JoNova

A science presenter, writer, speaker & former TV host; author of The Skeptic's Handbook (over 200,000 copies distributed & available in 15 languages).


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Thursday Open Thread

9.3 out of 10 based on 16 ratings

298 comments to Thursday Open Thread

  • #
    Sambar

    High winds and torrential rain across most of Victoria in the last 24 hours. I wonder how much electricity was NOT produced by wind and solar over the last 24 hours.
    Best part about renewables is they are NEVER there when power is required most. Reported that 9 inches of rain (in the old scale) fell at Mt Baw Baw. This water run off will go into Melbournes water supply at the Thompson dam, I wonder if the desalination plant will be turned off any time soon.

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    • #
    • #
      RickWill

      The last week in SE Melbourne has not had a lot of sunshine. The daily insolation for the last week in kWh/sq.m 1.6, 1.9, 1.7, 1.8, 1.3, 0.7, and today probably the worst so far.

      The annual average is around 4kWh/sq.m. The variability is a huge impediment. Low cost, long term energy storage is not there yet.

      150

      • #
        yarpos

        I was churning out 180W at noon yesterday. 6% isnt bad, all part of my cunning plan to consume the output and minimise export.

        80

      • #
        Robber

        Per OpenNEM, Vic solar peak generation for the last 7 days:
        1.2 GW; 1.2; 0.9; 1.2; 0.9; 0.6; 0.7 GW
        And total generation per day:
        7.1 GWh; 6.2; 6.6; 7.0; 6.0; 6.8; 4.7 GWh

        70

      • #
        Hanrahan

        It was a little chilly here so I went outside and watered the garden in the warm sunshine. Nothing like the sun to brighten up the day.

        Currently generating 2 kW from a 3,5kW system.

        80

        • #
          GD

          t was a little chilly here so I went outside and watered the garden in the warm sunshine.

          Hanrahan, you really are cruel. Stuck here in Victoria, it’s been a very cold May, and now the tempest of the Gods has struck. East Victoria is a shambles after devastating storms on Wednesday night.

          Geelong, where I live, has mostly survived, but it’s colder now that the wind is blowing a gale.

          Why do people live in Victoria?

          I’m here for family reasons. I grew up in Townsville. I’m getting out as soon as I can.

          I experienced Cyclone Althea in Townsville. It was devastating, but at least it wasn’t cold.

          Warm sunshine?

          The best you’ll get is a glimpse of the Sun between the clouds around midday if you’re lucky.

          Bleak City indeed.

          And thanks to Dan, I’m trapped.

          60

      • #
        Klem

        Those are great numbers compared to here. Most of my neighbour’s solar panels face away from the Sun, they’re lucky to get 5% on a Sunny day.

        We even have a local woke church that spent $150k for their solar panels, they dont face Sunward either and they’re covered in snow for 6 months of the year. Get woke, go broke.
        (Wish i could meet the salesmen who closed that deal. Laughing all the way to the bank)

        40

    • #
      OldOzzie

      German Power Grids Prepare For Thursday’s Solar Eclipse

      his Thursday, a solar eclipse is set to cast a shadow over most of Europe, resulting in a plunge in solar power output.

      According to Reuters, citing Amprion GmbH, which is one of four transmission system operators for electricity in Germany, the solar eclipse could result in a plunge of about 1 gigawatt (GW) in the country.

      Amprion said the solar power generation is expected to dip between 0920 GMT and 1140 GMT on Thursday as the solar eclipse event occurs. During this period, Germany’s four high-voltage grid operators, or TSOs, will have to draw from alternative energy sources such as coal, gas, nuclear, and hydroelectric energy to keep the grid balanced.

      190

      • #
        Serp

        Ha-bloody-ha, a circumstance the EU cannot legislate itself out of.

        130

      • #
        tonyb

        I don’t think the solar eclipse will matter too much here in Devon, around 100 miles from the G7 summit. Its gloomy so no solar power and no wind so no wind power.

        As they want to be green, presumably they will cancel the conference.

        Very mixed feelings about it in this part of the world as the place is rammed with tourists anyway at this time of the year and the access to Carbis Bay is narrow and steep so its a mad place to hold it.

        Strange that everyone seems to be arriving by plane and helicopter so again that form of transport is ok for the elite.

        Mind you, bearing in mind the restrictions surely everyone should be going into quarantine when they arrive and when they go back to their own country.

        Or is it one rule for the plebs and one for the elite again?

        130

        • #
          Saighdear

          Wouldn’t it be lovely if it became very cloudy / misty FOGGY in “Cornwall” on their big day – Sea Haar – a real Pea-souper. Someone sets off a big firecracker – Imagine the Panic. all the “kings” ‘orses and all biden’s men couldn’t put Order together again. and the’red be a lot of Humpty dumpty too! The Gore effect springs to mind.

          40

    • #
      Annie

      The tree surgeon who has been attending to some old and dangerous pine trees here called in to pick up his gear. He says there are many trees down and Kinglake is cut off by them. The wind was very strong around 2.30am and there was heavy rain at that time. It was much quieter by 4.30am. The sound of a quite ordinary wind in the big stove flue could be used as a background sound to footage of the Antarctic! Last night reminded us of our time in North Yorkshire; strong Easterlies there.

      130

    • #
      Dennis

      Yes, but don’t forget that Union controlled Labor saved Victorians from brown coal hazard by shutting down Hazlewood Power Station and 25 per cent of baseload grid electricity lost.

      Isn’t globalism socialism wonderful.

      250

    • #
      Tim C

      The desal plant is turned on often, but only to stop it seizing up.

      00

  • #
    OldOzzie

    Even America now recognises – Follow the money: Big Pharma, Dr. Fauci and the death of hydroxychloroquine

    The $2.45 million Gilead spent in the first quarter of 2020 lobbying the federal government was well spent

    To better understand how using hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) to treat COVID-19 patients last year became a scientific quagmire, it’s always best to follow the money.

    HCQ is cheap (costing under $10 for the course of a COVID-19 treatment), well-understood by physicians having been prescribed for more than 80 years, and can be taken orally. Yet, Dr. Anthony Fauci and others at the National Health Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases preferred remdesivir, a proprietary, intravenous drug manufactured by Gilead Sciences, costing about $3,500 per treatment, with unknown side effects. And as to not make Big Pharma mad — and possibly threaten invites to cocktail parties, board seats and threaten grant monies — Dr. Fauci and his cohorts did everything possible to promote remdesivir and downplay HCQ, possibly costing millions of lives around the globe.

    Although, many doctors around the world were finding success with HCQ, in February 2020 NIH started enrolling patients for a remdesivir COVID-19 trial, with Dr. Fauci overseeing its progress. He had the final say on all the press releases, and presumably was working closely with Gilead. On April 16 something funny happened with the trial — the endpoints of it were quietly changed and updated on the clinicaltrials.gov website. Instead of evaluating remdesivir’s ability to prevent death from COVID-19, the study was redesigned to evaluate how fast a patient recovered from remdesivir.

    260

    • #
    • #
      Ted1

      Now for an explanation of why The Hole in the Ozone Layer is at the South Pole when 90% of the people supposedly causing it reside in the Northern Hemisphere.

      230

      • #
        Raven

        Ozone . . not a “well mixed” gas, then!

        70

        • #
          MP

          If it was would there not be a hole in both ends?

          90

          • #
            Ted1

            Follow the money and find out. A similar story. Proscribing cheap and effective long used chemicals, presumably the replacement chemicals were subject to patents. Very similar chemicals, too. Were they really different, or just “evergreening” patents?

            Then check out the banning of chlordane on the call of the UN. Very much the same story.

            Before that we had 2,4,5-T, where the prohibition forced us to replace a $9 a litre chemical with a $140 a litre chemical.

            150

            • #
              Raven

              Once upon a time (early 80’s) I worked for a commercial pest control company. They were just starting to grapple with the ever increasing restrictions on the use of organochlorines.

              I recall our chief technical officer lamenting that they used to treat housing blocks with Dieldrin (a organochlorine) as an anti termite treatment and would guarantee it’s effectiveness for 30 years. That was a guarantee, not a warranty.

              150

              • #
                David Maddison

                Yes, I believe there was no scientific evidence that the long-lasting inexpensive organochlorine termite treatment they used to use was harmful in any way.

                Vast amounts of property damage has been done as a result of the cessation of that cheap and effective treatment. Instead of a once-only treatment that cost hundreds of dollars a treatment now costs many thousands and only lasts a small number of years.

                Follow the money trail. And the Green useful idiots.

                200

              • #

                …in any way.

                Most profoundly ignorant comment you’ve ever made. Here is a bunch of recent papers

                https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/organochlorine-pesticide

                read them and read the papers they cite and come back and write the same thing.

                018

              • #

                and while you are struggling to show us what that money trail is… check out the toxicology on this reference

                https://geeaye.blogspot.com/2011/08/ddt-msds.html

                015

              • #
                Raving

                DDT had a lot of benefits too. For it’s day it was hugely benefical. In balance it saved more lives than it took. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DDT

                Humanity is better off for having first invented it and subsequently abandoning it’s use. That’s progress. An environmental scientist does not need to be a misanthrope

                24

              • #

                His statement is of this order –

                DM: no evidence that the nuclear energy industry has done any harm in any way.

                Me: Chernobyl

                Raving: nuclear energy and related technologies have done huge good for humanity and anti-nuclear people do not need to be misanthropes.

                I don’t accept this assertion. DM was wrong. There is plenty of evidence of harm. Evidence of good does not make him correct.

                116

              • #
                Raving

                And here I was thinking you were replying to Raven. No matter. DM is more extreme but still pro benefits of pesticide. That is okay

                I am fine with you not accepting the assertion (albeit confused as to which assertion)
                It’s okay if DM was wrong
                Yes I agree that there is plenty of evidence of harm
                Evidence of good need not make him correct.

                Being incorrect is not necessarily a bad thing.
                It’s a flow of events. There are occasions where the direction of evolution are more signifcant than the content involved

                And an environmentalist should not be a misanthrope, albeit that it’s not necessisarily bad. More like an unfortunte constraint

                13

              • #
                Raven

                Oh dear, GA . . settle, petal.

                “The dose makes the poison” – you must have heard the phrase.

                In the Dieldrin usage case I mentioned, the method was to treat the ground (via injection) around the footings once they were poured. It wasn’t sprayed willy nilly on the surface over the entire block.

                It was known to be a cumulative toxin even back in the 80’s and precautions were always taken. Remember too, the technicians of the time were spraying & handling all sorts of other ‘nasty’ chemicals. They and the company was very mindful of the safety aspects.
                As I say, that was forty years ago and I expect those Dieldrin treatments are still doing the job to this day.

                However, if you can point to a paper that reflects ‘damage’ associated with the usage case I outlined, I’d be interested to see it.

                100

              • #
                R.B.

                Epidemiological studies of organochlorine pesticides and endometriosis risk have had inconsistent findings. While 3 studies reported no association, 2 studies found statistically significant positive associations between select OCPs and endometriosis.

                Was that the bit that I was supposed to read to cure my ignorance?

