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The pace shifts: global demand for fossil fuels goes up so much people wonder if “peak coal” is yet to come?

The annual BP Statistical Review of World Energy has been released. Global demand for energy is speeding up again — mainly thanks to China, India and the US. Tellingly, all fuels — coal, oil, gas, nukes and hydro  — grew faster than their ten year averages, but not renewables. So the momentum has shifted back to fossil fuels, especially gas which was up a remarkable 5.3%, one of the fastest rates of growth in the last 40 years. Coal grew at 1.4% — twice as fast as the average for the last decade. Coal still supplies 27% of the total energy mix.

Is peak coal yet to come?

  Graham Lloyd, The Australian

“As a result, the peak in global coal consumption which many had thought had occurred in 2013 now looks less certain. Another couple of years of increases close to that seen last year would take global consumption (of coal) comfortably above 2013 levels,” the BP report said.                        

 Thank shale gas for saving the world eh?

…without shale gas in America and LNG exports to Asia, notably from Australia, greenhouse gas emissions would be much higher.                                                                         

Frack for the planet.

The story of 2019 is that though renewables have been growing at a blistering pace, the rate of increase is slowing, and it’s not keeping up with the growth in demand. Energy demand is up 2.9% but emissions were up 2%. Renewables growth isn’t fast enough to supply the extra demand and shrink total emissions.

UPDATE: Be aware everything after the dotted line in these graphs is a projection. Not real! See how small the renewables part is before the line…. h/t Bill in Oz.

BP Statistical Review, Graph, Fuel, nations.

Renewables (orange at the top) are not the main game in the major economies.

 

From BP

  • Primary energy consumption grew at a rate of 2.9% last year, almost double its 10-year average of 1.5% per year, and the fastest since 2010.
  • By fuel, energy consumption growth was driven by natural gas, which contributed more than 40% of the increase. All fuels grew faster than their 10-year averages, apart from renewables, although renewables still accounted for the second largest increment to energy growth.
  • China, the US and India together accounted for more than two thirds of the global increase in energy demand, with US consumption expanding at its fastest rate for 30 years. (Go Trump.)

Tell us again how coal is a stranded asset?

The huge Adani coal mine just got approval. It has a long future.

BP, Coal demand, Global, Graph. 2019

BP STatistical Review,

For Australians the word is “irrelevant”

The average player is increasing their emissions twice as fast as we are.

 Global carbon emissions rise twice as fast as ours

 Graham Lloyd, The Australian

BP said global emissions overall were up 2 per cent last year as the unexpected return to coal gathered pace.

The increase of 600 million tonnes of greenhouse gases from energy was greater than Australia’s total output.

The share of renewables in power generation increase from 8.4% to 9.3% but total electricity generation rose by 3.7%.

REFERENCE

BP STatistical Review of World Energy — 2019 edition

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Rating: 9.7/10 (69 votes cast)
The pace shifts: global demand for fossil fuels goes up so much people wonder if "peak coal" is yet to come?, 9.7 out of 10 based on 69 ratings

182 comments to The pace shifts: global demand for fossil fuels goes up so much people wonder if “peak coal” is yet to come?

  • #

    Australia is where hard working men dig up a cheap, reliable source of electric power, coal, for sale to other nations, who will use it to manufacture solar panels and wind turbines, which they will sell to Australia, for use in generating expensive, intermittent electric power.

    If this happened in the US, we would blame Donald Trump (or Barack Obama) and “The Russians” — who do you blame ?

    440

    • #
      Graeme No.3

      According to “our” ABC we should blame Donald Trump.
      This is the taxpayer supported broadcaster which the majority of Australians** don’t watch.

      **disclaimer: all those above 8 years old and most of those with a mental age above that.

      250

      • #
        peter

        Graeme, I like to watch the ABC (when not watching Sky News) and still do. But I admit that the swearing I do at the ABC content and the things I throw at the screen are annoying the family and scaring the cat. Good example last night, ABC News 24 interviewed an “energy expert” on the Adani approval. I thought “Oh, good, a bit of balance on the ABC”. The “expert” then started yapping on about subsidised coal in Australia, stranded coal assets, climate emergency, Australia’s international responsibility etc. I shouted “another Greenie dipstick” the cat ran to the door to get out and I clicked over to Sky News.

        161

        • #
          Sceptical Sam

          That’s a smart cat you’ve got there, Peter.

          Invest in a cat door.

          Then the cat will be able to leave of its own volition, as soon as you make the mistake of clicking over to their ABC.

          Trust the ABC? Not me.

          100

    • #
      Hanrahan

      “Australia is where hard working men dig up a cheap, reliable source of electric power, coal, for sale to other nations, ”

      Ya got that right. Australia’s miners are among the best in the world, both hard rock and open cut. Trouble is, that’s about our limit. We pretend we are the “smart country”but we have no world renown brands except Bundy rum, and the poms own that. We no longer own Dryzabone or Ugg boots either.

      140

    • #
      Bill in Oz

      Anyone else notice that those charts
      For China & India are ~ 60%
      Projections of what
      Might happen
      In the FUTURE ?

      A classic way of spreading propaganda.
      And PC BS.

      80

      • #
        Greg in NZ

        The propaganda / PR / bs is oozing thick & fast; Edward Bernays and the Vatican’s Sacra Congregatio de Propaganda Fide will be squirming with glee:

        https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/its-time-nz-declare-climate-emergency-majority-kiwis-say-in-new-poll

        “Of those who were polled, 53 per cent answered yes, 39 per cent said no, and eight per cent did not know.

        “Those who were more likely to agree that the Government should declare a climate change emergency were Green Party supporters, Pacific peoples, people aged 18-34, Labour Party supporters and Māori.

        “Those who were more likely to be against were National Party supporters, men aged 55 and over and New Zealand Europeans”.

        Remember when Timothy Leary wrote young people shouldn’t trust people over forty: these days, I don’t trust people under forty, then again, I’m in the ‘men aged 55 and over and New Zealand’ Europeans Scottish-Irish NZ-born Ngati Pakeha naysayer group (never voted National/Tory however).

        “Climate Change Minister James Shaw said as the consequences of climate change – such as floods, fires and storms – show ‘we need to treat it as such’”. Where’s Monty Python when you need them: No one expects the Spanish Inquisition! in 2019.

        90

        • #
          Greg in NZ

          Just had a quick squiz at your BoM‘s home-page city temps and only Brisbane and Darwin got above 20˚C today, everywhere else shivering in the teens – wherefore art thou, Goebbelsworming

          70

    • #
      Geoff

      The Gippsland Basin has 395 Bt of lignite, 600 Bt of black coal under the brown coal, 1,200 Bt of lignite under Bass Strait. Peak coal is a VERY long way off.

      The technoloigy to extract oil from this lignite is now proven at 1.1 barrels BoE/ton.

      Methane and methanol can be made from water and CO2. This technology is proven at a lower cost than drilling for methane. The question is only if renewable power sources can be used and the processes are still profitable. Ethene production is now being tested.

      The idea that there is peak anything in the fossil fuels space is ludicrous.

      90

      • #
        David Maddison

        Geoff, is it economically feasible at current prices to mine the coal under Bass Strait? (Assuming free markets were allowed to operate, Demonic Dan (Premier) would likely ban it.)

        50

        • #
          Geoff

          The coal could be treated in-situ. The oil extracted. 1,320 Billion barrels is a lot to ignore if you are running out. The treatment insitu is cheap, sub US$10/barrel, all in if you need to drill more holes. For existing holes its under US$5. On land its under US$20 for the easily extracted coal and under $30 for the rest.

          As its mostly lignite source the output will be light oils, sub C24. Same as Bass Strait source. The issue is the 18% phenols.

          60

      • #
        theRealUniverse

        Not sure why the need to make Methane when theres enough in the lithosphere to run the world indefinitely, well for foreseeable civilization depends on your opinion on how long that will last..

        10

        • #
          Geoff

          Methane and methanol can be made from water and CO2. This technology is proven at a lower cost than drilling for methane.

          Its cheaper to make it.

          40

          • #
            Bobl

            You obviously don’t understand chemistry then, burning methane produces CO2 and water liberating a certain amount of energy of which about 40% can be captured as electricity. To unbake the cake takes the same amount of energy into the process less losses so the round trip is less than 50% efficient, that is burning 1lt of methane produces enough energy to make 1/2 lt of methane.

            Without a cheaper energy source than Methane, IE coal or nuke, this is impractical, all your energy will be used up making less and less energy, where is the excess electricity to feed to the grid if the round trip is a net loss?

            So why would you do it instead of making electricity direct from the nuclear or Coal fuel

            20

    • #
      Geoff

      The Gippsland Basin has 395 Bt of lignite, 600 Bt of black coal under the brown coal, 1,200 Bt of lignite under Bass Strait. Peak coal is a VERY long way off.

      The technoloigy to extract oil from this lignite is now proven at 1.1 barrels BoE/ton.

      Methane and methanol can be made from water and CO2. This technology is proven at a lower cost than drilling for methane. The question is only if renewable power sources can be used and the processes are still profitable. Ethene production is now being tested.

      The idea that there is peak anything in the fossil fuels space is ludicrous.

      30

    • #
      Ex steelworker

      TThe LNP are right now in the perfect position to announce a complete 180’ on power generation and water security. Pauline Hanson and Clive Palmer have got it rite. Build Hele power stations, 1 in each state. Build ore processing plants, cokeing ovens and blast furnaces near all the mines Australia wide. Sell the pure processed minerals to the world at premium prices,Coked coal pig iron, aluminium copper ingots rare earth…ect. Set up an underground bunker in the middle of nowhere to store the world’s nuclear waste and charge like a wounded bull for eternity. If we do all that we would become the richest country in the world. If the alp/green don’t agree lnp would own the mining states forever.But what’s the chan

      21

      • #
        Another Ian

        Remember when we were going to have a trans-Australia rail link taking coal one way and iron ore back with steel works at either end?

