JoNova

A science presenter, writer, speaker & former TV host; author of The Skeptic's Handbook (over 200,000 copies distributed & available in 15 languages).


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Tuesday Open Thread

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148 comments to Tuesday Open Thread

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    pat

    open access:

    28 Jan: Australian: Firefighters battle ‘worst Canberra fire since 2003′
    Firefighters were on Tuesday night battling the worst fire to hit Canberra since 2003 after a ground clearance operation being conducted by Defence started the blaze.
    The Department of Defence confirmed an out-of-control fire threatening homes south of Canberra was likely caused by the landing light of one of its helicopters…

    The chopper and its crew had been conducting aerial reconnaissance and ground clearance to enable access for emergency services personnel, who were conducting bushfire prevention measures in the ACT’s Namadgi National Park, when the blaze was sparked.
    “It is deeply regrettable that our support operations have likely started this fire,” the ADF said in a statement. “Defence has taken immediate action to reduce the risk of fires being started by helicopters, including not using certain aircraft lighting in extreme weather conditions.”…

    (ACT Emergency Services Commissioner Georgeina) Whelan said hot, dry weather and enormous fuel loads were making it difficult to fight the blaze…READ ON
    https://www.theaustralian.com.au/nation/firefighters-battle-worst-canberra-fire-since-2003/news-story/b3c3d025ce97f989be98ea06ff17b46a

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    pat

    29 Jan: Reuters: UPDATE 1-Australia battles new bushfire threat as smoke cloaks capital
    Reporting by Colin Packham in SYDNEY. Additional reporting by Melanie Burton in MELBOURNE
    People in some areas near in Namadgi National Park were told it was too late to leave.
    “Helicopters and large air tankers are water-bombing, establishing containment lines and undertaking aerial surveillance,” Canberra’s emergency services said in a notice.
    “The fire may pose threats to all lives directly in its path,” Emergency Services Agency Commissioner Georgeina Whelan told reporters. “…Firefighters may be unable to prevent a fire from reaching your property. You should not expect a firefighter on your door.”…

    Australia’s Bureau of Meteorology and firefighting services were predicting temperatures to top 40 Celsius (104 Fahrenheit) over the weekend…
    A high pressure weather pattern is set to move across Australia’s east coast later this week, bring soaring temperatures over the weekend…

    Researchers from the University of Sydney on Tuesday released a report that found just three days of low-level bushfire smoke exposure increased the threat of cardiac arrest, with people over 65 at higher risk.
    https://www.theaustralian.com.au/nation/firefighters-battle-worst-canberra-fire-since-2003/news-story/b3c3d025ce97f989be98ea06ff17b46a

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    Travis T. Jones

    Madeleine Morris, of abc factcheck, has decided to walk the talk.

    I factcheck Maddy.

    Calculating your carbon footprint. Here’s why my family will try to cut our emissions by 7.6 per cent

    “Sure, we fly for holidays quite a bit to visit the family in Queensland and usually a yearly overseas trip — but, hey, we offset those flights.”

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-01-28/climate-change-bushfires-and-cutting-my-carbon-emissions/11892230

    Wait. What?
    Carbon offsets?

    Carbon markets will not help stop climate change

    “We now know from abundant experience from various carbon markets how these trading systems can be gamed and cheated.”

    https://climatechangenews.com/2019/12/13/carbon-markets-will-not-help-stop-climate-change/

    Carbon offsets have patchy human rights record. Now UN talks erode safeguards

    https://climatechangenews.com/2019/12/09/carbon-offsets-patchy-human-rights-record-now-un-talks-erode-safeguards/

    A new global carbon market could unleash finance for projects around the world. But protections for local communities were weakened in draft rules at Cop25

    Maddy’s gonna need a bigger calculator …

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      Travis T. Jones

      Part 2:

      Calculating your carbon footprint. Here’s why my family will try to cut our emissions by 7.6 per cent

      “Here you just have to enter your spend according to whether you are a vegetarian, pescatarian, low, medium or high meat eater.”

      https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-01-28/climate-change-bushfires-and-cutting-my-carbon-emissions/11892230

      Wait. What?
      A meat eater?

      2012: “In 2006, the United Nations concluded that the livestock industry was a big contributor to climate change.
      Mitloehner convinced the U.N. to recant its claim in 2010.”

      https://helenair.com/news/state-and-regional/prof-debunks-flatulence-as-major-cause-of-global-warming/article_1c6c9c5e-2dbb-11e2-9e51-0019bb2963f4.html

      Frank Mitloehner: Cattle, climate change and the methane myth – june, 2019:

      India alone has more cattle than the United States, the European Union and China combined, but they don’t even eat those animals.
      Those bovines in India that are dairy animals produce an amount of dairy, of milk, that’s nominal.
      It takes about 15 to 20 cows in India to produce the same amount of milk as one cow in the United States. That’s why these herds are so enormous.

      Well, what we have to do is pretty straightforward: We have to do the same thing that we have done in countries like the United States or Denmark.
      For example, in the United States, we used to have 25 million dairy cows back in 1950 — 25 million dairy cows.
      Today, we only have 9 million dairy cows.
      We have shrunk the herd drastically.
      But with this much smaller herd today — with the 9 million — we are producing 60% more milk.
      That means we have shrunk the carbon footprint of the dairy industry by two-thirds in the United States between 1950 and today.

      https://www.alltech.com/features-podcast-blog/frank-mitloehner-cattle-climate-change-and-methane-myth

      No, Four Pounds of Beef Doesn’t Equal the Emissions of a Transatlantic Flight

      Per passenger, a one-way flight from NYC to London causes 1,980 lbs (898 kg) of CO2 equivalent emissions

      https://ghgguru.faculty.ucdavis.edu/2019/09/26/no-four-pounds-of-beef-doesnt-equal-the-emissions-of-a-transatlantic-flight/

      “Maybe – just maybe – American farmers and ranchers deserve some credit for efficiencies that for decades have decreased greenhouse gases while improving food production at unprecedented levels.”

      So Maddy, my factcheck shows that as a fact checker and planet saver, you fail.

      >> Thank you fossil fuels.

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        Mal

        Since co2 increases have a nett environmental and economic benefit to the world, I plan to increase mine by 7.6% to offset all the idiots who want to create a plant famine.

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          sophocles

          Not create a plant famine …
          it already exists and has for a while, so it’s maintain a plant famine.

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          hatband

          Didn’t you hear about Borlaug’s Green Revolution 50 years ago?

          Most of the world’s arable land is wasted growing grain and rabbit food.

          There’s nor Plant Famine.

          Though with only 9 million Dairy Cattle, 99% Friesian/Holsteins, the U.S. may be

          close to a Saturated Fat famine.

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    Crakar24

    You know we cant drop inert bombs in woomera (desert) on hot days incase a spark starts a fire……in the freaking desert.

    The reason defence is so anal about this is be ause the stupid army started a fire once and here we go again.