                20

              • #
                robert rosicka

                Your MSDS is rubbish Leaf , it’s may , could and nothing more except it may harm some obscure fish somewhere .

                20

              • #
                greggg

                ‘organochlorine insecticides such as dieldrin have been linked to the increased risk of Parkinson’s disease. By inhibiting an enzyme present in the aldehyde dehydrogenase gene, these insecticides prevent the body from eliminating the chemicals and toxins that boost the likelihood of developing this degenerative neurological disorder. As reported by Healthline.org, dieldrin was particularly notable for increasing this risk sixfold.’

                https://naturalpedia.com/dieldrin-toxicity-side-effects-diseases-and-environmental-impacts.html

                20

              • #

                Dieldrin bioaccumulates and is not targetted. It is bad. Get over it.

                01

              • #

                Raving… reply at this level of nesting does not allow any more nesting of comments unfortunately. I did include the quote from the comment but acknowledge it was a small snippet so needed more info to identify it.

                00

            • #
              another ian

              As a rural reporter of older times explained it –

              A friend of his had a termite problem in his house. As the reporter observed:-

              “We party on things stronger than he can use on his house”

              90

            • #
              tom0mason

              Ted1,
              And as usual with these and many other bannings, not real cost/neefit analysis was does. All too often it was done during times of heightened over-emotional debates where all the facts were missing.
              In such febrile time rationality and logic are sacrificed for immediate action based on ‘feel-good’ emotions.

              20

            • #
              Fran

              I grew up in a house with whitwashed wall sprayed every year with DDT. My parents said that was rhe reason the 3 kittens I got over the years died. BUT, one got distemper, and two were killed by village dogs. Funny how people attribute things.

              When we got headlice, there was a 40lb bag of gammexane (lindane) mum got for the clinic. You took a handfull and rubbed it in your hair. Same for when we got bedbugs comming back from Kashmir after the rains had started, meaning you could not put the bed rolls out in the sun. You took several handfuls and sprinkled them onto sheets and mosquito net.

              NB I am in good health pushing 74, as are my 4 siblings; my parents made it to 96, both of them. A few years ago I read a bunch of the studies (had uni access to full papers rather than abstracts) purporting to show the terrible toxicity of organochlorines. They were crap.

              60

          • #
            tonyb

            There is an ozone hole at the arctic which last year was the largest on record. Both holes are caused by the intense cold.

            60

      • #

        Did you do any research before asking this? Seriously?

        214

      • #
        MrGrimNasty

        The explanation is temperature, not usually low enough up North.

        You do get a thinning in the Arctic sometimes as Raving has posted.

        (I’m not supporting ozone hole theory either way, just giving you the explanation).

        30

    • #
      Craig Thomas

      Hydroxychloroquine isn’t just almost completely useless, it can have very severe side effects and it’s likely to have killed plenty of people who would otherwise have recovered, especially in 3rd-world countries that’ve fallen for the HCQ fake news.

      Remdesivir has been proven to do some good, but it isn’t any kind of magi bullet.

      Almost all of these off-label medicine ideas were just wheezes dreamt up by fantasists, publicity-seekers, trolls and stock-boosters.
      Civilised countries like Australia never fell for them, except for some IQ-depleted individuals like Craig Kelly.

      https://www.bmj.com/content/370/bmj.m2980

      220

      • #

        HCQ is one of the safest drugs with the largest longest record of use. Kelly is a hero. That’s what you meant to say right?

        230

      • #
        Lucky

        HCQ, safe since about 1965 and effective for several medical conditions. But when ‘new evidence’ was presented (Pres Trump mentioned the benefit of use) it was declared dangerous.
        How much of the uselessness and danger was claimed before 2020? Almost none apart from iris risk which is managed by 6 monthly tests. Even the heart arrhythmia problem may be a contrivance. (As posted on this site).

        The slur on Craig Kelly as IQ-depleted- Kelly quotes well credentialed medics and academics, who of course could be wrong but who deserve more cred than CraigThomas and anonymous ‘fact-checkers’.

        120

      • #
        Fran

        Got many doses of the combo chloroquine & daraprim for malaria, as did almost everyone I knew during my teens. I never even heard of anyone complaining about side effects. The CDC followed the money on this one.

        40

      • #
        Ted1

        Craig, that isn’t what Dr Zelenko said!

        20

  • #
    el gordo

    Wuhan Market

    ‘Findings by Chinese and British researchers highlight scale of trade in wild species and the poor conditions in which they were kept.

    ‘The animals on sale include species known to be susceptible to coronaviruses – such as civet cats, mink and raccoon dogs – but not bats or pangolins.’
    (SCMP)

    41

  • #
    Analitik

    Tucker Carlson has a hysterical look at the inexplicable rise of Kamala Harris. The clip includes some shots of the protest banners in Guatemala that “greeted” on arrival for her meeting with the president including one that says
    “Kamala, Trump Won

    https://youtu.be/YomUYWnfAOc

    270

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    • #
      Hanrahan

      If test driving a hybrid take note of retardation with a trailing throttle. The more retardation the larger the hybrid motor thus the more power available when you sink the boot and the more regeneration that occurs and thus better fuel economy.

      My old Camry is not ideal in this regard but I don’t do enough miles for that to be of concern.

      40

    • #
      yarpos

      Good to see the US having options to those massive bloated land barges they call pick ups.

      Sadly we seem to be going the other way, importing some of the US blimps and watching previously functional light trucks slowly turn into blocks of flats.

      40

      • #
        James

        I bought a 1983 Subaru brat here in USA. Had a bull bar and tonneau cover sent from Australia. Painted it to look decent. Then made myself a left hand Brumby. I get a lot of compliments about it. No way was I going to spend $50000 on a gas guzzling pick up when all I wanted is a Ute! All up cost was $5000 plus some time painting.

        10

    • #
      bill

      remember no batteries no run just saying ultimate control?
      world war two gasifier,
      get me a steam engine

      30

    • #
      OldOzzie

      Now this is a Steering Wheelthink about trying to change settings at 300 Km per Hr

      00

  • #
    Hanrahan

    I have just heard that there has been a massive breach of privacy in the US and billions of pass words have been stolen.

    I have no idea if Australian banks’ pass words are stored in the US but I’ll change mine just in case.

    80

  • #
    David Maddison

    People are freezing in Vicdanistan.

    As the power grid is further degraded due to the fanatical obsession with windmills and solar, how are people going to keep warm with some of the world’s most expensive electricity?

    Especially consider:

    -Exploration for gas is banned in the most promising areas.

    -The Left are pushing for installation of gas to be banned in new housing developments or rebuilds of houses in existing areas.

    -The collection of firewood has been banned in many areas plus the Left are pushing to ban wood heaters.

    270

    • #
      Travis T. Jones

      Further evidence that renewables can’t stabilise the climate … or carbon (sic) is not the climate control knob …

      SA leads on [global warming] action as states and territories pick up federal goverment’s slack

      “Coal was phased out in 2016.
      Today the grid is dominated by wind and solar backed up by battery storage and interstate grid connectivity … the powerful G7 group of nations, that they would stop international financing of coal projects in a bid to tackle [global warming] and limit the rise in global temperatures to 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels.”

      https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/national/2021/06/06/south-australia-climate-change/

      80

      • #
        yarpos

        mmmm “interstate grid connectivity” ,powered by?

        mmmm “the grid is dominated by wind and solar” , nemwatch says 47% fossil fuel over the last 3 months and they dont account for the interconnect which is primarily coal. Dominated? more like shared.

        the self delusion continues apace

        70

    • #
      Geoffrey Williams

      ‘Ban on Wood Heaters’ . . .
      Time to go to War !!!
      GeoffW

      30

  • #
    deplorable lord kek

    New study finds that the use of weight-adjusted hydroxychloroquine & azithromycin improved survival of ventilated COVID-19 patients by nearly 200%

    link

    190

  • #
    Hanrahan

    Florida chose freedom over Fauci-ism.

    DeSantis received a rock-star reception at “the largest music festival since the pandemic began”.

    Are we looking at the next President?

    120

    • #
      David Maddison

      I am hoping President Trump will be the next President (as well as being the presently elected one if fraud is discounted).

      DeSantis could be Trump’s VP and then he can be President for the next term with Ted Cruz as VP.

      141

      • #
        Hanrahan

        There is still a large cohort of anti-Trumpers who are unforgiving in their hatred. Hatred towards deSantis? Not so much. The GOP will need every vote they can muster to beat election [email protected]

        What if Trump was House Speaker and launched unending impeachment hearings in the last two years of the O’Biden administration. That’s juicy.

        40

        • #
          Greg Cavanagh

          My previous reply may have disappeared into the ether.
          Too many Republicans worked against Trump, and voted against fair elections. The people are no longer voting for (R).

          Trump has formed his own party called America First. It’s making huge inroads already.

          110

  • #
    el gordo

    Coal fired power stations were invented just in time.

    https://saltbushclub.com/2021/05/15/current-co2-starvation/

    90

  • #
    David Maddison

    Any connection of wind and solar plant to the electricity grid should be interpreted as damage.

    The Australian electrical grid is now so extensively damaged that catastrophic failure will soon occur. The economic damage caused now is extensive. After grid collapse it will be extreme.

    140

    • #
      PeterS

      It would only be interpreted as damage if a terrorist did it. All others are rewarded and given lots of money. Go figure.

      50

      • #
        another ian

        Peter S

        Don’t you call that paying a ransom?

        30

        • #
          PeterS

          Yes that would be more accurate. I find it amazing how so many don’t see the games our governments are playing would be better suited to what a terrorist organisation would do if their goal was to destroy our economy.

          30

  • #

    I’m doing this Series on the future of coal fired power, and I have learned some things along the way.

    All along I’ve been saying that coal fired power has a future, and that has been confirmed, and not just confirmed, but resoundingly confirmed.

    However, the thing I HAVE found out about the most is access to information.

    I can find everything I want virtually at the first attempt when it comes to power generation, having (after doing it for so long now) perfected the art of correct words and phrases for the search engine wording.

    However, this time around, it’s all to do with China, this future for coal fired power, and that search function became more difficult, incredibly so in fact.

    I had to chase down a link, and from that link, if I finally did locate it, I then usually had to follow links within links within links, sometimes getting further away from what I wanted, and sometimes even just ‘stumbling’ across what I wanted.

    It’s not that China is being secretive about all of this, because, after all, I did eventually find the information. It’s just that I kept persevering, when others, and here, that might also include journalists, would have just given up completely. What I have found is that China is saying one thing and doing another, and that really goes along with virtually everything that comes out of China, so why would this power generation subject be any different. It’s just that they make it virtually impossible to find, not the basics, but the actual detail.

    In the end, a Series that I thought might take six days to find the information and then write about it has taken me almost four weeks now, and I still have the text to write for the last part.

    Every step of the way was difficult, and in fact, eye opening.

