborigines since the later arrivals drove them off the mainland.

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        • #
          el gordo

          Its quite clear that people had reached Australia by 60,000 years BP, particularly the people of Cape York who have Denisovan genes. They probably came across from New Guinea, during an earlier glacial epoch, when a land bridge formed and Lake Carpentaria was created.

          Later arrivals may have come across from Timor when sea level was low, Darwin was only 50 Kilometres away and they saw bushfire smoke. So they must have had a craft.

          I don’t think the Tasmanians were necessarily pressured by new arrivals, they were hunter gatherers who kept moving depending on resources. With the arrival of the Holocene and sea level rise they were effectively cut off from the mainland.

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          • #
            Analitik

            The mainland Aborigines were also hunter gatherers. If the they didn’t force the Tasmanian Aborigines off the mainland, then why didn’t the groups co-exist?

            And I don’t accept that it is at all “clear” that Australia was inhabited by man 60,000 years ago

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            • #
              Kalm Keith

              Forty thousand years is the more likely starting point.
              It’s been a while since I reviewed the Mungo Man story.

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              • #
                el gordo

                The Willandra Lakes district had been occupied long before 40,000 BP, they had walked overland following the inland waterways, which were more abundant because of the low evaporation rate.

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              el gordo

              ‘Previous archaeological digs and dating had suggested people migrated to Australia between 47,000 and 60,000 years ago. But a new excavation at an aboriginal rock shelter called Madjedbebe revealed human relics that dated back 65,000 years.’ (New York Times)

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            Graeme No.3

            E.G:
            Denisovan genes aren’t proof of early arrival. There is a higher level of them in PNG and a lower level to the south (by the time you get to SA or WA the level is quite low) so it may merely be some introduced genes later.

            During the glacial maximum, about 25,000 years ago, the sea level was some 140 metres below its present level, with the coastline extending 400 kilometres further to the north-west and the Kimberley was separated from southeast Asia (Wallacea) by a strait approximately 90 km wide.
            The Gwion Gwion paintings, Bradshaw rock paintings etc. are terms used to describe one of the two major regional traditions of rock art found in the north-west Kimberley region of Western Australia.
            A 2020 study puts the art at 12,000 +- 500 years. Around 15,000 years ago, the archaeological record shows that Aboriginals in the Kimberleys began using stone points in place of multi-barbed spears, but there is no record of this change of technology in the Bradshaw paintings.
            The Bradshaws are not the region’s earliest paintings. The earlier art consists of crude animal drawings that are believed to be up to 40,000 years old. The Bradshaws have nothing in common with this earlier art.
            Agnes Schultz, among others, noted that unlike with Wandjina art, Aboriginal people showed little interest in the Bradshaw paintings. So it looks like there may have been 3 different cultures in the Kimberleys, but we aren’t allowed to say this as the APPROVED SCIENCE says that aborigines have been here forever. Research concerning Bradshaw art is controversial and little consensus has been reached, as other interpretations generate considerable criticism due to its continuing potential to undermine native title claims. The APPROVED SCIENCE also says that aborigines were intensive agriculturalists here 80,000 years ago (see the ABC approved book Dark Emu) some 70,000 years before its start in the Middle East.

            Homo floresiensis is a species of small archaic human that inhabited the island of Flores, Indonesia until the arrival of modern humans about 50,000 years ago, although there are claims that they may have survived until 12,000 years ago. Their ancestry is debated, from those who favour descent from Homo erectus arriving 400,000 years ago to those who favour descent from H.sapiens. The latter would seem unlikely as the APPROVED SCIENCE says modern humans only left Africa about 70-75 thousand years ago. In any case those ancestors must have had boats or rafts to have crossed from Bali to Lombok where the water would have been deep permanently.

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              el gordo

              Ta G3, you are correct, the Denisovan genes were apparently picked up along the way.

              ‘Papuan and Aboriginal ancestors left Africa around 72,000 years ago and then split from the main group around 58,000 years ago.

              ‘They reached the supercontinent of ‘Sahul’ that originally united Tasmania, Australia and New Guinea around 50,000 years ago, picking up the DNA of Neanderthals, Denisovans and another extinct hominin along the way.’ (ABC)

              00

            • #
              Kalm Keith

              On a visit to Cairns many years ago I was struck by the strong resemblance that the locals shared with people from New Guinea.

              For variety, dare I say diversity, someone mentioned here that there were still some extremely small and different people living in QLD.