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    As I’ve said, I’m happy to be described as a full-blown conspiracy theorist. Nothing but high level conspiracy explains the Port Kembla wave generator or Uphill Snowy or French oiler subs from Adelaide. Nothing but high-level conspiracy explains the determination to install Malcolm Bligh Turnbull into certain critical ministries before hoisting him into the top job and keeping him there, against gravity.

    If something makes sense, it doesn’t happen. Technologies and projects are implemented because they do not work and cannot work, all of which is apparent before the first spade turns. The conditions are: it must cost, it must waste, and it must not work. Want to know why it’s hard to grow industrial hemp but easy to float a rustbucket wave gen off a favourite beach, maybe in sight of a coal-gobbling desal plant which costs half a mill a day but doesn’t make water? Please refer to the conditions: it must cost, it must waste, and it must not work.

    I respect that many people here are focused strongly on political parties and leadership. My head takes me elsewhere because my main concerns are about forces for which we barely have a name and which seem to prevail regardless of leaders or parties. (Don’t worry, I’m still conservative enough not to vote for Labor’s cynics.)

    Some people have researched these forces as a primary concern, can give a bit of background, and even a name. They are not my intellectual heroes (I tend not to have them) and I don’t agree with them on all matters. The bloke is a well-known internet personality who’s something of a classical anarchist, the lady is actually (sort of) a Trump supporter. What’s important to me is that their biggest concern is my biggest concern. My word for it is globalism, or globsterism, or Fabianism. I really don’t know what to call it. They call it Technocracy, and even in its present form it’s not as new as we think…

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oP1oX1W8P2w
    https://tinyurl.com/v5ejo7a

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      robert rosicka

      You give the socialists too much credit to be calling “conspiracy ” , more like the stupidity of a few than a conspiracy.
      Never underestimate the power of stupid .

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        We’ll have to disagree, Robert. It’s not just daffy socialists of the familiar sort, though the aims are communistic in the worst sense.

        For me, it’s bigger and wider than left/right politics and it’s my overriding concern. To start to see it requires a big change of view and brings much confusion. I’m not pushing anyone to that, but I’m prepared to say what’s on my mind and to risk seeming silly.

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      jack

      mosomoso
      I have a range of designer tin foil head ware for sale if your interested :-)

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        You tin foil salesmen quote one price then charge another. I’m wise to that consp…I’m wise to that trick.

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          jack

          I apologize for being flippant.
          But there seems to be a not too subtle under tow that will lead to a tsunami to will engulf us all.
          It is rare that a free nation will give up its freedom for despotism, it is usually one despotism replaced by another.
          It seems now that in the unprecedented event of relinquishing freedom, the fabianistic approach is making its mark. It also seems that it is complacency, the frog in the pot on the fire, that will allow this under tow turn into a tsunami.
          But any way,
          How about 2 for the price of one, and a free set of steak knives?

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        sophocles

        ‘your’ NO.
        That’s the possessive of ‘you.’ As in Your Iggerance which is the Iggerance belonging to You
        if your interested is bad English. There is nothing owned by you It’s a
        non-grammatical sentence.

        You need to use You’re (pronounced YOU-ER) which is short for you are
        as in if you’re interested or if you are interested

        Another with Greta Syndrome (insufficient time at school) …

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          WXcycles

          Do they have typos in NZ soph?

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            sophocles

            On both my keyboards, yes. And both at the same time, what’s worse.

            I admit I shouldn’t have let that post go, but I had just been re-installing an operating system for the second time and the programmers just cannot write or use English correctly for trying, so at nearly 3am, I threw a snit. Straws and fractured camelidae dorsa.

            ‘Pologies to all.

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              FijiDave

              camelidae dorsa

              Your little bit of Latin had me going, Sophocles. It made me yaw to starboard and look it up.

              You’re quite correct, homophones are a real distraction. Homophones they’re, there, their and the misused bought & brought have to be my biggest niggles.

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            Another Ian

            Typos are useful – they demonstrate that you are not a bot

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      OriginalSteve

      The idea is to basically run down australia so its helpless and will be done over by socialists.

      Just like the vietnam war which was designed to never be won, socialism creates a “war” state that can never be won…..just constant raging and anger….

      Lefties really do have issues….the ones at the top are just human jackals, the next layer down are like the SS, and the grunts / anarchists are the brown shirts equivalents.

      Lets call it what it is….communism.

      My uncle escaped from Communist Hungary as a child, I now have a very clear view of how nasty and sneaky communists are from his and his families’ experiences.

      Its one thing for the clueless woke latte sipping champers charlies “revolutionaries” to espouse it, its very much another to have to live it.

      Trendy socialists are the worst variety of fool…..enabling the monster that will eat them alive.

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        Speedy

        Hi OS. Orwell got it down pat in 1984, when he said that the whole idea of the revolution was to get rid of the old tyrants so that the new ones (and worse) could take over. Once the revolution takes hold, the “useful idiots” who made it possible are quietly liquidated, then the political philosophy is discarded in favour of what Orwell called a “Oligarchial Collectivism” In other words, ruling by and for the self-proclaimed elite.
        This explains the sometimes disparity between what the champagne socialists say and what they do. Personally, I don’t believe a word they say and – unfortunately – must take their behaviour as indicative of their plans for the future.
        So perhaps it’s lucky that “deplorables” like us are too dumb to understand their philosophy, but smart enough to know what they’re doing.
        Cheers,

        Mike

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          sophocles

          I disagree about being “too dumb to understand their philosophy” when the espoused philosophy has been tried many times over last century and has failed every time.
          It’s the philosophy which is dumb.. That’s not hard to spot.

          Which means those who espouse a dumb philosophy are dumb.

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      Richard Ilfeld

      It can look like a conspiracy, while in fact merely being a convocation of thieves. If a lot of folks can independently profit
      from the same illicit enterprise, they may all hike along the same trail. It may look like the are working together; and they
      may realize same. They are probably, in small groups, agreeing on mutual hand washing. But like a flock of vultures feasting on a carcass,
      they don’t have to coordinate to puck things clean.
      https://wattsupwiththat.com/2020/01/27/dc-solar-owners-plead-guilty-to-largest-ponzi-scheme-in-eastern-california-history/
      if you haven’t seen it yet.

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        Richard, I see it as both. Back when there was not supposed to be organised crime there was organised crime…but it was composed of countless rivalries, combinations, feuds and personal hates.

        That’s the globalist conspiracy. They’re all after the same things, use similar methods and they occupy the same spaces. There may be family heads, even supreme heads, but there is no trust. Davos, CFR, the Trilaterals, the IMF etc are gatherings of lawless conspirators with similar goals which are disguised and covert. But they are conspirators who distrust one another and are as interested in manipulating one another as in manipulating you and me.

        Of course, when I talk of these respectable institutions as criminal gatherings I couldn’t possibly mean it literally. The transfer of production to Asia and the deindustrialisation of the West (aka the development of consumer and service economies with propped currencies and debt) just happened. You get that. When Kissinger got together with Mao and Chou they just talked world peace and swapped a few recipes.

