JoNova

A science presenter, writer, speaker & former TV host; author of The Skeptic's Handbook (over 200,000 copies distributed & available in 15 languages).


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Weekend Unthreaded

7.1 out of 10 based on 17 ratings

156 comments to Weekend Unthreaded

  • #
    John Smith

    Here in US the other day, I was driving the wife’s car and she had National Public Radio tuned in.
    I never listen anymore.
    I was reminded why as they were talking about climate.
    One declaration by the gender neutral voice was “scientists now say that by 2050 one half of all species on Earth will be extinct.”
    Gaia please let one the them Progressives.

    141

    • #

      It’s not much different here. But I’ll bet the first to start complaining when things start going wheels up will be our equivalent of the ‘Progressives’.

      When we start having constant blackouts etc, the same people will be demanding more renewables. The definition of insanity, ‘Doing the same thing over and over again in the hope of getting a different result’.

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      • #
        Robdel

        I don’t quite agree with you. When electricity gets cut off there will be a general revolt. People will not sit back and accept it.

        90

        • #

          If South Australia is any example, I’m not sure that will be the case. The politicians will be in full damage control and there’ll be the MSM fully backing them up and looking to blame someone else. It’s only when people start dying that the facade of renewable energy will no longer be ‘sustainable’ (pun intended).

          140

          • #
            jorgekafkazar

            The MSM & the politicians will have prepared their fall guy well in advance. When the nights of blackness arrive, those who have battery-powered radios will be able to tune into a non-stop MSM rant explaining how dorty kapitalist suppressors of the masses are to blame, and how only Socialism can save the pipples from this oppression.

            90

          • #
            Robber

            There will be no blackouts this summer, but perhaps the odd brownout.
            The pathetic pollies have found the answer to reliable electricity – backup electricity from imported diesel generators.
            Who would have thought it? Shutout reliable local coal, stop the search for gas, and import dirty diesel.
            Now we need to get them to focus on affordable electricity. Cancel the RET now.

            130

          • #
            bobl

            No, it’s the right word.
            I am fond of saying. “Sustainability is completely unsustainable”. Particularly so when it comes to renewabubbles.

            70

        • #
          Ted O’Brien.

          A revolt won’t bring the lights back on. The revolt must come before another power station closes.

          The regressives might or might not wake up if the lights go off. But they won’t understand that the blackouts bankrupted their employers, putting them out of work.

          10

    • #
    • #
      John Smith

      Kindly read ‘the’as’of’in the last sentence.
      Also add ‘be’.

      20

    • #
    • #
      Environment Skeptic

      “scientists now say that by 2050 one half of all species on Earth will be extinct.”
      To fulfill the definition of ‘extinct’ all dogs need to disappear so that if even one, Labrador for example, remains, then scientists will claim dogs are not extinct yet. The concept of ‘extinct’ is so useless, that it serves no practical purpose.

      It is far more accurate to observe that old growth forests are 99% extinct in Victoria for example, and nearly all species that belong to an old growth forest are specific to the region. The complexity and diversity can not be replaced,…. and just because only 1% remains does not mean extinction has not already happened in other regions.

      the 99% that are completely free of the original inhabitants.
      A majority of extinction has already happened, ….and so now we are talking about the last 1% of the animal/plant/etc kingdom that remains intact. Bugger all. Half of 1% by 2050…while talking about the weather.

      31

    • #
      Rereke Whakaaro

      ‘Tis nought but signalling, by the vile virtue of thought and malice, to beguile and confound the dim of wit, and the slow of action.

      40

  • #
    scaper...

    Looks liked Qld is cooked. Had so much hope for the state but in reality…when the leaners outnumber the lifters all is lost. Another sign of the decline in our time.

    192

    • #
      OriginalSteve

      When i hear of progressives whinging about how bad stuff is, even at the risk of being physically assaulted, i like to point out it was their progressive mates and themselves that created the mess by voting for them….

      Makes for the occasional clash, but if stupidity isnt met with a sharp doses of reality, stupidity isnt adequately dealt with…..

      The good news is that in the inevitable ” grid down” scenario that will come from voting globalist warmists back into power is that people will get cranky and learn from their mistakes. Even truly stupid people learn if being being kicked electorally enough tines…..

      111

    • #
      el gordo

      Scaper its likely that labor will win the next Federal election with its tentative One Belt One Road Initiative.

      50

      • #
        Sceptical Sam

        El Gordo, It will make no difference. Labor and Liberal are now essentially one and the same. Even if the Liberal party were re-elected there would be little policy differentiation.

        What we need is a very strong cross bench of conservatives in both the House of Reps and the Senate to put a stop to the stupidity of the green-left that infests both the Labor fools and the Liberal socialists.

        80

        • #
          el gordo

          We have discussed the pseudo Marxist consortium before and I agree Australian democracy is pathetic, but the major which joins Beijing’s OBOR will have the edge at the next election.

          20

    • #
      bobl

      Yes scaper much to my chagrin. The only hope I have is that the 5 or 6 seats that One Nation are leading in go their way, and that the LNP (apparently full of Mentally dimmed Bearded dragon relatives) finally come to understand that One Nation now owns what used to be their libertarian and right wing constituency IE. the delcons. The fact is that Labor’s vote is DOWN in QLD not as much as LNP because us poor delcons didn’t roost on the ALP perch but it’s down. The LNP created its own demise by playing the ALP game and trying to wedge out ONP by preferencing Labor ahead of ONP – the LNP actually elected several Labor members this way, when it could have elected conservative ONP members instead. Pretty dumb move if you ask me. In the process the LNP has again angered the delcons and libertarians that have defected to ONP and are even less likely to see them back into the fold. This is a very bad LNP story and a very good ONP story.

      The Fed LNP’s learnings should be, “if we try to wedge out ONP by preferencing Labor ahead of them, we will lose the election in a landslide through our helping ALP candidates get elected”. The only way the LNP can be reelected in Canberra is to accept ONP as a coalition partner. This will change politics.

      The big worrying trend is inner city wannabe farmers – IE the watermelons almost getting enough votes to defeat Labor. Surely there can’t be that much brain cell deficit in one place? Then again, much of that is probably on the back on the greens pro-drug idiocy. Antarctica has nothing on the inner city for peak ice.

      100

    • #
      Graeme No.3

      scraper:
      Despite what many readers here think this is the better option, as it leaves Labor in charge as they drive the State into bankruptcy. Already each Queenslander would have to pay just over $17,200 per head to clear the State’s debt, compared with South Australia where the amount is around $7,600**. SA does have problems with higher unemployment, lower wage rates, rapidly declining industry and stagnant or falling population, but the future for Qld. looks bleak as they get those “benefits” of Labor rule also, especially as the Federal Govt. (sarc) will soon run out of money as well.
      Some time early next year the Federal Liberal government will (sarc) disintegrate and Labor will win the next election unless Shorten is photographed in a compromising position with a goat, and even then the media would probably suppress the evidence.
      So that will leave Labor exposed nationally until the Victorian State election in late Nov. 2018 as responsible for the current ruinous policies (and deservedly so) as Australia slides into depression.
      It is likely that the Liberals will split as a number of conservatives give up hope of common sense returning and join Bernadi. Equally Labor will split and the more stupid will go into coalition with the Greens, claiming as they always do that their stupid policies failed because they weren’t persisted with. So by 2020 Australia will have a stronger Conservative choice politically and a combined Loony Left handicapped by being blamed for the mess they’ve made, along with an incoherent rabble “in the middle”.
      Australia will be in a deep depression but at least recovery can start once our current Parties are relegated to the dustbin of history (along with their incompetent leaders and supporters). Hardly cheery news but with Turnbull and Shorten around what do you expect?