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        yarpos

        a wheel would have really useful wouldn’t it? ah well

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        • #
          Tilba Tilba

          a wheel would have really useful wouldn’t it? ah well

          Not necessarily – with rough or sandy terrain, wetlands, and incredibly thick bush – the wheel and carts could have been pretty useless.

          There are numerous pockets of land across many Australian regions where the original bush has never been cleared – rainforests, arid zone, temperate forests, savanna, etc, and the bush is incredibly thick, tangled, and strong. Wheels would not have penetrated far.

          But you raise a good point – isolated peoples suffer a major disadvantage, and it’s no accident that the world’s first agricultural societies developed in the Fertile Crescent of Western Asia.

          After bringing their original tool sets with them from Africa, these earliest migrants were in a broad area of similar land and climate – virtually from Portugal to Iran. Technological inventions in one spot (the wheel, animal domestication, writing, etc) could and did spread steadily right across the region – including as far as India and China.

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          • #
            yarpos

            Lets not dream they actually ranged very far, there is a reason there is no common language. There ae so many noble savage myths these days it is getting ridiculous, my favourite is “managing” vast tracts of bush using the modern confected term cultural burning vs living with results of lightning strikes. There is much to admire in regard to the ability to survive simply, but some of ever burgeoning myths and legends become a bit hard to swallow.

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            • #
              Tilba Tilba

              Lets not dream they actually ranged very far, there is a reason there is no common language.

              Why on earth is this a reply to me … I’m not a dreamer about this subject, or much else either. No-one (least of all me) claimed that many specific groups of Aboriginal People ranged over vast distances in an annual cycle.

              They tended to be fairly settled in favoured coastal or riverine regions, through to semi-nomadic within an overall territory in drier zones.

              The more tightly settled, the more different languages that emerged = the same phenomenon happened all over the world from the tip of Africa to Europe to Japan. Or an extreme case like New Guinea.

              But out in arid-zone Australia, the broad language groups cover truly immense areas, reflecting the very long distances people did travel, and trade over.

              I agree that “cultural burning” is a mawkish and unneeded innovation. I’ve always been happy with “firestick farming” – the deliberate and seasonal burning of brush and undergrowth to promote the growth of favoured plants, and feed for prey animals.

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            el gordo

            The Indus Valley Civilisation collapsed around 4000 years BP, so a small fleet of new immigrants escaped to Australia bringing sophisticated tools and the dingo.

            02

            • #
              Tilba Tilba

              Somebody brought the dingo.

              10

              • #
                el gordo

                It was a long sea journey, hugging the shoreline, yet not sure where to stop for refreshments. The dogs gave them a bit of security against the savages they may have encountered.

                00

  • #
    Alice Thermopolis

    If only there was a natural phenomenon called a “global climate”, the UN climate controllers could manipulate it at will until the cows – and $$$ – come home – or not.

    40

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    el gordo

    I’ll put this up again, just in case some of you may think global warming is fiction.

    https://notalotofpeopleknowthat.files.wordpress.com/2021/01/image-2.png

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      Kalm Keith

      That graph.

      Surely you aren’t suggesting that it shows human induced global warming?

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      RickWill

      Same problem as Australia – moved to faster response automatic electronic recordings in the early 1990s. Always look for the measurement system change before attributing an actual change.

      The ocean surface temperature is thermostatically controlled. Some swings and turnabouts that create noise but nothing to be concerned about until the orbital shift that enables land ice to accumulate around the North Atlantic land masses. That will affect a lot of people but not much impact on Earth’s temperature.

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      Harry Passfield

      The title in the chart should give you a clue that it’s not Global. It’s the Central England Temperature series .

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        el gordo

        Okay its a regional warming signal. Something strange happened around 1740 which may give us a pointer to what is happening now.

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        • #
          Analitik

          End of the Little Ice Age?

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            el gordo

            Not quite, 1727 to 1738 was the warmest decade in the CET prior to the 20th century. George was on the throne and they were all rejoicing at the bumper crops, but then came 1740 and a deep freeze. (Clearly visible in the CET graph.)

            In the following year it was back to normal, moderately cool. Coincidently, the LIA finished in Europe around the time of the Industrial Revolution.

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          RickWill

          Maybe they changed to new instruments around 1740. That would be consistent with what happened around 1990.

          They were most likely using mercury in glass in 1740. Maybe they got a new supplier. I think MIGs are now banned but that was centuries later.