    Some of (well, all of them) the biggest electrical equipment manufacturers have large state of the art operations in China, and strict technology sharing procedures in place, and if you think coal fired power is dying, these Companies will see that never happens. And, when you track down information then from those Companies, you’ll see that it’s not just China where coal fired power is being constructed. It’s everywhere, at all points of the globe, the latest technology in coal fired power. India is following China, only years behind them, and plants are opening up everywhere, not just in those two Countries, but in places you might not even consider.

    Those ‘majors’ in power generation are not just resting on what they have, but proceeding down the path of further technological advances in fact. If there was no future, they would be getting out ….. fast, but not only is that not happening, but they are opening up new plants faster than you can search for them on the internet.

    Anyway, I still have this last part to write about, but here’s an image for all of you to look at. This is the latest tech Advanced UltraSuperCritical plant just opened up six Months back now, and this is the Pingshan Two plant in Huaibei City, Anhui Province in China.

    This is a single 1350MW Unit. The generator is in the foreground, and that’s the round structure with the green pipes coming out of it. The larger round structure behind the generator is the steam turbine. I sort of ironically noted the subliminal factor in all this, of painting a (sarc) dirty black filthy coal fired monstrosity (/sarc) in a nice cream colour.

    Now, while this is a plant with a single Unit, most operations that will open next will be two Unit plants, using 660MW generators or 800MW generators. Plants utilising this A-USC technology will emit 30% LESS CO2 than an equivalent size older technology plant that we are operating here in Australia.

    Coal fired power is booming, only not in the ‘Western World’, and not that you will ever hear about it.

    Oh, and that single 1350MW unit is a bit more than three times the Nameplate of Macarthur Wind Plant, and will generate nine times the power and will last twice as long.

    Tony.

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    • #
      PeterS

      Yes but it was know for a long time that coal fired power generation was booming only in non-Western nations using this site, which ironically is very anti-coal. When you uncheck all but the last two boxes, it becomes pretty obvious what’s really happening around the world. Over 550 coal fired power stations are either under construction or are given the go-ahead to be built. The West is committing economic suicide. Much of the non-Western world must think we are complete fools. The other point to make regardless of whether our “leaders” know or don’t know all this is happening, they are negligent to the point of being guilty of terrorising their own people via economic means. They ought to be put on trial for economic war crimes against the West people.

      140

      • #
        Craig Thomas

        Don’t be ridiculous. A few tin-pot countries still in thrall to corrupt fossil-fuel money are saddling their taxpayers with expensive electricity.

        The rest of the world have moved way beyond coal already.

        If you compare retired v. operating v. construction you can see coal is being phased out, something only a fantasist would be in denial of.

        015

    • #
      William Astley

      Hi Tony,

      I am looking forward to your article on advanced coal fired power plants in China. China will have/has the cheapest electricity in the World and the fastest growing economy in the world.

      China’s plan is we destroy our economies fighting CAGW, covid, and critical race theory and the long list of pointless no win, fights of the week/month/year. We are running out of time. Month by month there is an organized increase in worldwide censorship. The US is visible failing. Executing plans that will not work.

      60

  • #
    David Maddison

    Australia’s fanatical obsession with windmills even extends to our Antarctic bases.

    Even so, there were two windmills at Mawson Station but in 2017 “one of the turbines suffered a critical failure and is no longer operational”. What they don’t dare tell you is that it literally fell over.

    No costs are disclosed but I would be surprised if they are actually saving any money compared to diesel generation (remember, we will be talking about “special government prices”, they probably got royally ripped off on the price of the windmill) although Antarctica is somewhere where wind power is likely to be possibly feasible if done properly and for an acceptable cost (not special government prices).

    https://www.antarctica.gov.au/antarctic-operations/stations/amenities-and-operations/renewable-energy/wind-power/

    70

  • #
    Lance

    Just fiddling around a bit on the question of “Does enough Lithium exist to satisfy EV and Grid requirements”.
    It is a rational question, what with every Pol in the world demanding EVs, Grid Batteries and such.

    Using US data because that’s available to me. Links on request. About 4 or 5 of them.

    Metallic Lithium requires 5.3 units of ore per unit of metal. Ie, 5.3 tons of ore per ton of Lithium.

    Lithium Batteries provide 10 kWh/Kg lithium metal in storage capacity. Cobalt cathode model. Or N-I-A alternate.
    World Lithium reserves are approx 9.9 x 10 ^ 9 kg (2010 est.)

    US has 287 million passenger and light truck vehicles. A Nissan Leaf has a 24 kwh battery and a Tesla has an 82 kwh battery. If the 2 are averaged and assumed to cover the US fleet, absent heavy trucks, the US needs 287 million 53 kwh batteries or 2.21 x 10 ^ 9 kg of lithium. About 20% of world reserves.

    US uses some 13 million barrels of oil per day for transportation. In electric units, that is 926 Gw of energy in 24 hrs or 3.86 x 10^7 kwh every hour of every day. US generation base is 1078 GW capacity, 834 GW coal/gas/oil. In 2020, US provided some 4 TWh of delivered power.

    If the US goes full wind/solar, equally loaded, it needs 3,352 GW of nameplate wind/solar to offset the carbon based generation based on CF of .3 for wind and .2 for solar. And it needs an additional 3,000 GW of capacity to power the EV fleet if they are to charge in 8 hours. To provide 25% of stored power for 7 days (arbitrary, but not ridiculous) US needs 1.9 x 10^9 kg for grid power storage and 5.24 x 10^8 kg lithium to store EV power for a total of 4.6 x 10^9 kg lithium metal. Approx 50% of world reserves.

    Assuming 50% recycling of lithium, in 8 to 10 years, US would need another 25% of world lithium reserves.

    So, yes, there is enough lithium for the US, but not including anyone else, and that for maybe 20 years. Assuming Zero Cobalt is used and the Nickle-Iron-Aluminum cathodes replace the cobalt and work as advertised. Otherwise, the cobalt runs out first.

    This also assumes that the 35% of lithium ores used for lubricants, ceramics, etc, are satisfied by “something else”.

    It also assumes some 467,000 miles of transmission lines, 10,000 substations, etc, will miraculously appear.

    Unless I’ve made serious errors, it appears the mr. Biden* will not achieve zero carbon by 2030 because it isn’t possible. Not selling my XOM stocks just yet.

    PS: The only viable US Boron-Lithium mine is being blocked by environmentalists because 10 acres of buckwheat is deemed threatened. It takes decades to get permits for Hydro or nuclear, so those won’t save us. Even if nuclear were allowed at 1 GW/unit, the only source of forgings for the pressure vessel is Japan and that is limited to 10/year. So to go Nuclear, the US would need the next 100 years of production just for the pressure vessels. Nuke plants are about 10 years from initial construction to completion because of lawsuits, NRC changes, cost and time over runs, so that doesn’t help, either. I guess we’ll all either cook or freeze, depending on who is correct about the climate. I’d suggest we’ll all go broke and starve first if these idiots have their way.

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      MP

      Don’t need batteries when you have pumped Hydro. Fill the boot with water and run it through a turbine and pump it back into the boot, never ending power.

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      • #
        Lance

        To have hydro, you need a reservoir at usable elevation and a source of water.

        Tell me. Where do you get that combination, that hasn’t already been used or subsequently already closed?

        Where do you get the energy to pump that water back into the boot?

        No significant hydro has been built in North America in over 45 years. In 2019, 90 dams of various size were removed for environmental reasons.

        Neverending power, eh? Convince me of how that is going to happen. Ever.

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        • #
          MP

          Naa that can’t be right, the government told me pumped hydro is like a big battery Malcom said so
          The boot is the reservoir, you pump through the turbine discharge back to the boot, unlimited, its just scaled down snowy hydro 2 and we know the whole country will run off that alone.

          Your ability to detect sarcasm needs topping up

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          • #
            Lance

            So, you are telling us that if we’d be smart enough to pump the water into the boot fast enough, we’d have more power than we started with?

            That’s amazing. Wish I’d thunk of it first.

            50

            • #
              MP

              No I am not telling us, I am telling you. I am not taking credit for this brilliant concept, Malcom Turnbull came up with it first and he deserves full credit for this clever plan.

              Clever plan #2 of Malcom’s, The New Subs which will not be run on fossil fuel (2050 compliant) but on Whale oil. This has created a massive industry in QLD, where we capture Whales in our nets (cleverly disguised as shark nets, whales are not as clever as Malcom) and tow them back to SeaWorld for processing and storage.
              The new subs will have Whale capture and processing facilities on board, so will be able to harvest and process to stay at sea indefinitely, food will from the whale flesh and the crew will be made up of predominately Japanese and some westerners who smoke Cob Pipes. Vitamins will be obtained from spinach grown on deck and from canned supplies.
              Whale teeth will be scrimshawed by the crew and sold in the gift shop at SeaWorld.

              Got rid of Malcom and installed Captain Covid, dumbest move ever!

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              • #
                Lance

                If you place a large funnel behind the propellers of the subs, then route it back to some pumps in the engine room with a big pipe, and do it fast enough, then you won’t even need the whale oil. Amazing. Pity the twits didn’t think of it sooner. Think of how many whales would have been saved. If we’d only put mirrors in front of light bulbs, we could shove the light into yesterday and make night like day. There’s no seeming end to the wonders that science has failed to see properly. You know, we just might have a booming business opportunity here. Think of all that wasted energy behind the jet aircraft that could be moved into their inlet nacelles with a simple pipe? I mean, that’s got to double or triple their range, eh?

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              • #
                MP

                Lance, this clever plan #2, has another purpose, it will prevent sea level rise. Studies show and scientists say that the sea level is rising due to the increase in whale population, through displacement. Malcom’s brilliance has factored this in.
                I like your thought process, but if it would work, Malcom would of come up with it first!
                Are you really Scot Morrison, still hanging off Malcom’s shirt tails?

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              • #
                MP

                Lance, NSW are poaching. They took our Jobbs.
                I would call NSW police but they are having a “conference” in Mullumbimby. I would call Vic police but they are busy bashing the rights out of everyone. I would call QLD police but they are all busy with the Car borrowing crew in our catch and release program.

                Are you busy?

                https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-06-08/breaching-whale-lands-on-boat-on-nsw-far-south-coast/100197626

                50

          • #
            Robdel

            You have discovered a perpetual motion machine. Please learn some thermodynamics before mimicking Malcolm.

            10

            • #
              MP

              I don’t need thermodynamics, I have my imagination and a picture of Malcom. (may peace be upon him)

              50

    • #
      David Maddison

      Here are some calculations for the US on the infeasibilty of building pumped hydro as a big battery for ruinable energy.

      The US is better placed than many countries due to the large availability of mountainous landscapes but the numbers still don’t work out, and in any case, throughout the world, all reasonably usable hydro sites are already exploited except in Tibet where the Chicomms are working hard to build more, and in the process control the water supply for most of Asia.

      https://dothemath.ucsd.edu/2011/11/pump-up-the-storage/

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    • #
      Ross P

      Lance
      Some UK engineers did similar investigations for cobalt for the replacement of the UK petrol and diesel vehicles. They found they would need TWO TIMES the current world production of cobalt just for the UK.

      70

      • #
        Lance

        Yeah, I’m just doodling. End result is “It Ain’t Gonna Happen, Mate”.