      ** SA State Debt estimated at $13 billion as the actual amount is a secret, although certainly more than the (verbal) claim of only $7 billion, as Weatherill throws money away trying to win the election in 4 months.

      70

      • #
        Bobl

        Not suppress the evidence they would spin it up into full blown cross species marriage (CSM) debate and drive our morals further into the abyss

        40

  • #
    Another Ian

    ““Road Diet” – The Stupid Is Strong In This One.”

    “When you have too much traffic for the road capacity, why, make fewer lanes! That’s the ticket!! ”

    https://chiefio.wordpress.com/2017/11/25/road-diet-the-stupid-is-strong-in-this-one/

    Forshadowing a Queensland near you?

    60

    • #
      OriginalSteve

      Its called forcing people out of private cars and into collectivist peasant transport called busses…

      Its social engineering.

      80

    • #

      They are already doing this in Melbourne. Sydney has bike lanes that see few bikes.

      70

      • #
        Sceptical Sam

        Bike lanes, bikes and abusive cyclists.

        It is past time that all pushbikes were registered and required to carry a registration plate front and back. A registration fee of $100 plus GST should be levied annually to defray the costs associated with the provision of bikeways etc. The owner of the bike should also be required to purchase third party personal insurance.

        At the moment bikes are a growing menace. Pedestrians are knocked over, arms and collar-bones broken, skin pealed off while the cyclist rides off into the sunset without any care of being held accountable or being able to be identified.

        However, under new State Labor Government regulations, Western Australia motorists face a $400 fine and four demerit points if they fail to leave a one metre gap when overtaking cyclists on the roadway. Cyclists are not required to do anything to maintain the gap or to avoid collisions; and they don’t – other than give the poor motorist a mouth-full of abuse and occasionally kick-in the side of vehicle.

        Then they wonder why they are treated with such disdain.

        61

        • #
          OriginalSteve

          You mean cranky stick insects that ride bikes?

          Like anything, obey the rules, be curteous and all good.

          Become prima donnas and see how fast it unravels…..

          40

          • #
            robert rosicka

            Another one of my pet hates is the Lycra set , try giving them a metre when they’re spread out across the road and I notice now they don’t litter the roadside as much with empty water bottles now it’s banana skins .

            Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

            31

            • #
              Sceptical Sam

              Ah yes. Banana skins.

              Subiaco Council Bye-laws

              Activities in Thoroughfares and Public Places
              Local Law
              Local Government Act 1995
              City of Subiaco

              2.1 General prohibitions

              A person shall not –

              (d) place on any footpath any fruit, fruit skins or other substance or fluid (whether vegetable
              or otherwise, but not water) which may create a hazard for any person using the footpath;

              🙂

              30

  • #
    OriginalSteve

    A lot of mom and pop readers will as its done by the nrma , assume all us good with the world if the nrma has endorsed driving electric shopping trollies….i wonder who supplies the charging stations?

    Social engineering? Er…can i hear music?

    https://www.mynrma.com.au/community/initiatives/electric-vehicle-fast-charger-network

    “As part of our Social Dividend Investment Strategy, we will establish Australia’s largest electric vehicle fast-charging network, suitable for a range of electric vehicles and free for NRMA Members.

    More than 95 per cent of NRMA Member road trips will be covered by the network. The $10 million investment will deliver at least 40 chargers, more than double the size of the current network of chargers in NSW and the ACT.

    The network will unlock Australia for electric vehicles, enabling stress-free journeys whether motorists are doing the daily city commute, or visiting beaches on the South Coast, weekend getaways to our world-class wine regions or snow trips to the mountains.

    The first charger is already in place in Western Sydney, outside our new office at Sydney Olympic Park. We hope to have our first charging stations operational next year and we will take a phased approach to the roll out of the network.

    We’ll be prioritising sites where lots of NRMA Members live, where electric vehicles are embraced and supported, and areas of high tourism demand, striking the balance between infrastructure delivery for both metropolitan and regional communities.

    Get involved

    We are encouraging NRMA Members, local councils and community groups to demonstrate their interest in having a charging station in their local area.”

    40

    • #
      Dennis

      With due consideration for the many fossil fuel service stations located around NSW, and the average time spent per vehicle at each fuel pump, it would be interesting to obtain the numbers and work out the “efficiency” of recharging EV if the fleet was converted to EV.

      And when the mass exodus takes place on public holidays the chaos and “charge rage” factor.

      110

    • #

      I really, really, want to see this in action. It’ll make the recent US Black Friday shopping rage look like a church afternoon.

      90

    • #
      James

      I was thinking about the Tesla Truck and how it is supposed to save companies money. I would like to see the mathematics on what kind of substation / electric service would be required for a company with a fleet of a few hundred trucks would need to charge them up at their depot? How about at a truck stop, to allow trucks to charge at a sufficient rate to keep them on their current schedules.

      Here are a couple of articles from Seeking Alpha that got me thinking about this today:
      https://seekingalpha.com/article/4127520-tesla-semi-pricing-missteps?ifp=0&utoken=95e727def8cf7e6b2cb3fe90cc79ad28e940af11
      https://seekingalpha.com/article/4127559-tesla-truck-reservations-falling-short-spite-super-aggressive-pricing?ifp=0

      60

      • #

        Until they can work out a battery system that can fully charge around the same time as it takes to fill a tank of fuel and they have enough stations located as ubiquitously as current service stations and have batteries with a similar range as a tank of diesel, none of this will work.

        I’d love to see how such a semi would handle a 40 tonne load on the hills around our area. Diesel powered tow trucks would have a field day.

        60

        • #

          Do the maths:

          Filling up a 100kWh battery (360 MJ) in 6 minutes requires at least 1MW. That’s e.g. 100 amps at 10,000 volts. Do you want the unwashed to be handling that sort of gear? A robotised recharger will cost about $250,000; not including the generator. Per recharge point.

          Typical conventional filling station pump delivers around 20 litres/minute. The nett energy at the wheels from conventional fuel is around 10 megajoules per litre – a 50 litre fuel tank therefore holds 500 MJ of nett energy and can be filled in less than half the time; at an equivalent recharge rate in excess of 3.3MW. Connecting and disconnecting fuel hoses can be done by unskilled adults.

          All other things are not equal however: Rapid charging of batteries causes them to heat up substantially and their charge efficiency drops so significantly more than 100kWh of electrical power consumption is needed to recharge a 100kWh battery.

          Modern filling stations typically have 8 to 20 pumps. Were EV’s to have an equivalent; they’d need substations out the back of each one; fed by at least 33kV power lines. i.e. electricity grid upgrades. Of course there are arguments that people would more often recharge at home or at work; but what of those on long journeys? Long weekends?