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          Yonniestone

          Marxism was never about solving anything but to create a constant state of confusion so those in control can dictate what happens to the confused.

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      farmerbraun

      A self-proclaimed elite, enforcing its collective will , by violent means of all descriptions.
      I call that fascism.
      It’s alive and well.

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        WXcycles

        Agree, fascism has always been about an aggressive ruling govt party using all levels of violence early and often to always get its policies implemented, against any and all organised opposition. It requires the end of political debate and open civil processes. We are still a long way from it.

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      hatband

      Mosomoso asks what is going on:

      It’s called Technocracy, Kevin Rudd was/is a Technocrat.

      Going by the name, it sounds like Rule By Engineers, or something like that,

      so no one ever questions what it means.

      The BER [School Halls Projects] is an example, so is the NBN.

      So are Snowy 2, the Subs Project Cool Burns by indigenes, probably Snowy 1, the list is

      endless, and everybody that makes decisions must be on board,

      because public criticismof Technocracy doesn’t exist.

      Here’s the best link I could find in a hurry that explains it:

      https://www.technocracy.news/dr-tim-ball-why-people-continue-to-believe-global-warming-hoax/

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        sophocles

        Technocracy is not good: it’s sold as being an ideal but as it’s proposed, it has no checks or balances, which makes it dangerous. It’s proposed as an ideal but it’s far and away not one.
        It’s wide open, as it stands, to corruption.

        https://www.investopedia.com/terms/t/technocracy.asp

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          hatband

          Technocracy is … sold as being an ideal but… It’s proposed as an ideal

          Not really.

          It isn’t discussed at all, apart from some Newspaper article saying Kevin Rudd is a

          Technocrat as if the reader is familiar with the term,

          e.g. Paula Mathewson writing in The Guardian in 2013:

          …what focus groups are saying about Rudd – that he’s the same old “talk under wet cement” technocrat they remember from his time as prime minister.

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        Another Ian

        I suggest that they are all more understandable as

        “government enthusiasms”

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    pat

    28 Jan: BrisbaneTimes: Greyhound Australia rules out new Adani deal, hours before Brisbane protest
    By Toby Crockford and Christine Flatley; with AAP
    Greyhound Australia has announced it will not sign a contract extension with mining giant Adani, a day before activists were set to launch a protest campaign against the bus company’s work at the Carmichael mine in central Queensland…
    Greyhound said in a statement it would complete the services it was contractually obliged to deliver until March 31 this year and no more, after pressure from anti-Adani campaigners.

    “Greyhound Australia has received numerous messages, emails and phone calls from people expressing their thoughts both for and against the Carmichael Rail Network and Adani Carmichael project,” the statement said.
    “Following considered deliberation, and in the best interests of our staff, customers, and partners, Greyhound Australia has decided to not enter into a contractual agreement with BMD to service construction of the Carmichael Rail Network beyond our preliminary March 31, 2020 commitment.”…

    In response, Adani Mining chief executive Lucas Dow released a statement saying the company was “not intimidated” by protesters and the Carmichael mine’s construction was “progressing well”…

    “Greyhound took a stupid risk but quickly saw sense,” Galilee Blockade spokesman Ben Pennings said.
    “Most Australians don’t want the Adani mine and every single company with a retail brand has listened to their customers and dumped Adani.
    “We’re already experiencing climate chaos and corporations simply have to take heed of an angry public increasingly willing to risk legal sanction for a liveable climate.”
    https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/business/companies/greyhound-buses-rules-out-new-adani-deal-20200128-p53vgv.html

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      Another Ian

      Greyhound entering another “get woke, go broke” phase?

      Be interesting to see who bids for that contract.

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        hatband

        It’s called Capitalism.

        Capitalists fund the Astroturf Anti Adani org, they supply the Rent-A-Crowd,

        the Police Force looks the other way, Adani hocks it’s lease, and

        the Protest Funders pick it up for a song.

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    pat

    22 Jan: Guardian: Great Barrier Reef group severs ties with Greyhound over Adani contract
    Exclusive: Bus company’s CEO Alex de Waal resigns from board of Citizens of the Great Barrier Reef Foundation after support for coal project declared ‘clear conflict’
    by Graham Readfearn
    A Great Barrier Reef conservation organisation has ended its partnership with bus company Greyhound just hours after Guardian Australia revealed the company’s contract at the controversial Adani coal project in Queensland.
    Citizens of the Great Barrier Reef Foundation held an emergency board meeting at 8am today, where its chairman Alex de Waal, who is the chief executive of Greyhound Australia, resigned…

    Andy Ridley, chief executive of Citizens of the Great Barrier Reef, told Guardian Australia: “It was a clear conflict. We acted within hours and the decision was very clear.”…
    “We didn’t know,” said Ridley. “The challenge is that we had a good partnership [with Greyhound] and we strongly supported them as a means of transport because of its low footprint and that 40,000 [of their customers] gave us a dollar. We will miss that funding.”…READ ON
    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/jan/22/great-barrier-reef-group-severs-ties-with-greyhound-over-adani-contract

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      Kalm Keith

      Australia is in trouble.

      There’s huge funding of these activists but I don’t know how Australia’s tax officers view the movement of funds from overseas “supporters”.

      Are Foundations audited or are they treated as charities that are tax exempt.

      I resent tax free activity that is undermining Australian industry and employment.

      KK

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        hatband

        I don’t know either, but I do know how the ATO views deduction claims for donations to

        Trade Unions by subcontractors who have won a large bid.

        It waves them through with zero scrutiny.

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        Sceptical Sam

        Well according to a submission in the Joint Parliamentary Committee on Electoral Matters’ report of a couple of years ago (as reported in that left-wing rag the “Guardian”) there is:

        “evidence that a number of organisations that received tax concessions are engaging in activities in defiance of clear regulatory restrictions.

        Specific examples given included:

        Greenpeace Australia Pacific, 350.org Australia and the Wilderness Society (Australia) participating in a pre-election rally against prime minister Malcolm Turnbull in June 2016, along with the Australian Labor party, the NSW Greens and GetUp

        The Australian Conservation Foundation hired a truck to drive through the environment minister Josh Frydenberg’s electorate during the 2016 election campaign, which displayed a banner criticising the minister for refusing to sign the foundation’s environment pledge.

        In October 2016, the Australian Marine Conservation Society attacked the Queensland Labor government’s dealings with Adani by staging protests at Labor’s state conference.
        The Wilderness Society (Queensland) authorised campaign material during the 2015 Queensland state election urging voters to “Put the LNP last.

        On 14 August 2015, the Australian Conservation Foundation authorised a one-page advertisement against the then environment minister, Greg Hunt. The advertisement included the logos of five other entities that are both registered environmental organisations and registered charities.”

        Needless to say it was opposed by the Labor/Green cabal.

        It went nowhere.

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    jack

    Got a red thumb, I think because I mention an author hated by the left.
    Lets see if I can get 20 red thumbs.