        So, why is anyone letting the Pollies waste everyone’s time and money on something that’ll never work out?

        Even reasonable people ought be stocking up on rope, oil, tar, feathers, beams, shackles, yokes, and such, eh?

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      • #
        Raving

        Problem in lack of cobalt reserves? I don’t think so. Until recently the metal was considered a waste product of mining other things. There was only a small market for cobalt before the EV rush

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cobalt,_Ontario

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    • #
      yarpos

      In Australia it has taken 50 years to decide on a 2nd airport for Sydney and break ground, and it still a long way off. I cant imagine what a nuclear power plant would require. I will never see one, that much is for certain.

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      • #
        Hasbeen

        It will probably be finished, if ever for jet fuel to be banned, & all air transport grounded.

        10

    • #
      Chad

      Lance
      June 10, 2021 at 10:44 am · Reply
      Just fiddling around a bit on the question of “Does enough Lithium exist to satisfy EV and Grid requirements”.

      World Lithium reserves are approx 9.9 x 10 ^ 9 kg (2010 est.)

      “According the US Geological Survey (USGS), there are around 80 million tonnes of identified reserves globally as of 2019. “
      https://www.nsenergybusiness.com/features/six-largest-lithium-reserves-world/

      And from Wiki…
      “The total lithium content of seawater is very large and is estimated as 230 billion tonnes,…”

      So, i dont think we need panic about running out just yet !

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  • #
    MP

    I read previously that the Morrison gruberment had doubled its share holding in Big Pharma, I think it was just before the not a vaccine was announced. While searching for that, I came across these.

    https://independentaustralia.net/politics/politics-display/morrisons-anti-accountability-vaccine-gets-l-np-off-scott-free,14604

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Sharma

    Why would you trust the Pharmaceutical industry.
    https://www.theguardian.com/business/2018/sep/25/pharmaceutical-industry-donates-millions-to-both-australian-political-parties

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  • #
    Greg in NZ

    On your/their/they BoM’s homepage yesterday was a link to a video with part of the title being:

    “Australia cold, snow and flood”.

    DEN!ERS! The 3 cardinal sins of the cult of CCC – unless carbon dioxide is now capable of causing a ‘negative reality inversion’ or sumpfink. Time to wax up yer skis!

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  • #
    David Maddison

    NUREMBERG-style TRIALS

    There is no excuse to believe in the anthropogenic global warming fraud as even with a censored Internet such as with the social(ist) media, the truth is quite easy to find.

    Therefore anybody who is a willful participant in the fraud should be considered guilty as a contributor to the destruction of Western Civilisation by means of destruction of the power grids to weaken the West and empower China.

    SIMILARLY, we know there are simple, effective, cheap, non-“vaccine” treatments of C-19. There have been from even before there was a vaccine even available. As a result of governments such as Australia’s banning those treatments many people died unnecessary. Even if treatments such as HCQ were ineffective, after decades of experience they were known to be safe.

    Those who participated in banning HCQ and similar treatments ought to be held PERSONALLY responsible for the deaths of people who died because they were denied access to such treatments. Again, the information was and is out there, they cannot claim:

    We didn’t know.

    All those who participated or continue to participate in either (or both) frauds, should be prosecuted and severely punished if found guilty.

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    • #
      Lance

      We were only following orders. Now. Show me your papers. /sarc off

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      • #
        Greg Cavanagh

        And now in newspeak…. “We were following the science”.

        50

      • #
        yarpos

        We are edging ever closer to the vax passport. It will be an everyday requirement before you know it.

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        • #
          shortie of greenbank

          for some. warning shots have been fired in this idea as some businesses in south east qld have banned vaccinated people from being allowed entry to site.

          They have a good excuse that if someone does have an adverse reaction to the vaccine collapsing at that location or the vaccine does still allow viral shed and someone catches wu-flu from the vaccinated then all liability is held by the shop owner the insurance companies will take no liability for it.

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    • #
      Lance

      The Indian Bar Association has taken legal action against the World Health Organization’s (WHO) Chief Scientist Dr. Soumya Swaminathan for her role in spreading disinformation and suppressing data on the use of Ivermectin to treat COVID-19.

      https://greatgameindia.com/india-legal-notice-who-ivermectin/

      They further stated that Swaminathan, in her statements against the use of Ivermectin, ignored research and clinical trials from two organizations—the Front Line COVID-19 Critical Care (FLCCC) Alliance and the British Ivermectin Recommendation Development (BIRD)—who have presented solid data showing ivermectin prevents and treats COVID-19.

      “Dr. Soumya Swaminathan has ignored these studies/reports and has deliberately suppressed the data regarding effectiveness of the drug Ivermectin, with an intent to dissuade the people of India from using Ivermectin,”

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  • #
    David Maddison

    I just purchased a new book although I haven’t read it yet:

    Green Tyranny: Exposing the Totalitarian Roots of the Climate Industrial Complex

    by Rupert Darwall

    For a review, also see:

    https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2017/11/29/delingpole-the-great-global-warming-scam-began-with-the-nazis/

    If you really want to understand the great global warming scam you must listen to my podcast this week with Rupert Darwall.

    In his new book Green Tyranny, Darwall tells a story so extraordinary and implausible that it’s no wonder most of the mainstream media has been too scared to touch it.

    The bottom line: it all started with the Nazis.

    Yes, I know. It sounds so click-baity, doesn’t it?

    That’ll be why even those journals and writers that have reviewed the book favorably have tended to steer clear of the key chapter in Darwall’s book. The one mischievously titled ‘Europe’s First Greens’.

    Europe’s First Greens were, of course, the Nazis.

    The documentary evidence provided by Darwall is irrefutable, for this is a considered, well-researched and scholarly work not a potboiler.

    What Darwall demonstrates is that the ideology driving the current climate scare originated in Hitler’s Germany.

    Angela Merkel’s Energiewende, the brainwashing of your kids in school with green propaganda, the Climate Industrial Complex, the black outs in South Australia, Solyndra, Obama promising that electricity prices would “necessarily skyrocket”, the bat-chomping bird-slicing eco-crucifixes destroying a skyline near you, the real reason Trump just had to pull the U.S. out of the Paris climate accord – it’s all basically the fault of the Nazis.

    That’s because Nazis – though similar in so many ways to their fellow totalitarians the Communists – had at least one major point of difference with Marxist ideology: they feared and loathed industrial progress and they worshipped nature.

    Hitler wrote in Mein Kampf:

    When man attempts to rebel against the iron logic of Nature, he comes into struggle with the principles to which he himself owes his existence as a man.

    The Fuhrer, in other words, was as big a Gaia worshipper as even Naomi Klein or Emma Thompson or Leonardo di Caprio.

    As Hitler thought, so did the Nazi intelligentsia. Many of them were vegetarians and, like Rudolf Hess and Agriculture Minister Walter Darre were big fans of organic farming. The party was fiercely anti-smoking (even though the Germans continued to smoke fanatically so long as tobacco was available). They were also massively into “renewable” energy, especially wind, tidal power and hydroelectric.

    Hitler said in a dinner party conversation in 1941:

    “We shall have to use every method of encouraging whatever might ensure us the gain of a single kilowatt…Coal will disappear one day.”

    He then speculated on renewable solutions to this ‘peak coal’ problem:

    “The future belongs, surely, to water – to the wind and the tides.”

    (This isn’t mentioned in the book but Hitler’s favorite SS commando – Otto Skorzeny – who miraculously survived the war and retired to live in Spain spent his later years campaigning on behalf of the wind industry.)

    Darwall doesn’t mince his words:

    The Nazis’ profound hostility to capitalism and their identification with nature-politics led them to advocate green policies half a century before any other political party. As an approximation, subtract Nazi race-hate, militarism and desire for world conquest, and Nazi ideology ends up looking not dissimilar to today’s environmental movement.

    What Darwall goes on to demonstrate is how this mindset, unabated by the defeat of Nazi Germany, continued to dominate European political thought. This was especially so in the two countries most responsible for promulgating the climate change scare: Sweden and Germany.

    In Germany, the Nazis’ green ideology became linked inextricably with that of the Peace movement – which, with a certain irony, was largely sponsored by the Soviet Union.

    Sweden, meanwhile, did most to get the global warming scare up and running in the early days. Bert Bolin, the first chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was a Swede.

    You’ll have to read Darwall’s book for the full, rather complicated story. By the end you’ll have an answer to perhaps the most puzzling of the many questions about the global warming industry: why, given the scientific evidence is so flimsy, does it carry on pushing its cause so fervently?

    The answer is simple: because “global warming” is not about “the science” and never was about “the science.”

    Like the “acid rain” scare and the “nuclear winter” scare, the man-made global warming scare is a fake news story designed to push a political and economic agenda.

    At the bottom of that agenda is the same superstitious fear the Nazis had: that industrial progress is morally wrong because it is against Nature.

    Hence the greenies’ obsession with renewables. Despite all the evidence that renewables do at least as much environmental damage as fossil fuels, only much more expensively, and without making any meaningful difference to “climate change” the green ideology persists in pretending that renewables are the “clean” “natural” alternative to “dirty” fossil fuels.

    It’s about emotion not logic; about the narrative, not reality.

    For decades we’ve been gulled by a compliant (and invariably ignorant) media into believing that the global warming scare is about scientists doing clever sciencey stuff and reaching important conclusions which the world can only ignore at its peril.

    But actually, all along, the tail has been wagging the dog.

    The scientists are a virtual irrelevance in this story: merely the useful idiots of a political agenda.

    That agenda is part religion – a kind of pagan nature worship expressed through opposition to Western industrial civiliation and the embrace of retrograde technologies like wind power.

    And it’s part leftist politics and economics: a way by which Europe can destroy and overtake the United States’ economic hegemony by neutralising one of its greatest competitive advantages – the abundance of fossil fuels which have now made it the world’s number one energy superpower.

    Donald Trump probably hasn’t a clue about the intellectual and ideological undercurrents which created the great global warming scare. But he’s a businessman and saw what was happening through gut instinct.

    Global warming is a scam – the biggest the world has ever seen.

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    • #
      Lance

      Yeah, Sweden kicked things up. But. Saint Greta got her comeuppance from Sky News:

      https://www.facebook.com/paul.alexander.7355079/videos/4054095118013148

      Basically, child abuse by her parents with a response by an adult.

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      • #
        Analitik

        At some stage, she will catch on and with her type of autism, she will be demanding from her parents, “HOW DARE YOU???!!!”

        40

    • #
      MP

      Rupert has a new book out, much the same as the old book. I think he just replaced the word Climate with Covid.

      20

    • #
      Lucky

      The thesis is correct, worth observing tho’ that this nature worship thing is quite old. It was a big part of the central European Germanic Volk-culture and first written down in the middle ages. It is essentially feudalist- respect for rank, the baron in the castle, his servants, with the serfs having to obey and suffer.