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            Graeme No.3

            Rick:
            The Royal Society (about 1661) calibrated thermometers against the one made by Hooke. There were changes in placement of thermometers from outside to inside in an unheated room etc as this was before Stevenson was born.
            1740 was a noticeable cold year, but the previous 20-25 years had been a bit warmer (at times).

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      John of Cloverdale

      My graph (Link below) of CET, ann summer mean temp cf sunspot graph
      Just an eyeball correlation on my part,
      1) the summer temperatures of 1730 and 1780 are similar to those of 2000.
      2) the warming trend from the years,1695 to 1730, matches any so-called modern ‘unprecedented’ warming.
      Link

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  • #
    robert rosicka

    Any Apple iPad gurus here , I’ve got a new iPad with nothing on it but passcode is playing up .
    Can I reset the new one back to factory and start again ?

    10

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      Serp

      https://forums.whirlpool.net.au/forum/141 is the Whirlpool iPad page which is where I’d start (mind you I don’t have any iPads).

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      Chad

      Give it a try…
      But as it is new, i would haul it back to the Apple store for a proper fix

      30

      • #
        robert rosicka

        Might end up there yet but was trying to set password which it wouldn’t recognise and now I’m basically locked out although I think there’s an option for a hard reset .

        10

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        Chad

        To continue…
        Iuse iPad and iPhone..mainly for compatability with the rest of the family + Apple TV etc.
        It often gives me the 5h1ts, but the one hing Apple is Good for is tech support and customer service through the Apple store……..NORMALY !
        But, Covid seems to have got to them….
        …My son went to the Canberra AppleStore to buy a new phone at the weekend., whilst i broused options at JB hifi. ..I had a normal “ hand sanitised” JB experience playing with numerous phones and gadgets etc…..
        ..meanwhile, my son had to que outside the A’store, register his full details, state exactly what he wanted to buy, …before they would even quote him a TIME that he would be allowed to enter the Store !

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          OriginalSteve

          Yup….appears to be control freakery at its best.

          Or Soviert style management.

          Watching “Chernobyl” last night…..noted the scientific errors, but the feel of how it was handled feels very modern society….

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    Wet Mountains

    From a yank’s perspective…God I love this site; you guys are great.

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    • #
      PeterS

      Thanks but I hope I can say the same thing about you “yanks” by Jan 20 but if Biden manages to become POTUS then you guys haven’t done enough to stop the fraudulent election of such a hopeless man. You follow?

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        Kalm Keith

        Peter, we here in Australia have many issues related to our governance that just get passed in by the population as , too hard. They’d rather just go to the footy and hope that the politics fixes itself.

        Sure we can look to the U.S.for inspiration but we have a lot of ugly behaviour to fix before we can say we’ve fixed the rot here.

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          Tilba Tilba

          Sure we can look to the U.S. for inspiration but we have a lot of ugly behaviour to fix before we can say we’ve fixed the rot here.

          I trust you don’t include me in that “we”! There are many things I love about the US after eight visits – its best cities, the national parks, the friendliness and energy of the people, the music, etc.

          But I expect it is the LAST place I would look to for “inspiration” in terms of politics and governance. The US Constitution (with amendments) is a dog’s breakfast, elections are an unholy mess, and all politicians rely on huge big-money donations. Not for me!

          I particularly dislike the First Past The Post / Winner Take All voting systems … they could learn a great deal from our Preferential Voting system, and our Proportional Voting system in our upper houses.

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            Kalm Keith

            Tilba,

            Well done, a good start to 2021; spoken like a true victim.

            You’ve completely misrepresented what I was saying and to be honest, that wasn’t unexpected.

            My hope for America is that in some way the illegal votes can be identified, quantified and disallowed. This should then see Trump back in the WhiteHouse.

            Failing that, it is very likely that after the O’Biden _ Harris inauguration there will be a groundswell of investigation and prosecution and rectification of some of the corruption in the
            election that will grind on an make life difficult for the new team.

            This may produce a better election in the coming intermediate elections and the major one in 2024.

            Either way, I would be inspired.

            The other likely result is that The O’Biden!Harris ticket is allowed to stand, they move in, Trump goes to the U.K. to play golf, and the whole election mess is swept under the carpet and dismissed forever.

            That would not be inspiring.

            KK

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              Tilba Tilba

              Well done, a good start to 2021; spoken like a true victim.

              Would you like to explain what I might be a “victim” of – just because I might hold a less-than-inspirational view of US politic structures?