    Aristotle
    Etienne De La Boetie
    Francis Bacon
    John Lilburne
    Baruch Spinoza
    John Locke
    Charles Montesquieu
    Thommas Hobbs
    Voltaire
    Benjamin Franklin
    Adam Smith
    Thomas Jefferson
    Fredric Bastiat
    John Stuart Mill
    James Madison
    Ludwig von Mises
    Friedrich Hayek
    Henery Hazlitt
    Milton Friedman
    Jorden Peterson

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      robert rosicka

      You need to include an author the left hold in high esteem , one they get their inspiration from and even evidence of man made globull warming .
      Theodor Seuss Geisel

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      toorightmate

      jack,
      I’ll let you in on a little secret…………………
      THE LEFT CAN’T READ>

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        robert rosicka

        They can’t count either .

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          Dave in the States

          That’s the big problem: innumeracy. That is why alarmists think:

          Human co2 emissions are big in the global scale of things and therefore a big problem.

          They don’t understand that even if the hypothesis they espouse is correct the effect would be logarithmic.

          That they fail to realize statistical graphs can be and are manipulated to show the unprecedented or misleading trends. Or that they fail to realize statistical insignificant values cab be and often are shown to be alarming.

          That climate models are evidence and the numbers the spew out are meaningful and relevant.

          That wind and solar can replace hydrocarbon fuels.

          That wind and solar are relatively inexpensive and will stay that way.

          That EVs can replace ICE vehicles.

          I could go on.

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            jack

            Dave
            From what I’ve observed on this site, it has quite a colony of numerical/objective type humans.
            I have found that most peoples belief in “climate change” has very little to do with the numbers or objective analysis.
            It’s all about koalas, polar bears and media repetition, in other words propaganda.
            Unfortunately, when it come to swaying the masses, propaganda beats facts and figures every time.
            At the same time I an very dubious of the quality/agenda of our education system.

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        yarpos

        the seem to read Alinsky OK, or is that a picture book now?

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        sophocles

        I would put it slightly differently:

        they can read
        they can calculate/compute

        what they can’t do is comprehend.

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      hatband

      The Fake Left doesn’t have issues with Hobbes, Spinoza, Franklin, Mill, Mises. and

      Jordan [make your bed] Peterson, so you’re on fairly safe ground.

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        jack

        Hobbes, Spinoza, Franklin, and Mill, if you cherry picked at a shallow level a left type collectivist may support them, but if delved down to there epistemology, you would find very little agreement from any collectivist. Once you support Reason you are supporting Individualism, a very anti-collectivist fundamental. I agree they were soft red flags.
        Mises I would not agree with, mainly talking economics, he is very much free market, which is the antithesis of Marx’s Das Kapital, the lefts economic bible.
        I think if you stood up at the party meeting and mentioned he name you would get lynched.
        Jorden , don’t really know, just put him in there to make it a bit modern and there seems to be a lot of the left that really hate him. I think morally he is an anti-collectivist.
        I haven’t work you out yet, a wannabe anarchist, or do you just sit on the fence?

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          hatband

          Don’t take this as criticism, but I’m not paid to comment, nor am I a gatekeeper.

          Just a word on Individualism and Free Markets.

          The individual , by definition, is one out, and always

          potentially at the mercy of the Strong.

          No matter your politics, it’s always Labour versus Capital.

          When we had Tariffs in Australia, the Working Man and his family had a chance.

          Once Whitlam axed the Tariffs on Clothing and Footwear the balance of the previous 30

          years swung sharply in favor of Capital, and it’s gotten much worse

          in the 45 years since.

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            jack

            Wow that was quick!
            Myself, with a tendency towards a free market, mainly less Government intervention, but I do believe in tariffs, especially for Australia.
            In the world geared such as it is, free trade between nations, benefits corporations, and most corporations exist not because of their business acumen, but because of political favor, which I consider wrong.
            You would expect the, very left, Whitlam to legislate to to protect the ‘workers’, not to destroy their livelihood, as you pointed out. He in reality pandered to the corporations that became benefactors of his action.
            The Lima declaration, supported by governments on both sides, with the humanitarian pretense of helping developing countries, allow corporations to build ‘sweat shops’ over seas at the cost of destroying industry here in Australia.
            The people are better of with less government intervention.
            You have got to question the motives of any government action, because it sure ain’t in the interest of the people.
            I won’t even start with the Banking system.

            Let me give you my lay political summation: Big Government Bad, small government better.

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        jack

        A further thought.
        The left, especially the ‘useful idiot’ type, being without fundamentals, will latch onto ideas from any where.
        What ever is expedient at the time.
        In the US, most democrats have a distaste for the founding fathers and the constitution.
        When is suit their needs, in typical political flip flopness, they run around quoting them.
        If you have a minimal philosophical foundation, you can go around contradicting yourself with impunity.

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      jack

      Well that didn’t work well at all.
      Only 1 red Thumb!
      Not to many utopioides here.
      Let me try another tact.
      Feel free to red thumb if you disagree.
      And if your brave enough tell why i have been so unkind.

      People, where the world would be better off, if their parents used contraceptives.

      Plato
      Hegel
      Karl Marx
      Friedrich Engels
      Trotsky
      Antonio Gramsci
      Adolf Hitler
      Saul Alinsky
      Michel Foucault
      Hilery Cliton
      Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez
      Greta Thunberg

      Sorry that is it, just typing these names has lobotomized my thought process.

      31

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    Choroin

    This new Rebel Media expose of Greta Inc was quite interesting.

    Her early connections with Ingmar Rentzhog, a Swedish financial adviser and PR manger who launched her new career are covered in some detail.

    Lots of interesting footage about her private security detail also.

    Worth the watch, not too long if you watch at 1.5x speed.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TTXdhTwO320

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    Choroin

    ^ oh, and in addition to the above, Ingmar Rentzhog made millions off of ‘discovering’ (creating) Greta Inc.

    80

  • #
    pat

    28 Jan: Carbon Pulse: China pilot CO2 markets to stay closed with extended holiday amid virus concerns
    The carbon exchanges for Beijing and Shenzhen on Tuesday confirmed their emissions markets would remain closed until at least Feb. 4, with the other Chinese pilot markets expected to follow suit after the central government extended the Lunar New Year holiday to curb spread of the coronavirus.

    28 Jan: Carbon Pulse: US threatens retaliation against EU over carbon border measures -Financial Times
    The US has said it would react with possible retaliatory measures against the EU if it opts to impose carbon border adjustments, the Financial Times reported, quoting US commerce secretary Wilbur Ross.

    27 Jan: Carbon Pulse: German development agency seeks CERs to offset 2017-18 emissions
    A German development agency has opened a tender to acquire UN carbon credits to offset its emissions from 2017-18.