          Volkswagen (marketing) in Germany has addressed the problem of e-Golf buyers being unable to take their car on annual vacation: They have access to a free loan car for a couple of weeks a year. Which of course doesn’t address the fundamental issue; that EV does not scale to “ubiquity”. Germans take annual (summer) vacations at the same time; for each region. There’s the potential of around 8 million German cars being on vacation during the high season; and very few for 9 months a year. So who’s going to be paying for the pool of conventionally-fuelled loan cars?

          90

          • #

            You’ve quantified some of the issues that I was alluding to in my post. I think you could add many other points when it comes to the practical application of battery power and one thing comes to mind, in Australia, is the Summer heat both direct and reflected off roads and highways. I wonder what that would do to these batteries? I know that in the middle of Summer, you can burn your bare feet if you didn’t have insulation and carpeting on the floor of your vehicle, and that’s just in Victoria.

            40

          • #
            OriginalSteve

            Yup…ideology – tick.

            Common sense – cross.

            Tell ’em theyre dreaming. Think about how much electrical infrastructure would need to be stood up to cover as many petrol stations as we have now.
            Now work out how the grid will cope with its declining generating capacity for extra load.

            These people are in la la land…

            50

          • #
            Will Janoschka

            Do you want the unwashed to be handling that sort of gear?

            Yes please quickly! I have investment in funeral CARE! 🙂

            50

            • #
              James

              Now that is a great idea. My investment in Diabetes drug manufacturer is doing very well. The next progression is the funeral after many years of treatment!

              40

      • #
        Bruce J

        Just waiting to see the first electric/hybrid triple-bottom road train on the Sturt Highway. Oh, sorry, they call them trains and run them on steel tracks (with the steel made using coal??) so they don’t interfere with the tourists on the roads.

        50

  • #
    el gordo

    James Hansen scoffs at renewables.

    “More renewable energies? You’re joking. The subsidies set aside for renewable energies are forcing consumers to pay higher rates – a sort of invisible tax. The power bill keeps rising, but the customer does not know why.”

    Notrickszone

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    • #
      Dennis

      Yes, but the politicians are saying that once the pain has ended cheaper electricity will be achieved again.

      sarc

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      • #
        Graeme No.3

        Dennis:
        What they say so carefully as to be misleading is that electricity will keep getting more expensive but after a few years the rate of increase will slow down.
        This might be because the general population get fed up and starts decorating the lamp posts. I don’t like the idea of that, I would prefer the current pack of numbskulls to be on a treadmills generating some electricity. It would be a derisory amount but it would drive home to them how hard it is to generate any usable amount.

        50

  • #
    Manfred

    The Green Dream

    Take heart, in spite of the widespread Regressive insanity du jour the State of Victoria has agreed that like selling alcohol, assisted dying will only be available to adults over 18 who live in Victoria. As at least 15% of the Australian population are older than 65 yr there should be plenty of scope for terminal tourism.

    “What could possibly go wrong?” Slippery slope? Euthanasia on the rise in Europe

    While introduced on the basis of being exceptional and rare, once in law, the killing starts. For example, the experience in Europe sees that the number of euthanised “cases” have risen year on year – in Belgium for example official data shows that, more than five people per day are are now euthanised, clearly not exceptional or rare. Here the initial eligible categories have been extended to now permit child euthanasia (as long as the child understands), or elsewhere in the Netherlands, a proposal is now presented that if you’re tired of life this may qualify as a sufficient criteria to call it a day, or be persuaded to call it day? People argue that euthanasia is exceptional, but once enacted into law, euthanasia becomes a slippery slope. The ‘right to die'(no where in international law does this idea exist), slithers its evil way to a ‘duty to die’. The obvious concern … external pressure (or eventually Green policy?) may be brought to bear. Reducing CO2 emissions to ‘save the planet’ is the Green motto, no different from the twisted meaning behind the sign, ‘Arbeit macht frei’.

    Across the Tasman In New Zealand wise comments were made earlier this year, Simon O’Connor: Why we didn’t back euthanasia bill

    As the committee observed with overseas experience, once assisted suicide and euthanasia is enacted there is the slow but predictable broadening of access. It quickly ceases to be for terminal illness and becomes permissible for any form of pain.

    Overseas jurisdictions have seen people seeking to end their lives for a variety of reasons, including depression, being abused, and being tired of life. It has also seen the expansion of guidelines to permit children to end their lives. These overseas jurisdictions tried to incorporate safeguards, but the only fool-proof way to protect everyone is to ensure that assisted dying and euthanasia are never made legal.

    Fortunately, the UK Parliament overwhelmingly rejected the assisted suicide ‘euthanasia bill’, heavily supported by all the disabled groups. The World Medical Association consistently rejects euthanasia as unethical.

    Governments have a duty to promote and support life. Vesting them with the ability to curtail life is another Regressive policy, indeed it is a Green commandment. The State of Victoria, heart of The Con, unsurprisingly leads the way to hell.

    20

    • #
      OriginalSteve

      People should reasearch the infamous Nazi T4 program…the test run for modern euthanasia and eugenics…..

      Victoriastan is going to collapse in on itself.

      The greens said there would be global wamring refugess – there will, because like the people who escape from the hellof Communism will migrate out of SA and Vic into wherever the lighst are still on.

      We should put an armed broder crossings to Victoriastan from all other states, and stop people from leaving Victoriastan , and tell them to go talk to Comrade Andrews direct, to air thier anger….

      I’d love to see the conversation with my great aunt and Comrade Andrews…it would be I think short and fairly unpleasant…for him….

      40

      • #
        robert rosicka

        Me personally I don’t want to be a head on a pillow I want a choice but knowing people like I do I’m sure it would be expanded and used where it shouldn’t .
        Maybe a clause that any changes have to go to the people would fix that I don’t know .

        20

  • #
    TedM

    Yes when King Solomon wrote, and I quote. “Vanity,vanity vanity, all is vanity” : it was no doubt appropriate for his time. However if he was alive and writing today, I’m sure it would be more like “insanity, insanity, insanity, all is insanity”.

    80

  • #
    robert rosicka

    While there was a swing away from lab and lib in the bush looks like it didn’t count for much in the end , weatherdill must be happy with these results after all he has done to his state what palacechook is proposing to do to Queensland with the 50% renewables .

    61

  • #
    Another Ian

    On the SA battery

    “Elon Musk Made the Kessel Run in Less Than Twelve Parsecs”

    “I had to laugh at the stories the other day on the battery backup system Elon Musk and Tesla made for the Australian Power grid:

    Tesla has completed its 100 megawatt Powerpack battery backup system in South Australia within 100 days (easily), as Elon Musk had promised. That means the company essentially won the “bet,” and won’t be on the hook for the entire cost of the project, estimated at $50 million. More importantly, it means that some 30,000 homes in South Australia will have a power backup in case there’s no breeze at the Hornsdale Wind Farm located about two hours from Adelaide.