              You really do not have to be thoroughly duped by the mainstream media, be a card-carrying Marxist, or even in the pay of the Chinese Communist Party, in order to be sceptical that there was massive illegal voting, or even run-of-the-mill petty fraud.

              Does it not puzzle those who claim with such certainty the election was fraudulent, that no state court, no federal court, no state, no governor, nor the DOJ, nor the CyberSecurity Agency, and not even Mitch McConnell, has agreed there was?

              Are they all corrupt and in on the plot? Hardly seems possible. As I keep saying, being sceptical and agnostic is not a bad position to occupy – and it is a dramatic process to watch.

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        Serp

        Aha, an example of victim blaming innit? Next you’ll be blaming the Australian public for copping sweet Turnbull’s usurpation. Anyway Trump will be inaugurated in a couple of weeks and we’ll be able to start being nice to each other again.

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          yarpos

          well it was pretty sweet

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          PeterS

          A child would have known that people like Rudd and Gillard did not deserve to become PMs but the people decided otherwise. Go figure.

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          • #
            Tilba Tilba

            A child would have known that people like Rudd and Gillard did not deserve to become PMs but the people decided otherwise. Go figure.

            So do I assume that you have no faith or belief in democracy, and that leaders should be appointed only with consent of the governed?

            Disturbing if true. BTW I wasn’t a fan of Rudd-Gillard much, but it was sweet to see the demise of the insufferable Howard!

            Turnbull could have been a successful PM if he weren’t so full of himself. Keating was the last one I really liked.

            07

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              OriginalSteve

              Hmmm…..Crudd was elected and Gullard basically overthrew him. Crudd has been whining about it ever since.

              The Crudd/Gullard years were one where you had to scrape it off your skin and had to have a good shower afterward…..particularly unpleasant and grubby period of time…

              It was a grubby free for all, very banana republic stuff…..

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                Tilba Tilba

                It was a grubby free for all, very banana republic stuff…..

                It could be argued it was the picture of civility, compared to the palace coups in the Liberal Party since 2007:

                Bredon Nelson > Malcolm Turnbull > Tony Abbott > Malcolm Turnbull (I’m back!) > Scott Morrison … lot of blood on the carpets!

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                Chad

                Bredon Nelson > Malcolm Turnbull > Tony Abbott > Malcolm Turnbull (I’m back!) > Scott Morrison …

                Hmm ?….makes you think where we could have been if M T had never been on the scene ..?

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                Tilba Tilba

                Hmm ?….makes you think where we could have been if M T had never been on the scene ..?

                I suspect he would have been a successful Labor prime minister … but something happened – whether he approached the party, or the party approached him – it didn’t lead to a deal.

                I expect he would have asked for a lot – things the ALP hierarchy and/or the unions weren’t prepared to concede.

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        Wet Mountains

        For three days up to and including election day I stood on a major street corner in Colorado with a sign supporting Trump. Five hours each day. Today and tomorrow, I will be on that same street corner again supporting Trump. I must do everything in my power to avoid the violence I feel is coming. There are millions doing the same thing. Pray that we succeed.

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          Good on you. If all Americans did as much this would have been sorted in november…

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          Tilba Tilba

          Well, the country has worked itself into a corner.

          Half the population won’t accept it if Candidate A becomes president, and half won’t accept Candidate B. I doubt that there would be civil war – it’s not a fight over land, or state v state, but it could be a pretty ugly four years for the Biden-Harris admin.

          Lots of healing and uniting required, it seems to me.

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            Neil Crafter

            “healing and uniting”?

            And some kumbayas for good measure along with hopes and prayers. If you think Biden and Harris want to heal and unite you’re really on some good substances.

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            • #
              Kalm Keith

              🙂

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              Tilba Tilba

              If you think Biden and Harris want to heal and unite you’re really on some good substances.

              I’ll assume you’re not a right-wing nutjob, but simply someone who doesn’t really understand how Washington works at all.

              As we speak, we do not know who has won the two Georgia Senate run-offs, but whatever, Biden-Harris really do have a huge amount of healing to do.

              Their first priority is the 2022 mid-terms, in which they have to work hard to hold their very slim House majority, and try to get or keep an even tighter Senate majority.

              I think they will work very hard indeed on the “healing and uniting” agenda, and while some might be scathingly dismissive and cynical, such an approach will definitely appeal to normal mainstream Americans.