        30

  • #
    Ian of Brisbane

    I note the declining projected OECD coal use. What else would they say?

    60

    • #
      Bobl

      More to the point look at the top line they project a declining total energy consumption from all sources for the EU, with north African immigration – that isn’t going to happen without some major deindustrialisation.

      20

  • #
    Mike Jonas

    Coal demand is shown as declining slightly after 2020. Probably an error driven by the same thinking that leads to surprise that coal demand hasn’t started declining already?

    180

    • #
      theRealUniverse

      Im not sure what the best estimate of a notion of ‘Peak Coal’ would be. Guess it would be in order of centuries. ‘Peak Oil’ has been debunked, there is NO ‘peak oil’ (or gas). Oil will be around for a very long time. If it isnt we collapse overnight, and gas too.

      20

  • #
    Another Ian

    More fuel

    “The great hundred billion dollar+ renewable energy fleecing of American taxpayers & energy users”

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2019/06/13/the-great-hundred-billion-dollar-renewable-energy-fleecing-of-american-taxpayers-energy-users/

    120

  • #
    ivan

    Global carbon emissions rise twice as fast as ours

    OK, where are all the diamonds then? If carbon emissions are up then there must be more diamonds available since they are carbon.

    If, on the other hand , they are talking about carbon dioxide, the plant food, then so what , the crops will be better, although I’m not so sure because of the drop in overall air temperatures this northern summer, in fact we could do with a nice dollop of the global warming they keep talking about (we are in July and I as well as others in the village need heating on in the evenings to be comfortable).

    101

    • #
      Another Ian

      Were you looking for them in the green latte set then? More likely found in the rough (IMO)

      40

    • #
      Geoff Williams

      My brother living in Wales confirmed to me on the phone only yesterday that he was using heating in his home.
      GeoffW

      50

  • #
    el gordo

    Peta Credlin ran with the Adani mine on last night’s show, took us into an Indian village showed the power of newly installed electricity. Keep in mind that this is a story that the ABC wouldn’t touch with a barge pole, SKY had it in homes right across the nation.

    320

    • #
      Hanrahan

      I wish there had been subtitles. Mr Adani must have said some interesting things.

      80

    • #
      ColA

      El Gordo,
      There was a good report in GWPF and also posted on WUWT about the benefits of powering the poor and saving childrens lives. When my own children challenged me about my support for Adani, I asked them if the Indians would install birdchoppers and solar to solve the demand – they admitted they could not afford to satisfy that huge demand, then I simply made them think about the benefits to the Indian poor and the fact that if Adani didn’t get cleaner high quality coal from Australia they would buy dirty coal from somewhere else, so their precious environment would be worse off!
      They didn’t barrack for Adani – but they didn’t protest against it either!

      100

      • #
        Dennis

        On the early afternoon Channel 9 News yesterday there was a discussion between the news presenter and two other panelists, one of the discussions was about the approval for the Adani Carmichael Mine. The presenter, a young thirty something women, became somewhat emotional and stated that “we” do not need more holes in the ground and suggested that the Adani Mine would hasten the end of the Great Barrier Reef. It was then pointed out that the location of the mine is over 300 kilometres inland from the Queensland coastline. She appeared surprised but insisted that the Reef was in serious trouble and that mining was one of the reasons.

        An older male panelist advised that he and his sons have been diving on the Reef for many years and that it is in very good health. The presenter responded emotionally that his children enjoy the Reef but what about her own children in the future when there is no Great Barrier Reef.

        Tourism industry business people in Queensland are very concerned about the lies being spread regarding the health of the Reef and the related loss of foreign tourists who get the messages from green climate change hoax activists that create the wrong impression that the Great Barrier Reef is dying. Australia needs tourism and the adverse impact from deceptive comments should be condemned. The Australian economy, government revenues, depend on the significant contributions and jobs related to mining ventures and service industries to the mines.

        The news presenter’s false impression is worrying, how many other young Australians are there who have been misled?

        150

        • #
          Hasbeen

          It is always academics looking for a grant, or idiots, who have never been anywhere near the thing who are telling us how bad it is.

          100

        • #
          Vladimir

          Took my grandchildren to see the Reef at Port Douglas. We did normal touristy things – a bit of diving, glass-bottom boats… We did not see much may be because the tour was quite restrictive, still the kids were happy.
          Anyway, our guide said nowadays Low Islands were much smaller than when Captain Cook discovered them, due to rising sea level.

          I’d rather expect, being “live animal” the Reef moving South if it likes cooler waters. Of course it would be very slow shift but we have an army of scientists, equipped with the best stat methods to separate true signal from noise. Surely, they would notice !

          50

          • #
            theRealUniverse

            ‘Low Islands were much smaller than when Captain Cook discovered them’ .. should ask him where is the evidence? Theres been NO rising levels more than a mm or 2 since then, if that. Geophysical FACT.

            70

            • #
              Vladimir

              It was “her”, the lady with strong Dutch or German accent, though nowadays you never know – she could be of the First Nations, relying on the sacred knowledge.

              60

          • #
            Hanrahan

            You didn’t see much because, to be honest, there isn’t much to see. Never been there but you might have had a better experience on Green Is. where they “garden” the reef and control the COT or in an aquarium such as Reef HQ in Townsville or the newer one in Cairns.

            The reef can’t move south because it can’t colonise deep water. My belief is that the reef began as a fringing reef during the ice age when the sea level was far lower and the continental shelf was the shore line. As the sea level rose new coral colonised on top of the existing so was never in deep water. The broken coral formed shallow water but where the tides rip the water is deep. Run your pointer over the reef in google earth to see the contrasts.

            Disclaimer. These are private thoughts which I have never read being discussed. If there are scientific errors I am happy to be corrected.

            30

            • #
              BoyfromTottenham

              H – my understanding was that the current reef is only about 10-12kyo, because when the sea rose (200 ft?) after the last Ice Age the previous reef surrounding the previous shoreline was slowly ‘drowned’, and a new sea edge formed some distance inshore, near which the new reef grew. However, your thoughts sound reasonable to me too. I guess it depends upon how rapidly the sea rose – if fast, then a whole new inshore reef, if slow, then the coral grew up as the sea rose. Ain’t science wonderful?

              40

            • #
              Graeme#4

              Cold water live coral reefs can exist to at least 2000 metres down. Recently a deep-water coral reef, over 100 kms long, was found 800 metres down off the coast of Carolina in the U.S. Deep water coral reefs also exist off the coast of Africa.

              50

          • #
            WXcycles

            Low Islands were much smaller than when Captain Cook discovered them …

            This is a BS myth they’ve spun you Vlad, I’ve dived all around that Isle and reef, many times during my life, in no way has it shrunk, if anything it will be getting slowly larger from the coral’s growth alone. In fact there has not even been a significant major cyclone over it since at least the early 1970s. It’s basically an undisturbed typical island and mid-reef and in rather good shape the last time I saw it. I seriously doubt 3.3mm per year sea level rise is going to out pace the rapid coral growth. Lots of purty soft corals on the leeward side of it too.

            20

        • #
          ColA

          Dennis,

          The news presenter’s false impression is worrying, how many other young Australians are there who have been misled?

          While the CAWAtology science cult continue feeding climeligion to the catastrophic MSM head grabbers and our politicians vote seeking ears listen to them it will continue and get worse.

          Nothing will happen until somehow the open debate about CO2 is broadcast to the nation and it HAS TO BE the MSM, Sky is good but it still doesn’t get the coverage! We need anti-climate disruption!!

          70

          • #
            ColA

            Oh and don’t forget the Unis and school teachers in there as well, they are also preaching not questioning.

            60

          • #
            theRealUniverse

            It certainly need a greater coordinated effort to counter the BS.

            40

          • #
            OriginalSteve

            Maybe its just me, but since when does emotion have anything to do with science?

            I get annoyed with unthinking, emotional idiots, whose concept of science is weeping over mythical polar bears dying on ice floes…

            Its this perrenial argument over the thinkers vs the BS artists….

            The great irony i find is the CEOs of this world are non technical corporate types, but are people people but have a lit of the power, but are too scientifically ignorant to stare down the climate clowns.

            Maybe we just need more technocracies to just get stuff done….

            10

    • #

      I see that now Adani has been approved, there are SIX more of those large scale coal mines in that same Galilee Basin awaiting their own approvals, and one of them is three times the size of Adani.

      Tony.

      200

      • #
        el gordo

        Its a coal rush and green activists will be the only creatures to go extinct.

        150

        • #
          GD

          Its a coal rush

          I see what you did there, ‘coal rush’. And in many ways it’s true. Without coal, Australia’s exports would be down and in particular, Queensland would be bankrupt.

          Palachook’s massive inflation of the public service is ironically paid for by their coal exports.

          The stupid is big with lefties.

          40

          • #
            WXcycles

            Palachook’s massive inflation of the public service is ironically paid for by their coal exports.

            And they still can’t run a train or a bus schedule on time!

            30

      • #
        Hanrahan

        The Australian Adani GM told Credlin that the MD of a neighbouring mine said he was doing nothing until/unless Adani was approved.

        The reelection of the libs means a lot for Nth Qld. We are a depressed region ATM RE hasn’t appreciated in years.

        100

    • #
      theRealUniverse

      Saw Bob ‘greentard’ Brown on 7news last night complaining on how Adani was the devils contract almost. The likes of him will have to crawl under a rock. To contrast they (locals) were all celebrating in the pub! Theres gonna be much coal extracted outa there fort a wee while yet.

      80

    • #
      Geoff Williams

      You have to admire that woman Peta Credlin.

      70

      • #
        GD

        You have to admire that woman Peta Credlin.