    A megawatt is a measure of energy production or transmission rate. As such, it is a perfectly appropriate way to size the capacity of a power plant that is assumed to have a continuous supply of fuel. However, it is an extremely odd way to size a battery”

    More at

    http://www.coyoteblog.com/coyote_blog/2017/11/elon-must-made-the-kessel-run-in-less-than-twelve-parsecs.html

    30

    • #
      Graeme#4

      So far I haven’t seen any specs for this battery other than its MW capacity when new. Would love to know the max current output and its projected lifetime. Has the actual cost been disclosed?

      00

  • #
    Yonniestone

    I have a question for the good Christians out there, with the current attacks on Western culture from all angles Mrs Yonnie is wanting to go to a church this Christmas to reflect and show support for decent people that are enduring unwarranted slurs from politics and their affiliates.

    Now I know many faiths have embraced the CAGW open borders globalist cool aid and Mrs Yonnie has zero tolerance for such silliness so is there somewhere that is more traditional maybe or unaffected by any of the above mentioned?

    I’ll be going along too for support and a chance to hopefully meet some good people.

    60

    • #
      robert rosicka

      We used to go for the Christmas service even though atheist but now the kids have grown up no longer do it .

      30

    • #
      Peter C

      Pope Francis has taken the Catholics off the list. Anglicans already struck out since Rowan Williams became the Archbishop of Canterbury. and the Uniting Church has adopted same sex marriage.

      Maybe Lutherans are still sound.

      30

      • #
        Yonniestone

        Didn’t think of Lutherans, when I did construction work on schools their ones had the best behaved kids and were the easiest to deal with administration wise.

        50

    • #
      Annie

      Marysville is a bit of a hike for you but I can guarantee that the Vicar and his wife are sceptics! Actually, the ‘Midnight’ Eucharist is at 11.30 pm at Marysville and the Christmas Day one is at 9.00 am.
      There will be a Carol Service at 10.00 am on Christmas Eve at Marysville…Anglican parish of Christchurch. We are traditional straight down the middle line anglicans.

      50

      • #
        Annie

        The Christmas Day 9.00 am Eucharist is at St, Thomas’s Church in Buxton, 10 mins from Marysville. The parish now is a joint Marysville/Buxton one.

        40

        • #
          Yonniestone

          Thanks Annie we looked at the Anglican church here but didn’t know their stance, the Ebenezer St John’s church in Ballarat refused to marry a couple that supported SSM but a Baptist Church priest here said he had no problem with it so I guess a bit of leg work may be involved.

          Thanks again for the invitation we visited Marysville last year a very pretty area, maybe a Sunday service in the new year would be better timed.

          30

          • #
            Annie

            I hope you find somewhere for Christmas Yonnie. Maybe we’ll have the honour of welcoming you sometime! I think we have a Facebook page but I’m not into FB. Marysville Anglican Church or Marysville Christchurch should find

            10

  • #
    Yonniestone

    I have a question for the good Christians out there, with the current attacks on Western culture from all angles Mrs Yonnie is wanting to go to a church this Christmas to reflect and show support for decent people that are enduring unwarranted slurs from politics and their affiliates.

    Now I know many faiths have embraced the CAGW open borders globalist cool aid and Mrs Yonnie has zero tolerance for such silliness so is there somewhere that is more traditional maybe or unaffected by any of the above mentioned?

    I’ll be going along too for support and a chance to hopefully meet some good people.

    40

    • #
      Yonniestone

      The question was so good I had to ask twice, apologies.

      50

    • #
      bobl

      I think many of them are infected – it’s the nature of the Briggs Meyer F’s that they tend to dominate the “Caring” industries leaving the delcons B-M T’s to actually make living possible.

      However since churches are usually more interested in people welfare than the IQ of Bearded Dragon’s the illogic of burning people or agri animals food as fuel, or decreasing food yield (by decreasing CO2) may appeal to them more than your average communist (Oops, slipped out, I mean Green – Note to self – keep up with the branding changes…)

      Such a pity the the current Pope is also a thoroughly brainwashed socialist. So much so, that I’d rather he stuck to saving souls, and just skipped saving the planet

      60

      • #
        Yonniestone

        Yes the current pope is obviously far left leaning so no there, I still can’t believe other churches support SSM as it goes directly against the bible, how can they even start to justify this?

        60

      • #
        Annie

        Not all of us are infected with SJW infections!

        30

        • #
          Bobl

          I didn’t say everyone just dominated by Annie, and it’s a big pity since on the whole SJW don’t do church, interferes with the Sunday morning latte

          30

        • #
          Annie

          True, you didn’t, Bobl. The trouble is that we all get tarred by the same brush, unfortunately.

          10

  • #
    David Maddison

    “Scientists” are doing a trial at the Barrier Reef to recolonise bleached areas of coral with coral larvae.

    Why are they interfering with nature as bleaching is a perfectly natural event?

    130

    • #
      Yonniestone

      I knew a dancer called Coral and bleaching was a natural event where she worked…….

      80

    • #
      robert rosicka

      They’re doing it to reinforce the something must be done about this tragedy and send more money to stop the CAGW meme .
      One has to wonder if the law of unintended consequences will come into play with this one .

      70

    • #
      Graeme No.3

      David Maddison:

      To stop the bleaching being repaired so that the ABC and other gullibles will always have something to photograph as “evidence” of doom.

      Quite why it is evidence of global warming escapes me, but then I am one of those who ask “why then does coal grow in areas with higher temperatures” and “what global warming”? And “how did corals survive (indeed flourish) in the past when CO2 levels were much higher and temperatures sometimes higher as well?”

      I think their efforts will be in vain as the climatec cools in the next few years and they are discredited at last.

      50

    • #
      Sceptical Sam

      Well David, isn’t that a good thing?

      Now the Reef will never disappear. Saved by the good efforts of scientists who have learnt to grow coral at the taxpayers’ expense.

      With 2,900 individual reefs over an area of approximately 344,400 square kilometres (133,000 sq mi) it should keep them occupied for a little while.

      All they need to do now is get on with their regrowth program and stop whinging about the bloody thing.

      40

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        Will Janoschka

        All they need to do now is get on with their regrowth program and stop whinging about the bloody thing.

        Why? Is coral reef regrowth a big moneymaker for some? Who/m? 🙂

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    • #
      Mary E

      “Seeding” the coral now is so that when the corals recover -on their own- in the next year or three the greenish community can exclaim success and proof that they, and only they, can save the world.

      It’s setting the game up in advance to take the credit on the win.

      10

  • #
    Peter C

    A Perfectly Good Civilization is Going to Waste -JoNova

    As Jo says in her blog intro, the state of the Nation has not yet turned for the better.

    Policy is misguided and our political leaders are uninformed or misinformed on very important issues. I would like to try and change that, which is why I support this blog. If there was no JoNova blog I would have more time in every day but I get a lot from it, both from the articles and from a lot of informed comments that follow.

    I hope others feel the same and contribute to the chocolate fund. Christmas is almost here.

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    • #
      Annie

      I second that Peter C.

      I often find there is too much to read here and on WUWT, Tallbloke’s blog, etc. and I spend more time than I should reading but I learn a lot of fascinating stuff. It is also good to feel that I am in the company of like-minded people.

      20

  • #
    David Maddison

    I heard a commentator talking about the Queenslandistan election and in regard to electricity prices he said that many farmers were suffering due to the high cost of electricity including pumping water for irrigation and also that farmers had lost export markets due to high electricity prices for otherwise competitively priced products, tomatoes were the example given.