      10

  • #
    shortie of greenbank

    Dr Jennifer Marohasy’s special on the reef ‘Finding Porites’ airs at 13:00 AEST today, or in just under 2 hours from the time of this post on the IPA youtube channel. Hopefully this link works for you.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZENS9xyK1a8

    80

  • #
    David Maddison

    QUEENSLAND

    Another pumped hydro big battery fantasy project, at taxpayer expense of course.

    https://www.pv-magazine-australia.com/2021/06/08/1-gw-pumped-hydro-project-progresses-in-queensland-state-minister-pushes-for-deserved-federal-contribution/

    Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said the Borumba Dam pumped hydro project has the potential to be the state’s largest pumped hydro station. Borumba Dam has long been considered a prime location for a pumped hydro facility, with University of Queensland energy expert, Professor Simon Bartlett, identifying the site as ideal more than five years ago. Indeed, Premier Palaszczuk said her government is “prioritising” Borumba because of its existing dam infrastructure, land access and location within the Southern Queensland Renewable Energy Zone.

    In light of last month’s Callide power station fire and subsequent blackout, the project seems to have taken on new urgency. Minister for Energy, Renewables and Hydrogen, Mick de Brenni, said the May crisis “proved” the importance of having pumped hydro as part of a diversified energy mix. “We were able to ramp up the Wivenhoe Hydroelectric Station to provide critical generation support and stabilise the network,” de Brenni said.

    At 1 GW, Borumba would have double the generation and triple the storage of Wivenhoe, he added. The minister believes that if Borumba moves ahead, the Commonwealth should contribute to the capital cost.

    “We’re talking about nation building infrastructure,” de Brenni said. “Every other state has had energy projects built by the Commonwealth – Queenslanders deserve their share.”

    Queensland Treasurer Cameron Dick said the funds slated for making business case at Borumba would include detailed engineering and design, hydrological modelling, geological testing, an assessment of environmental impacts and community consultation. “We’re investing $22 million to potentially unlock a multi-billion-dollar construction project that would leverage billions more in clean energy investment and support thousands of jobs,” the treasurer said.

    State-owned electricity transmission company Powerlink has been tasked with undertaking the business case, “given its understanding of the electricity market and experience delivering very large infrastructure,” the Queensland government’s media release said.

    The business case is expected to take up to 24 months, with a submission expected in the second half of 2023.

    (SEE LINK FOR REST)

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    • #
      Lance

      I’m unsure of Queensland’s process for Environmental Impact Studies, Permitting, Public discussions, enviro lawfare, construction timeframes, etc, but if they remotely resemble US cases, it will be decades before Borumba will ever see the light of day, if at all.

      Borumba isn’t an answer within any living adult’s lifetime. It is window dressing for politicians who will be long gone from office before the average citizen understands just how badly they’ve been tricked.

      Queensland’s economy will crash long before Borumba is ever built.

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      • #
        shortie of greenbank

        If I remember rightly Borumba had been often slated for expansion (it could be upgraded to make the South East’s biggest dam, Wivenhoe, to look small) since at least the 80s. This has failed, due to concerns of wall construction and geological stability in the area. Not sure why this would no longer be an issue only when the next Green Useless Thing (GUT) comes along?

        If Borumba can be expanded as previously hoped for water storage then I am all the more supportive of the idea… but for pumped hydro?

        50

    • #
      MP

      State-owned electricity transmission company Powerlink has been tasked with undertaking the business case, “given its understanding of the electricity market and experience delivering very large infrastructure,” the Queensland government’s media release said.

      And the CEO of power link is….. https://www.linkedin.com/in/simon-bartlett-4aab1174/?originalSubdomain=au

      Straight into detailed design, skipped a few costly steps like feasibility to save the taxpayer some coin.

      30

    • #
      Raving

      Nothing wrong with pumped hydro. It’s just another form of sloppy storage.

      The fantasy is in pretending to be like Niagra Falls

      12

    • #
      Ronin

      Let’s hope it doesn’t turn into a debacle like the illfated Traveston dam, the $600,000,000 wasted on it would come in handy to kick this project off.

      20

  • #
  • #
    Robber

    Wild and cold weather last night, and AEMO peak generation was 31,700 MW. Solar zero, wind 16%.
    Earlier in the week the peak was around 28,000 MW.

    70

  • #
    Philip

    New Wokeland (formerly New Zealand) is pressuring Aus to stop subsidy of fossil fuels. All we need is an ALP government and this will be done, or 5 years and the Liberals will do it themselves.

    Does anybody ever consider the world is fed by diesel ?

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    • #
      Dennis

      I did some fact checking yesterday, the subsidies these Kiwi Labour clowns refer to are part of our taxation system and most developed nations also allow businesses to deduct expenses incurred during the course of business activities resulting in revenue before taxable income is calculated after deductions legally allowed.

      And the fuel tax rebate is for off road applications, fuel tax being a road maintenance revenue source so logically reimbursed for fuel used in all off-road applications, mining and farming, generators, etc.

      As Senator Matt Caravan stated recently, much to the annoyance of opposition MPs, Australia does not subsidise fossil fuels.

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      • #
        Philip

        Oh ok. So they want them to end the tax rebate for agriculture and mining. Clowns.

        Come to think of it I actually doubt even a Labor government would even do that. I don’t think it would go down that well. Still you never know these days.

        20

      • #
        Analitik

        Yes, pretty much all of the “subsidies” for fossil fuels are in the form of tax rebates so the underlying business has to be profitable for there to be any benefit.

        Contrast this to the absolute gifts provided to renewable energy projects and operations where the subsidies are what keeps their light on.

        The one major exception to all of this is the shale oil industry in the US which is not profitable and survives on debt. The subsidy here is provided through lie interest rates which keeps debt payments from being crippling so through refinancing, the can gets kicked down the road.

        40

  • #
    Dennis

    If the anti-coal lobby was right claiming that coal will soon become a stranded asset with no markets, how will the recently commissioned, the under construction and the planned for construction coal fired power stations even around Asia Pacific and Africa be fuelled considering their minimum of 50 year working life extended over 80 years if well maintained.

    Net zero emissions by 2050 or earlier according to the leftists.

    And when will qualified people speak out loudly and publicly about Carbon Dioxide (CO2) not being Carbon (C), and CO2 not being “pollution” but is essential for life on Earth?

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    • #

      If the anti-coal lobby was right claiming that coal will soon become a stranded asset with no markets…..

      Oh dear!

      Look at this image first, at this link. This shows the Coal Forecast Demand over the next Decade, and here’s a short test for you. See if you can find the U.S. on that pie chart.

      Now look at the image at this link. This shows known current coal reserves, and note at the top left, this is in ….. BILLION tonnes.

      Note also which Country has the largest current known deposits. Note also that this same Country is the fourth largest coal exporter on the Planet.

      We’re The Hekawi Tribe. We think you anti coal hypocrites speak with forked tongue. (Umm, am I still allowed to say that?)

      Tony.

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      • #
        Raving

        Africa at 26 billion tons looks to be unexplored. Don’t they have some huge newly discovered peat bogs there? Perhaps more coal neglected than coal poor

        LAM at 15 billion tons. Given the Amazon, its an extremely poor continent. No sunken assets

        30

      • #
        Craig Thomas

        Seeing as your links exclude any contextual data up to and including any legends as what the diagram is supposed to represent, what you’ve written tells us nothing useful.

        Essentially what you’re telling us is, “Some random images I found on some random person’s random blog appear to be incorrect, and also, let’s all use a couple of sparse data points to jump to unwarranted conclusions”.

        Shoop-de-doo, Tony. Why don’t you use the IEA or some other relevant professional body?

        How about:
        “Given that the combined coal consumption of the European Union and the United States now represents around 10% of global coal use, further declines in those markets will have a limited effect at a global level.”
        https://www.iea.org/reports/coal-2020

        08

        • #
          Annie

          Haven’t seen you for a long time Craig. Did you get out of bed on tbe wrong side this morning?

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      • #
        Kalm Keith

        They, the Hekawis lived very near the F’Kawis, only separated by two miles of thick jungle in which they all frequently became lost.

        30

    • #
      Philip

      Net Zero by just about every western nation these days. Absolute nonsense and the term gets thrown about liberally.

      40

      • #
        Hanrahan

        Was feudal England “carbon neutral”? medieval cows still burped and farted.

        30

        • #
          another ian

          H

          “There are 94 million head of cattle in the US.”

          Which supposedly have to be replaced by bugs to save the planet.

          “Once there were 50-to-100 million buffalo, they were the most numerous large mammals to ever exist… | by David Bunnell | Medium

          So the last time there were 100 million bovines in America, CO2 levels were very low and earth was experiencing the coldest period of the last 10,000 years – but this time they are causing out of control global warming.”

          https://realclimatescience.com/2021/05/let-them-eat-bugs/

          Now into which paddock do you expect those medieval cattle to be drafted?

          20

  • #
    David Maddison

    According to Newtonian gravitation the force of gravity propagates instantaneously.

    According to Einstein gravity and gravitational waves propagate at the speed of light.

    Einstein was proven correct during the GW 170817 gravitational wave event when any difference between the speed of light and speed of gravity would have been less than 1 part in about 10^15.

    Just sayin’…

    10

    • #
      Analitik

      The Newtonian gravitational theory is an approximation of Einstein’s theory of General Relativity.
      Now the challenge is to describe the graviton in the Standard Model

      10

      • #
        David Maddison

        In the normal chart of the Standard Model, it has been assigned a place as a tensor boson, right next to the scalar boson, the Higgs particle. Obviously, it hasn’t been worked out how it fits in or even if it exists, but it does have the space made available for it.

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          Analitik

          Yep, it has been given a place but a falsifiable theoretical description that gets around the renormalization inherent in QCD is beyond our best minds atm (String theories are not falsifiable )

          00

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    Dennis

    I recall reading a few years ago that an electricity grid cannot cope with more than 30 per cent input from wind and solar sources of energy and by that intermittent and unreliable input level back up generators, batteries and other support is essential to avoid destabilising the grid.

    Does anybody have a link or other information please?

    20

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      Ronin

      I notice that Norfolk Island has diesel and solar generation, they have to keep a minimum of 30% participation by the diesels to maintain control of their grid.

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    • #
      Greg Cavanagh

      Either do a Google search for those words, or search TonyFromOz’s comments on this site (don’t know how you do that). But that has been a much discussed subject on many forums over the years.

      40

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      Robber

      Look at SA in OpenNEM.
      On average in SA 19% solar, 41% wind, gas and diesel and iports/exports to Vic to balance demand.
      To ensure demand is met that peaks around 2,500 MW, or up to 3,000 MW in summer, they have 3,200 MW of gas and diesel generators, and a big 500 MW power cord from Victoria.
      Wind nameplate is 2,200 MW, so on average about 650 MW, and solar peaks around midday at about 1,000 MW.

      20

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      Lance

      Not sure there’s a “link” that explains it, but the overall concept is:

      Thermal ( coal, gas, nuke, and to some extent hydropower ) generation provides the baseload grid power as well as the frequency synchronization signal that the wind/solar inverters need in order to couple to the grid.

      Thermal power has about 20 to 25% redundant capacity in order to compensate for other thermal units being off line for maintenance or emergencies.