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  • #
    pat

    28 Jan: Guardian: UK must create 120,000 green energy jobs by 2030 to meet targets
    National Grid report says target needs to be met if projects to cut greenhouse gas emissions are to go ahead
    by Jillian Ambrose
    The UK must recruit more than 100,000 people to fill green energy roles within a decade if the government hopes to meet its binding climate targets, National Grid has warned.
    A report by the company found that Britain needs to fill 120,000 roles in the green energy industry by 2030 to help develop projects that can cut greenhouse gas emissions to near zero. That number is likely to reach 400,000 by 2050, when the government expects to have developed a clean energy system based on renewable electricity, green heating systems and electric vehicles…

    The report warned that a fifth of employees in the energy sector are due to retire by 2030. The UK’s energy industry faces stiff competition from other sectors and has a narrow pipeline of young people pursuing Stem (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) qualifications to draw from, it said…

    ???Research carried out by YouGov has found that people of all ages, from all regions across the UK, are “looking for a job with environmental purpose”. More than eight in 10 women and seven in 10 men have said they are keen to play their part in tackling climate change. Over half of adults are specifically looking to work for an organisation that is helping the UK to achieve its climate goals…

    Kwasi Kwarteng, the minister of state for business, energy and clean growth, said: “Tackling climate change is not only saving the planet, but is significantly boosting our economy. As we work to reduce our emissions to net zero by 2050, the UK has the potential to support 2m green-collar jobs across our world-class renewables sector, among other industries.”
    https://www.theguardian.com/business/2020/jan/28/uk-must-create-120000-green-energy-jobs-by-2030-to-meet-targets-national-grid

    28 Jan: Guardian: Energy firms face inquiry over £1.3bn green power cable
    National Grid and Scottish Power project was two years late and has suffered outages
    by Jillian Ambrose
    National Grid and Scottish Power face an investigation by the energy industry regulator after repeatedly bungling the startup of a £1.3bn subsea power cable which is supported by home energy bill payers.
    The high voltage power cable began transmitting renewable electricity from Scottish windfarms to homes and businesses in England and Wales in late 2017, about two years behind schedule.

    Since then it has suffered multiple outages due to faults along the 850km power line, which runs from the west coast of Scotland to the north coast of Wales, and has spent most of this year offline…
    When the cable is not operating there is a higher risk that windfarms may be paid to turn off, at a cost of millions of pounds to energy bill payers every week, to avoid overloading the local grids with more clean electricity than Scotland can use…READ ON
    https://www.theguardian.com/business/2020/jan/28/energy-firms-power-cable-national-grid-scottish-power

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    pat

    27 Jan: BBC: Climate change: UK has ‘one shot’ at success at Glasgow COP26
    By Matt McGrath
    If the Glasgow climate conference fails to deliver, it could mark the end of the global approach to tackling the problem…
    But according to Claire O’Neill, the president of COP26, the UK has “one shot” at making it a success.
    She told a BBC documentary that if Glasgow fails, people will question the whole UN approach…

    If the EU can persuade China to put an ambitious new climate plan on the table, it will significantly improve the chances of success in Glasgow.
    “For China to enhance it’s climate targets or not will be primarily a political and diplomatic decision, and that is precisely why the European engagement at the diplomatic level will be critical for us to unlock further climate ambition from Beijing,” said Li Shuo from Greenpeace China…
    PIC: The influence of Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg has grown rapidly

    However, many experts are concerned that China won’t show its hand until they know who will be the next president of the United States – that election will take place just six days before the meeting in Glasgow opens…

    To achieve a deal, the UK will need to persuade some of the more reluctant countries like India, Brazil and Australia that it is in their interest to agree to increase their ambitions.

    Rachel Kyte is now Dean of the Fletcher School at Tufts University, but was previously the World Bank’s special envoy on climate change.
    She believes that agreement in Glasgow will need the UK to help shift the narrative – that a new climate deal offers more opportunities for countries than challenges.

    “This is completely within our means. Most of the technology we need, we have. Most of the finance we have, ***it’s just sloshing around in the economy just really inefficiently purposed at the moment,” she said…
    https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-51229604

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    • #
      el gordo

      ‘To achieve a deal, the UK will need to persuade some of the more reluctant countries like India, Brazil and Australia that it is in their interest to agree to increase their ambitions.’

      India, Brazil and Australia can see with their own eyes that this is meaningless if China keeps building coal fired power stations. We have no ambition to go broke for a myth.

      10

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        hatband

        Scotty & the crew are onboard the Climate Choo Choo.

        Their job is to spin like crazy that they’re resisting, rather than greasing the skids.

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        • #
          el gordo

          ‘Scotty & the crew are onboard the Climate Choo Choo.’

          The green left are accusing the government of scuttling Madrid, abandoning subsidies for renewables and much more. Reading between the lines, I see a divorce from this IPCC lunacy.

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          • #
            Graeme No.3

            see pat on the net post, about Morrison’s speech about “working with the States to produce lower electricity bills, more reliable generation AND to reduce emissions”. Possibly by offering to build new coal fired stations with lower emissions.

            Can anyone see Dopey Dan and Palacechook agreeing to abandon more “renewables”? **
            When the bills start climbing Morrison can blame them.

            ** Include SA where the Premier What’sHisName and his Minister PelicanBrain are gungho for “renewables” but who cares? It doesn’t matter what they do, and there is a distinct chance they will blackout the State again.

            10

          • #
            hatband

            Reading between the lines, I see the project rolling along unimpeded, Scotty

            playing his role fairly believably.

            You’ll never read it in The Guardian, but I’m thinking Scott Morrison-Technocrat.

            Cultural Burning- it sounds like the Mother of all Technocrat Schemes.

            00

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          el gordo

          Adaptation is the new buzz word, forget emissions its already too late, so lets adapt. A political masterstroke by Morrison.

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            hatband

            It’s Spin.

            The Adaption will be Behaviour Modification on our part to the Bushfires, not

            modifying the Bush to suit our safety.

            Scotty is a weasel, that’s why the support he’s getting is from Liberal Weasels,

            not the people with any integrity left.

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              el gordo

              You fail to see the big picture, comrade.

              Morrison is talking adaptation, this is climate science, key words Bob Carter. The PM is empowering the people to adapt to climate change, like getting rid of the undergrowth to avoid more catastrophic bushfires in a warming world, and not concern ourselves with emission reduction because the rise of CO2 cannot be stopped.

              The government is being advised, probably by those two kiwis who got Scot and Boris reelected. This is pure speculation and should not be taken seriously..

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              el gordo

              ‘ …. adaptation works whatever the causes are.’

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      WXcycles

      “This is completely within our means. Most of the technology we need, we have. Most of the finance we have, it’s just sloshing around in the economy just really inefficiently purposed at the moment,” she said…

      Another loony who has no clue about finance or economics, or rather, doesn’t want to know about it.

      UK Deficit = £23.5 billion (1.1% of GDP)

      “… huh … what’s a budget? …”

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    pat

    behind paywall:

    China, not America, will decide the fate of the planet
    Financial Times- 27 Jan 2020

    Carbon Brief on the above:
    Gideon Rachman, chief foreign affairs commentator at the Financial Times, writes “that the battle to control climate change now depends much more on what happens in China than in America”. “China’s coal addiction and authoritarian system mean that it will struggle to provide a global lead on the climate. The Europeans are passionate on the subject but probably lack the organisation and the international heft to take charge,” he says. “Nonetheless, the Trump administration’s climate scepticism (denialism, if you prefer) still matters.”