        Yes, she’s my pin-up girl, after Travago girl :)

        I know, I’m shallow. Sigh.

        20

      • #
        WXcycles

        She gets my thumb’s up! Terrific having her on Channel 83 now, and what a relief from all the shallow ignorant ‘fashionable’ nonsense elsewhere.

        20

  • #
    OriginalSteve

    Well, someone is doing thier best to halt oil movement through the straut of hormuz….coal should surge…

    https://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2019-06-13/oil-tankers-struck-in-suspected-attacks-in-gulf-of-oman/11208016

    50

    • #
      Hanrahan

      The last attacks were limpet mines, pretty ineffectual but this sounds like torpedos.

      I wish Pompao would shut up and not blame Iran in a knee-jerk. Trump’s friends, Saudi Arabia and Israel are far more likely.

      97

  • #
    Jonesy

    Original Steve is on the critical argument for Australia. If there is even a holdup of a week, we will feel immeadiate pressure in our transport sector. Our government chased off refining in the urge to reduce co2 emmissions. We need to embargo from export what is left of our crude oil and gas condensate. We need to start now on processing gas to liquid and coal to liquid technology to reduce our reliance on expensive imported fuel. Batteries will not power 72tonnes of cargo all night times 100000 plus units every night. Diesel is the only energy dense enough to reliably and affordably keep Australia on the road. Hells bells! If we crack the technology of molten salt nuclear, we could make diesel out of air!

    90

    • #
      Dennis

      The transport industry could abandon heavy transport and use 1-tonne capacity EV light trucks instead.

      It would make as much sense as wind and solar farms to replace power stations.

      51

      • #
        Robber

        Dennis, just think of all those new “renewable” jobs – how many more truck drivers would be required? Trucks already make up 10% of total traffic.

        50

      • #
        theRealUniverse

        ‘The transport industry could abandon heavy transport’..not possible and wont happen, not for this continent.

        60

        • #
          Greg in NZ

          Nor this little continent: I’m back in the professional driving game [7-seater vans and 40-pax buses] and a). the owner’s not about to up down-grade to electric toys [she's a non-believer in this warmist junk anyway] and b). no computer/satellite-guided ‘self’-driving vehicle would survive the narrow, windy, bumpy, broken, pot-holed, idiot-filled rural and city roads I have to deal with. Humans rule! And diesel works, and works, and works…

          100

    • #
      Kinky Keith

      Yes,Yes and Yes.

      20

    • #
      WXcycles

      What we need is a shock to security of supply and pricing to get the political and economic impulses to do it. This sort of thing may finally provide that. I don’t know what else will do it.

      20

  • #
    Robber

    The International Energy Agency presents similar data in a different way:
    Change in total energy demand 2017-2040 for advanced economies (AE) and developing economies (DE) in Mtoe:
    Low carbon AE +500, DE +1500 (includes 350 nuclear)
    Gas AE +100, DE + 1100
    Oil AE-400, DE +750
    Coal AE -340, DE +400
    Totals AE -140, DE +3750
    So “renewables” at +2000 Mtoe, all other +1500.

    I looked for similar data for Australia, found this from Office of the Chief Economist prepared back in 2014:
    Primary energy consumption in PetaJoules 2014/5; 2034/5; 2049/50:
    Coal: 1635; 1871; 1945
    Oil: 2431; 3304; 3879
    Gas: 1610; 2045; 2253
    Renewables: 341; 441; 463 So renewables represent only about 6% of total demand.
    And the makeup of “renewables”:
    Hydro 68 68 66
    Wind 59 116 118
    Bioenergy 195 220 231
    Solar 19 23 34
    Geothermal 0 14 14

    80

  • #
    Travis T. Jones

    Warren Buffett: “If you own a railroad carrying a lot of coal it will carry a lot of coal for a long period, a very long period.”

    “We have always underestimated the amount of oil and gas in the world,” Buffett countered. ”

    https://www.cnbc.com/2019/03/25/heres-what-warren-buffett-thinks-about-climate-change-and-investing.html

    70

    • #
      Hanrahan

      Warren Buffett: “If you own a railroad carrying a lot of coal it will carry a lot of coal for a long period, a very long period.”

      Now if Pluccachook would ring Buffett she would build the railway to the Galilee basin before someone else took up the opportunity,

      110

      • #
        theRealUniverse

        She wont do squat, shes unhinged. Of course someone will beat her to it, if not China, ‘build one next week, when would you like it finished?’

        50

    • #
      Another Ian

      TTJ

      He’s hoping that also works for oil as B & N carts from Canada’s oil patch. Likely has to do with him not being a fan of Keystone pipeline too.

      10

  • #

    The thing about the increase in coal fired plants versus the increase in renewables is this.

    A new large scale coal fired plant will have two Units around 1300MW, so a Nameplate of 2600MW and at its normal operating Capacity Factor, (when new and for the first few years) of around 85 to 90%, it will generate around 20TWH of power a year.

    A new large scale wind plant of (Macarthur size) 420MW Nameplate at 30% CF will generate 1.1TWH of power a year.

    So for every new coal fired plant they open up, they have to open 20 large scale wind plants just to keep up.

    That just won’t happen.

    Even more when it comes to solar plants, so even having a mix, they can never keep up.

    It’s not that they are building more coal fired plants, just that they deliver so much more power.

    Tony.

    210

    • #
      John in Oz

      Tony,

      Don’t forget to always state that
      - the coal-fired power station generates continuously, 24/7 but the wind-generators are intermittent
      - as well as the wind farm, they also need (and should be forced to build themselves) a continuously available back-up generator

      Love your work

      130

      • #
        ivan

        Wind farms should be forced to quote for supplying a guaranteed amount of power in one month lots and if they don’t supply that power they should be fined. You would then see some pigs squealing and maybe some realistic power pricing.

        40

    • #
      Another Ian

      Tony

      This just occurred to me.

      With area figures like that as ammunition ask a supporter of renewables if they are willing to have turbines nearby. If given a NIMBY answer produce the figures and point out that they’re going to get them if such were to occur.

      120

      • #

        There will always be a non NIMBY related reply ….. you know, “I live here in the suburbs, and you just can’t construct one of those types of wind plants here.”

        A bit like in Zali Steggal’s electorate. They’d just scoff and say the same thing. It’s always somewhere else where they can’t see it, and the people where those wind plants are located are those who (in the mind of those city dwellers) just don’t really matter, and because they can’t hear the noise, and see how often the blades are stationary, then it doesn’t exist.

        Ask one of them if they have ever stood at the base of a wind tower, and seen how huge they are, and heard the noise they make. Watch the jaws drop.

        As I have always said, if the power comes out of the proverbial ‘hole in the wall’, then it’s all the same to them. They will never experience that intermittency, so that also does not really exist. The fact that the availability and reliability of supply relies SOLELY on coal fired power does also not apply in their minds, or more importantly, in the minds of those who really matter, those commentators who tell us wind is good, you know, economists!!!

        Tony.

        180

        • #
          AndyG55

          I think you could squeeze a few medium size wind turbines into Zali’s electorate.

          Plenty of room near the Naval Hospital,

          Bushland down from Balgowlah Heights,

          Bushland behind Chowder Bay.

          George’s Heads, Middle Head

          And North Heads is both windy and unoccupied.

          Go to Google Earth and gave a look

          These are PRIME spots for wind turbines.

          Come on Zali, you KNOW you want them ! ;-)

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  • #

    Coal is a “stranded asset”? So much nicer than “strangled asset”. It’s like saying “quantitative easing” when you mean “making up money ’cause you can”. I’m sure the globalists have invited a few good wordsmiths to this year’s Bohemian Grove as a reward for nifty expressions like “stranded asset” and “quantitative easing”.

    Back in the real world, big energy arrangements are being made. (I know, I know. The Shanghai Cooperation Organisation’s recent meetings didn’t make it to the headlines any more than the war in Yemen, but Eurasia is going big with energy as the resource-rich and land-locked Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan are looking east. And where else would Iran look? Russia, with easy gas delivery to Europe, can look both ways.)

    Chongqing, a suddenly modern central China city now larger than many countries, is the hub. That “world heartland” which theorists have loved to talk about it is now more than talk. Not saying it will all come to planned fruition, not saying it’s a good or bad thing. Saying it’s happening. And it’s happening big.

    Meanwhile, back in the bush, we squabble over Adani and our drop in the world energy export bucket.

    Adani is a distraction. It was always going to happen. Just like tree-huggin’ Gupta was always going to snap up some NSW coal to make “green” steel in SA with another bargain pick-up. (Sorry, I meant to say “unstrand a certain NSW asset”.) What globalists want is an energy poor Australia…but domestically. Domestically. Don’t argue about Adani, argue about the state of electricity generation in Australia for Australians. Let’s stay on that subject. It’s good if some Queenslanders get jobs and Indians score some of our primo coal. But we need to be an energy powerhouse…domestically. Domestically.

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    • #
      theRealUniverse

      “quantitative easing” = printing as much fiat (worthless notes) currency as fast as you can.

      20

      • #
        Kinky Keith

        And watch the devaluation of your currency.

        Some countries with large overseas debts possibly use devaluation as a way of getting the debt to be a bit less threatening.

        30

  • #
    • #
      OriginalSteve

      EVs ( except in some industries) are the pointless vehicle ever developed. Even steam cars like the Dtanley Steamer have a practical use and can be fired by ptetty much anything that will burn…

      50

      • #
        Another Ian

        “And in 1930 Bessler (a maker of logging locomotives) installed V-twin compound in Waco and flew successfully in California”

        Herschel Smith “A History of Aircraft Piston Engines”

        10

  • #
    OriginalSteve

    Common sense has finally prevailed…..

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-06-14/adani-has-its-environmental-approvals2c-so-what-happens-now/11207998

    Once the green nonsense disappears ( all that will be left is the brown stain on things, like dam water on a white building…) industry needs to keep going.

