JoNova

A science presenter, writer, speaker & former TV host; author of The Skeptic's Handbook (over 200,000 copies distributed & available in 15 languages).


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Weekend Unthreaded

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Weekend Unthreaded, 9.0 out of 10 based on 24 ratings

250 comments to Weekend Unthreaded

  • #
    RicDre

    Irony Alert: Some Californians Are Buying Gas-Powered Generators To Power Electric Vehicles During Blackouts

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2019/10/11/some-californians-are-buying-gas-powered-generators-to-power-electric-vehicles-during-blackouts/

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    • #
      Hanrahan

      BTW a small Honda generator charges a Tesla S at abt 2 miles per hour.

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      • #
        AndyG55

        Heres a suggestion, just put the generator in the back of the Tesla and leave it running permanently, then you would have to stop to fill up the generators gas tank.

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        • #
          RicDre

          “…just put the generator in the back of the Tesla…”

          Hmm, we could call it a hybrid-Tesla…

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          • #
            Annie

            Or just have a small battery for starting, lights etc. and save yourself a whole lot of money and angst…rely on petrol or diesel, no probs.

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            • #
              Another Ian

              Annie

              A recent discovery on modern petrol vehicles when a Falcon alternator went out. It is my property beater so I wasn’t too worried about replacing it.

              Used to be that when you had it started the petrol pump was driven by the engine, so electrical load was mostly just the ignition.

              Now most are injected and the pump is electrical. And if diesel and common rail – - .

              A comment was that a new series Landcruiser will flatten the battery in about 6 hours without the alternator.

              81

    • #
      Another Ian

      Another for the growing list of “California didn’t think about – – ”

      “Nobody saw this coming: Electric-Car Owners Shocked by California Blackouts”

      http://www.smalldeadanimals.com/index.php/2019/10/11/we-dont-need-no-flaming-sparky-cars-40/

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    • #
      StephenP

      Remember when the Spanish paid so much for solar electricity that some chancers found it economical to run generators at night to run lights that powered their solar panels?

      20

    • #
      Roy Hogue

      You don’t know the half of California’s folly. Since a power line was responsible for one of the bad fires last year, this year just in time for the fire season the electric utilities have rolled out a plan called PSPS (Public Safety Power Shutoff) with the intent of shutting off power to any area where wind is forecast. Said outage to last as long as the windy conditions continue. Since wind at this time of year can last days at a time this means essentially shutting down big chunks of civilization for indefinite periods.

      Needless to say this is not going over well with the average Californian. I started a thread on our local community forum that has kept the comments coming until it is now several times longer than any thread in anyone’s memory.

      Edison’s attitude is apparently get your own generator if you want reliable power, to which I asked, “If we need our own generator to have reliable power why do we need Edison?” Interesting question isn’t it? I expect the backlash to begin soon.

      10

  • #
    RicDre

    Peter Ridd has reached the $700,000 mark ($706,986 as of 1:19 PM EST) on his GoFundMe channel plus $105,500 in donations that have come through from non-gofundme channels.

    370

  • #
    David Wojick

    I posted this earlier but thought it worth repeating.

    My latest: 500 skeptics rattle Europe’s climate cage

    https://www.cfact.org/2019/10/11/500-expert-skeptics-rattle-europes-climate-cage/

    The beginning:

    The climate change debate has never been as hot in Europe as it is in America, but that has now changed some. At least 500 experts, mostly Europeans, have signed a ” Declaration that there is no climate emergency” which has been delivered to the Secretary General of the United Nations.
    Fritz Vahrenholt, one of the signatories and a moderate German green, explains it this way:
    “The Dutch climate researcher and geophysicist Professor Guus Berkhout took the initiative and wrote to critics of climate models in various countries, including me. We then promoted the text among colleagues. It’s interesting to note that there are about 150 Italian researchers on the lists, about 100 Americans and 70 Dutch, but only 14 Germans. In Germany, the mainstream is particularly dominant – one no longer dares to go against the party line.” (I am one of the American signers.)

    Vahrenholt adds: “The climate debate has become so hysterical that it is driving politics into a cul-de-sac. But there is no climate emergency. If Greta Thunberg’s demands were to be implemented, development and prosperity would be at risk worldwide. Thunberg accuses politicians of killing people – but she ignores the successes of policy making: The global number of starving people has halved, life expectancy has doubled, child mortality has declined by 90%. These achievements have been significantly to do with improved energy supply, better heating and transportation and better food supply.”

    The Declaration project is led by a Dutch group called CLINTEL (https://clintel.nl/), which is short for Climate Intelligence. We certainly need more of that.

    There is more in the article.

    Great fun this.

    I have been informed that the number of signers is over 600 and growing. Here’s to Climate Intelligence. Their English language website is coming soon, hopefully on the 17th.

    Also check out my Climate Change Debate Education website, with over 350 skeptical science videos, organized by presenter. Then by length, ranging from one minute to over an hour per video. http://ccdedu.blogspot.com

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    • #
      Latus Dextro

      Great to see CFACT on the case. All hands on deck.
      Posted earlier still, yesterday, at JoNova – There is no climate emergency

      Meanwhile, Tony Heller’s prodigious output and devastating analysis highlights the wanton froid being peddled by the scientivists and their MSM cucks.

      “A Crime Against The Community”

      “In this video I look at temperatures in Australia and how they are being”misused” and “suppressed.” “

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      • #
        Latus Dextro

        Thanks David for the vital backstory.
        Inadvertent ingrate @ 3.1

        50

        • #
          Greg in NZ

          ‘wanton froid’

          was unsure if that was a new style of Chinese/Austrian cooking or a case of

          ‘Climate Freud’

          neurotic behaviour, unconscious conflict, resulting in riotous yelling/screaming/wailing, aka tantrumis maximus, to gain Mommy’s attention (known as Mum, Ma, or Mother, west of the International Dateline, or Mummy in certain ‘royal’ households).