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    David Maddison

    “Sometimes I wonder whether the world is being run by smart people who are putting us on or by imbeciles who really mean it.”
    ― Laurence J. Peter, The Peter Principle

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  • #
    Ian1946

    Does anyone have any data on the Big Battery is it charged up yet there has not been much wind in SA for a few days

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    • #
      David Maddison

      I don’t know but it is likely to be delivered with a certain state of charge.

      Incidentally, I’d like to know the operational parameters of the battery. It’s life will be significantly reduced if it is fully charged to a typical lithium voltage of 4.2V and also if the battery is fully discharged.

      I understand that in military systems lithium batteries are only charged to 3.9V to preserve battery life at the expense of storage capacity.

      Some figures on operational parameters and impact on battery life cn be found here:

      http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/how_to_prolong_lithium_based_batteries

      I am predicting that the battery won’t achieve its nameplate capacity and won’t last as long as claimed.

      I’d also like to know how much power will be consumed for cooling and how much power is lost due to inherent inefficiencies in the charge and discharge process.

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      • #
        Serp

        I presume there’s a management system for which an instruction manual exists and that the actually available capacity would be deducible from information found therein.

        It’s anybody’s guess how quickly it will “break” –maybe Sportsbet will create a pool.

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        • #
          Curious George

          It should last for about 2,000 cycles. The cycle is unlikely to be less than a day. The life is therefore about 6 years. It should still be OK at the next election.

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          • #
            Bobl

            Unless of course someone unloads a 22 into it in which case they might find out why I rate these as a security risk.

            30

            • #
              Will Janoschka

              Unless of course someone unloads a 22 into it in which case they might find out why I rate these as a security risk.

              Only if you are considering a size 18650 Samsung or Panasonic cell. All the other cheap Chink cells have not enough stored power. OTOH for a ,17 unload; cell may ask, “did someone say someyhing? 🙂

              21

            • #
              David Maddison

              Here are the consequences of uploading various bullet rounds into various lithium polymer batteries. They are indeed very dangerous when abused.

              https://youtu.be/5TLEVo1cEjQ

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      • #
        Graeme#4

        I believe that the Tesla Powerwalls use the same battery cell as the Tesla cars. I also believe that the Powerwalls use the same battery modules – i.e. 441 battery cells per module, complete with liquid cooling. The specs on these Panasonic battery cells are available on the web, so you can obtain some good info. Also it’s worth sitting down for an hour and watching the Jeff Dahn presentation on these battery cells.
        After looking at the Dahn presentation and reading the Tesla owner’s comments on managing their car batteries, it seems to me that it’s possible for these batteries to obtain extended lifetimes IF they carefully manage their charge and discharge cycles, and I believe that the Tesla systems are setup to provide this careful management. However, managing the cycles in this way won’t allow the batteries to be used to their fullest potential, as they wont be able to fully charge and discharge the batteries.
        So I think that there is going to be a lot of fudging with the SA battery bank in the future – on one hand they will tell us what it can do, but in practice I believe that they will never use it to its full capacity, because if they do so, it’s lifetime will be very short.

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        • #
          Will Janoschka

          For stationary, shipboard, or even rail; storage of electrical power. nothing beats modern lead acid battery technology, as the TELCOS learned back in the 1960s. If instead you must lift such to be supported by differential atmospheric pressure (aircraft); use vast lithium polymer battery in module towed behind craft, that can be easily released after after spontaneous combustion and ‘xplosion’!

          01

    • #
      Graeme No.3

      The claims are that
      Generating capacity = 100 MW
      Storage capacity = 129 MWh
      Generating duration at capacity = 1 hour 20 minutes
      Cost £29 million (estimate converting $50 million to GBP using a rate of 0.57 £ / Au$)

      Each of these are debatable. Those sorts of batteries cannot go below 20% capacity without reducing their life, so Capacity 103 MW max.
      Discharge rate is slower than that, likely to be restricted to 50% of capacity per hour, so half as much for 2 hours. Even that would have adverse effects on life if common.
      The battery is an all singing, all dancing one in that it will stabilise the grid, soak up excess electricity from the adjoining wind farm for sale at a later time (and higher price), and supply 70MW to State public service Departments. I am unable to confirm if it grants wishes for good behaviour from small children or leaves money for tooth loss.
      Cost $A50 million is wishful thinking. Off the shelf Bloomberg estimate the batteries as $A90 million, and anyone who viewed the video of Jay Weatherill gazing at Elon Musk like a love sick calf would realise that he would have been putty in his hands. Possibly there will be an (inflated) service account to make up the difference between the announced price and what Musk decided was the maximum he could get. The shelf life is put at 15 years albeit with capacity declining to 65% safely postponing that decision until Jay has long gone.
      The real stabilising of the grid will be achieved by the 9 OCGT (except they will burn diesel) initially leased by the State and shortly after that announcement purchased outright. Where the money is coming from and whether its appropriation is legal is another undisclosed matter. I am told privately that the Grid owner SA Power Networks has also installed diesel generators which will be usable this summer. (That was the original decision to be announced and they may have got on with the job while the Labor cabal figured out how to make it look as if they knew what they were doing).

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      • #
        Chad

        Graeme, a few corrections..
        Teslas, Power Pack ratings of 100MW , 129MWh are ” operating” specifications, not “max” cell specifications, so the BFB can be expected to supply a full 129MWH at its 100MW discharge rate for its pecified life.
        Infact Musk made a point of saying that this is the first installation designed to supply at that rate.
        Cost wise, we may never know what SA had to pay however it is known that Tesla were selling smaller systems for us$350,000 per MWh installed, over 12 months ago, so considering the advantages of volume purchace ( 129 x as much !) then the cost is unlikely to be more than us$45.0 million.
        BUT,.. Musk also said that because this was the most powerful system they had ever designed, and Tesla would learn much from it,..they would share the final cost with SA ??

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        Graeme#4

        Also Graeme I don’t believe that they can charge above 90% of the rated capacity as this would also significantly impact the battery lifetime.

        00

        • #
          Will Janoschka

          Also Graeme I don’t believe that they can charge above 90% of the rated capacity as this would also significantly impact the battery lifetime.

          They can but not recommended! What is needed is a balance charger so that each cell in series parallel battery construct only charges to most energy/lifetime ratio. Has been done but remains unaffordable. 🙂

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  • #
    philthegeek

    Congrats to PHON in QLD!! 🙂

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    • #
      Craig

      You are exactly the sort of person Phil which explains why western society is going backwards. You don’t have to agree on all her policies but on climate change topics as this bog is devoted to, she got her head on right. Give yrself an uppercut Phil.

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      • #
        robert rosicka

        One nation did themselves no favours with the infighting and bickering , it’s a brand missing a product and has no semblance of ever looking like the party will ever be all for one one for all .

        I just hope that Cory Bernardi can step up to the plate and fill a void that people are desperately looking for .
        31% of qld voters did not vote for the two majors and that’s telling in itself .

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        • #
          Dennis

          Former Prime Minister John Howard commented a few months ago that the numbers since the 2010 hung parliament federal election indicate that only about 60 per cent of voters now support the major parties as compared to 80 per cent in past history on average.