      Thermal power “backs up” ALL of the wind and solar intermittency, as well as providing the voltage and frequency stabilization that solar/wind cannot provide.

      Solar/Wind do not provide voltage or frequency support. They merely offset fuel costs for thermal generation or water availability for hydropower. In short, solar/wind do not provide anything the grid needs except for a possible reduction in fuel costs.

      Therefore, when solar/wind generation exceeds the available thermal reserve power generation capacity, they effectively act to destabilize the entire grid. That means 20% to 30% of generation capacity.

      Once this threshold is exceeded, there is no way to guarantee a stable grid. It is a roll of the dice.

      Without specialized, expensive, power electronics, solar/wind inverters can never provide reactive power or frequency stabilization. Even with them, they cannot engage the grid without the synchronous plant frequency signal existing prior to engagement for safety and stability reasons.

      The idea that intermittent generators can replace synchronous generators is borne out of ignorance, stupidity, cupidity, malice or madness. A grid scale power system in the real world and the theoretical world, is ultimately subservient to the loads attached to the grid. The synchronous generators follow the load, the intermittent generators follow the synchronous generators, and the whole thing collapses in seconds to minutes if there is an imbalance between power demand and power supplied at frequency and at voltage. Grid safeties disengage the synchronous power plants if the frequency varies by more than about 0.2 to 0.5 Hz (50Hz system) or if voltages sag or surge more than about 6%. In emergencies, frequency can span -3 Hz to +2 Hz but only for short durations, seconds. see:
      https://www.researchgate.net/publication/324774696_Review_of_Voltage_and_Frequency_Grid_Code_Specifications_for_Electrical_Energy_Storage_Applications

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      • #
        Hanrahan

        In a previous life I knew about analogue TV. You may remember one of your own where you had to adjust both horizontal and vertical stability.

        The thing was you didn’t adjust either to match the actual frame or line frequency, you adjusted them to be a lille slower but as the decaying voltage approached the point where it would reverse a sync pulse in the received signal would cause a reverse a little sooner – every time – so your picture was stable.

        I strongly believe this synchronisation is still what happens, in principle, with all inverters be they rooftop PV or windmill driven.

        If the synchronise output is so little it may be lost at the extremities of the grid and inverters start free-running. From there it’s like herding cats.

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      Chad

      ??.. it cannot be a technical limitation because there are several grids around the world that operate with 50+%. Wind & Solar input.
      Our own S Australia is a prime example,
      Germany another.
      But it depends on your definition of “destabilising” ?
      Even a minor % of unreliable generation introduces a certain level of uncertainty.!
      They do have “backup” available from FF generators, but do often run with high % W & S without self destructing !…or destabilising the grid

      02

      • #
        Lance

        50+% of what Chad?

        Assuming you mean intermittent generators, Germany survives because Norway is their buffer. Without Norway’s Hydropower, Germany would have no way to back up their intermittent generators and no way to offload their excess wind/solar when that circumstance arises.

        S. Australia depends upon the Vic interconnector and blind luck to survive. Other generators back up South Au intermittents.

        Your 2 examples do not define the rest of the world who do not have Norway or Interconnectors to back up the folly.

        Suggest you investigate: Grid Reliability. Frequency Stability. Voltage Stability. Cascading Collapse by frequency and voltage induced failure.

        Not all electrons are equal. They are only equal if they arrive at the exact instant and frequency that the connected load demands. Otherwise, they are disruptive and dangerous.

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        • #
          Craig Thomas

          What a load of tosh. Germany and Norway got their first interconnect 2 months ago.

          And the recent disconnection of the SA – VIC interconnect resulted in the biggest impact in VIC, considering SA is a net exporter of electricity and it’s been setting the price (when the interconnect is available) due to its plentiful supply.
          https://ieefa.org/south-australias-renewable-heavy-grid-now-has-the-countrys-lowest-wholesale-electricity-prices/

          Additional interconnects will bring prices down even more:
          https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-05-31/sa-nsw-electricity-interconnector-gets-approval-from-regulator/100177928

          Oh and as for frequency stabilsation, SA has the best infrastructure in that department as well, something that is saving them tens of $million$ every year:
          https://ieefa.org/big-battery-in-australia-proves-profitable-as-neoen-recovers-capital-costs-in-just-two-years/

          It beggars belief that Lance wants to waste his time peddling obvious untruths. Get a hobby Lance.

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            Germany was connected to Norway through Denmark.

            Craig are you trying to be funny pretending a battery can do better Freq stability than big coal which used to do it for free?

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            yarpos

            What an achievement eh? SA has the best stabilisation technology. Yes well it would wouldnt it? having the most unstable grid and all. Millions spent doing something that was inherent in the network before. Yes indeedy a great leap forward and feather in the cap for SA.

            Re the impact of the interconnect outage, pure fantasy.

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          Chad

          Lance,
          ……as i said ..”it depends on your definition of destabilising”…
          And…”even a minor % of unreliable generation, introduces a level of uncertainty”
          BUT .those Grids..SA, Germany etc,…do “cope”. With high levels of Wind and Solar,..without becoming “destabilised”
          I hate to imagine all the extra effort the AEMO have to devote to keep SA fully supplied,…obviously way more than other states, but that is a “capacity” issue….. to match supply with demand.
          By definition even a grid with 50% RE, still has a lot of FF back up available, so that 30% number has just been plucked out of the air.
          And, Lance, last time i looked , Germany has more than enough FF “back up” to take care of ANY level of RE shortage, and if necessary they could shut down RE generators ,..but instead the chose to sell surplus to other markets.
          Dont get me wrong here, i still think Wind & Solar are a scam and a futile waste of money, …but to say that more than 30% is not viable,…is just not true.!

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            Hanrahan

            Chad, SA ALWAYS has gas generators running.

            Put this
            https://reneweconomy.com.au/nem-watch/
            in your bookmarks and tell us when they don’t.

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            • #
              Chad

              H’
              Look at the data.
              SA often runs for hours at 70-80% Wind only.
              So how can anyone believe over 30% is a problem ?
              If it can do it for a hour, it can (does) do it for a day , or week
              Sure it has Gas backup on standby, likely even providing synchronisation,…but it is definitely running MORE THAN 30% .
              Why are you guys so hung up on repeating dud information ?
              You can see the same situation to Germany if you take your blinkers off

              10

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            Hanrahan

            OK, let’s talk about Germany. True they have a lot of windmills which combined with solar on a sunny day can exceed 30% of demand BUT they have interconnectors to French atomic generators and Central Europe’s coal power which provide stability and they export HVDC across the Kattegat to Norway.

            All is well.

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            yarpos

            Germany’s grid is inherently destabilised these and has massive investment in technology, infrastructue and people to keep it functioning. Just because something is working doesnt mean its a doddle to make it so

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            Lance

            Chad, Germany’s grid survives because of Norway, Denmark, Sweden, and Belgium, interconnectors.

            NordLink (Norway to Germany interconnector) 1.5 GW
            Hansa PowerLink (Sweden to Germany)
            Kasso Froslev (Denmark to Germany) 400 MW
            Alegro (Belgium to Germany) HVDC, 1 GW

            Germany often has to PAY them to disengage their wind power. Negative pricing.

            Germany pays more per kW than anyone except the Solomon Islands.

            Grid Stability

            https://wattsupwiththat.com/2021/01/19/germany-weighs-electricity-rationing-scheme-to-stabilize-its-now-shaky-green-power-grid/

            The result of all the government meddling is becoming glaringly clear: the country now finds itself on the verge of blackouts due to grid instability, has the highest electricity prices in the world, relies more on imports and is not even close to meeting its emissions targets.

            Germany’s rickety and moody power grid now threatens the entire European power grid stability, as we recently witnessed.

            “controllable consumption facilities” would be able to receive no electricity for up to two hours per day if there was a threat of overloading the grid.

            “This includes charging stations for e-cars as well as heat pumps, which can already be temporarily disconnected from the power supply,”

            So what solution does Berlin propose today? You guessed it: more meddling and interference, more outlandish bureaucrat solutions. Included among them are shutting down the remaining baseload coal-fired and nuclear power plants, and relying even more on the power sources that got the country into its current mess in the first place.

            This is the sorry state of Germany’s once highly regarded power grid.

            https://www.tdworld.com/grid-innovations/generation-and-renewables/article/20970380/the-myth-of-the-german-renewable-energy-miracle

            In Germany’s case, as the percentage of renewable energy resources in the form of wind (both onshore and offshore) and solar has increased, Germany’s carbon emissions have increased. This is because conventional resources must be kept on line to provide stability to the grid due to wind and solar’s intermittency. As Germany phases out its nuclear units, those conventional resources increasingly are coal. In addition, solar resources and wind resources are often producing at maximum output at times when the grid doesn’t need them – resulting in excess electricity supply on the grid – and pushing the market price of power to very low levels, even negative (negawatts)

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              Chad

              You guys seem to have a hard time differentiating between “Grid Stability”, and “Supply/Demand Management”..?
              Try to keep on topic and not attempt to disguise a simple situation with lots of irrelevent waffle.
              Generally, grid “instability” is a reference to Frequency deviation (sometimes Voltage also) , …
              …but matching Supply from generators , to Demand from consumers, …is not a reference to grid stability. !
              Any grid ..100% FF , or mixed FFand RE ,..will always have issues matching supply and demand, and yes,.it is much more difficult with high proportions of RE in the mix. But it is not an impossible or unworkable situation with more than 30%, or 50% RE in the mix
              And that was the OPs question !

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                Chad

                Definition of grid stability..

                A stable power system is one that continuously responds and compensates for power/ frequency disturbances, and completes the required adjustments within an acceptable timeframe to adequately compensate for the power/frequency disturbances.

                https://www.kiwithinker.com/2017/04/energy-balance-imbalance-and-a-definition-of-grid-stability/

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                Lance

                Chad, that’s a load of sophistry.

                https://www.tdworld.com/grid-innovations/generation-and-renewables/article/20970380/the-myth-of-the-german-renewable-energy-miracle

                “75% of the generation within the European interconnected grid in 2016 was conventional thermal and nuclear. Renewables in the entire European interconnected grid were 12% hydroelectric, 10% wind, and 4% other. [5] Thus, Germany relies on (or “leans on”) the conventional rotating machinery in neighboring counties in order to ensure continuous, reliable operation. ”

                Germany is a parasite upon the EU grid. Germany relies upon others to back stop their inability to provide stable power. That isn’t sustainable by any means because Germany is closing their nuclear plants, as are France and others. The backstop is going away by political edict. What supplies that backup power when the baseload plants are shut down? eh?

                RE relies upon thermal generation and political excuses in order to play these games. Sure, you can hide the inability of RE to provide sufficient and stable power by disconnecting user loads and call those actions “load management”. Tell that to lost production in manufacturing plants.

                Queensland has lost Callide, Victoria has lost Hazelwood, Liddell is scheduled to close. So tell us, Chad, what exactly will back up all of that intermittent wind and solar power after 2023?