    30

  • #
    Elgorza Narce

    So global demand for fossil fuels increases whilst virtue signalling banks deny their investors the opportunity to be a part of it. Their boards and CEO’s need to be held accountable for decisions which negatively impact the profitability of the bank, but no doubt they are enjoying business from tax payer subsidised green industries which keeps them going.

    For example, these clean green clowns are advertising quite heavily at present:- https://bankaust.com.au/personal/campaigns/no-fossil-fuels/

    I wonder if they are running their lights, computers, phones, coffee machines on renewable energy, and whether they travel by bicycle or planes and cars??

    Contrast these hypocrites with a bit of down to earth sanity from another investment adviser with the succinct name of N(o)BS Investing.
    https://www.nbsinvesting.com/post/fear-mongering-101-global-warming

    I know where I would rather put my money.

    30

    • #

      An email I just received from Bank Australia… Bankers for Globalism and Rule by Unelected Bureaucrats (and Bankers.)

      The email. :(

      “We’re proud to be supporting Progress 2019.

      Progress 2019, the largest social change event in Australia – is a platform to build a future for everyone in Australia. On Thursday 20 and Friday 21 June this year, more than 1500 of Australia’s leading thinkers, advocates, movement-builders and social entrepreneurs will gather at Melbourne Town Hall to hear from over 170 speakers and network, get inspired and build their advocacy and campaigning skills to grow the progressive movement across Australia.

      We’re pleased to be sponsoring the Australian visit of Canada’s pioneer of social entrepreneurship and ethical investment Joel Solomon who joins in conversation with compatriot and CSR leader Allyson Hewitt to explore the potential impact of the clean money movement in Australia. Joel is the author of The Clean Money Revolution: Reinventing Power, Purpose and Capitalism and will be speak about the moral value of the money we spend every day, the power that consumers and individuals have in their purchasing choices, and ways that we can build a clean money movement in Australia where corporations and governments respond to collective pressure for a more just society and environment.”

      30

  • #
    pat

    yesterday, I posted:

    Adani mine student protest
    Courier Mail – 13 June 2019
    STUDENTS angry at the State Government’s approval of the Adani Coal Mine have threatened to close down the centre of Brisbane in protest. Just hours after the project was given the green light, Uni Students for Climate Justice and Movement Against Destruction unveiled plans…
    to the ***ABC headquarters, where they will demand a live cross to the…Uni Students for Climate Justice organiser Catherine Robertson, said the decision…

    Facebook: 16h ago: Supporting Conservtives in Queensland;
    (Courier Mail) STUDENTS angry at the State Government’s approval of the Adani Coal Mine have threatened to close down the centre of Brisbane in protest…
    The 5pm rally will disrupt peak hour traffic as protestors march from Brisbane Square, across Victoria Bridge to the ***ABC headquarters, where they will ***demand a live cross to the demonstration by the public broadcaster to “show the people’s response” to Adani’s approvals.

    Uni Students for Climate Justice organiser Catherine Robertson, said the decision to approve the Adani coal mine’s groundwater plan was an “absolute disgrace”.
    “It will spell the end of the Galilee Basin and cause irrevocable destruction to million year old ecosystems,” she said.
    “We will not stand idly by whilst the government makes decisions that are hurtling us toward a point of no return on the environmental crisis.”..
    https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?id=606785829377185&story_fbid=2179709458751473

    remember this:

    21 Dec 2018: Guardian: BBC’s London HQ put on lockdown over climate change protest
    Extinction Rebellion group calls for environment to be made ‘top editorial issue’
    by Jim Waterson
    Extinction Rebellion, a direct action group that has recently shut down key London roads, has ***demanded the BBC makes the environment its “top editorial issue”.
    Broadcasting House was locked down early on Friday afternoon, with BBC staff and guests unable to enter or leave the building while security kept the peaceful but noisy protesters away from the entrance.

    Extinction Rebellion activists, who are demanding a meeting with the BBC director general, Tony Hall, said the corporation had a duty to broadcast about climate change with “the level of urgency placed on informing the public about the second world war”…
    Extinction Rebellion also organised protests on Friday at BBC offices in Bristol, Glasgow, Cambridge, Birmingham, Truro, Sheffield, Bangor, and the broadcaster’s Berlin bureau…
    Since then, Extinction Rebellion activists have blocked bridges and glued themselves to the gates of Downing Street, earning media attention that has allowed the campaign to spread to 35 overseas countries…

    The BBC has been criticised for its coverage of climate change, especially the decision to give airtime to climate change sceptics such as Lord Lawson, who oppose the scientific consensus…
    https://www.theguardian.com/media/2018/dec/21/bbc-london-headquarters-put-on-lockdown-over-protest-by-climate-change-campaigners-extinction-rebellion

    lol. more like they were welcomed by the CAGW-infested BBC.

    00

    • #
      pat

      reminder how George Monbiot/Guardian castigated the BBC!

      7 Nov 2018: Guardian: David Attenborough has betrayed the living world he loves
      by George Monbiot
      Since 1985, when I worked in the department that has made most of his programmes, I have pressed the BBC to reveal environmental realities, often with dismal results. In 1995 I spent several months with a producer, developing a novel and imaginative proposal for an environmental series. The producer returned from his meeting with the channel controller in a state of shock. “He just looked at the title and asked ‘Is this environment?’ I said yes. He said, ‘I’ve spent two years trying to get environment off this fucking channel. Why the f**k are you bringing me environment?’”
      I later discovered that this response was typical. The controllers weren’t indifferent. They were actively hostile. If you ask me whether the BBC or ExxonMobil has done more to frustrate environmental action in this country, I would say the BBC…

      Youtube: 5min34sec: 1 Nov 2018: A passionate message by George Monbiot at the Extinction Rebellion
      posted by New Internationalist
      A passionate call to arms by journalist George Monbiot at Parliament Square on Wednesday, 31 October. “We have waited long enough, we are waiting no longer. No one else will deliver it for us, no one is left but us”
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FPT3950UGuk

      The Earth is in a death spiral. It will take radical action to save us by George Monbiot
      Guardian – 14 Nov 2018
      It was a moment of the kind that changes lives. At a press conference held by climate activists Extinction Rebellion last week, two of us journalists pressed the organisers on whether their aims were realistic. They have called, for example, for UK carbon emissions to be reduced to net zero by 2025…
      Think of Donald Trump and his cabinet of multi-millionaires; the influence of the Koch brothers in funding rightwing organisations; the Murdoch empire and its massive contribution to climate science denial; or the oil and motor companies whose lobbying prevents a faster shift to new technologies…

      Only rebellion will prevent an ecological apocalypse by George Monbiot
      Guardian – 15 Apr 2019

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    • #
      pat

      just got asked which day/date for the Brisbane students Adani protest:

      Just hours after the project was given the green light, Uni Students for Climate Justice and Movement Against Destruction unveiled plans to stage a mass rally in the Brisbane CBD during afternoon peak hour next ***Friday, June 21.

      00

    • #
      Graeme No.3

      pat:

      The green brains are criticizing the BBC? Their most consistent friend? They will wind up with no friends at all, and will have to huddle together for warmth as the Grand Solar Minimum starts to bite, and their policies towards electricity generation come home to roost.

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  • #
    theRealUniverse

    ‘The increase of 600 million tonnes of greenhouse CO2 gases from energy was greater than Australia’s total output.”
    The trouble with all the statements about amounts is totally absurd, those ‘millions’ of tonnes make up a couple of molecules per billion in most cases. It always seems allot to the ‘great unread’ but in reality its NOTHING.

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    • #
      el gordo

      Do you think human induced CO2 molecules are heavier than the natural variety?

      The massive greening of India and China over the past couple of decades may indicate that new coal fired power plants are also fertilising the surrounding countryside.

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      • #
        theRealUniverse

        Of course they are bigger and heavier..how do you think we tell the difference, so they can get all the numbers they quote../sarc

        10

        • #
          Another Ian

          And coloured so you can see them

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          • #
            el gordo

            Greta Thunberg reckons she can see it floating in the air, but I have my doubts.

            Reading a little further NASA says the greening is caused by changes in land use and not CO2 from Hele, and they also make the point that ‘carbon absorbed by crops is quickly released back into the atmosphere.’

            00

            • #
              Hanrahan

              Except for that part that becomes the wood of trees and the flesh of animals and fish.

              30

            • #
              theRealUniverse

              NO plants release OXYGEN and absorb CO2. H is correct allot goes into the wood.
              NASA says = NASA lies.

              20

              • #
                el gordo

                The Australian government is looking into it.

                ‘One hectare of industrial hemp can absorb 22 tonnes of CO2 per hectare. It is possible to grow to 2 crops per year so absorption is doubled. … Industrial hemp stem consists primarily of Cellulose, Hemicellulose and Lignin, whose chemical structure, carbon content, (and therefore absorbed CO2)…’

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      • #
        Dennis

        The delegation from China to the UN IPCC Copenhagen Conference reported that over 3,600 years of civilisation China had experienced three warmer periods than the present (before the cooling cycle now underway started) and each warmer period resulted in increased prosperity as crop yields increased.

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    BoyfromTottenham

    I just don’t believe that graph of China’s projected energy demand – the trends prior and after the present are radically different, with coal shown as trending down by nearly 50% by 2040, and no growth in oil and hydro. Given that China is building hundreds of coal fired power stations, and it is impossible for them to feed those new power stations for the next 20 years without a significant increase in coal consumption. Likewise oil – millions of new cars on the road every year, but no increase in oil consumption? Pull the other one, its got bells on!