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        • #
          el gordo

          One Nation is a ragtag bunch without real ideas, apart from their opinion on climate change.

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        • #
          philthegeek

          party will ever be all for one one for all .

          Nope, but its not supposed to be. Its ostensibly a vehicle for Poorline to stay on the public payroll, but actually its all for James Ashby.

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          • #
            el gordo

            Very amusing Phil, but in reality …

            ‘There were swings against both major parties, and towards One Nation — who averaged 21 per cent of the vote in the seats where it fielded candidates.

            ‘However, far from winning a predicted balance of power, the minor party may not win a seat.’

            ABC

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    • #
      bobl

      Phon has changed politics in QLD, this is a party that is running first in 2 and second in up to 8 seats and has a primary vote in many seats between 20 and 30% similar to the majors. The LNP now has nowhere to go, either they embrace ONP policy including coal power or disappear into the wilderness.

      ONPs constituency is Libertarians and the LNPs right wing (Which used to be called the Centre) labelled Delcons at the last Commonwealth election. The fact is that the LNP has deliberately elected the Labor Party in order to try to wedge out ONP who supporters used to be theirs. The LNP has now abandoned those supporters for a SECOND TIME. The LNP is so stupid.

      Who’s Deluded now LNP, the Delcons cost you this elections and the Delcons will deny you the federal election too, if you don’t start LISTENING to them. Don’t blame the people flocking to ONP, blame yourselves for denying delcons a voice.

      Unlike the Palace Chook, I don’t think the ALP will achieve 47 seats, the Electoral commission suspended counting in TWENTY SEATS because the preference allocations were wrong. We actually have no idea of the tally in those seats. Break out the popcorn because this isn’t over yet.

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      • #
        Dennis

        It ain’t over until the fat lady brags.

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      • #
        James

        The Republican Party is learning that people do not want establishment candidates. There is a strong push to primary out the old RINO representatives, and many are seeing the writing on the wall and retiring prior to losing in a Primary election.

        I am thankful I moved to the US from Australia. The Westminster system makes it much harder from someone outside, a non politician to come in and change the status quo!

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        • #
          bobl

          My wife and I are also thinking about a move to retire in the USA wall-to wall Labor government would only make that decision easier. Meantime I’ll have to accelerate my plan for CHP and off-gridding before the Palace Chook destroys Queenslands grid like South Australia. Hopefully she won’t get a majority and will have to deal with an independent. That at least slows the regressives legislative process to a crawl.

          It’s a real pity Mal Roberts won’t get up in Ipswich, but he did poll double the LNP candidate and is in second position becoming the conservative choice in Ipswich. Labor Notably polled LESS THAN 50%, so more voters than not DONT WANT THE ALP in Ipswich. That’s surely a milestone, Ipswich is unassailable ALP heartland and they polled less than half.

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          • #
            James

            You could probably afford two houses in the US, for what you house in Australia would sell for, and still have money left over.

            Many retirees have property in the South for winter, and in the North for the summer months.

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            • #
              Bobl

              Would like to explore the option with you sometime. Biggest obstacle is understanding property tax. We would probably look at Texas or elsewhere in the south / southeast, but are open to somewhere near a lake (that doesn’t freeze). A deplorable community would be nice.

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      • #
        robert rosicka

        They have 46 seats now so not looking good for commonsense but hey be careful what you wish for you might just get it Queensland.

        20

    • #
      AndyG55

      How did you favourite the “Greenies” go? 😉

      30

      • #
        robert rosicka

        Andy I think they were down in the regional centres but up in the cities , you know wherever soy latte is freely available .
        No huge surprise in any of results really numtards are numtards which ever state your in .

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  • #
    Ruairi

    Some countries now forgo the use of coal,
    To signal the great virtues they extol.

    For sixteen hundred years Antarctic cooled,
    Which means that climate models have been fooled.

    The lookouts on Australia’s ship of state,
    Should spot the icebergs, ere it is too late.

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    David Maddison

    I can’t believe the conservatives of any variety did so badly in Queenslandistan. How dumbed down have Australians become?

    I agree that the Turnbull Party is appallingly bad but Green Labor is much, much worse.

    This is not looking good for the federal election and this is also looking gravely serious for Australia.

    I feel this is the end.

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  • #
    PeterS

    The Queensland election is a perfect example of how the Liberal Party (states and federal) is destroying itself. The party now tries to pretend it stands for both conservative and progressive left policies at the same time, yet it criticises all minor parties that stand for just one or the other. In other words they want to stand on their own as a mindless and confused mess, instead of seeking support from other minor anti-left parties. As a result the ALP have done well using support from the Greens and even One Nation to maintain the upper hand. Turnbull has been the master of all this. Keep this up and they will disappear in a puff of smoke. Goodbye Liberal Party – nice knowing you. Hope you have a great funeral. Only one way to avoid it. Get rid of Turnbull now, and replace him with someone (I don’t give a damn who it is) who is a true conservative opposition to the left – someone not much unlike Cory Bernardi, and someone who will form alliances with other minor parties, such as the Australian Conservatives and One Nation to shore up their base. If the Australian voters then still prefer progressive left instead of conservative anti-left governments then so be it – they can have the ALP+Greens in all governments across the nation. This country can then go to “hell”, and it will. The it might learn the lesson the hard way.

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    Rod Stuart

    The party now tries to pretend it stands for both conservative and progressive left policies at the same time

    The very definition of cognitive dissonance.

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    • #
      PeterS

      Indeed. In fact if they continue as they are now they will enter the next phase – insanity. That would accelerate their demise to make room for a new party. They do have an opportunity to reverse direction but I suspect the cancer has spread too far and wide in the Liberal Party and has already infected the Nationals.

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  • #
    pat

    26 Nov: SMH: Peter Hannam: Global hot spot: Exceptional heat pushes up ocean temperatures off Australia
    Australia is home to a global hot spot for sea-surface temperatures, with a record burst of prolonged heat in the country’s south-east helping to make conditions several degrees warmer than average.
    Daily weather charts generated by the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration show the unusual warmth is almost unmatched around the world, compared with normal temperatures.