                Earlier, you claimed that Germany had sufficient FF backup for their RE generation. That isn’t true. As of 2020, GE has 49.5% thermal/nuke generation. After they close their nukes as planned, there will be 37% thermal generation. Without leaning upon the 75% coal/gas/nuke generation of France and others through their interconnectors, Germany will face grid collapse.

                Go ahead and focus on irrelevant comparisons. The fact is that when the thermal generation is absent, your renewables are utterly useless.

                If your power is still on in a year or two, let us know how things worked out.

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                Chad

                Lance, you can do better than this…

                you claimed that Germany had sufficient FF backup for their RE generation. That isn’t true. As of 2020, GE has 49.5% thermal/nuke generation…..

                That is net power consumed, ..not capacity available !
                Germany has 218 GW of grid generation capacity installed..120 GW of it being Wind and Solar .So there is still 90+ GW of coal Gas, and Nuclear CAPACITY available for a PEAK demand of 65GW.

                Come back and discuss something when you have figured out how to research accurately.

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    Lance

    Dr. Thomas Sowell:

    “It is hard to imagine a more dangerous way of making decisions than by putting those decisions in the hands of people who pay no price for being wrong”.

    Perhaps Politicians ought to post a bond in the amount of their entire personal wealth, including all assets 10 years prior to being elected, before they are allowed to vote the citizenry into obligation. That might change things a bit, in the case they are wrong in their decisions.

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  • #

    Aunty Pravda’s rolling news feed of unacceptable articles for the 10th June – https://thepointman.wordpress.com/rolling-headlines/  #freepointy

    Pointy

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  • #
    Geoffrey Williams

    Economic Vandals Indeed and some day we in the West will regret these actions by our elected governments. And then we will have to pay dearly.
    GeoffW

    20

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    Serp

    Muzzled outdoors in Victoria until next year’s State Election; surely people won’t cop this.

    20

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      shortie of greenbank

      they will and they will even vote for more!

      This is Victoria we are talking about, it even worked here in QLD with palletbricks government easily winning last year and a policy of instant lockdowns and masking demands (though a much more effective track and trace at least).

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      • #
        MP

        they will and they will even vote for more!

        Yep, nothing surer. But even if they do vote another it will be lib and it will be the same. Think SA.

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      Annie

      Ridiculous. I trust they won’t.

      00

    • #
      PeterS

      It won’t matter who is in government. They are all tainted with the same brush. The only difference is the amount of evil paint on the brush.

      20

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    Lance

    Interesting. Ivermectin works. Follow the money.

    https://ussanews.com/News1/2021/06/09/horowitz-the-censorship-of-ivermectin-is-the-biggest-story-of-covid/

    Daniel Horowitz: The censorship of Ivermectin is the biggest story of COVID. Why do global authorities refuse to greenlight ivermectin, with 29 randomized controlled trials vouching for its efficacy with no side effects?

    https://freerepublic.com/focus/f-bloggers/3966554/posts

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  • #
    David Maddison

    One thing I’ve noticed about Leftists is that they never feel shame, no matter how obvious the evil of their actions is.

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    • #
      Serp

      I see no reason to single out the oh so sanctimonious left; all politicians are psychopaths and their activity is as far from an exercise in ethics as is a barroom brawl.

      60

      • #
        PeterS

        Spot on. Morrison should be ashamed of himself for being reneging on coal for example. He used to espouse it so much before he became PM but now he’s on the renewables and emissions reduction bandwagon, boots and all.

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        • #
          Serp

          I guess he knows things we don’t but to me he seems to be facing the imminent staged collapse of his nation with blithe unconcern even putting his shoulder to the wheel by opting for the inherent physical vulnerability of a gas pipeline over utilising the local coal.

          Still though there’s no impediment to constructing one of those chinese super USC coal plants as described by TonyfromOz later once the renewable inability to deliver has become apparent to all after however many years that’s going to take –we’ll all be dead innit? Ah well, dream on…

          30

      • #
        Hanrahan

        No! Not all politicians are the same. That’s a lefty cop out. My son uses it as an excuse when a lefty is caught out.

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    OriginalSteve

    This may be of interest:

    https://www.naturalnews.com/2021-06-02-horrifying-study-reveals-mrna-vaccine-nanoparticles-are-circulated-throughout-the-entire-body-brain-heart-liver-ovaries-testes.html

    https://www.naturalnews.com/files/Pfizer-bio-distribution-confidential-document-translated-to-english.pdf

    “Labeled, “Pfizer confidential,” the study is known as a bio-distribution study that uses luciferase enzymes and radioisotope markers to accurately track the distribution of Pfizer’s mRNA LNPs across the body. The first section is labeled:

    “SARS-CoV-2 mRNA Vaccine (BNT162, PF-07302048)
    2.6.4 Summary of pharmacokinetic study

    “The study reveals how mRNA LNPs are distributed across the body, even affecting ovaries and testes, raising huge questions about fertility in those receiving mRNA vaccine shots. The following chart shows the mass of NLPs (in micrograms) found in each organ following mRNA vaccination.
    ……..
    “They found the spike protein in circulation, so in the blood of 11 of those 13 healthcare workers that had received the vaccine. What this means is, so we have known for a long time that the spike protein is a pathogenic protein. It is a toxin. It can cause damage in our body if it gets into circulation. Now, we have clear cut evidence that the vaccines that make our bodies or the muscles or the cells in our deltoid muscles, manufacture this protein, not the vaccine itself, plus the protein gets into blood circulation. When in circulation, the spike protein can bind to the receptors that are on our platelets and the cells that line our blood vessels. When that happens, it can do one of two things. It can either cause platelets to clump and that can lead to clotting. That’s exactly why we’ve been seeing clotting disorders associated with these vaccines.

    50

    • #
      Fran

      My daughter (high risk due to adrenal insufficiency) had her first shot followed several weeks later with gross menstrual bleeding with clots. My 84 y/o neighbour had pain and tingling in both hands for 3 days after her second shot – similar to what Eric Clapton is said to have experienced..

      20

      • #
        Kalm Keith

        The reported side effects seem to be much worse than the occasional sore arm from previous vaccinations.

        When people are frightened out of their wits by immediate after effects that’s bad and should signal the need for a review of the situation.

        The long term effects also need identifying and quantifying.

        I hope things work out O.K. for those you are concerned about.

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  • #
    Peter Fitzroy

    So in the previous post the assertion was made that ivermectin and not lockdowns is the reason why India is seeing a decline in Covid.

    yet there was no proof that ivermectin had any role at all

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    • #
      Serp

      I don’t get it, unthreaded and all: Isn’t this something to post on that thread?

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      • #
        Raving

        The mod didn’t have the patience to deal with Fitzroy’s claim that Jo was running from one side to the other. (Antiviral treatment as opposed to vaccine treatment)

        Personally I have no problem exploring either branch, if not both sides simultaneously. Frankly choosing which side to emphasize on this specific blog has more to do with editorial choice and less so with weak argument.

        I find the people and stuff which is discussed here to be surprisingly stimulating, notwithstanding the tedious one sideness

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        • #
          Analitik

          Would you rather take
          1. an existing drug, taken by millions over decades with well known safe dosage limits, that suppresses the viral replication ?
          or
          2. an experimental vaccine (of a type never having passed clinical trials) that has skipped the normal testing regime for side effects as well as efficacy by being given emergency approval ?

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          • #
            Raving

            You mean something ike arsenic? Not sure about it’s antiviral properties but you get the drift of what I am saying.

            https://www.rxlist.com/arsenic/supplements.htm

            Old drugs work but many aren’t so safe either. Just as new drugs are ‘proven to work’ but can also have side effects worse than the target they are supposed to remmedy.

            It’s not an either/or choice. There is bad and good on both sides

            Have spent my life being treated by tried and true products which end up being worse than the condition itself. Have grown tired of those past good intentions. No thank you.

            Now I am bombarded with endless TV commercials by big phrama for exciting new products which cost mega $$$. There really is big money in making and selling this stuff! Each advertisements carries disclaimers about decreased immune function and the possibilty of fatal outcomes. Even my pysician tells me that the sideeffects are serious and the dangers are real.

            No thank you. Maybe I am reacting to past dissapointment but I prefer to live with my condition untreated.

            Chasing after quality of life can be a bit like using arsenic for porcelin white skin
            https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/the-poisonous-beauty-advice-columns-of-victorian-england

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            • #
              Analitik

              So you choose to ignore the “with well known safe dosage limits” part.

              OK

              10

            • #
              another ian

              Careful with arsenic as your example – it is on the borderline of being declared an essential trace mineral.

              Whu=y us folk from the back of beyond need to stock up on prawns when we get to the cost

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              • #
                another ian

                Also strychnine as per a NT character in a Ted Egan song who did his experimenting on the airstrip.

                Logic being that if you over-did it a bit and broke into a gallop you wouldn’t to run into a tree

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      el gordo

      A reduction in cases coincided with the vaccine rollout and statewide lockdowns. So there is no definitive proof that Ivermectin is of any value.

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      Craig Thomas

      The assertion – if it was made – would be ridiculous and obviously wrong.

      The proposal for Ivermectin is to use it to treat the symptoms, not the causes.
      It isn’t intended to reduce infection rates, just improve outcomes of treatment (which it doesn’t, on balance, anyway).

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    el gordo

    South Pole temperature and CO2 seasonal comparison.

    https://imgur.com/a/CDasqHH#kAi4m7S

    20

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    Serp

    As he supposes Jack Kennedy would the loyal irishman in Joe Biden is set to intervene in the bizarre revivification of the Good Friday zombies which have been exhumed by Brexit and a note has been passed to Boris ahead of the Cornwall G7 gig Scomo’s been invited to. And they complained that Trump was mischievous!

    00

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    Tim Spence

    Google Earth. Pick the most sandy, most dry part of the Sahara and drill down. There’s no definition or focus to the image but it is a light shade of green which I find curious. I can understand Google wishing to deter meteor hunters or mining operations operating in such a dangerous area but why green, unless …

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    David Maddison

    About the fraud that DDT is harmful and the millions of people who died unnecessarily because of fraudulent cessation of use.

    The Truth About DDT and Silent Spring

    https://www.thenewatlantis.com/publications/the-truth-about-ddt-and-silent-spring

    AND

    The 1972 U.S. ban on DDT is responsible for a genocide 10 times larger than that for which we sent Nazis to the gallows at Nuremberg. It is also responsible for a menticide which has already condemned one entire generation to a dark age of anti-science ignorance, and is now infecting a new one.

    https://21sci-tech.com/articles/summ02/DDT.html

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    tom0mason

    On of the top founding guys that helped start Moderna is banned from twitter for telling the truth.
    See https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/international-news/disease/founder-of-moderna-canceled-by-twitter-for-confirming-truth/

    20

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    MrGrimNasty

    The BBC completely ignored a million (conservatively) marching in London against covid lockdowns/passports etc. (Fullfact says ‘..but we have not been able to find any BBC coverage of the protest that took place in London on 29 May 2021’), but 80 (looks less) climate nutters…..

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-57386119

    And of course, let’s not forget the kid’s news service – a few Animal Rebellion nutjobs, what could be more important!