          As for Sigmund, wasn’t his first choice of ‘vehicular propulsion’ a certain powdered fuel by the name of Über Coca (?)

          80

          • #
            Latus Dextro

            ;-) G-in-NZ – dang!
            As we appear denied the free use of the English language, my impoverished French got the better of me. I had meant to use ‘chaud‘ but had became shorted out by the current S.Island froid, which has been relentless and unseasonal for the last week or more and in an aberrational moment, became oddly transmogrified by that forbidden word one vowel different to Freud.

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            • #
              AndyG55

              climate frãũď

              No problem at all. ! :-)

              40

            • #
              Greg in NZ

              Oui oui Otago!
              Buddy phoned from Bannockburn 2 weeks ago saying he’d been up since 3 am ready to turn the windmills on – nah, not those windmills, the ones grape growers use to fend off frost… in Sept/Oct, ie. spring.

              Chaud / froid – carbon™ causes everything!

              40

      • #
        OriginalSteve

        Speaking of a little unhinged….I heard of a church having a “sustainability festival” …. all youd need then would be morris dancers and it would be a full blown eco pagan setup….

        The discussion yesterday about the emerging one-world religion seems to be happening at the grassroots level, whereby cluess churches are allowing themselves to be schmoozed into the eco lunacy…..in the rush to be “relevent” they ae trading sound christian theology for trendy wordly foolishness…..and this is how it goes down….

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        • #
          Russ Wood

          Morris dancers? But – but – but – some of them wear BLACKFACE! Ooohh, scream!
          Mind you, I’m writing as one who, many years ago, was invited in to help found a Morris side in Johannesburg – the Jubilee Morris. I had to back out as the musician ‘cos my antique squeeze-box was chromatic keyed, and couldn’t play all of the dance tunes! The folk club DID put on some mumming plays, however.

          00

  • #
    tom0mason

    No doubt NOAA won’t want to hear it – I have doubts they’ll even log it — but buckets of low temperature records (maybe 100+) have tumbled across the United States over the past 24 hours.An embarrassment of riches for the cold hunters, almost as embarrassing as that paltry handful of heat records which fell in the Southeast
    Says https://electroverse.net/just-count-the-cold-records-that-fell-over-the-past-24-hours/

    And a day later there are more broken records, see the unofficial recording site at http://coolwx.com/record/usamovie.day.php .

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    • #
      tom0mason

      Add to that …

      Despite it being early October, many parts of Canada are seeing a flurry of winter conditions — the worst of which are in Manitoba.
      Calgary has already seen its fair share of snowfall and Vancouver managed to break several weather records for its cold temperatures this week, one of which was 103-years-old.

      Now, much of Manitoba, including Winnipeg, is seeing blizzard-like snowfalls. Environment Canada issued a winter storm warning as parts of southern Manitoba are pummeled with snow.
      The weather agency says that parts of Manitoba have already received between 20 to 40 cm of snow, with an additional 20 cm expected over the next 12 hours.

      The snowfall is also accompanied by very strong winds, with gusts between 80 to 100 km/h.
      “Travelling will remain difficult if not near impossible into Saturday as the heavy accumulating snow, strong winds, and temperatures near zero result in treacherous conditions,” says Environment Canada’s website.

      “The combination of heavy, wet snow and strong winds will likely result in more downed trees and power lines.”

      More at https://www.sott.net/article/421841-Manitoba-Canada-is-getting-pummeled-by-an-early-winter-snowstorm

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    • #
      Ross

      I see the electroverse link mentions crop futures going up. Given many farmers in the midwest had trouble planting their crops on time because of the very wet late winter/early spring and now this on top of it, then a few farmers will be having very hard time.

      100

      • #
        PeterS

        So we should expect the farmers to turn into global cooling alarmists, not! It’s time for farmers to join in the war against the climate change alarmists. However, our own farmers in Australia will have a tough time doing that. They are suffering extreme drought conditions but of course it’s not new. They have been through it many times in our history. The difference though is our farmers are left out on a lurch while the farmers in the US are supported greatly by their government. At least their government recognises to a large extent the importance of food security, as well as fossil fuel and energy security. Ours doesn’t.

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      • #
        tom0mason

        EM Smith over at https://chiefio.wordpress.com/2019/10/09/effect-of-early-winter-on-crops/ has some interesting info on the crop losses.

        Here is one (of two) of his featured videos, https://youtu.be/CKpjhCTvAFs

        10

    • #
      Pauly

      Vancouver has ‘coldest Oct. 10 in 123 years’. “41 records broken in province in past 2 days”.

      https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/cold-temperatures-weather-records-british-columbia-bc-1.5316498

      And not to be outdone, the world’s climate change love child was in Denver, Colorado, on Friday:
      https://www.denverpost.com/2019/10/11/greta-thunberg-denver-climate-strike/

      However, you won’t find too many internet videos of this event. If you look closely at the photos of people gathered around, they are all dressed in parkas, scarves and beanies. And that white stuff on the ground in the background of the photos? That’s snow – because yesterday had the coldest temperature ever recorded in Denver:
      https://www.denverpost.com/2019/10/11/denver-weather-historic-low-cold-front/

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      • #
        Pauly

        Looks like the Denver Post has changed some of its photos since I first found these links, presumably to remove those showing snow.

        However, the following link, from CBS Denver, has an aerial shot that shows snow covering every grassed area near where Greta spoke, and snow on the ground immediately in front of the rotunda where all the climate activists were speaking from.
        https://denver.cbslocal.com/2019/10/11/climate-strike-denver-greta-thunberg-civic-center-park/

        Clearly, the irony of the situation escaped them!

        110

        • #
          toorightmate

          The snow may have hidden the rubbish that the Green Activists left lying on the ground???
          It seems to be a trade mark of Activist gatherings these days.
          Rubbish left by rubbish talking about rubbish.

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        • #
          RicDre

          “… an aerial shot that shows snow covering every grassed area near where Greta spoke…”

          Is this a new “Thunberg” effect, similar to the well-documented “Gore” effect?