              Biden-Harris know very well what they need to do for the next two years. The mid-terms are critical – especially if Kamala Harris wants eight years.

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          OldOzzie

          Wet Mountains – from Sundance at The Last Refuge – theconservativetreehouse – Rag Tag Bunch of Conservative Misfits

          Nationwide Action Alert: Horns of Jericho – Sound At NOON ET Wednesday

          Many people cannot attend the Washington DC rally to support President Trump. However, several groups have organized to share an action message that all patriots can take at noon Eastern on Wednesday January 6th. “Sound the Horns of Jericho.”

          The objective is for people coast to coast, regardless of their location at Noon ET on Wednesday, to blow their car horn in support of President Trump and the rally taking place in Washington DC. Let the sound of our patriotic message carry with the same intensity as the Horns of Jericho.

          Download and share the graphic above on your social media accounts: Parler, Facebook, Twitter, TicTok, etc. and help spread the word. Whether you are attending a rally at your state capital, or whether you are stuck in COVID compliant isolation, set your phone alarm to remind you at NOON on Wednesday and then blast your car horn.

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            Wet Mountains

            OldOzzie: Thanks for the site. Added it to my list. Went well today on my corner (head on a swivel). Couple stopped by to take a picture with me and several people I met at the election time corner vigil stopped and said hi. Only one guy started telling me how bad Trump was. Said he was a scientist, he knew…not sure what that has to do with Trump. It finally came out he got all his information from MSM and he repeated it very well. It is evident the left is a vile, angry group that can only tolerate their own kind.
            I visited Sidney once, February 1971. Stayed a week. Kings Cross. Had a great time. Enjoyed the openness and honesty of the people.
            Just one question, “How did Jo know what I looked like?” Eerie

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              Tilba Tilba

              I visited Sidney once, February 1971. Stayed a week. Kings Cross. Had a great time. Enjoyed the openness and honesty of the people.

              Sounds like you might have been traveling on Grey Funnel Line – on R&R from Vietnam. I was a uni student in Sydney in 1971 – the Cross was a pretty lively and bohemian place.

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    Lucky

    Here is a list:

    Phillip M. Orville Prize
    Institute for Scientific Information
    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
    Scientific American
    Association of American Geographers
    American Geophysical Union
    IPCC
    association with the Nobel Peace Prize joint award to the IPCC
    American Geophysical Union
    European Geosciences Union
    American Meteorological Society
    Bloomberg Markets “50 Most Influential” people
    National Center for Science Education
    the Institute for Scientific Information
    American Association for the Advancement of Science,
    American Physical Society
    Climate One at the Commonwealth Club of California
    National Association of Geoscience Teachers
    Center for Inquiry
    American Association for the Advancement of Science
    Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement
    National Academy of Sciences
    World Sustainability Award
    —-
    A celebrity in a certain field has been given much recognition by universities, academies, foundations and institutions. The above list, not claimed to be complete, mentions the recognition as awards, prizes, medals, honorifics in many forms, and acclaim generally.
    The prestige of the givers of the acclaim cannot be disputed. Thus the recipient of that acclaim must be worthy indeed, and statements and research findings from that person should be given over-riding weight in disputes with the irresponsible and ignorant.

    Or not.

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    Another Ian

    Grandma’s electric got an earlier start than you might have imagined

    “In 1903 The Electric Car Was 54 Years Old”

    http://www.smalldeadanimals.com/2021/01/03/in-1903-the-electric-car-was-54-years-old/

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      RickWill

      The electric motor actually halted the development of the electric car. Some smart bod decided to attach an electric motor to a combustion engine to turn it over to get it firing thus avoiding the less than lady-like task of cranking the engine.

      My first car had a crank – actually built in 1967. It also had electric start but I never needed to buy a battery because I could always get by with hand-me-downs from relatives who did not have cars with a crank. Only had one seriously embarrassing momemt when I stalled the car in a major intersection in Brisbane and needed to crank start it.

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      • #
        RicDre

        “My first car had a crank…”

        I never owned a car with a crank but I did own a Pontiac Firebird with a 5-speed manual transmission that had an electric starter that would fail every couple of years requiring it to be replaced. I got into the habit of always parking the car in a place with a small downhill grade so that when the starter failed I could the put the car in first gear, push in the clutch, release the parking brake to get the car rolling then pop the clutch in to turn the engine over and get the car started. Luckily the car started very easily so it only had to roll a couple of meters to get up enough momentum to be able to turn the engine over and get it started.