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  • #
    pat

    14 Jun: ABC: WA power retailer Synergy forecast to lose $180 million over three years as dire finances revealed
    By Daniel Mercer
    WA power provider Synergy will post almost $180 million in losses over the next four years as the financial position of the state-owned utility deteriorates…
    Last month, Energy Minister Bill Johnston confirmed Synergy was expected to crash to a loss as it grappled with a flood of renewable energy that was undercutting its fleet of coal and gas-fired power plants…

    Professor Wills, whose private company is pushing for a $160 million solar farm in the Wheatbelt that would compete with Synergy, said the utility was facing a prolonged period of pain.
    “There’s no doubt globally utilities are suffering from changes in the way energy is generated,” he said.
    “Our electricity sources are changing to renewables and that’s actually providing new opportunities for new businesses to enter the market, so therefore there’s competition.
    “Competition should be good for the market, it should actually bring pricing down.
    “However if your cost structure is not as flexible, then clearly you’re going to bear some burden of those competitors coming in and taking market share.”…
    Professor Wills suggested there was a growing case for a revamp of WA’s household electricity price structures, to ensure people were charged according to how much strain they put on the grid at peak periods of demand…
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-06-14/wa-power-retailer-synergy-forecast-to-lose-$180m-in-three-years/11199906

    13 Jun: AmericanThinkerBlog: PG&E’s bankruptcy: Renewable energy costs at 800% of market rates
    By Chriss Street
    PG&E’s bankruptcy court revealed that the company may dump its state-mandated renewable energy source contracts that cost up to 800 percent more than market rates…
    With PG&E residential electric rates rising by 71 percent to subsidizing renewables, Northern Californians’ electricity costs 19.30 cents per kilowatt-hour, or about double the 10.66 cents in Oregon and 9.46 cents in Washington…

    But the U.S. Bankruptcy Court proceedings revealed that the company has $34.7 billion of overpriced renewable energy contracts costing up to $197 per megawatt-hour that could be replaced with new contracts priced at between $25–30 per megawatt-hour…

    California already gets 34 percent of its power from renewables, and utilities under S.B. 100 enacted last year must reach 50 percent in 2026 and 60 percent in 2030. But lobbyists understand that the bankruptcy judge’s decision may have doomed the ability of crony capitalists to finance huge solar and wind projects based on bureaucrats jacking up electricity rates on working class consumers…
    https://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2019/06/pges_bankruptcy_renewable_energy_costs_at_800_of_market_rates.html

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    • #
      Graeme#4

      While WA energy prices are OK at present, there is a looming problem because the state govt is allowing the major coal power station run down, which contributes significantly to the southern energy.

      20

      • #
        Bobl

        What do you mean OK. Cost me over $370 over 2 months for two people living in an apartment! That’s $2100 a year just for an apartment. Perth’s electricity is EXPENSIVE.

        10

  • #
    Zane

    Iraq’s possible oil reserves could be three times higher than thought, and exceed Saudi Arabia’s. While in the 70s under the Shah, Iran was pumping 7 million barrels a day, now it’s only around 2.7 million. Shame the mad mullahs are holding the place back. There is plenty of oil about. Enough coal lies under coastal waters for thousands of years. Doomsters talk of shortages is scaremongering propaganda.

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  • #
    pat

    followup to reply #16.1 re George Monbiot:

    BBC doesn’t give a hint long-time, regular BBC contributor Monbiot is basically synonymous with XR, but begins with XR PR spin.

    17min42sec to 20min26sec:
    BBC: you might remember the Extinction Rebellion cimate protest that stopped traffic for days; now CAGW moving up the agenda. net zero emission by 2050 blah blah.
    Monbiot: useful target, not as ambitious as some countries, Norway etc…ON AND ON ABOUT MUCH MORE REQUIRED ETC.

    13 Jun: BBC World Business Report – Presenter: Roger Hearing
    Plus our regular environmental commentator George Monbiot tells us whether he thinks the UK’s target to achieve zero carbon emissions by 2050 is attainable.
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/w172wx8nmfmzfdc

    10

  • #
    Zane

    Glee at the ABC at the possibility of Adani becoming a ” stranded asset “. Don’t sell those cow dung futures yet…

    10

    • #
      el gordo

      ‘Stranded assets are investments that are not able to meet a viable economic return and which are likely to see their economic life curtailed due to a combination of technology, regulatory and/or market changes.’ wiki

      The Galilee Basin is getting a green light, so no stranded asset.

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      • #
        WXcycles

        The “stranded asset” part is the result of a neglectful lack of RAIL AND ROAD INFRASTRUCTURE to economically extract it (as yet).

        It has little to do with approving a mine, given the scale of the global coal market and demand level.

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    • #
      Graeme#4

      Something about this on Sky News tonight. Comment from Bloomberg, who invest in renewables, advises that it costs $50 to export coal and the sell price is currently around $65. Bloomberg also claims that it will cost $2m for the mine and $1m for the railway, thus coal cost will increase to around $88.

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  • #
    pat

    sounds great to Guardian readers no doubt, given what it fails to say:

    13 Jun: Guardian: Onshore wind farms in UK could cut £50 a year off energy bills
    Government urged to overturn effective ban to help meet ambitious climate targets
    by Jillian Ambrose
    Government ministers face rising calls to lift their block on onshore wind farms to help meet the UK’s ambitious climate targets while reducing home energy bills…
    Peter Dickson, a partner at Glennmont Partners, which manages Europe’s largest ever clean energy fund, is among those urging the government to change its stance. He said if the UK is “serious” about climate crisis target “policymakers must encourage all forms of renewable power generation.”…

    A boom in new onshore wind projects could also cut energy bills by £50 a year compared to a high-gas energy mix according to new research ***commissioned by RenewableUK, the trade body…
    The analysis undertaken by ***Vivid Economics shows that growing onshore wind from 13GW today to 35GW by 2035 would reduce the cost of electricity by 7%…
    An onshore wind boom could also treble the number of jobs supported by the sector to 31,000 and boost exports to £360m a year by 2035…

    Dickson said: “Investors we speak with are increasingly viewing fossil fuel-based generation plant as stranded assets and are looking for opportunities to divest into new technologies that help to tackle climate change.”…
    Norwegian energy giant Statkraft, Europe’s largest renewable energy generator, echoed the call for greater ambition for renewable energy including “low-cost options like onshore wind”.
    Alan Whitehead, the shadow minister for energy and climate change, said: “Onshore wind is a win-win-win. It reduces reliance on imported fuels, reduces energy prices for households and reduces carbon”…
    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/jun/12/onshore-wind-farms-in-uk-could-cut-50-a-year-off-energy-bills

    last time I recall ***Vivid Economics, they were commissioned by WWF:

    21 Nov 2018: WWF: UK can lead the way in stopping climate change by reaching ‘net zero’ emissions by 2045 – new report reveals
    Ground-breaking emissions modelling ***commissioned by WWF demonstrates the UK can end its contribution to climate change in less than three decades…
    The new report, written by and based on modelling by Vivid Economics, comes as the UK celebrates 10 years of the world-leading Climate Change Act, and shows…
    https://www.wwf.org.uk/updates/uk-can-lead-way-stopping-climate-change-reaching-net-zero-emissions-2045-new-report-reveals

    Can renewable energy sector drive further cuts in UK emissions?
    Financial Times – 23 Apr 2019
    Alex Kazaglis, principal energy economist at consultancy Vivid Economics, and ***formerly at the CCC…

    ***Vivid Economics: Alex Kazaglis, principal
    Alex’s recent work includes assessing the suitability and effectiveness of electricity market designs for renewable technologies in major economies; designing innovation support programmes in the UK; supporting low carbon development in Africa, Asia and Australasia and advising energy companies on the impact of integrating electricity grids across Europe…
    Prior to working at Vivid Economics, Alex was Head of Power Sector at the Government’s Committee on Climate Change…
    He was also Director at the Australian Government’s Climate Change Authority during its first major review of Australia’s emissions reduction targets…
    Alex has a MSc (with Distinction) in Environment and Development from the London School of Economics, where he studied as a Foreign and Commonwealth Office Chevening Scholar, and a first class Honours degree in Engineering and Science from the University of New South Wales.

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    • #
      Graeme No.3

      pat:

      There is NO ban on on-shore wind in the UK.
      What has happened is that subsidies have been stopped.
      So, come on wind farmers, if wind generates so much cheaper you can make a profit anyway.

      30

  • #
    pat

    AUDIO: 7min12sec: 14 Jun: 2GB: Ray Hadley: Adani to create nearly 10,000 jobs as project gets underway
    Adani Australia CEO says the project will create nearly 10,000 jobs as they prepare to begin construction after receiving government approvals on Thursday…
    Adani Australia CEO Lucas Dow says over 1500 jobs will be created during the construction process.
    He estimates over 8,000 new jobs would be created through the project.
    Mr Dow tells Ray Hadley the process is already underway…
    “Two years from today… we’ll expect to have sold our first coal.”
    https://www.2gb.com/adani-to-create-over-30000-jobs-as-project-gets-underway/

    extraordinary attacks on Adani by Alan Jones this morning, as usual. also noted last night that Michael McLaren is not really supporting the approval. pity.

    00

    • #
      Hanrahan

      They must have always expected approval because they haven’t been sitting under a shady tree all this time. They have done all their drilling so the mine design will already be done and they have a fully staffed office so they have vacancies posted with job descriptions already, and there are local contractors doing some work for them.

      This is the ultimate “shovel ready” project.

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    • #
      Hanrahan

      Jones had a lot to do with the defeat of the one term Newman government here. He really bad-mouthed the LNP. He was involved with the “lock the gate” movement.

      10

  • #
    TdeF

    The only reason Adani has persisted is the nature of our coal. Australia would have no coal income by now if it didn’t have the best coking coal for making steel. Indonesia caught us in exports and would have all our business now and the Greens and everyone else would be out of a job, if not for black coal. Of course the hypocritical Labor government in Queensland is raking in the profits from coal and gas, while attacking them.