          110

      • #
        Greg in NZ

        Pauly, WE* all know cold is caused by heat. *Whacked-out Enviro•mentals.

        Meanwhile an hour-or-so west of Denver, up the I-70 toward Summit County, CO in the Rockies, that ‘white stuff’ sure makes Loveland Ski Area look mighty purdy this time of year:

        http://www.keno.org/colorado_web_cams/loveland_ski_area_cams.htm

        Loveland Pass and Arapahoe Basin are ‘just over the hill’ from here, along the same ridge of the Continental Divide: wonderful, primo, steep, deep, back-country terrain ❄

        70

      • #
        theRealUniverse

        Gore…”Snow will be a thing of the past” “our kids wont know what snow is”..

        30

    • #
      theRealUniverse

      Rolling ever onwards..the next LIA, 2020-2050? Regardless of fake news about Himilayan glaciers shrinking and other places (minority) I think theres going to a be a steady buildup of ice in the nether regions before long. A good place for the XR loonbins to be forced to reside.

      30

      • #
        Greg in NZ

        Say it ain’t so! Who will think of the nether regions!

        Won’t somebody please think of the nether regions . . .

        20

    • #
      Another Ian

      A mere challenge for the next iteration of the warming algorithm

      20

  • #
  • #
    James Poulos

    All through the Hiatus, they looked for reasons to attribute it to continued Global Warming.

    Decline in severe weather events continued to prove Catastrophic Climate Change.

    Pacific Islands rising from the ocean only proved Historical Sea Level Rise.

    Recovery of the Great Barrier Reef only proved Ocean Acidification.

    I can only conclude:

    Climate Activists belong to a Death Cult!

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    • #
      Hanrahan

      Even the super typhoon threatening Japan seems to have been s fizzer. Don’t get me wrong, I’m happy for the locals, but the organisers of the rugby union that cancelled important games might feel that they have been needlessly panicked. I can understand the F1 cancelling Sat qualifying but they have left themselves an out by scheduling that for this morn;

      https://www.windy.com/?35.120,144.031,6,i:pressure,m:eKkakcs

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      • #
        Latus Dextro

        Nice graphic! Winds seem quite mild, even gusts moderate. Hysteria.
        Climatism always costs.

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        • #
          Greg in NZ

          Even the snow models have been pulled back somewhat, from 1 m (3 feet) to 10-20 cm on Hokkaido’s ski areas, as well as the tri-border of China, Russia and North Korea to the west:

          https://www.snow-forecast.com/maps/dynamic/japan?over=none&symbols=snow&type=snow.next3days

          Clicking on the 3-6 days prognosis shows another rain-bearing depression heading north towards Honshu, Japan’s main island. Guess a lot of 16-year-olds don’t know what the term ‘Typhoon Season’ means. Also, wonder if the BøM are gonna go all Godzilla on us and claim this week’s little low off the QLD coast is unprecedented UN-persecuted.

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        • #
          theRealUniverse

          Notice how often these things are always predicted to be the ‘strongest ever’. Yep looks like it has lost its force allot in the past 24.

          10

          • #
            Greg in NZ

            The biggest EVAH… since the last one, Typhoon Vera, back in 1958.

            Radio NZ is repeating, via BBC / Reuters / Mickey Mouse, that Disneyland Tokyo closed for the very first time due to weather… since the last time back in 1984. Eric Blair will be laughing in his grave.

            20

      • #
        toorightmate

        I have sat through a few cyclones in the Pilbara.
        When the wind is blowing at >180kph and the rain is sheeting down, you don’t go outside with an umbrella.

        50

      • #
        theRealUniverse

        Windy craps out on my chrome (wont display the wind properly) I have to use firefox to view it.

        10

    • #
      PeterS

      Climate Activists belong to a Death Cult!

      I’ve realised that a couple of years ago but more recently woken up to the fact they are far worse than that. They are also becoming an existential threat to the West. It’s time more people woke up to that fact. In other words they are not much better than terrorists, at least in name only but if left alone will eventually escalate into actions against the West. Time for appeasement is over.

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      • #
        OriginalSteve

        Nazism didnt get killed off … it just went underground and resurfaced in the green movement…

        90

        • #
          PeterS

          I’ve called the Greens more aligned with Nazism than communism many times before but was criticised for saying it. I’m glad someone else agrees with me. They have an alliance with the ALP only because of political expediency. If they ever became a major political force (highly unlikely but not impossible) they would dump the ALP like a hot potato. The Greens actually remind me of the young brown shirts at the early stage of Nazism in Germany.

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          • #
            el gordo

            Not quite, they were running through the streets of Hamburg hitting people over the head, this lot just disrupt traffic.

            Beijing is eliminating State Owned Enterprises (SOE) and encouraging overseas investment in China. This is a positive move.

            21

            • #
              Greg in NZ

              Oi, I got hit on the head!

              Keith Richards’ first coherent comment moments after falling out of that coconut tree in Fiji.

              His second and third comment? Oi, where’s my drink? Man I need a fag smoke.

              40

          • #
            theRealUniverse

            Yes, ‘eco-fascism’ is the term../Brown Green Shirt/ stuff, beat up anybody who disagrees with you.

            20

  • #
    PeterS

    Children now are using courts to crash and burn the West (and only the West – see 1st link below). As Martin Armstrong explained in his post (see 2nd link) they are communists using climate change as their excuse to convert the West into a socialist dictatorship. I can agree to that if one considers the children are misguided fools who do really believe in their cause, much like the communists of old who started revolutions in the past only to end up with a dictator, much to their surprise and disgust.

    Kids’ climate lawsuit to go before Alaska court

    The Climate Change Fraud Used by Marxists When Communism Failed

    50

    • #
      theRealUniverse

      I feel sorry for them, probably PAID to file a suit. Based on totally fr@udlent science. On a tweet from a twitter link posted on here somewhere, eco nuts PAID 400 pounds (each I guess) to protest..now WHO would have that sort of cash..