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    pat

    27 Jan: Nature Communications: Paris Climate Agreement passes the cost-benefit test
    by Nicole Glanemann, (Potsdam) Sven N. Willner (Potsdam) & Anders Levermann (Potsdam & Columbia Uni)
    (from abstract) We account for uncertainties regarding the damage curve, climate sensitivity, socioeconomic future, and mitigation costs. The resulting optimal temperature is robust as can be understood from the generic temperature-dependence of the mitigation costs and the level of damages inferred from the observed temperature-growth relationship. Our results show that the politically motivated Paris Climate Agreement also represents the economically favourable pathway, if carried out properly…
    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-13961-1

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    pat

    lol:

    28 Jan: Guardian: This was supposed to be Ireland’s climate election – what happened?
    Country was among first to declare climate emergency but health and housing take priority at ballot box
    by Rory Carroll
    Ireland had seemed poised for its first climate-centric general election, with concern about carbon emissions and species extinction expected to shape the battle for votes on 8 February.
    Last year, after all, Ireland became only the second country in the world to declare a climate and biodiversity emergency. “Great news from Ireland!! Who is next?” Greta Thunberg tweeted at the time.

    Momentum grew. The Green party surged in local and European elections and young climate activists led protests in Dublin. In an opinion poll, 55% of Irish voters named climate change as the most serious issue facing the planet and 54% said they were prepared to curb their living standards to combat the threat.

    But now, with two weeks to go, most voters are tuning out on the environment. In an Irish Times opinion poll last week, just 7% of participants said climate change would have the most influence on their vote.
    Instead of global, voters are thinking local. Forty per cent said healthcare was the most important issue and 32% said housing, reflecting widespread anger over hospital bed shortages, waiting lists, soaring rents and homelessness…
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/jan/28/this-was-supposed-to-be-irelands-climate-election-what-happened

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    pat

    a new catastrophe:

    28 Jan: Brisbane Times: Extreme weather: Parts of north Queensland drenched by rain similar to 2019 floods
    By Toby Crockford
    A north Queensland community has recorded more than 500 millimetres of rain in 24 hours and the weather bureau has described some rainfall totals as “similar” to those seen during last year’s floods.
    The Bureau of Meteorology said in the 24 hours to 9am on Tuesday, five locations in the state’s north were drenched by rainfall in excess of 350 millimetres, with parts of the Townsville CBD going underwater.

    Areas around the Burdekin Shire town of Ayr, about 70 kilometres south-east of Townsville, copped the worst of the downpours including Rita Island with 529 millimetres, Ayr itself saw 421 millimetres, Groper Creek recorded 418 millimetres, Inkerman Bridge received 403 millimetres and Brandon had 386 millimetres…

    Senior forecaster ***Gabriel Branescu said the overnight rain closed the Bruce Highway and some schools, with more rain on the way on Tuesday night and potential for the next two days…
    Mr Branescu said there were similarities to the one-in-500-year Townsville floods last February…
    https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/national/queensland/parts-of-north-queensland-drenched-by-rain-similar-to-2019-floods-20200128-p53vhp.html

    ***Gabriel has been all over the MSM today:

    20 Oct 2018: ABC: Dracula’s weatherman flees cold climates to face the Queensland sun
    By Shelley Lloyd
    ***Gabriel Branescu speaks four languages, has lived on four continents, guided Soviet-made MiG fighter jets on sorties over Eastern Europe and safely landed expeditioners on an ice runway at Casey Station in Antarctica.
    He grew up in the shadow of Dracula’s castle in Transylvania, a distant mountainous region of the former socialist republic of Romania — a country still steeped in obscurity and seemingly frozen in time.
    So how did he end up on the other side of the world as a meteorologist in Brisbane?…

    Time to flee the cold
    When his son began to face health problems, the family sought out a warmer climate, bringing Mr Branescu to a job with the Bureau of Meteorology in Darwin in 2011.
    “It was a massive culture shock for my family arriving from Canada to Darwin, where it was so laid-back and tropical…

    He said the biggest challenge now facing forecasters was the high expectation of the community.
    “It’s big pressure, people want to know the forecast 10 days out, and that’s very difficult,” he said.
    “People are very tough on forecasters — we are not gods.”…
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-10-20/draculas-weatherman-transylvania-antarctic-brisbane/10388066

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    toorightmate

    Nothing whatsoever to do with climate, but isn’t it nice that no one is mentioning Kobe Bryant’s raped case.
    Maybe that’s because he was a fine Democrat supporter.

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    OriginalSteve

    Uh oh…..

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-01-28/solar-profits-threatened-by-nem-rules-killing-investment/11903706

    “Solar generation is being buffeted by financial headwinds that are killing investment

    “Solar no longer ‘a licence to print money’

    “Independent wholesale energy market consultant Allan O’Neil has waded through the 660 pages of the ‘Generator Statistical Digest (GSD) 2019′ and found one of the key themes was the struggle new solar farms were having “with the messy reality of the electricity market”.

    “”A couple of years ago it might have seemed like converting plots of old-style farmland into new-style solar farms would be a licence for someone to print money,” Mr O’Neil said.

    “Back then, NEM wholesale prices were averaging close to $100/MWh (megawatt/hour) and the renewable generators’ other key source source of income, Large-scale Generation Certificates (LGCs) were roughly similar — around $80-90 MWh per certificate — an indication of the paucity of renewable energy in the system at the time.
    …………….
    “A case study in struggling solar

    “But the collapse of the LGC market is only one nasty surprise that has blind-sided renewable investors.

    “The state-of-art facility started generating in late 2018 and has the capacity to deliver close to 400GWh of renewable electricity to the national power grid annually.

    “Falling Marginal Loss Factors (MLFs): MLF’s account for transmission losses. Lower MLFs mean larger losses and therefore lower NEM revenues, and for that matter fewer LGCs credited, which in turn also erodes revenue. Recently MLFs have been recalculated and more remote generators like Coleambally saw its output effectively slashed by 13 per cent overnight. Movements like this were unprecedented a few years ago, with MLFs barely moving year-to-year for most generators. Mr O’Neil said, looking at the GSD data, these savage cuts to solar farms’ revenue bases are now fairly commonplace.

    “Spot price discounts: Another arcane, but important, area of the NEM for generators. The GSD breaks out the various generators’ net spot revenue per unit of production. Coleambally — like most other solar farms — suffers a unit revenue discount to the spot average. The reason is fairly simple: solar plants supply peaks in the middle of the day as wholesale demand is falling away. Compared to the reasonably nearby Uranquinty gas plant near Wagga Wagga, where output is concentrated at higher price peaks, Coleambally’s price harvest is pretty meagre.
    Network constraints: The GSD data looks at generation constraints from a number of different angles, and none of them are particularly flattering for the likes of Coleambally. There are a number of factors constraining generation, but put simply the network is like a freeway with a speed limit of 100kmh, but traffic runs much slower in peak hour. Solar generators, without storage, generally have to merge into peak-hour conditions, limiting their capacity to contribute.