    In Victoria around 2009 we, the people of Victoria, had a deal to sell $200Million of our brown coal to India but the Age hit the roof. They were making the coal ‘blacker’ by squeezing out the water. Horror! Blacker! Kindergarten journalism but it worked and Labor Premier John Brumby promptly banned the export of our brown coal, so it stayed in the ground. The alarmists say it is the most ‘polluting’ coal per tonne but that is because it is 66% water and you need 3x as much, so it is a lie in a string of lies.

    Still the anti coal lobby won a decade ago in Victoria and shut down brown coal exports and a whole R&D industry in removing the water from brown coal with technology from a Bacchus Marsh company in conjunction with Monash University. Labor devastated another emerging industry. Meanwhile we are told Australians are inventive. The wine cask maybe. Not our politicians.

    They call themselves ‘progressives’ when they are against all progress and tax anything which moves. They call themselves Anti-Fascists when they are in fact black shirted violent Fascists shutting down free speech. And everyone conservative is labelled Fascist and Alt Right and capitalists when all the real money hungry capitalists like Liberal leaders Turnbull and Hewson are right into fake energy along with the Greens.

    So Queensland will be earning 92% of its coal money from coking coal. Consdier even newly reelected Greens leader Richard di Natale said export of coal should be banned, unless it was used for making steel. What’s the difference in CO2? None. Who expects GPs like Di Natale or Bob Brown to know any science?

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    • #
      Hanrahan

      Haven’t you got a lot of proven reserves of on-shore gas that has been black banned? As I read it the water that comes up with the gas is suitable for agriculture so the locals could use it.

      50

      • #
        TdeF

        Yes. On shore too. Exploration banned. While we run out of gas and tax it to death.

        The undeclared carbon tax is double as it is per ton where CO2 per ton of ethane is lower, so $400 a ton for gas, $200 a ton for coal. The biggest carbon tax in the world, turned into cash for anyone who runs a windmill. Not for the power, just a gift. A never ending gift of our cash to windmill owners and solar panel owners. Hidden in our electricity bills, not itemized and marked up by all the middle man. That is how we went from the world’s cheapest electricity to the world’s most expensive without any other change but hidden carbon tax.

        The system has been copied in the UK. It is illegal as it is not a tax, just hidden legislated payments to third parties to gift cash to windmill people and solar people. Not for electricity. At least half flows overseas forever. For nothing.

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  • #
    neil

    That first chart must assume that the majority of China and India’s populations will remain in poverty past 2040. That is not the intention of their governments, they plan to bring them out of poverty by industrialising, which means producing more electricity, burning more coal.

    The developing world will require a 200-300% increase in coal usage to beat todays poverty and by 2040 there will be another billion people who will need electricity as well.

    Our saviour is that at projected usage we have about 700 years of coal reserves, but we should be able to replace coal with nuclear within a century or two.

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  • #
    Zane

    Many of India’s new power plants will be on the coast, and it is cheaper to supply them with seaborne thermal coal from Australia, South Africa, Indonesia etc than to freight lower quality domestic coal 1000s of kms by train from the coalfields in northern India. Things happen because they make economic sense, at least when businessmen and not politicians make the decisions.

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    • #
      TdeF

      India is the world’s third biggest coal miner, after the China and the United States.
      You would think they knew the difference between thermal coal and high value coking coal for steel.

      The coking coal price forecast for 2019 at $195/tonne.
      Where Pacific basin benchmark Newcastle coal prices will likely average USD 93.80/t this year

      Spot the difference.

      Greens are not against Metallurgical coal, yet. They are against Thermal coal. Logic has never been a strong point.

      30

  • #
    pat

    total CAGW BS from Tom Burke E3G and BBC. worth a listen:

    AUDIO: 8min40sec: BBC Radio 5 Live: Tom Burke – E3G – Are we able to meet the UK emissions target – 12 Jun 19
    posted by Tom Burke
    We do it by putting our money where our mouth is, and by following through on this commitment to get the law in the right place by investing in the right things, and most importantly, above all, by investing in energy efficiency of our buildings, particularly our homes, because that will not only reduce our emissions, but it would also help get peoples bills down, and it will help reduce the burden on the health service of fuel poverty, because that makes it very difficult for older people to thrive.
    The government has got to set the lead and invest, and I think you will find that where the government first invests private money will follow behind it, so it’s not just going to be a big bill for the taxpayer or the consumer, but never the less, there will have to be some sort of contribution from all of us to solving this problem, it is the biggest problem of our generation.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a4ayp54PCGk

    rough paraphrase:

    Tom Burke (E3G): everyone’s behind it – TUC, CBI, Extinction Rebellion, Greta Thunberg…

    BBC Rachel Burden: cost?

    BURKE: Chancellor came up with figure of $1tn figure, immediately knocked down. my guess is it may well be a lot cheaper to go low-carbon, than to go high-carbon.
    BBC: that’s interesting.

    BURKE: i do see more wind and solar, not nuclear – too expensive, not compatible with flexible system we need to build for the future.

    BBC: Royal Dutch Shell quote re fashion!

    BURKE (later): China and India are already making major changes in how they produce electricity. China major producer of solar panels, moving to EVs.

    00

  • #
    pat

    BBC not happy at all links from links from links – all negative:

    13 Jun: BBC: Adani mine: Australia approves controversial coal project
    PIC: Plans for the mine have drawn protests across Australia

    Visiting Australia’s controversial Adani mine (LINK TO BBC NOV 2018 HIT PIECE ON ADANI)

    Critics say the project’s true impact remains unclear…
    Initially, Adani said it would be one of the biggest in the world and employ 10,000 people.
    But the mine has been scaled back significantly and it is now expected to create “1,500 direct and 6,750 indirect jobs”, the company says…
    It was heavily debated before last month’s general election. The poll returned Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s government – a supporter of the mine – to power…

    VIDEO: 2min52sec: BBC: Will coal exports kill the Great Barrier Reef? (ends – whole world feels threatened by this big industry on the Qld coast)

    PIC: Though many oppose the mine, others – such as these demonstrators – say it will improve the economy (CLERMONT – NO MENTION THEY WERE OPPOSING GREENS’ BOB BROWN CONVOY)

    The Carmichael site itself is barren land but those who oppose the mine say that activating it would still harm the fragile ecosystem of the ***nearby Great Barrier Reef…

    “As custodians of the world’s greatest coral reef system, Queensland and Australia has to lead by example and show there’s a bright future for everybody that’s beyond coal,” said Shani Tager, a spokeswoman for the Australian Marine Conservation Society.

    VIDEO: 2min21sec: BBC Laura Foster: Climate change: How 1.5C could change the world

    Under the Paris climate agreement, Australia has pledged to cut emissions by 26% on 2005 levels by 2030.
    However, the UN has warned that Australia is not on track to achieve its commitment (LINK).
    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-48618774

    BBC’s anti-Adani pic shows vibrant protesters; pro-Adani pic is rather dull.
    reminder how theirABC reported pro-Adani protesters in Clermont:

    28 Apr: ABC: Anti-Adani protesters felt threatened by locals in Queensland coal mining town of Clermont
    By Jemima Burt and Rachel McGhee
    Police are investigating after a prank firecracker was set off overnight, near where activists were staying.
    “Some people did get very frightened yesterday and so they might, when they’re being threatened, when you have women alone in cars with children,” Bob Brown said.
    “Older women and older men being threatened with obscene language, people banging on their cars and stones being thrown … that’s frightening.”…

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    pat

    Ryan couldn’t mentions how the entire world won’t finance coal (joking):

    AUDIO: 2min21sec: 14 Jun: ABC AM: Will Adani’s Carmichael mine become a stranded asset?
    By Peter Ryan on AM
    Norway, western Europe’s largest oil producer, has announced it will dump billions of dollars in stocks linked to fossil fuels from its sovereign wealth fund.
    Banks in Australia and China have refused to bankroll the Carmichael project, forcing Adani to self-fund the mine.
    https://www.abc.net.au/radio/adelaide/programs/am/will-adanis-carmichael-mine-become-a-stranded-asset/11208646

    AUDIO: 4min12sec: ABC AM: Locals celebrate final approval for Adani Carmichael mine
    By Rachel Mealey on AM
    The news is being celebrated in regional Queensland, with local mayors across the region claiming the mine will provide a much-needed economic boost for their towns.
    They hold out high hopes that the Adani approval will be the first of many throughout the Galilee Basin.
    TRANSCRIPT:
    ABC’S KIM LANDERS: It’s been the most divisive project in recent Australian history…
    GREG WILLIAMSON: In this area, we see the opening up of the Galilee Basin and the northern part of Australia to give access to agriculture, food production.
    Once a 400-kilometre rail line is established to the coast, the possibilities of other industries tacking onto that are endless.
    RACHEL MEALEY: Townsville mayor Jenny Hill says her city will feel an immediate impact…
    (FINISHES WITH TWO GRAZIERS – CRAGG & LANG – CONCERNED ABOUT WATER, PRESUMABLY PROMPTED BY ABC)
    https://www.abc.net.au/radio/adelaide/programs/am/locals-celebrate-final-approval-for-adani-carmichael-mine/11208496

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    Peter Fitzroy

    Interestingly all the europeans and chinese are now talking about sector coupling, which looks to the use of energy by sector, and then matches that with the appropriate type of energy generation

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    Simon

    The Adani mine makes no economic sense, it’s cost of production will be too high. Unless there is massive subsidisation by Australian and Indian taxpayers.
    The more likely scenario is that it will never go ahead, with Adani’s exit strategy being compensation from the Government for not providing approval.