      10

  • #
  • #
    David Wojick

    Serious business talk of EV bubble bursting!

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-10-10/dyson-scraps-plans-for-electric-car-after-failed-attempt-at-sale?fbclid=IwAR2jt720onZw7BlrM2Qe9A6sFuGu6hcLwLTfeEMUnuX4zNnPbIdKXFU87EM

    Dyson Ltd.’s sudden decision to scrap its $2.5 billion electric-vehicle ambitions is the latest reality check creeping into the once soaring EV industry.

    The famed maker of vacuum cleaners and hair dryers couldn’t find a way of making the project commercially viable, billionaire James Dyson said in a letter to staff Thursday. The announcement came about two years after the company first disclosed its plans to jump into car manufacturing.

    Dyson represents one of the most high-profile players to pull out of a sector that’s attracted hundreds of start-ups in recent years seeking to become the next Tesla Inc. But there are mounting signs that the bubble is bursting as China scales back handouts in the sector and competition heats up. Sanford C. Bernstein estimates that global EV sales fell for the first time ever in July and dropped by a record 23% in August.

    “Tesla’s future remains uncertain. Almost all the EV start-ups trying to follow look challenged,” Bernstein analysts, including Max Warburton and Robin Zhu, said in a report that cited the Dyson decision as a worrisome development in the industry. “Most of these start-ups will likely fold. The truth is barriers to entry in autos remain high. Making cars is hard. The move to EVs will be expensive.”

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  • #
    Another Ian

    “On the quiet sun front
    “The recent prolonged solar minimum and subsequent weak solar cycle 24 have led to suggestions that the grand solar maximum may be at an end,” says this study on nature.com.

    The study, published in 2015, looked at past variations of solar activity. In 2010, the study found, scientists estimated a mere 8% chance of a return to Maunder Minimum-like conditions within the next 40 years.

    However, “the decline in solar activity has continued, to the time of writing, and is faster than any other such decline in 9,300 years.” (Italics added)

    https://www.iceagenow.info/fastest-decline-solar-activity-9300-years/

    Via Chiefio

    50

  • #
    Another Ian

    “Records Found in Dusty Basement Undermine Decades of Dietary Advice

    Raw data from a 40-year-old study raises new questions about fats”

    https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/records-found-in-dusty-basement-undermine-decades-of-dietary-advice/

    Via http://www.smalldeadanimals.com/index.php/2019/10/12/the-sound-of-settled-science-58/

    40

    • #
      Peter C

      Thanks Ian,

      I took a copy for future reference;

      This part was very interesting:
      ….9,423 study participants, ages 20 to 97, all living in state mental hospitals or a nursing home. It was the largest experiment of its kind….It was also one of the most rigorous. Participants were randomly assigned either to the group eating the then-standard diet, which was high in animal fats and margarines, or to a group in which vegetable oil and corn oil margarine replaced about half of those saturated fats. And because the Minnesota participants were in institutions that prepared all their meals and kept records, the scientists knew exactly what they ate for up to 56 months. Many nutrition studies have foundered because people misremember, or lie about, what they ate.
      Analyzing the reams of old records, Ramsden and his team found, in line with the “diet-heart hypothesis,” that substituting vegetable oils lowered total blood cholesterol levels, by an average of 14 percent.
      But that lowered cholesterol did not help people live longer. Instead, the lower cholesterol fell, the higher the risk of dying: 22 percent higher for every 30-point fall. Nor did the corn-oil group have less atherosclerosis or fewer heart attacks.

      The study was never published, despite the good quality data and study design. It seems to have contained very important results. The reason for non publication is not known, since the authors are deceased. It is implied in the article that the study scientists themselves did not like the result (they seem to have been anticipating and hoping for a different result).

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      • #
        Latus Dextro

        It has been shown that 50% of those with “normal” cholesterol who have experienced their first MI, experience a second MI.
        The focus on a low level vasculitis / enhanced arterial endothelial ‘stickiness’ associated with chronic widespread inflammation may be more predictive. A CRP <1 is highly desirable. Chronic, unresolved, internally or externally driven maladaptive ruminative stress is one killer. Another may be widely oscillating blood glucose levels associated with the consumption of refined carbohydrates, white flour and sugar.
        But beyond these there's abject cold and the pressing urgency to address the murderous 40,000 excess winter deaths of the seasonal UK power impoverished brought about by the CO2 delusion used to promote globalism.

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        • #
          OriginalSteve

          That fits with other research that points to lower cholesterol inducing heart attacks and lower cholesterol can create elevated aggression once the brain is deprived of cholesterol.

          The other thing that I havent seen studied is the link between liver function and cholesterol levels. My thoughts are that a decreased liver function may not recycle cholesterol out of the blood fast enough, leading to an “elevated” blood cholesterol level.

          Cholesterol itself is not bad.

          40

  • #
    Lance

    Good article at City Journal

    “Electric vehicles won’t save the planet and won’t survive without subsidies.”

    https://www.city-journal.org/electric-vehicle-batteries

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    • #
      Graeme No.3

      With the usual howls (in the comments) from kids who’ve had their candy taken away.

      I liked that comment about Tesla starting up 100 years after Studebaker stopped making EVs.

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    • #
      theRealUniverse

      Quote from Marohasy ‘Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts.’
      Interesting…there isnt really any such thing as a scientific fact. Truisms maybe better, or probabilities of there being an erroneous assumption. ALL science theories and hypothesis (which are different things) have assumptions and more importantly approximations. Those assumptions and approximations are necessary BUT can lead to misleading hypotheses. So facts, yes but please tread with caution. We cant compare a complex system of ‘climate’ to basic concepts of Newtons first law, or 1st law of thermodynamics, which to a very high degree are proved by experiment.
      As for ‘Climate Change the Facts’, yes in the data.
      I believe the climate is virtually un-modelable due to the nature of astrophysical processes in the sun which cant be predicted, at present.