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          OriginalSteve

          I had an old Hillman as my first car.

          A couple of times I managed to start it with a crank…have to be carefull lest the crank catches and smashes your wrist….

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            Tilba Tilba

            My maternal grandfather apparent came a cropper cranking a car – well before I was born. Details are not clear, but the crank either caught and zapped him, or the car was in gear and ran over him.

            The cars we had when I was very young all had cranks that I can recall – Austin, Morris, Vauxhall. I do vaguely recall my father having to do it sometimes.

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            Serp

            Many a broken foot resulted from Norton ES2 kickback.

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          Annie

          Gosh, yes, I remember having to do that sometimes!

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            Chad

            I bought a new Citroen GS in 1982…..great car ! ..adjustable height Hydro suspension, Air cooled flat 4, incredible brakes,..etc
            It took me a year or more before i noticed it had a crank handle under the bonnet and access to the crank point behind the grill !
            I think that model was still available through to the late ‘80s

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              Tilba Tilba

              I owned a truly dreadful Citroen DS in the late 70s … I can’t describe here in respectable language what a complete dog that car was.

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        Hanrahan

        The story I heard was that a gallant fellow helped out a lady and tried to crank her car, broke his arm and died of complications [we are talking 120 yrs ago] A friend thought there must be a better way and invented the starter motor.

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    Andrew McRae

    Question about Queensland COVID stats.
    https://www.qld.gov.au/health/conditions/health-alerts/coronavirus-covid-19/current-status/statistics#casesummary

    Active cases[1] = 17
    Current hospitalisations = 17

    This has to be the first time I’ve ever seen the number of current hospitalisations equal to number of active cases.
    At the end of October the national average was only 13% of cases were bad enough to need hospitalisation.
    How did this jump to 100%? What changed? Any ideas?

    My guess is it’s someone accidentally typing same number into two different fields, or thinking they’ve copied+pasted+copied+pasted when they actually coped+pasted+pasted. Just hard to believe there is any room for a data entry human error between crunching the stats in the health system and publishing them on the public web site.

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      RickWill

      Victoria had a similar situation about 40 days ago. I think there were three cases, all hospitalised. I think two walked out and the last one rolled out.

      It is sort of inevitable toward the end of the active cases that most will be in hospital. Some people spent more than 100 days in hospital with Covid and still survived. If there are no new cases for a few weeks then the ones having it will be in a bad way and likely in hospital.

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        Andrew McRae

        Thanks, Rick.
        Severity proportional to recovery time. That makes a lot of sense.
        Maybe it was a Christmas time arrivals/shopping spike where all the easy cases have gone home already, though I note there’s been new ones every couple of days up here. Maybe older demographic were more likely to travel at this time of year so a greater proportion of travellers got a long-lasting case.

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      Hanrahan

      That is usual in Qld, today it’s 18. Almost all active cases are hospitalised but I have never seen anyone in ICU. I check most days. The new case I heard on the news was an imported one in hotel quarantine.

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    OldOzzie

    Interstate university students choose NSW over Victoria as pandemic hurts applications

    Richard Ferguson
    Reporter

    University students across the country are choosing to study in NSW over Victoria this year, with interstate applications to the southern state collapsing.

    Applicants for Victorian university spots have dropped by 13 per cent on the previous year — from 8669 to 7544 — with most students choosing their preferred institutions during the height of Melbourne’s second COVID-19 lockdown.

    By comparison, interstate applicants for NSW universities are up 14.9 per cent — from 7361 last year to 8456.

    That figure is higher for students applying directly from Year 12 — up 21.9 per cent.

    The drop in interstate students enrolling in Victoria comes after a difficult period for the university sector and with the state’s biggest export market — international education — hard hit by border closures.

    Victoria’s largest tertiary institutions, the University of Melbourne and Monash, have projected revenue shortfalls of $300m and $350m respectively this financial year.

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      yarpos

      Not looking like such a smart choice at the moment, but they could only go with what they had at the time.

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        OriginalSteve

        Yes but I suspect the Comrade-in_-Chieef would be delighted as the state starts to collapse around him…after all, thats the real objwect of covid – destruction of the middle class.

        Watching “Chernobyl” last night……reminded me of Victorias bungling with covid…. lots of massaged figures and truth twisting….very Soviet style management.

        “There is no radiation”…as you observe the exposed reactor core ionizing the air above it…nothng to see here….