    “FCAS costs: Frequency Control Ancillary Services (FCAS) costs are another one of those mysterious factors bubbling away in the NEM cauldron. Basically they are costs recovered from generators missing their forecast output, either pushing out too much or too little power and putting the system out of balance. Historically, FCAS costs amounted to just 1 to 2 per cent of revenues being rebated back to the market operator. The GSD data shows for many solar farms it is closer to 5 to 10 per cent. It is 7 per cent at Coleambally, which is a fairly heavy and ongoing erosion of margins. As Allan O’Neil points out, solar output is not as predictable as other generation due to things like clouds floating past and therefore bear a disproportionate share of FCAS costs.

    “Solar profit pain may not mean lower power prices

    “Green Energy Market’s Tristan Edis says the state of investment in solar in Queensland is a salient lesson. Basically it has fallen off a cliff.

    “Queensland and South Australia have been at the forefront of depressed solar prices, but Mr Edis argues News South Wales and Victoria will not be far behind.

    “”Ultimately, they too will see depressed prices in the middle of the day. Victoria (and South Australia) will also see an increasingly significant wind generation price depression effect,” he said.

    “”This is great news for electricity consumers. Unfortunately though, it means NSW and Victoria will likely follow Queensland’s footsteps of a renewable energy investment collapse in a year or so’s time.

    “”The one caveat is that maybe our governments will take their climate change commitments seriously, or another coal generator calls it quits.”

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    Firstly, note the unfortunate title for this article at the main ABC news site, and then again, as a heading in the text itself: (while the article has a different heading for the actual article, the main home page for the ABC shows the alternate title, the one from the heading in text itself)

    Solar no longer ‘a licence to print money’

    Then, when you read the article itself, there’s nothing really about altruism, about saving the Planet, about the need to lower costs for electricity for the people. No, it’s just about how to make a lot of money from solar power plants, not rooftops, but commercial power plants themselves.

    They don’t even bother to hide it any more. They are actually relying on high prices to make their money. Totally opposite to the meme that it is the cheapest form of electricity, and is in fact what is causing prices to be heading lower.

    Despite all the ‘blah blah blah’ about makin’ money, there was absolutely nothing on the actual power being generated by these solar power plants, and now, spread across the NEM’s five States, there are 43 of these solar power plants with a total Nameplate of 3427MW, and the largest of them is that plant they mention at Coleambally and that has a Nameplate of 180MW.

    I went and had a look at the Load Curves for power generation from this plant for the last couple of weeks and it looks like it’s restricted to an output of around 105 MW maximum. It rises as usual from around 6AM, and when it reaches 105MW it flat lines across the remainder of the day till it falls away again late in the afternoon.

    Here’s a link to the image for this Coleambally plant fortoday (28Jan2020) and note how it varies around the maximum, dropping away as cloud lowers its output. The total generated power for the period of generation gives it a daily operational Capacity Factor of 21%, and that’s at the height of Mid Summer.

    Then I went and did the same exercise for ALL of the 43 solar plants for today as well. This link shows the image for the Load Curve for all of those plants. The maximum for the day is 1860MW, and from a Nameplate of 3427MW, that CF at the maximum is just 54.3%. Across the whole period of power generation for the day, it has a daily operational CF of 19.5%, again at the best time of year for solar power, Mid Summer. For the best Month of the year, that CF for the Month comes in at 24.9%. In June, Mid Winter, that CF drops to just 11.2%, and the year round CF comes in at 17.2%, so that effectively means that ALL these solar 43 plants have an effective power generation of just 590MW, from a Nameplate of 3427MW.

    For some perspective, Bayswater currently has one of its Units off line, and the average for those three Units across the whole 24 hour period of yesterday was 1780MW.

    So, every one of those 43 solar power plants delivered the same power across one day as those three Units at Bayswater delivered in eight hours. Those 43 solar plants have double the Nameplate of those three Bayswater Units and only delivered a third of the power of those same THREE coal fired Units.

    Across the whole day, solar power generated 16GWH of power, and that was 2.5% of all the required power being consumed across the day (630GWH) and all coal fired power delivered 436GWH. (69.2% of all generated power across the day) so all 43 solar plants multiplied by 27.25.

    The money making capabilities of solar power plants is incidental. They just cannot EVER equal what coal fired power does, when it comes to actual power generation.

    The same article mentions storage, umm, batteries. So, if you add together the fact that solar power is making power more expensive, then you add on the cost of the batteries, would someone please explain to me how all of that is supposed to make power cheaper.

    And also note how all along, the meme was to let the market decide what form of power generation was ‘the way of the future’.

    Judging from this article it seems that the market has decided, and it’s not solar plant power that’s for sure.

    And also note the author of the article, an ABC Business reporter.

    I long for the day the ABC actually gets an engineering reporter to tell the truth about these types of power plants, and not just about the greedy money grubbing side of things.

    Tony.

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      Speedy

      G’day Tony – thanks for that. Question for you. What’s the odds that the materials that make up a solar panel are produced by (ahem) renewable energy, with the consequent cost savings embedded into the capital cost? What would be the cost of a solar panel that was manufactured using solar & wind energy?
      Just wondering.
      Cheers,
      Mike

      20

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        Speedy

        Sorry Tony, I meant to use the word savings with inverted commas – aka “savings”…

        10

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        Graeme#4

        An interesting question, which prompted me to go looking for answers. My panels are made in Singapore, but I don’t know what percentage of the panels are manufactured from raw materials there. If it’s a significant percentage, Singapore derives 95% of its power from natural gas, so the panels would be manufactured primarily using gas energy. More research is needed…

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      Kalm Keith

      A great summary Tony.

      One day, not so far away, all of those solar plantations will be at their engineering “use by date”.

      Will they be re-engineered to continue the good work, just shut down and left for someone else to clean up, or properly removed and the components “ethically” put away where they can cause no harm.

      The future looks dim with piles of unmanageable renewables waste, a weirded out energy marketing system and a neglected baseload generation infrastructure.

      Here in Newcastle currently there’s a large number of empty shops and offices that gives an ominous feel. I suspect that the exorbitant cost of Electricity has for many been the last straw.

      Political stupidity eventually reaches a point where it can’t go on.

      Something has to change.

      KK

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        WXcycles

        The future looks dim with piles of unmanageable renewables waste,

        Keep the good stuff, the wastes can be disposed of in lined concrete in a mine shaft.