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      • #
        Greg in NZ

        And how is the sun doing these days?

        https://www.spaceweather.com/

        Tenth day with no sunspots – 2019 now at 73% spotless days, equivalent to 2008′s minimum – Arctic auroras going off under the full moon (Tromsø picture) and now there’s something called the Russell-McPherron Effect I need to read up on.

        tRU, you have any layman’s description of the Thermosphere Climate Index (as per spaceweather‘s data left-hand column)? 1957 had the hottest, 49.4×10¹⁰ W, with 2009 the coldest, 2.05×10¹⁰ W, while presently we’re at 4.42×10¹⁰ W which is classified as cold. It’s a little above my head; any easy-to-comprehend explanation? Ah, read the fine print, Greg!

        https://spaceweatherarchive.com/2018/09/27/the-chill-of-solar-minimum/ Thermosphere Climate Index

        10

  • #

    There’s something I have noticed (again) in this last week.

    I noticed it last year when I was doing the daily electrical power data collection and collation, and it made me smile a little, really, and it concerns daylight saving time. (DST)

    As you are aware, that change (here in Australia) took place last weekend, and again, Queensland is the only State not participating, with respect to all States east of the WA border that is, you know, that same area of the main Australian electrical power grid.

    Okay then, you think, what would that power grid have to do with DST.

    As you are aware from what I have mentioned previously, and often, electrical power generation and consumption is ….. instantaneous. What is generated is that tiny bit more than is actually being consumed, so they (those Engineers running the show at the AEMO) have to watch it on a second by second basis, and new plants are added to the grid as power consumption increases on a five minute basis, and then taken off the grid on the same basis as power consumption drops.

    That needs to be done on that instantaneous basis, so here, time is critical, and for that purpose, one time is the Standard and it is all worked out from that, and for that purpose, Queensland is the standard time point, and everything, all power generation is set around that time in Queensland, and I already can hear some brains working on that. I contacted the engineers at the AEMO (just one of a number of times I have spoken with them) and they confirmed Queensland as that time base reference.

    Now, normally, the only difference to that is in South Australia, (SA) as all other States, Tasmania, Victoria, NSW, and Queensland are all on the one time, with SA half an hour behind that. So, when you read the actual power consumption charts at the AEMO site, they are all with respect to the time in Queensland. (hence instantaneous)

    Now, when I was taking that data on that daily basis, what I did find was a little quirk, in that while you might expect power consumption to be fairly much the same across the Country, because people have the same habits at home, hence power consumption would be similar with respect to time, what I did find was that each State had their evening peak power consumption at slightly different times.

    So, what I would do was to find the time of absolute maximum electrical power generation, and use that time as the evening peak. During the cooler Months that was between 6.30PM and 6.55 PM every night, and usually around 6.40PM. In the Summer Months, that peak moved back earlier in the day, mainly thanks to HVAC and the different nature of power consumption because of that when compared to Winter power consumption, easily seen from the careful notice of the daily Load Curves, and how they (religiously) change for one Season to the next, having done that ever since the introduction of electrical power.

    Okay, then, now taking that one point of max generation, I use that time point to then find actual power consumption in each of those five States. What I did find, across the whole year, is that each State has a differing time point for their own peak power consumption. It might only vary ten to fifteen minutes either side of that max generation time, but adding all five States consumption together at that one point in time is in fact the time of maximum power consumption, even though each State has a slightly different time for their own peak. You might expect it to be different mainly with SA, being a half hour later each evening, but SA is the second smallest consumer in the Country at barely 6.2% of all consumption, so it makes very little impact on the overall, even when it does have a high peak at times. Now, as you may guess, the largest power consumer by State is NSW, so when that State has a high peak, then that is more often than not the time setter for the overall peak.

    Okay now, cue the time change for DST.

    What that has now very effectively done is to lower (and only marginally mind you) that main evening peak, and spread it out along a longer time frame. So instead of the evening peak reaching (say) 28000MW at one point in time, in other words up to that peak and then back down, in increments of 100MW, what DST has done is to spread that peak along a time base of now around an hour and it might only reach 27500MW, but it will stay at that level, give or take 100MW for a longer time, usually around an hour or so, and sometimes longer. Peoples habits are the same, with respect to power consumption versus time, but now that actual time base has moved around a bit with now different times.

    It’s a sword with two edges though. Because, instead of their being just one point in time for the peak, and then power falling away. it now is sustained at a slightly lower level, but for a longer time.

    And it is predictable. You know exactly the time when that evening peak will kick in, and now, how long it will last, so (as the AEMO entity) you can organise your power generation needs around that time. Well, you know, the power plants you can trust to actually do that, ramping up coal fired plants on that regular daily basis, and bringing in natural gas fired units and to a lesser degree, hydro Units as well. Forget all solar power because all of that is gone for the day, and wind is either there or not, and hey, that’s only 6% or so, if it is there at all, so wind power is also pretty much inconsequential when ACTUAL power is required for when it is needed the most at that peak time.

    So there you have it, Daylight Savings Time comes into the mix for power consumption. It actually might be a good thing at the height of Summer, when those ‘monster’ power consumption days kick in because it slightly lowers that main evening peak a little, even if it does spread it out for a longer time.

    See how much you learn from looking at the single most neglected thing in this whole electrical power debate, the simple daily Load Curves.

    And hey, can you see in a slightly different manner now, how Queensland might come under pressure from a number of fronts to NEVER re-introduce DST.

    Tony.

    (Cue subject change deflection real soon)

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  • #
    el gordo

    The recent uptick in world temperatures was caused by Sudden Stratospheric Warming and not El Nino.

    http://clivebest.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/Aug-2019.png

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    • #
      Peter Fitzroy

      Imagine, if, as you believe, we are headed for a cool period. Would this cooling be enough to trigger a positive feedback loop. For example, if the oceans cool, then they will hold more CO2 in solution, removing it from the atmosphere. With less CO2, and water vapour, any warming influence would be lessened, resulting in further cooling.