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    Another Ian

    Somewhat O/T

    On a previous thread someone posted on electric aircraft. Here is some more on that and why kerosene will rule for quite a while longer for passenger aircraft

    “This video deals with the physics of attempting to fly an aircraft with battery power. There’s some complex math that lasts a few minutes, but please bear with it. And you’ll see why battery powered flight for large planes is still decades into the future. (Contrary to what the Green cons are telling you.)

    https://youtu.be/VNvzZfsC13o

    Via http://www.smalldeadanimals.com/index.php/2019/06/14/june-14-2019-reader-tips/#comment-1214615

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    PeterS

    I’m not sure about peak coal but I like to know when we will reach peak stupidity wrt CAGW so we can look forward to getting back to reality over the other side of the peak.

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    pat

    14 Jun: AustralianMining: Coal industry continues to boom
    by Alex Gluyas
    Global coal consumption and production rose in Australia in 2018, reflecting positive results for the coal industry according to new data released by BP in its 2019 statistical review of world energy.
    The report showed a continued bounce back in coal in 2018 with consumption up by 1.4 per cent and production increasing by 4.3 per cent, with the increase being at the fastest rate in five years.

    The strong growth of the coal industry in Australia is reinforced by the fact exports were largely going to Asia according to chief executive of the Coal Council of Australia, Greg Evans.
    “Asian economies are expanding and need affordable and reliable electricity which coal provides, this growth is being driven by the construction of high-efficiency low emission (HELE) power stations,” he said.
    “Those coal industry detractors who repeatedly say demand for coal is languishing need to understand the facts and appreciate our coal industry has a long future and will remain an important part of regional New South Wales and Queensland.”

    In further positive news for Australian producers, natural gas consumption and production was up by over five per cent, representing one of the strongest rates of growth for both demand and output for over 30 years…
    https://www.australianmining.com.au/news/coal-industry-continues-to-boom/

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    TdeF

    Don’t you love the anti Science Greens.

    Not enough electricity, so someone needs to invent another way without coal or nuclear.
    Can’t make steel without coal, someone needs to invent a way.
    Can’t get rid of CO2, an invention is needed to ‘sequester’ the CO2 as if the 98% of CO2 in the oceans is there by mistake.

    And Di Natale has promised 175,000 Green jobs to replace the $60Billion Australian Government income lost if coal exports stopped,
    but who would pay them and what would they do? And a huge tax on cars to allow electric cars to have no taxes.

    You just make it up. Or demand inventiveness. Like the Victoria invention of a way to remove the water from brown coal. Shut down by the Labor government and the Greens who hate black, dirty coal. The world’s worst pollutant even though CO2 is invisible.

    You cannot just tax everyone else so that you can have full employment doing nothing, not even farming.
    Just like the USSR or Cuba or Venezuela.

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    pat

    12 Jun: OpenDemocracy.net: Revealed: Climate change denier makes big donations to Boris Johnson and Jeremy Hunt
    Tory hopefuls under fire for accepting cash from company linked to major ‘climate science denial’ group. Johnson has yet to declare the funding, ‘raising questions about who else is bankrolling him’.
    by Peter Geoghegan; Additional reporting by Caroline Molloy
    Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt’s largest donation was £25,000 on May 22 from First Corporate Shipping, according to the register of MPs’ interests. First Corporate Shipping is the trading name of Bristol Port, which is co-owned by Tory donors Terence Mordaunt and Sir David Ord.
    Mordaunt is a director of the Global Warming Policy Forum, the advocacy arm of the climate sceptic Global Warming Policy Foundation…

    Boris Johnson also received £25,000 from the Bristol Port owners ‘“at the same time” as Hunt, Mordaunt told openDemocracy. The Tory front-runner, who launched his leadership bid today, has yet to record the donation on his register of interests. He has until later this month to do so…
    Leading environmental campaigners from Greenpeace UK criticised Johnson and Hunt for being “bankrolled by a director of Britain’s leading climate denial group.”…

    Mordaunt told openDemocracy that the forum was not involved in climate change “denial” but that “our knowledge of global warming is very imperfect and that if it is happening, it is happening far slower than most experts and climate models have predicted.”…
    Boris Johnson has described to concerns about climate change as a “primitive fear” that is “without foundation.”…READ ON
    https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/dark-money-investigations/revealed-climate-change-denier-makes-big-donation-boris-johnson-and-jeremy-hunt/

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    TdeF

    As for Boris, it’s Boris or Farage and every politician knows that. They would all be out of a job in a General Election. Like our Queensland, the British have had enough (except for the Scots who want to secede, as always).

    And Boris is smart enough to know you cannot fight a war on two fronts, so his front is Brexit, not Grexit. One battle at a time, I hope. As Teresa May proved 183 times, you can promise one thing and do another.

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    pat

    Times is with the “program”:

    13 Jun: UK Times editorial: The Times view on Britain’s carbon target: Net‑Zero
    The government is right to commit to a stringent target for cutting carbon emissions
    At the conclusion of her premiership, Theresa May has made what may prove to be a historic undertaking to the benefit of future generations. The prime minister’s decision to commit the country to a legally binding target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to “net zero” by 2050 should be welcomed. That Britain will now have the most demanding emissions targets of any industrialised economy is no reason for anxiety.

    The 21st century is an age of environmental concern and unparalleled technological advance. Britain has the expertise to solve the first by applying the second: devising new techniques in engineering and energy to mitigate climate change at an acceptable cost.
    A net-zero target does not mean reverting to living in mud huts and eating vegan diets, as critics would have it. But it will involve changes in behaviour until technology can solve the problems…

    The cost of energy generated by solar photovoltaics has dropped 90 per cent over the past decade. By planning now for an expansion in the use of renewables, electric vehicles and carbon capture and storage, the new target can be met…

    Second, the costs of achieving it needs to be weighed against the benefits, not least to public health. An estimated 40,000 lives are cut short by air pollution in this country every year, costing the economy £20 billion in healthcare and sick days. The forecasts of Public Health England are not unrealistic. If no action is taken, it calculates that air pollutants will cause 2.4 million new cases of disease over the next 16 years…

    As with any insurance policy, there is always going to be a cost. But with it comes peace of mind.
    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/25fa4a58-8d51-11e9-845f-5fdba6fd3f52

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      WXcycles

      May muct be the most stupid PM the UK has ever had, and that’s a kinda impressive status.

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    pat

    13 Jun: UK Telegraph editorial: Theresa May’s net-zero target is the wrong approach to climate change
    Politicians are making a habit of introducing legally binding climate change targets that they then leave to others to deliver…
    But as we shut down fossil fuel-burning industries and replace them with imported products, all we are doing is exporting those emissions to countries that are not making similar reductions if any at all. Globally, renewable energy has increased only marginally since world leaders attending the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro in 1992 committed to tackling climate change.

    The UK is unlikely to meet the current target of 80 per cent cuts by 2030 yet is introducing an even more ambitious target which the Treasury estimates will cost £1 trillion. Supporters say this is a small amount annually when spread over 30 years, but it still represents a slow-down in economic growth about which they are not being entirely straightforward with the public.

    UN modelling suggests meeting the net zero carbon target by 2050 would cost 5.3 per cent of GDP – an annual cost of £187 billion for the UK assuming the policy’s efficient implementation. Other studies say it could be far higher without making a significant impact on global emissions.
    A better approach than setting impossible targets is to encourage investment in green energy research, development and new technologies
    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/2019/06/13/theresa-mays-net-zero-target-wrong-approach-climate-change/

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    pat

    being carried in major NewsCorp MSM:

    Anti-Adani protester Ben Pennings warns thousands will be arrested
    Courier Mail – 4 hours ago
    “Sustained nonviolent tactics like strikes, boycotts, street occupations and blockades will communicate our refusal to ever allow thermal coal mining in the Galilee Basin,” says Ben Pennings, a spokesperson for Galilee Blockade…

    11 Jun: EchoNetDaily: Friday D-Day for Adani civil resistance
    by Ben Pennings, spokesperson for Galilee Blockade
    On Thursday, Queensland Labor are expected to approve Adani’s dodgy and dangerous water plans. On Friday, our civil resistance starts…
    If Queensland Labor approve Adani’s dodgy and dangerous water plans, grassroots groups in the Stop Adani movement will move beyond conventional political protest. Sustained nonviolent tactics like strikes, boycotts, street occupations and blockades will communicate our refusal to ever allow thermal coal mining in the Galilee Basin…

    How many grandparents will have to be arrested before our governments protect their grandchildren? Does Labor have the stomach to arrest thousands of everyday Queenslanders? How many party members and unions will abandon Labor in favour of peaceful protesters trying to protect their future?

    The Stop Adani campaign is a line in the sand, a campaign of international significance and ecological necessity.
    Go to the Galilee Blockade Facebook page or Website for more information. Sign up to join the civil resistance.
    Together, we will win.
    https://www.echo.net.au/2019/06/friday-d-day-civil-resistance/

    if EchoNet was the only coverage up til now, why give this person wider coverage?

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      pat

      how pathetic:

      14 Jun: CanberraTimes: AAP: ‘I’m watching you’, Palaszczuk tells Adani
      by Tracey Ferrier
      In her first comments since Adani won the final approval it needed to begin construction in the Galilee Basin in central Queensland, Ms Palaszczuk told Adani she’ll be watching it like a hawk.
      “The company has promised 1500 direct jobs, and 6700 indirect jobs,” she told parliament on Friday.
      “They have promised Queensland these jobs are to be local jobs. I expect Adani to live up to that promise.
      “They have promised to look after our environment. I’m determined that they will.”…

      (Deputy Premier Jackie Trad) hit back on Friday, accusing some LNP members of secretly fearing resources projects in their own electorates.
      “They say one thing in their electorate and then they come here and say exactly the opposite,” she told parliament.
      “As long as it’s not in their backyard … they’re all hunky-dory with it. But as soon as it’s in their backyard it’s ‘close the gate, lock the gate’.”…

      Opponents of the mine say politicians have failed them so they will wage a non-violent campaign and ***brave mass arrests to stop the project.
      “Sustained nonviolent tactics like strikes, boycotts, street occupations and blockades will communicate our refusal to ever allow thermal coal mining in the Galilee Basin,” says Ben Pennings, a spokesperson for Galilee Blockade.
      “Whoever gets contracted to build the Adani mine is a brave company indeed.”
      https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/6216941/im-watching-you-palaszczuk-tells-adani/?cs=14264

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        Hanrahan

        The mine is a long way from anywhere. No shops, no pubs, no coffee houses. They will not be welcome in either Charters Towers or Clermont, the towns at each end of the Gregory Development Road and they would remember how they were received in Bowen. It’s not like this was in the Hunter. Townsville is a little more cosmopolitan and they may be able to picket Adani offices.