        10

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        Chris

        The worlds biggest solar-thermal power plant ‘Crescent Dunes’ in the Nevada desert has gone bankrupt. The company behind this plant is the same one who was going to build a solar farm for the SA government ,fortunately there was a change of government which cancelled the deal. stopthesethings.com

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      Robber

      Tony, those solar plant investors must be starting to hurt, as spot daily prices are now often dropping below $50/MWhr because of the midday solar surplus.
      For January, average prices have been NSW $104/MWhr, Qld $59, SA $51, Vic $50/MWhr.
      Compare that with January 2019, when those prices were $117, $94, $241, $250.
      And average prices for the last seven months: $82, $62, $69, $83.
      Is surplus solar now driving prices down?

      20

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      WXcycles

      Excellent expose` Tony, so they deliver, in practice, about 1/5th of claimed output, per year.

      What a joke.

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    graham dunton

    The world at war, episode 20-Never forget. Never again.

    Every school should play this, will it cause stress, will they understand the difference?
    while many are fixated daily on chasing skeletons,through some artificially created labyrinth.

    The world at war, episode 20-Never forget. Never again.

    https://www.michaelsmithnews.com/
    Never forget. Never again.
    Tuesday, 28 January 2020

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    el gordo

    Monsoon failure caused by the positive IOD, which is still impacting even though it has returned to neutral.

    https://www.weatherzone.com.au/news/latest-monsoon-onset-for-darwin-on-record-is-now-a-certainty-despite-recent-rain/530990

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    Bobl

    AEMO WEBSITE NEW LOOK
    The screen which shows the actual power generation by state used to include the amount being generated by “Wind and Other”
    This item has been removed from the new display. It was the main reason I went for a look.

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      Bobl,

      at that same page where I think you are looking, the Dispatch Overview, I know it doesn’t give the totals, but on the green bar for each State, the end bit is in a lighter green and has the little wind tower fan icon in it. This shows how much of the total is coming from wind power, and is referred to as semi scheduled generation.

      However, if you go along to the third tab at the top headed ‘Fuel Mix’, it gives you percentages for actual supply, and at that page, is a tab with a drop down menu that you can select the Current mix or for other time frames, and it gives you a percentage of the total for each source of power generation, and under that bar graph, the actual power totals for each of those sources.

      Tony.

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    Another list of experts with apparently no expertise in the critical area! They left of Mickey Mouse this time but he actually has real firefighting experience!

    https://abcnewswatch.blogspot.com/2020/01/lacking-of-inquiry-where-are-bushfire.html

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    Ross

    I watched Alan Jones on Sky last night. What fantastic broadcaster that guy is –gets out among the people affected by the fires, learns what is actually happening and what is NOT happening then looks directly at the camera and tells the Government and bureaucrats in very simple terms why they are failing. He uses very simple everyday examples which cannot be argued to make his point —kids are meant to going back to school but parents cannot buy the clothes, the books etc. and in some cases there are no schools to go. In his blunt terms things need to happen NOW , not next week.
    All the wonderful generosity of the Australian public (about $500 mill apparently) but there is not much sign of it being delivered.

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    Zane

    Silly Guardian now says we have to stop drinking milk because dairy farming produces three times more greenhouse gases than some vegan alternative. What planet do these nutjobs come from, and who is paying them to spout this endless nonsense?

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      hatband

      Drinking Animal Milk isn’t any good for you anyway, up until the early 1940s, the Cream

      was separated out and sent to the Co-Op, and the Skim was fed to the Pigs and the Chooks.

      The larger issue is why aren’t the producer organisations

      campaigning hard to discredit these people?

      At the moment, they’re operating in a vacuum and there’s no opposition at all.

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        Greebo

        Couldn’t agree more. Horse milk would probably be best for us if we must, as equines are monogastric, like us. It is also low in fat. . I do not drink milk. It causes large amounts of mucus in my system. But I always believed that ALL mammals wean their young for a reason. Why it is sold as a good idea to then consume the milk of totally unrelated animals is beyond me, except to prop up the dairy industry.

        I have no scientific backup for this next, but I believe that our interference in the foodchain is the reason we see so many children these days with anaphylactic reactions to seemingly ordinary foods. I have two step grandsons who cannot go anywhere without their epipens. Both are fatally allergic, one to peanuts ( which are not really nuts ) and the other to “tree” nuts ( which are ). I also believe that the ever increasing ‘fashion’ for mothers to not breastfeed is a major contributor, as breastfeeding would seem to be a major way to pass on certain immunities.

        As I say, I have no scientific backing here, just observations from living with a woman who was a midwife, a Kinder teacher and what they now call early childhood educator.

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      To wil the end is to will the means. If emissions are to go to zero then cows must too. Reality has left the building.

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    robert rosicka

    Train crash near Barnawatha not long ago , seems a passenger and goods train have impacted each other after one of them came off the track .
    Hope no one had a train booked from Melbourne to Albury , no reports of serious injury thankfully and maybe now they will fix the tracks after stuffing the line up during the last upgrade .

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    el gordo

    ‘The impact of climate change on the unprecedented NSW bushfire crisis will be examined in a new inquiry announced by the state government.

    ‘Premier Gladys Berejiklian announced the bushfire inquiry on Thursday, saying it was crucial to “leave no stone unturned”.

    ‘The inquiry will be run by two experts over a six-month period and will take submissions from the public.’ SBS

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      el gordo

      It feels like a pro warmist whitewash.

      ‘State Premier Gladys Berejiklian said the inquiry would consider how climate change, human activity and other factors had contributed to the blazes.
      Bushfires have killed 25 people in NSW and damaged thousands of homes.

      ‘Ms Berejiklian said she hoped the inquiry would allow the state “to learn from this season and the catastrophic conditions we’ve faced, and apply these learnings for the future”. BBC

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      el gordo

      Dr Mary O’Kane is Chair of the Aurora Energy Board and is clearly biased, its a total whitewash.

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    el gordo

    Adaptation strategy is now coming into place.

    ‘Natural disasters will put NSW’s AAA rating at risk in the long term, according to a report by credit rating agency Moody’s.

    ‘The report warned prolonged drought and longer, more extreme bushfire seasons would place significant pressure on the state budget.

    ‘The state’s capacity to handle immediate climate hazards would be exhausted as “long-term impact poses credit risks”.

    ‘Moody’s also warned Sydney would experience severe water stress in the next decade, requiring significant spending on infrastructure.’ ABC

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    Greebo

    This bloke for PM. I don’t care where, I’d probably move there…

    Farage’s final speech.

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    Graeme#4

    Not sure if this thread is still being monitored, but for “OriginalSteve”:, I have just reviewed my Eucalypt fuel load calculations. Now have a revised figure of 8.34 Tonnes/hectare over one year. The difference from my initial higher figure comes from my wrong decomposition amount – I took the least case for one item (branches and twigs), instead of averaging the separate decomposition rates, based on their percentage. I’ve re-calculated the average decomposition rate at 23%.
    If the fuel load is allowed to accumulate, it can reach as high as 99.42 Tonnes/hectare over 28 years, or the 95% percentile mark of the calculated maximum.

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    Greebo

    Quite an interesting ‘interview’…

    Rubin and Carlson, Part one

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