      What are the chances?

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      • #
        el gordo

        Its important to leave CO2 out of the equation and focus on the oscillations.

        After the huge warm spike at the end of last century the heat has now been taken up by the oceans, eventually dissipating as the sun cools.

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        • #
          Peter Fitzroy

          Fine leave out CO2 – but are you saying that it is not possible to get a positive feedback in cooling? If so, how do you get into an iceage?

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          • #
            el gordo

            Water vapour may offer a positive feedback, there is some debate on this and needs further discussion.

            ‘ … how do you get into an iceage?’

            We are at the end of the Holocene, a mini ice age of 500 years, the world becomes cooler and wetter, then a few hundred years of cold/ dry conditions. Deserts form, ice and snow build until glaciers reach London and New York.

            How do we avoid becoming snowball earth?

            40

            • #
              Peter Fitzroy

              That is my point, if you can have feedbacks working one way, they can work in the other direction as well. The stasis does seem to be controlled by plant life in the main (and that’s all the way down to the algae and phytoplankton. However, a meteor strike, or a bit of runaway volcanism and you are off piste. We are recording rates of change not seen previously. To be sanguine is to be ill-informed

              09

              • #
                el gordo

                ‘We are recording rates of change not seen previously.’

                That is incorrect.

                If you want to see a possible future then go to 1300 AD, real climate change is terrifying.

                20

              • #
                bobl

                Not the case, the current epoch is below the Holocene average and not unusual at all. You as usual err on the side of alarmism, most things in Nature are self limiting, they either have negative feedback or saturate (Eg like mouse plagues), getting to a snowball earth is HARD, it will require a sustained time at the extreme outer edges of our elliptic orbit. We are not there for thousands of years.

                What is a risk though is that natural cooling may cause oceanic absorption of CO2 which could induce famine, this is a big risk associated with any cooling, indeed the increase in CO2 is currently sustaining our population growth, we can’t go back to even 370 PPM without possibility of food shortages.

                20

          • #
            RickWill

            Peter asked:

            If so, how do you get into an iceage?

            Glaciation is associated with the eccentricity of earth’s orbit. The onset occurs when there is high eccentricity in the orbit. During perihelion, the northern hemisphere predominantly faces the sun. During aphelion the southern hemisphere sees more of the sun but at much reduced intensity than at perihelion.

            Due to the substantially higher proportion of water in the southern hemisphere than the northern hemisphere there is more stored energy over the earth in any yearly cycle when eccentricity is low. The difference in stored solar input between almost circular orbit and maximum eccentricity averages 16W/sq.m less over the yearly cycle. Over a few thousand years, that difference in power input is enough to cause land and sea ice accumulation. Once Bering Strait is closed due to sea ice, the transfer of heat from the North Pacific to North Atlantic is reduced. That slows the Gulf Stream in the Atlantic and the land surrounding the North Atlantic cools resulting in rapid build up of land ice.

            The next peak in eccentricity in the so-named Milankovitch cycle is 30kyr away but is unlikely to result in glaciation. The following peak, about 130kyr out, is a big one and will certainly result in glaciation. I may not be around to see that but that would accurately be termed catastrophic climate change for a large proportion of the world’s population.

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      • #
        theRealUniverse

        What are the chances?..NONE. As that CO2 does nothing and doesnt produce any feedback at all. Those so called feedback loops dont consider many other inputs. They cant exist as the atmosphere and ocean system is in thermal equilibrium.
        Also the main ‘sin’ of the models is the assumption of a flat earth model.

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        • #
          David Wood

          Talking about the flat earth model.
          A fundamental assumption of the greenhouse gas hypothesis is that the average solar energy falling on the surface of the earth is one quarter of the maximum. This is ONLY true when averaged over a full 24 hours, not 23 not 24, but exactly 24 hours.
          However the mathematical equations used in the textbook explanation of the hypothesis do not include any time dimension and must therefore be considered to apply instantaneously. It is, of course, physically impossible for the sun to shine on the whole surface of the earth at the one moment.
          Once this simple error is accepted the mathematical treatment of the greenhouse hypothesis is proven to be wrong.
          It would be possible to construct a more correct model in which one half of the earth’s surface is bathed in sunshine at half of the maximum intensity, and where the dark side of the planet loses the energy received by the sunlit hemisphere. However this would not produce the ridiculous notion that sunlight, on its own, is incapable of heating anywhere on the surface to higher than -33 0C. As such it would not be capable of producing most of the scary scenarios beloved by alarmists.

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          • #
            Kalm Keith

            Nice.

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          • #
            Peter Fitzroy

            Gosh, the award of the unaware comment of the day must go to this one.
            you forgot angle of incidence, seasonal variations, and axial tilt, which also have an affect.

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            • #
              theRealUniverse

              YAY PF you finally dont believe in the ‘flat earth’ theory of the GHG effect..what are we coming to..

              60

            • #
              toorightmate

              DRONGO,
              I know David Wood and I have read your ramblings.
              If I were you, I would shut up.
              You are totally out of your league.
              David would buy and sell you blindfolded.
              I repeat – you bloody DRONGO.

              60

              • #
                Graeme No.3

                toorightmate:

                While I would agree with your comment I must wonder how stupid DRONGOs are?

                Surely, since there are DRONGOs around they must be capable of reproduction (at least those of higher mental capacity) where does that leave Fitzroy? Is there video of him attempting congress with an aggrieved zebra? Probably a male zebra as Fitzroy seems incapable of absorbing obvious facts. Or has it been suppressed by his fellow cult members?

                60

              • #
                Bill in Oz

                Graeme, you are gaily a wandering
                Into fields that I dare not tread !
                Watch out for offended zebras !

                :-)

                30

            • #
              AndyG55

              “Gosh, the award of the unaware comment of the day must go to this one.”