    Only patches off Greenland and New York in the US are as abnormally warm compared with long-run averages. (See chart below.)
    “It’s clear sea-surface temperatures around south-eastern Australia, and Tasmania in particular, are well above average,” Blair Trewin, senior climatologist for the Bureau of Meteorology, told Fairfax Media…
    Temperatures are as much as three degrees warmer than normal…
    As sea-surface temperatures typically lag a couple of months behind land ones, the waters may not feel especially warm for those braving an early season dip…

    Melbourne on Saturday notched its sixth day in a row of 30 degrees or warmer conditions, equalling a mark set in 1896.
    The city is forecast to have a 29-degree maximum on Sunday, with the timing of the arrival a cool change to determine whether the record bar is lifted…
    Melbourne has also set a record for 12 nights in a row above 15 degrees, with a tally that could extend for another six nights on current forecasts…ETC
    http://www.smh.com.au/environment/weather/global-hot-spot-exceptional-heat-pushes-up-ocean-temperatures-off-australia-20171125-gzsrey.html

    26 Nov: SMH: Brides of the sun: this is what climate change looks like
    by Gethin Chamberlain
    (Guardian bio: Gethin Chamberlain is a freelance photojournalist. He previously covered India and South Asia for The Observer)
    Journalists from the Brides of the Sun reporting project (LINK), backed by funding from the European Journalism Centre, travelled to Mozambique and Malawi to track down young girls like Agnes who married when the changing weather forced their families into poverty…
    http://www.smh.com.au/world/brides-of-the-sun-this-is-what-climate-change-looks-like-20171122-gzqdt9

    Wed or dead: Millions of girls as young as 14 across climate change-ravaged Africa forced to be child brides
    By Gethin Chamberlain
    Mirror.co.uk-3 hours ago

    Die Zeit in Germany ran the story on 8 Nov:

    „Ich habe mich entschieden, diesen Mann zu heiraten, um zu …(“I have decided to marry this man to survive”)
    Die Zeit Germany – 8 Nov. 2017
    by Milena Zwerenz
    Sie ist eine von insgesamt zwölf jungen Frauen, deren Geschichten das Projekt Brides of the Sun …

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  • #
    pat

    25 Nov: Newsbusters: (Former)Time Editor Bleats the Koch Brothers Will Ruin His Life (and Earth) by Buying Time
    by Tim Graham
    The Koch brothers might be part of buying Time magazine, and a former Time science editor is so panicked he wrote an article for the leftist magazine The Nation (LINK) titled “Don’t Let the Koch Brothers Buy Time Magazine.” Charles Alexander wrote about how his life’s work of screaming environmental bias may be about to go down the drain…

    Alexander thinks this sale could destroy us all: “Despite 30 years of scientific warnings about global warming, Congress has not passed an effective plan to slow the burning of fossil fuels. The Koch brothers, whether they understand it or not, appear to have plotted to destroy civilization as we know it for their own short-term profit.”…
    “Are there no corporate white knights to save Time from the dark knights, as Jeff Bezos saved The Washington Post? For the moment, we will still have the harsh truth about climate change published in The New York Times, The New Yorker, Rolling Stone and, yes, The Nation. But the Internet is hurting those publications’ revenues as well, and what happens if they too get bought by dark knights with fossil-fuel money?”…

    Alexander concluded with the thought that in line with his weather forecast, when the Earth starts to boil and fry, we will all realize liberal bias was the answer. “The ravages of global warming will become too obvious to be denied, even by the likes of Trump. But by then the damage to the planet may be irreversible, and my beloved Time, once a soldier for truth, may have fallen casualty to the forces of greed and deception.”
    https://www.newsbusters.org/blogs/nb/tim-graham/2017/11/25/time-editor-bleats-koch-brothers-will-ruin-his-life-and-earth-buying

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    • #
      bobl

      Sometime I wonder why the Koch Brothers don’t switch from being megalomaniacs (in the eyes of the left) to suing leftist newspapers for defamation to make their fortunes. Lawfare on the left surely has to have some profit in it – and it’s about time they got a taste of their own lawfare medicine. (The left pretty much loses most of the time anyway).

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    • #
      Graeme No.3

      Well I throw Subscription offers from Time straight into the rubbish bin. From memory the last one I opened included the offer of a leather jacket which hardly fits in with rapid global heating.

      With sanity returning to Time then I may open the envelope.

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  • #
    robert rosicka

    Seeing as though it’s unthread has anyone here from an Ag background have any experience with mites , I’m used to the red legged variety which usually are only active in winter but I have an infestation of the little critters in and around the pool .
    These are just black and seem to be going through a ten day cycle .
    While very very tiny they make up for it by sheer numbers .
    Question is how to be rid of them without nuking the pool ?

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  • #
    pat

    Hetherington keeps up the fight:

    26 Nov: DailyMail: TONY HETHERINGTON: I was victim of a rare earth metals investment scam operating under the name Denver Trading
    R.R. writes: I was victim of a rare earth metals investment scam operating under the name Denver Trading.
    Its bosses were jailed, but the firm which introduced me to the fraud was never investigated. It was Sol Emissions Limited which told me it charged 5 per cent commission, but actually took up to 60 per cent.
    How can I find Sol Emissions and take the company to court?

    HETHERINGTON: Denver Trading was a major fraud. That is not just my view. It was the verdict of a judge and jury who decided that 600 people had been ripped off to the tune of about £7 million, half of which had been pocketed by the company’s sales agents. The company was run by two experienced professional fraudsters, Christopher Sabin and Tobias Ridpath…
    The pair are now serving nine-year jail sentences, imposed last May, thanks to an investigation by Devon and Cornwall Police…

    Sol Emissions, based in the City of London, lied to you. It claimed there was a ‘lucrative’ market in rare earth metals and that ‘the end result for at least the next five years for this commodity is that investors will be queuing to become involved in what can only be compared to a Gold Rush’.
    It added: ‘It is almost certain the prices for rare earth metals will skyrocket over the next two to five years.’
    In fact, despite the name, rare earth metals are not even that scarce. They are used in mobile phones and similar devices, but there is no market for ordinary investors. One who put £39,000 into Denver Trading found the real value was just £285.
    The salesman you dealt with was Eddie Turford, now 24, but the owner of Sol Emissions was 33-year-old Tom Markham. Together, they now run TRM Recruitment…

    Markham’s financial acumen can be gauged by the fact he also tried to sell you carbon credits that he claimed were ‘extremely desirable to potential buyers’. This was rubbish. If you had put money in, you would have lost your investment…
    The blunt fact is that this unpleasant pair fleeced investors, lined their own pockets handsomely and are now business owners. Neither of them replied to repeated invitations to comment or explain themselves…

    They may yet have to answer questions though. According to the police, information about Sol Emissions ‘is currently being assessed by the City of London Police’s National Fraud Intelligence Bureau’.
    Any reader who trusted Markham and Turford and lost money should contact me. I will be happy to pass on to the police any evidence I receive.
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/money/experts/article-5116699/TONY-HETHERINGTON-victim-rare-earth-metals-scam.html

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  • #
    pat

    comment in moderation re: 26 Nov: DailyMail: TONY HETHERINGTON: I was victim of a rare earth metals investment scam operating under the name Denver Trading

    20

  • #
    robert rosicka

    The former state of Queensland now becomes the newest state to join the ranks of the glorious republic of dumbfukistan .

    50

  • #
    robert rosicka

    South Australia are going to hold an expensive royal commission into the Murray darling basin but how can one state have judicial power over other states .

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    • #

      Weatherdill is running out of electricity and now water. It’d be really nice if that idiot would run out of oxygen.

      90

      • #
        David Maddison

        But SA has a desal plant, how can they run out of water?

        Oh, I forgot, you need a proper electricity supply to power that.

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    • #
      Dennis

      Election stunt, and already dealt with via the Howard Coalition Government and consultations and negotiations with all of the State governments for areas the river system flows from and through.

      20

    • #
      philthegeek

      South Australia are going to hold an expensive royal commission into the Murray darling basin

      Better value per $ that the RC the LNP insisted in holding into the Unions and given the political goings on with Barnyard being such a, well, useless minister probably well worth having. There is a bit of a sniff of serious corruption in whats come out about the admin of the MD Basin.