        I now call the border at Albury-Wodonga “The Berlin Wall”.

        My neice just moved to the NT – I said to her – good, stay up there. The southern states are in a space of terminal covid madness…..

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    OldOzzie

    Growing human cost of China standoff

    By Stephen Lunn

    Portland is used to living on tenterhooks, but not like this.

    The Alcoa aluminium smelter that sits on the rugged coastline at Point Danger on the town’s outskirts in Victoria’s far west is perennially under threat of closure due to profitability concerns and high carbon emissions.

    A $77m federal government support package in December won’t be enough to secure its long-term future, leaving the state’s Treasurer, Tim Pallas, under pressure to offer a lifeline.

    Now two other industries critical to the town’s survival — timber and crayfish — have ground to a virtual halt, collateral damage in the ongoing trade standoff ­between China and Australia.

    Timber exports that flow through the Port of Portland from the so-called “Green Triangle” that stretches from along Victoria’s border into South Australia’s far east are worth more than half a billion dollars a year.

    More than 150 direct jobs in the industry have already been lost and there are fears the numbers could reach a thousand or more in the first half of this year if the sanctions continue.

    The local crayfish industry has been forced to sell its catch domestically for much cheaper prices — often less than half — and the Australian market is likely to be far less hungry for the product after the festive season.

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      yarpos

      Might also be a lesson abut hitching your future to one market, especially a communist dictatorship.

      Stein’s Law: If something cant go on forever , it will stop.

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    • #
      Serp

      Yep. and they’re keeping Gina Haspel hostage in a wheelie bin… I’m so ridden with confirmation bias and wishful thinking that existence is become a blur.

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      RickWill

      There is something clearly amiss in the election counting process. I have my own clear perspective from data I collected and analysed myself. I do not know the reason for the irregularities. Nothing I have seen shows that anyone else knows the reasons.

      The fact that the well funded media groups have comprehensive censorship over any efforts to unearth what is going on suggests there is something going on. But it now appears it will not be addressed in a court of law, at least not before Biden is POTUS. It will not be addressed in the joint sitting objections to the college votes; albeit it will be aired publicly but probably in the same scattergun approach.

      I believe the only way to resolve a case of fraud is to get someone to squeal. Is it the North Georgia AG who has just resigned? Who knows?

      Conspiracy theories abound. Clear proof is missing. Sixty plus days of scratching around without anything that is more than a piece of the puzzle. There needs to be a picture that is very clear.

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        OriginalSteve

        I suspect it exists. Trumps only real option is military action and mass arrests of those involved in the whole mess.

        Logically, no President should leave office if the election, which is the basis for leaving office, is in doubt.

        Otherwise you’re abdicating your repsonsibility.

        Abe Lincoln arrested whole state legislatures when they were implaicated in wrong doing. Precendent exists.

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    OldOzzie

    DIVEST: 150+ Multinational CEOs – Saks, Macys, Pfizer, United Airlines, Lyft – Demand Biden Is Made President Despite Fraud

    A press release from New York, liberal CEOs of the largest multinational corporates has demanded that the rampant election fraud in the United States be ignored and Joe Biden be made President.
    The list, published below, represents a list of companies 75 million Trump voters could now divest their business from in retaliation for the corporate attack on free and fair elections.

    The release states:

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    OldOzzie

    CORTES: Republic… Or Oligarchy?

    At the conclusion of the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in 1787, when asked what kind of government the Framers had created for our new nation, Benjamin Franklin reportedly responded: “a republic, if you can keep it.”

    Like the other Founding Fathers, Franklin understood deeply how representative government, like the Roman Republic, could devolve into oligarchy and eventual dictatorship. Accordingly, the American Constitution endeavored to channel the best practices of self-government from the Classical world while avoiding a similar subsequent fate.

    This coming week in America may well determine the “if you can keep it” part.

    The most powerful interests in America align, with remarkable synchronicity, to try to complete a grand electoral larceny, to literally subvert the foundations of our very republic in ways that would permanently divide our nation and embolden unelected powerbrokers intent on transforming America into an effective oligarchy.

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    OldOzzie

    FDA Admits PCR Tests Give False Results, Prepares Ground For Biden To “Crush” Casedemic

    The FDA today joined The WHO and Dr.Fauci in admitting there is a notable risk of false results from the standard PCR-Test used to define whether an individual is a COVID “Case” or not.