              No, PF !

              The “UNAWARE” award is ALWAYS firmly in your grasp.

              And everyday, you make sure that you are never going to lose it.

              60

            • #
              Fred Streeter

              you forgot angle of incidence, seasonal variations, and axial tilt

              Or, of course, these may have been omitted as they are not germane to the single point being made.

              40

          • #
            AndyG55

            Not only that, but according to the S-B law, the effect of the variable Sun’s energy is to the 4th power, so the effect of the Sun’s energy certainly cannot determined simply by averaging over half the globe as a disc.

            60

      • #
        AndyG55

        Great to see you are concerned about a DROP in atmospheric CO2 levels, PF

        Reality might finally be breaking through your brain-washed miasma.

        Crop growth would slow, and yields would decrease.

        CO2 has basically zero effect on temperature, that is your next step to realisation. !!

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      • #
        el gordo

        We have to leave CO2 out of the equation and recognise that natural variability is driving OHC.

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24179224

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        • #
          Peter Fitzroy

          There must be an explanation the changes which are much faster now than in the past, https://www.pnas.org/content/116/4/1126

          But you seem to implying that there can be no way to get to an ice age, as if were down to natural variability, you would not see the linkages to the eccentricity in the earth’s orbit

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          • #
            AndyG55

            “which are much faster now than in the past”

            AGAIN, ignorant little mind, they do not have the resolution of past data to make that statement.

            We have had barely 150 years of slight warming, and the resolution of past data would be lucky to be anywhere near that.

            Sorry, I know basic mathematical comprehension is beyond you.

            If they want to look at OHC, they should consider this. Barely a squiggle !!!

            70

          • #
            el gordo

            ‘ … linkages to the eccentricity in the earth’s orbit.’

            .The Milankovitch cycle is not relevant, natural variables like volcanic eruptions and a quiet sun are the main drivers going into a mini ice age.

            40

      • #
        Lance

        Peter. I have an honest question to ask of you.

        Do you realize that it doesn’t matter if you are right or wrong about CO2 or fossil fuels or anything else?

        The raw materials for your “solutions” do not exist in sufficient quantity.

        The manufacturing capacity does not exist in sufficient quantity.

        The installation force required does not exist in sufficient quantity.

        The capability for wind or solar to provide reactive power does not exist.

        The transmission lines to integrate disparate, intermittent, generation, does not exist.

        The economic reality of having to build two grids for the function of one is totally ignorant.

        Nothing you say can change this.

        SO why do you pretend that your viewpoint matters to anyone, anywhere, in the slightest?

        I’m truly curious. Is “doing something” that is utterly irrelevant so vastly important?

        Or does someone pay you to troll blogs with ignorance?

        It is amazing how you dodge reality in favor of ideology with no regard to fact.

        Please do enlighten us all as to exactly why you tilt at windmills.

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        • #
          Kalm Keith

          Obvious answer.

          Now body could be that stupid.

          So it’s $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$.

          Soros the Manipulator strikes again.

          KK

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        • #
          Peter Fitzroy

          Lance – if you see an increase in C02 by over 100 PPM in 100 years, and this after millennia of stability, and there is a new source of C02 production from burning fossil fuels which through various measurements completely accounts for the change (including ocean CO2).

          If you accept the science that C02 absorbs and readmints (in a random direction) IR, then the increase in CO2 will be bound to have an effect on temp.

          As to power generation – you assume a cold start for the build out of more sustainable generation (this is the hysterical claim that somehow we can only provide energy in this one way)

          Do I care if my view matters to you? Nope. I am not here to convert dinosaurs

          My topic, which all of you ignore, all the time, is this – is it possible to get a positive feedback in a cooling phase.

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          • #
            Lance

            Oh, so you are here to “convert dinosaurs”?

            Now we know. You have a religious mission.

            So be it. At least you admit that your position is ideological and religious, not practical.

            To answer your question about positive feedbacks:

            1. It is irrelevant.
            2. If it were relevant at all, or possible in any circumstance, it would have already happened. It didn’t.

            3. The proof of this is the Ordovician Period. CO2 levels were 10 times what they are today and it was an Ice Age.

            4. Your ignorance of system dynamics is proof that you know nothing about feedbacks or non linear harmonic systems. More so, your ignorance of Ed Lorenz’s proofs regarding system stability and predictability for stochastic system mathematics means that you don’t even understand the basic principles.

            5. Navel gazing ideological belief is no substitute for knowledge or science. It is, however, a precursor to Propaganda, Book Burning, Shunning, and other Nazi tactics.

            Glad we could clear this up. Your Religion guides you. Not facts. Not Scientific Methods. Pure Power.

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            • #
              Peter Fitzroy

              The Ordovician Period – which bit? You are citing a classic case of sampling error, where the samples were spread to far apart to show what was going on.

              In short “The problem with such coarse data sampling is the Ordovician ice age lasted only half a million years. To fill in the gaps, a 2009 study examined strontium isotopes in the sediment record. Strontium is produced by rock weathering, the process that removes CO2 from the air” (Young 2009)

              “What was found was consistent with the strontium results in CO2 levels dropped at the same time that sea surface temperatures dropped and ice sheets expanded. As the ice sheets grew to “over the continent, rock weathering decreased. This led to an increase in atmospheric CO2 which caused global warming and a retreat of the glaciers. (Young 2010)

              Again you mix up weather (Lorenz) with climate.

              So how do you generate an ice age?

              09

            • #
              Peter Fitzroy

              While the full reply undergoes moderation, this is a snippet
              The Ordovician Period – which bit? You are citing a classic case of sampling error, where the samples were spread to far apart to show what was going on.

              010

            • #
              theRealUniverse

              Yes Lance, especially no 4.!
              on 3. That was backed up by the late Bob Carter.