        GetUp will need deep pockets to fund them.

        Does Plucca think this surly attitude will get her reelected?

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        • #
          Another Ian

          H

          “They will not be welcome in either Charters Towers or Clermont, the towns at each end of the Gregory Development Road and they would remember how they were received in Bowen. ”

          Like socialism – must work if you give it another try (/S)

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    pat

    behind paywall:

    Japan, China and South Korea must end support for coal
    Financial Times-13 Jun 2019
    If Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, President Xi Jinping and President Moon Jae-in were to end government support for thermal coal, and instead raced into cleaner and ever cheaper renewables, it could put a big dent in the fossil …

    13 Jun: EU Observer: Does Juncker even know what is in the Paris climate deal?
    By Peter Teffer
    The European Commission has done a great job in the fight against climate change, its outgoing president Jean-Claude Juncker said Tuesday (11 June) at an event organised by Politico (LINK).
    Referring to “facts” which proved the commission took the climate threat as a “serious issue”, Juncker boasted that “without the European Union this Paris climate agreement would never have been possible”.
    He is probably right.

    However, Juncker then went on to say that there was no need for the EU to raise its 2030 climate targets.
    “To fix new goals again and again, doesn’t make sense. Let’s focus on what we have decided,” he said.
    It showed Juncker clearly did not know the details of the Paris agreement.
    In fact, it is Juncker’s comment which does not “make sense”.
    Fixing new climate goals “again and again” is actually a crucial feature of the deal, which was made possible by a bottom-up approach…
    Of course, it is understandable why Juncker would want to downplay expectations…READ ON
    https://euobserver.com/environment/145148

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      pat

      followup to:

      Japan, China and South Korea must end support for coal
      Financial Times-13 Jun 2019

      is it really a surprise the piece is written by Christiana Figueres, according to –

      Carbon Brief: Writing in the Financial Times, former executive secretary of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change Christiana Figueres says this trio of large east Asian economies should commit to phasing out coal and bringing in renewables instead. With these nations exporting “high-polluting coal technology to fast-growing economies in south-east Asia”, she notes that such a transition would benefit the entire world. “If Japan, China and South Korea decided together to end their coal race and instead pursue a race to the clean energy future, everyone would benefit, including them,” she concludes.

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    Zane

    China must end support for coal? That’s news, since they produce and consume 4 billion tonnes of it each year! That is half of global usage. Incidentally, Inner Mongolia, where the coal is mined, is the wealthiest province in China. These coal barons are rolling in money! Don’t tell the Greens…

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    pat

    front page of Townsville Bulletin tomorrow:

    We’re coming: Green activists fire warning at Adani contractors
    Townsville Bulletin – 1 hour ago
    Businesses who take on work for Adani are in the firing line, as a “massive influx” of activists travel to the mine site to “physically stand in the way of machinery”…

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    pat

    lol:

    13 Jun: BusinessGreen: Deliver ‘concrete plans’ to hit net zero by 2050, UN urges business leaders
    by Madeleine Cuff
    The UN has today urged business leaders to step up efforts to slash carbon emissions as part of a co-ordinated effort to rally support for tougher national climate targets at a crunch summit in New York in September.
    In an open letter (LINK) to business leaders, executives from across the UN urge firms to adopt science-based targets (SBT) to bring their emissions pathways in line with 1.5C degrees of warming.

    The letter is signed by Lise Kingo, CEO and executive director of the UN Global Compact, one of the member organisations of the SBT initiative, alongside more than 20 leaders including UN General Assembly president María Fernanda Espinosa Garcés, UN climate chief Patricia Espinosa, and former Unilever CEO Paul Polman…
    The “visionary leaders” who commit their companies to a 1.5C target will be recognised at the upcoming summit in New York on September 23, the letter adds…READ ON
    https://www.businessgreen.com/bg/news/3077347/deliver-concrete-plans-to-hit-net-zero-by-2050-un-urges-business-leaders

    14 Jun: ClimateChangeNews: EU aims for long term climate deal by ‘early 2020’
    Draft conclusions for a meeting of EU leaders indicate the bloc will not set its 2050 climate target this year, despite pressure from the UN secretary general
    By Sam Morgan for Euractiv
    Talks on a climate plan for 2050 should wrap up by the end of this year in view of final adoption in early 2020, according to the draft conclusions of an EU summit taking place next week in Brussels…

    For campaigners, this looks like foot-dragging. Next week’s summit is the “last chance for governments to show they’re prepared to ramp up ambition,” said Sebastian Mang from Greenpeace. “Waiting until 2020 would be an irresponsible denial of the science,” he told EURACTIV…
    https://climatechangenews.com/2019/06/14/eu-aims-long-term-climate-deal-early-2020/

    Greenpeace, time to shut up.

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    pat

    how do we get those trillions of CAGW $$$?

    13 Jun: Reuters: Climate change risk should be part of monetary policy: ECB’s Villeroy
    by Leigh Thomas
    PARIS – Central banks should take into account climate change risks not only as part of ensuring financial stability but also when setting monetary policy, ECB policymaker Francois Villeroy de Galhau said on Thursday.
    Central banks have so far focused largely on the impact of climate change risks on big investors’ liabilities and how they can help improve conditions for low-carbon investments.
    However, Villeroy, who is also governor of the French central bank, said that monitoring climate change risks stretched further…READ ON
    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-ecb-policy-villeroy/climate-change-risk-should-be-part-of-monetary-policy-ecbs-villeroy-idUSKCN1TE218

    why isn’t this called abuse:

    13 Jun: Vox: Will climate change kill everyone — or just lots and lots of people?
    The debate over whether climate change will end life on Earth, explained.
    By Kelsey Piper
    Is climate change going to end human civilization for good, and so soon that we may as well not bother saving for retirement?
    That’s the theory put forward in a recent viral Vice post: “New Report Warns ‘High Likelihood of Human Civilization Coming to an End’ Within 30 Years.’” (LINK)

    The Vice story summed up a new report from the Breakthrough National Centre for Climate Restoration, an Australian think tank…
    The story went up on Vice with an orange-tinged, haunting illustration of the Statue of Liberty submerged to the neck by rising seas. The post was shared more than 70,000 times on Facebook and left readers terrified, despairing, and sharing doubts about whether it’s ethical to have children…
    https://www.vox.com/future-perfect/2019/6/13/18660548/climate-change-human-civilization-existential-risk

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    pat

    risks torpedoing?

    13 Jun: EurActiv: EU fossil gas investments undermine bloc’s climate goals, campaigners say
    EURACTIV.com with AFP
    The European Union’s investment arm risks torpedoing the bloc’s commitment to abide by the Paris climate goals by financing billions of euros worth of new natural gas infrastructure projects, new analysis said Thursday (13 June).
    The European Investment Bank, the world’s largest multilateral lender, provided €2.5 billion for fossil fuel projects in 2018, the bulk of which went towards gas pipelines.
    Even as scientists warn that reliance on fossil fuels must be slashed in order to drag greenhouse gas emissions down, the EIB spent €14.23 billion on fossil gas projects between 2013 and 2018.

    This compares to no direct finance for coal and €310 million for oil projects in the same period, according to industry watchdog Oil Change International.
    An EIB source told AFP the bank was currently reviewing its energy lending policy.
    “It must take account of the views and needs of energy stakeholders across the spectrum – from national authorities to ***academia, civil society, and industry,” said the source…READ ON
    https://www.euractiv.com/section/energy/news/eu-fossil-gas-investments-undermine-blocs-climate-goals-campaigners-say/

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    pat

    13 Jun: National Observer: Michael E. Mann took climate change deniers to court. They apologized.
    By Emma McIntosh
    In 2011, renowned scientist Michael E. Mann sued a Canadian think tank that published an interview suggesting his work on climate change was fraud.
    Eight years later, the Winnipeg-based Frontier Centre for Public Policy — which often promotes climate change denial — apologized Friday and wiped the inflammatory interview from its website.
    “(The apology) gives me faith in our legal system that truth can still win out, even in an era of ‘fake news’ and ‘alternative facts,’” Mann said in an email to National Observer…

    Climate scientists should be challenging climate disinformation publicly more often, said University of Calgary climatologist Shawn Marshall, “but it is a matter of picking our battles.” Scientists aren’t marketers, Marshall added, but now find themselves in the business of convincing the public their findings are real — an especially difficult task in the polarized realm of social media…READ ON
    https://www.nationalobserver.com/2019/06/13/news/michael-e-mann-took-climate-change-deniers-court-they-apologized

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    WXcycles

    https://s3.amazonaws.com/jo.nova/graph/energy/statistics-global/bp-primary-fuel-nations.gif

    Hang on a minute, this graph shows unreliables growing strongly in China through 2040, but from what I understand the Chinese are sweeping them under the carpet as an expensive failure and red-herring. In fact, I think that’ll be the case in Europe US and India too.

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    Maptram

    “UPDATE: Be aware everything after the dotted line in these graphs is a projection. Not real! See how small the renewables part is before the line”

    There is a problem with projecting energy from renewables out to 20 or more years. Yes they can project the quantities of solar panels and wind turbines that will be built, but renewables also require favorable weather.

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