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/57211037

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    Ian1946

    I see a lot of criticism of SA re power generation and windmills and solar panels. Surely NSW is the mendicant state in the power generation stakes. Recently NSW has been importing up to 2GW from both QLD and VIC most of the day. If Liddell is allowed to close then as I see it blackouts are inevitable and Queensland will be forced to close down the interconnectors to protect the continuation of supply to QLD and prevent blackouts.

    What a sad state of affairs in a state where the LNP is in in power.

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    • #
      Serp

      Yep, the worst is yet to come with the Victorian government hell bent on shutting down Yallourn as soon as it can irrespective of the outcome for electricity consumers since decarbonisation is the greatest of all goods and must be pursued even if whole nations are destroyed on the journey…

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    CHRIS

    While the LNP in NSW has that intellectually challenged Matt Kean as Environment Minister, then NSW gets what its deserves. Even the head of the Climate Change Department in Australia said that solar and wind alone cannot drive an industrial society. When are these brain dead politicians (on all sides) going to wake up to this fact? Unfortunately. I think NEVER

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    • #
      Ronin

      It will take mass blackouts.

      30

    • #
      el gordo

      The industrial age is over for Oz, do not be afraid, we have a quarry and beautiful pristine environments. Except for those renewable monstrosities, which will eventually be dismantled.

      Now that global cooling has begun we should be planning our energy mix going forward, without concern. Premier Gladys knows we can’t run very fast trains trains on wind, so my guess is that Mt Piper will get the nod for a new coal fired pod when global warming is off the agenda.

      20

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      el gordo

      Now there is a good idea.

      ‘Make Canberra the coal bank’

      ‘Victoria coal power plant owner Alinta wants government help as banks impose stricter environmental and social curbs on lending.’ (Oz)

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    Kalm Keith

    While having a quick flick through the latest news headlines, came across this brilliant new ECO concept;

    “Running seawater through an ocean carbon capture plant could chemically convert carbon dioxide to limestone on a grand scale”

    A “professor” from UCLA, where else, has been working on this CCS initiative. It’s postulated that removing CO2 from seawater will be better than the present expensive atmospheric CCS methods.

    The reduced oceanic CO2 levels will then invite atmospheric CO2 down into a new capture zone. All done.

    40

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      Raving

      Reverse Osmosis Energy Efficiency comes to mind. Shoud be able to extract carbon in the course of desalinization. Maybe some hybrid process?

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        Kalm Keith

        The primary issue with that is cost.

        Can anyone really afford to drink desalination water.

        Much cheaper to just build the damned dams.

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        MP

        No that won’t work, RO removes everything and as Sodium Chloride is the major Compound every thing else is combined in the Sludge. Where you going to bury all that for the miniscule quantity of carbon. (salt into the water table)

        The biggest Gold reserves in the world are the Oceans, with Au in solution in ppb through chlorine leaching, along with many other metals.
        FYI a grain of carbon approx 4mm has the surface area of a football field, carbon (though its called absorption) actually coats the surfaces exposed within the grain with whatever is in the solution. Carbon is what is predominantly used in mineral processing to recover metals in the solution with a few exceptions i.e. CuSO4.

        Also plan B ain’t going to work either.

        Ro is an extremely expensive process and a major energy consumer.

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    • #
      Hanrahan

      So we are back to semi-starving our trees and crops of CO2.

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    • #
      Annie

      KK, doesn’t the ocean already do this, in the form of all the shelled creatures? The CO2 will be in really short supply once much of it has been deposited in limestone.
      This also supposes that we think there is too much in the atmosphere. Dunno about you but I would rather that level didn’t drop from where we are (even if our darned trees keep growing too fast!)

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      • #
        Annie

        Not to mention what will go back into the oceans when/if the planet actually cools off. Shiver/starve.

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      • #
        Kalm Keith

        Good idea; grow more oysters and crabs to “sequester” all of that troublesome CO2. Sell the meat to cover the oyster/crab farms.
        Fantastic solution Annie.

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  • #
    David Maddison

    This guy is an Internet privacy expert and talks about how Big Tech is spying on you, in this case with Alexa. He is also concerned that no one seems to care. He has excellent videos.

    Just to anticipate the response of Leftists who hate individual privacy with their usual ad hominem attacks against conservatives, he is not a “tin foil hat conspiracy theorist”.

    https://youtu.be/ccrUAp4GQvY

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    • #
      Raving

      My ISP is one of the top 2 in Canada. They informed me that my primary email addy which is provided by Yahoo intends to mine my emails for commercial data. My choice was to lump it or find another ISP or email service. There is no opting out. Not to mention that 100sof millions of Yahoo email passwords have been compromised.

      How do you expect me to be concerned or care about my email privacy when I already know it is so wide open and my ISP agrees to such external access?

      The sense of privacy and security on the internet is illusionary

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    Hanrahan

    After the big day generating wind power y’day SA is becalmed today. This is no way to run a power grid.

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    Ronin

    “After the big day generating wind power y’day SA is becalmed today. This is no way to run a power grid.”

    But but but…. The Big Battery will smoothe it all out…….. won’t it.

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  • #
    another ian

    “BBC – Twelve Years Of Covering Up Climategate”

    https://realclimatescience.com/2021/06/bbc-twelve-years-of-covering-up-climategate/

    And still going

    “Now the BBC admits it happened, and says Phil Jones is a hero and victim of cyber terrorism.”

    Film at 11

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  • #
    OriginalSteve

    It occurs to me we are seeing just another 1918 flu re-run

    How?

    Well, with the 1918 flu, they had just invented asprin. People took asprin, their temps dropped, they felt fine…then a nasty cytokine storm and all over….and spread it all through the community as the felt fine…..

    Now – a vaccine that suppresses symptoms, they fell better, share mutations ( via a leaky vaccine ) and protein spikes around the community….similar play book.

    One person commented giving people a vaccine right now was like giving ants an ant poison – to carry back into their nests.

    So maybe the new vaccine-driven variants are now spreading through the community.

    “Hey Ive been vaccinated and feel great….”
    ….cue flashing ambo lights…..

    I’m also wary of the globalists creating a massive scare soon – the uptake of the vaccine has been ( wisely ) low, but we “useless eaters” need to be medically disposed of asap ( according to the globalist play book ) – so expect more lock downs to make people start screaming for the vaccine to make it stop. In some ways, similar to the bali bomb – people didnt want to be involved in Iraq…then boom…where do we sign up? The 2025 report https://archive.is/eHOXw predicts a 80% population reduction in USA, 60% reduction in Australia and 67% reduction in the UK. To achive this, vaccine uptake must be around the mooted 70% – so how will the globalists do it?
    Expect either a whole new built-to-order nastier bug from Foocis “Bugs-R-Us”, or a mysterious massive outbreak acrosss many parts of australia and crippling lockdowns again, untilt he sheeple “get the message” and roll over…..

    The UK has a super high rate of vaccination, but I think the govt there appears to be much more brutal in how it treats its population, and the globalists in europe are incredibly ruthless. I also think the UK heritage of the nobility saying “do as your told, pleb” is alive and well and “do you bit” is being exploited upon well meaning people to do them over.

    Australians are inclined to tell the nobility to get stuffed, so expect much pain inflicted upon us, to force people to plead to be vacicnated to “make it all go away”….talk about out of the pan into the fire….

    Falau opined that the fires were Gods judgement upon this nation for its sinful behaviour. If you look back through the Bible, you find judgement brought upon a whole nation of Israel ( or any nation ) due to its behaviour, with the ultimate being invaded and the whole population being “vomited out of the land” as punishment. Will Australia repent and turn back to God? I hope so. If not, we may wind up on the sharp end of things….the CCP may be the thorn in our flesh sent to chasten us.

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  • #
    another ian

    “Memory Holes Are Greatly Improved”

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2021/06/10/memory-holes-are-greatly-improved/

    1984 by mouse

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  • #
    el gordo

    On an earlier thread wxcycles had a lot to say on aerial phenomenon.

    ‘But somehow in all of this time, with all the modern mobility in capture technology, especially since WWI, no one has EVER and I mean E-V-E-R managed to get 1 single unambiguous and clear high-res image of a UFO. Why is it so?’

    I can only imagine that they are operating outside our understanding of physics. The ability to dematerialise is a game changer and if you are convinced its not extraterrestrial then China is a step up from Stealth.

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    • #
      another ian

      Re photo quality – seems to share with those of the Lock Ness monster

      If you read R.V. Jones “Most Secret War” you’ll find there was a rash of UFO reports just after WW 2 – supposedly Russian

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      • #
        el gordo

        After WW2 there were many reports of UFO behind the iron curtain and our adversaries were just as mystified. On the question of what will be revealed on the 25th.

        ‘There is not going to be any “big reveal,” says Robert Sheaffer, a leading skeptical investigator of UFOs. “There are no aliens here on Earth, and so the government cannot ‘disclose’ what it does not have. Some people think that the government knows more about UFOs, or UAPs, than the public, but it’s clear that they know less on the subject than our best civilian UFO investigators, not more.” (Scientific America)

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      • #
        el gordo

        China is not there yet.

        ‘A Chinese physicist has said that a new wind tunnel in Beijing to be unveiled “soon” will put China decades ahead of the rest of the world in hypersonic technology.

        ‘Chinese Academy of Sciences researcher Han Guilai told an online lecture last week that the JF-22 wind tunnel, in Beijing’s Huairou district, was capable of simulating flights at up to 10km per second – 30 times the speed of sound. Together with an existing facility, also in Beijing, it would put China “about 20 to 30 years ahead” of the West.’ (SCMP)

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  • #
    another ian

    “Vicki Campion guest post. It’s a one-sided match”

    “IT takes a special person from inner Sydney who can construct a brief for a minister about an issue in Bourke – but that is exactly how we staff our public servants in Australia. Does it make sense that the Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications Department only has two per cent of staff (53) in regional areas, with the remaining 95 per cent in Canberra, central Melbourne and central Sydney?”

    More examples at

    https://catallaxyfiles.com/2021/06/12/vicki-campion-guest-post-its-a-one-sided-match/

    Brings this to mind from

    http://www.smalldeadanimals.com/

    “Why this blog?

    Until this moment I have been forced to listen while media and politicians alike have told me “what Canadians think”. In all that time they never once asked.

    This is just the voice of an ordinary Canadian yelling back at the radio – “You don’t speak for me.” “

    20

  • #
    another ian

    “Aussie Climate Activists in Damage Control Mode as Winter Weather Strikes the East Coast”

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2021/06/11/aussie-climate-activists-doing-damage-control-as-bitter-cold-strikes-the-east-coast/

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    CHRIS

    I am sick and tired of the influence the “Canberra Bubble” has on Australian politics. I sent an email to my local Member, the current PM, about this disgraceful anomaly. Of course, I never got a reply, but that is no surprise. As far as I’m concerned, all political parties could not give a rat’s a$$ about the plight of people living in regional Australia. And why? Because they are totally obsessed with votes, and unfortunately, regional votes are only about one third of the total.

    10