    This matters significantly as it fits perfectly with the ‘fake rescue’ plan we have previously described would occur once the Biden admin took office. But before we get to that ‘conspiracy’, we need a little background on how the world got here…

    We have detailed the controversy surrounding America’s COVID “casedemic” and the misleading results of the PCR test and its amplification procedure in great detail over the past few months.

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    • #

      Every single – that’s right all of them- test for detecting the presence of something, whether it be in biology, chemistry, plumbing, electrical or whatever, can have false outcomes. So what?

      Let’s go to western australia which has had no community cases for months despite many thousands of tests. They have had positive tests though – in returned travelers in isolation. Coincidence maybe?

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    OldOzzie

    COVID-19 IMPACT ON TOURISM

    Tourism Back to 1990 Levels as Pandemic Halts Travel

    Prior to the coronavirus outbreak, the global tourism sector had seen almost uninterrupted growth for decades. Since 1980, the number of international arrivals skyrocketed from 277 million to nearly 1.5 billion in 2019. As our chart shows, the two largest crises of the past decades, the SARS epidemic of 2003 and the global financial crisis of 2009, were minor bumps in the road compared to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Looking ahead, most experts don’t expect a full recovery in 2021, which started off with many countries still battling the second wave of the pandemic. According to the UNWTO’s estimates, it will take the industry between 2.5 and 4 years to return to pre-pandemic levels of international tourist arrivals.

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    Analitik

    The chairman of The Proud Boys was arrested for destruction of property (a BLM banner).
    The kicker is that his name is Enrique Tarrio

    So much for the group being a bunch of “White Supremacists”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/public-safety/proud-boys-enrique-tarrio-arrest/2021/01/04/8642a76a-4edf-11eb-b96e-0e54447b23a1_story.html

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    Harry Passfield

    I sent some of the reports of voting fraud to an old friend in the UK and said it was becoming clear that Trump was robbed.
    His reply was to say he wasn’t sure because it could be disinformation. The incredible irony was that he sent me link from……..the UK Guardian to support his pov!!

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    Dennis

    Electricity pricing, renewable (so called) energy, Snowy 2 pumped hydro and more, for your information …

    https://web.archive.org/web/20180805061319/http://stopturnbull.com/national-poverty-guarantee-2017-2018/

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    CHRIS

    Tur*bull could not care less about the ‘ordinary’ Australian…and never did. This elitist waste of human tissue is not worthy of consideration in any sphere of debate. The same goes for his wife: Lucy in the Sky…with demons

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    Analitik

    A realistic audit of the costs of UK Onshore and Offshore Wind (& Solar) Powered Generation

    Neither offshore nor onshore wind has become cheaper; indeed, both have become more expensive over the last two decades.

    How do we know this? Because one of us, Gordon Hughes, has compiled data from audited accounts on the capital and operating costs of 350 onshore and offshore wind farms in the United Kingdom, a set which covers the majority of the larger wind farms (> 10 MW capacity) built and commissioned between 2002 and 2019.

    and

    The BEIS [Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy] assumption of an operating life of 25 years for onshore wind is optimistic but not completely outside the bounds of reason. Our analysis suggests that the upper bound with current contractual arrangements and market conditions will be no more than 20 years. On the other hand, assuming an operating life of 30 years for offshore wind – note, with a constant load factor – is completely at odds with any of the actual evidence. The same is true for the 35 year lifetime for large solar plants.

    https://briefingsforbritain.co.uk/the-costs-offshore-wind-power-blindness-and-insight/

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    el gordo

    Good sleuthing by Andy May exposes the extent of zealotry.

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2021/01/06/changing-climate-debate-history/

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    el gordo

    With the NAO now in negative territory, the beast from the east will pummel great britain.

    https://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/precip/CWlink/pna/nao_index.html

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    el gordo

    Judah Cohen (AER) makes a bold forecast.

    ‘A significant weakening of the PV is underway and a major mid-winter warming (MMW where the zonal winds reverse from westerly to easterly at 60°N and 10 hPa) is likely in the next couple of days.

    ‘All we really know is that the AO/NAO are predominantly in the negative phase for up to two months following an MMW.’

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    CHRIS

    The only state in Australia that could be run 100% by “renewable energy” is Tasmania: Hydro + Wind + a bit of solar. As for the rest of Ozland, wind is a waste of time, solar could help a little, and hydro is possible, if only our dimwitted politicians could see it (ie: harness the monsoonal rains and drive them down south where it won’t be wasted).

    10