      And….water availability/quality is actually a pretty fundamental issue in SA being on the end of the supply. Its actually like…real stuff.

      10

  • #
    robert rosicka

    Just listening to ABC and some greentard presumably from the greenie mob wailing about the Great Barrier Reef said there was no Reef system in the world not suffering from CAGW.
    This false statement and and similar claims are rammed down the publics throats so much no wonder we are in the mess we’re in .

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    robert rosicka

    Ha ha got my own back , the missus called me in yesterday and said the beach volley ball was on
    I looked it and it was the men’s but today it’s the women’s , what skill they have .

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    Will Janoschka

    Have some folk here done an analysis on using an integer power series a a scale for time and its reciprocal frequency; (generally complex), or temperature and its reciprical(??)?
    This seems to well express complex congugates well. By ‘integer power series’ I mean the form of interval (distance unit) represented as …1/x^6, 1/x^5, 1/x^4, 1/x^3, 1/x^2, !/x^1, !/x^0, x^0, x^1, x^2, x^3, x^4, x^5, x^6…; for any x except zero (rational, transcendental, or not). Please notice the two ones in the middle with some completely undefined interval between 1/1 and 1!. What would Planck’s formula curve look like if that x were replaced by t (time) on the ordinate; T (temperature) on the abscissa; and the curve (function) constant values of spectral, or total ‘radiance’?
    Any comments would be appreciated, including I want some of whatever you been smoking\drinking! Please note that the scale “is” the extended Fibonacci series if (x) is rounded to an integer! 🙂

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    • #
      Will Janoschka

      completely undefined interval between 1/1 and 1!

      To try to get to the concept, that interval is not linear but circular! If the interval betwixt 1/1 (frequency) and 1 (time) is 2 (anything) radius 1, than the center must define the value Zero distance\interval, at the center! If however that interval betwixt 1/1 (frequency) and 1 (time) is 1 (anything) diameter. than the concept of ‘ZERO” location must vanish; as the first derivative of a constant with respect to anything is the only (conceptual) zero you will ever find, and cannot be physical! Which is closer to what is physically observed and measured! especially with regard to ‘absolute zero temperature’. Perhaps high time to discard political speculation\conjecture and go back to ‘science’, complete with all the Aw sh—s, required by scientific discovery.
      All the best!-will-

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    pat

    behind paywall:

    25 Nov: UK Times: Emily Gosden: Data threat to proposed energy cap
    Plans to help a further two million vulnerable households next winter with an extended energy price cap could be stymied by the government’s failure to release data identifying those in need.
    Ofgem has already capped energy prices for about four million households with pre-payment meters, amid concerns that they were paying too much for their energy.
    The energy regulator is due to extend protection to cover a million primarily pensioner households that already receive the “warm home discount” from February, and wants to extend it to cover a further two million next winter…
    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/business/data-threat-to-proposed-energy-cap-70h53350p

    25 Nov: Reuters: China signs deal to build new nuclear reactor in Pakistan: WNN
    China has signed a deal to build a third large nuclear reactor in Pakistan, which wants to get a fifth of its electricity from nuclear by 2030.
    World Nuclear News, supported by industry lobby World Nuclear Association, reported that China National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC) and the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) have signed a cooperation agreement for the construction of a 1,000 megawatt (MW) HPR1000 “Hualong One” reactor at the Chashma nuclear power plant in Punjab…

    China is already building two Hualong One reactors with a capacity of 1100 MW each near the port city of Karachi, which are expected to become operational in 2020 and 2021 respectively.
    PAEC chairman Muhammad Naeem told Reuters last month PAEC was in the final stages of awarding contracts for Chasmah, which would take Pakistan’s nuclear capacity to about 5,000 MW when it is finished. He said Pakistan wanted to build at least 3-4 more big nuclear reactors by 2030…
    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-pakistan-nuclear-china/china-signs-deal-to-build-new-nuclear-reactor-in-pakistan-wnn-idUSKBN1DO1W6

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    pat

    by former UK Energy Minister (Labour), Brian Wilson, who writes regularly for The Scotsman:

    25 Nov: Scotsman: Brian Wilson: Ill wind blows for Scotland’s 2nd Industrial Revolution
    For a few days, the ­problems of BiFab ­commanded public attention. It was almost back to the old days, with workers threatening to blockade the yards. The First Minister rushed home to take ­command. A few heads were knocked together to underwrite the work and laps of honour ensued.

    End of story? Well, it certainly should not be. What happened with BiFab is only the symptom of a far more serious problem which remains entirely unresolved. It might be called “Whatever happened to Scotland’s Second Industrial Revolution?”. In other words, how on earth have we ended up getting so little economic benefit out of renewable energy?

    The sad sub-text to the BiFab story is as follows. Scotland, at present, has only one large offshore wind project under construction, though the Beatrice windfarm has a value of £2.6 billion. It has been in gestation for almost 20 years. Yet the only substantial part of that work being carried out in Scotland is a £100 million sub-contract, and we can’t even that get that right…

    ***There seemed to be some media awakening last week to the fact it was not meant to be like this. The bold promises of that “second industrial revolution” were dusted down. I heard the BBC’s Gordon Brewer on television asking Keith Brown, the industry minister, why Scotland has been so unsuccessful in attracting investment in renewables infrastructure with the vast majority of hardware imported…

    I did not get the impression that Mr Brown understood the basis of the question, far less knew the answer. When in doubt, however, there is no doubt about the first place of refuge – blame Westminster, which Mr Brown duly did for failing to give certainty to the renewables industry. The problem with this is that it is completely untrue…

    The same question should have been asked long ago about onshore wind. While we were listening to endless political rhetoric about the “Saudi Arabia renewables” and world-beating targets, nobody seemed to care about the fact that thousands of turbines which appeared on our hillsides were being built in Spain, Denmark and Germany while every promise of investment in Scotland came to nothing. (Dundee no more, Leith no more, etc)…READ ALL
    http://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/brian-wilson-ill-wind-blows-for-scotland-s-2nd-industrial-revolution-1-4621767

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    toorightmate

    Why does the ABC say it is “toxic” for the LNP to have any association with One Nation?
    The One Nation vote is significantly higher than the Green vote, but the Leftists don’t say that it is “toxic” for the ALP to be associated with the Greens.
    The bias continues – full steam ahead.

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    tom0mason

    A place to park this interesting piece of info from https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/Delivery.cfm/SSRN_ID3026900_code2220942.pdf?abstractid=3023248&mirid=1&type=2

    Where they say —

    Detrended correlation analysis of a global sea level reconstruction 1807-2010 does not show that changes in the rate of sea level rise are related to the rate of fossil fuel emissions at any of the nine time scales tried. The result is checked against the measured data from sixteen locations in the Pacific and Atlantic regions of the Northern Hemisphere. No evidence could be found that observed changes in the rate of sea level rise are unnatural phenomena that can be attributed to fossil fuel emissions. These results are inconsistent with the proposition that the rate of sea level rise can be moderated by reducing emissions. It is noted that correlation is a necessary but not sufficient condition for a causal relationship between emissions and acceleration of sea level rise.

    and so much more…

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