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            • #
              Peter Fitzroy

              The next bit
              In short “The problem with such coarse data sampling is the Ordovician ice age lasted only half a million years. To fill in the gaps, a 2009 study examined strontium isotopes in the sediment record. Strontium is produced by rock weathering, the process that removes CO2 from the air” (Young 2009)

              09

            • #
              Peter Fitzroy

              The next bit with the offending word removedIn short “The problem with such coarse data sampling is the Ordovician ice age lasted only half a million years. To fill in the gaps, a 2009 study examined str0ntium isotopes in the sediment record. Str0ntium is produced by rock weathering, the process that removes CO2 from the air” (Young 2009)

              “What was found was consistent with the str0ntium results in CO2 levels dropped at the same time that sea surface temperatures dropped and ice sheets expanded. As the ice sheets grew to “over the continent, rock weathering decreased. This led to an increase in atmospheric CO2 which caused global warming and a retreat of the glaciers. (Young 2010)

              Again you mix up weather (Lorenz) with climate.

              So how do you generate an ice age?

              010

              • #
                Graeme No.3

                Actually the Ordovician is considered to have lasted 40-42 MILLION years.

                And if you are relying on radioactive Strontium isotope breakdown you raise the question of how much there was? I know that Climate Scientists are capable of ‘miriculous’ accuracy but you are talking of less than 0.2% of a minor quantity of a minor mineral.

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              • #
                Graeme No.3

                miraculous, rhymes with Climate louse.

                40

          • #
            Hanrahan

            Could you describe this “synchronous condensor*” for me Fitz? Ta.

            * Speil chucka doesn’t like “condensor” but I’m pretty sure that’s how it was in my text books. Maybe my brain is failing me.

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          • #
            Hanrahan

            is it possible to get a positive feedback in a cooling phase.

            Yes. As you describe sounds possible. Another is that as snow/ice cover expands more of the sun’s rays are reflected back into space, accelerating expansion of said white stuff..

            BTW My post immediately above is in reply to yours just below.

            40

          • #
            AndyG55

            “My topic, which all of you ignore”

            Because its a load of meaningless nonsense.

            You really do manage the “-GO” part really well, PF.

            40

          • #
            el gordo

            Water vapour feedback is strongly negative.

            40

            • #
              Graeme#4

              Hmm. Close to the surface, surely WV can both heat and cool, so surely any feedback effect can also be negative and positive?

              20

            • #
              AndyG55

              Not quite correct G4.

              WV is purely a coolant.

              It is very much a huge net transferrer of energy upward.. ie a COOLANT

              The only time it can seemingly cause warming is when it has taken too much energy upward, as latent heat.

              30

          • #
            RickWill

            Peter asked:

            – is it possible to get a positive feedback in a cooling phase.

            It is possible to get positive feedbacks, wherein a reduction in solar input causes a disproportionate reduction in temperature. The average” temperature across the globe is related to the distribution of water over the Earth’s surface. The Pacific is the main solar collector for Earth. Temperature across the globe depends significantly on the transfer of heat from the Pacific to the Atlantic. There are two geographic nip points that are vital for that heat redistribution – Bering Strait for heat transfer from the North Pacific to The North Atlantic and Drakes Passage for the Southern Ocean circulation and heat from the Southern Pacific to the Southern Atlantic thence to the North Atlantic via the Gulf Stream. Europe enjoys its amenable climate, despite its high latitude, from solar energy collected in the Pacific.

            Sea ice forming over the Bering Straight would severely restrict heat transfer from the North Pacific. That will knock out the Gulf Stream in the North Atlantic and causes cooling in all the land surrounding the North Atlantic.

            Eccentricity in Earth’s orbit, combined with the axis tilt and distribution of water causes a significant variation in stored energy in the oceans – as I explained to your question above.

            Water generally provides negative feedbacks but the distribution of heat is subject to critical geographic conditions that can lead to positive feedback.

            The easy way to wipe out populations surrounding the North Atlantic would be to close the Bering Strait. A well placed bomb or two could do that.

            30

          • #
            bobl

            Peter, if there is more CO2 emitting more IR spherically then there is more emission to space, with a constant input from the sun, that is a recipe for less energy. Energy in any reaction must be conserved.

            If what you are suggesting is true then increased temp would cause decreased IR emission due to feedbacks but satellite observation proves that wrong, as average temps rise IR emission rises, every high sensitivity model shows decreased IR emission with temperature, real world measurement shows the exact opposite happens, IE those models ARE WRONG

            Your problem here is that you have no way to create new energy to sustain the warming.

            00

        • #
          Peter Fitzroy

          Oh and two grids? All the Australian renewable generators are required to use a synchronous condenser at the point at which their supply is connected with the grid. you only need one grid.

          19

          • #
            Lance

            So What?

            A synchronous condenser is a power sink until it is needed for reactive power.

            Some 30% of its rated capacity is lost every second just so it is available for the seconds it is needed.

            That’s an expensive and inefficient way of compensating for a lack of active power reactance capability.

            Once again, you do not understand grid power.

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            • #
              Peter Fitzroy

              Then why are they used?

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              • #
                AndyG55

                Why the **** don’t you listen to Lance, instead of fabricating your own garbage explanations, PF

                It is blatantly obvious that his understanding of power systems is several magnitudes ahead of yours. Yours is indistinguishable from ZERO

                Why is it that any time you try to put forward something, it is ALWAYS an argument from IGNORANCE. ????.

                50

              • #
                Peter Fitzroy

                Ah – the old ‘stay in your lane’ argument.
                Do you hold to that?

                17

              • #
                AndyG55

                Keep displaying that ignorance, PF

                It all you are capable of.

                No evidence of CO2 warming.

                No evidence of any human caused global climate change in 40 years.

                You really are a flounderer, aren’t you PF.

                If you want to try to put forward an argument, at least try to make sure you know SOMETHING about what you are talking about !!

                Even the slightest little bit would help.

                50

              • #
                Lance

                Synchronous Condensors are used to stabilize frequency and voltage.
                They essentially store kinetic rotational energy and release it when the downstream voltage or frequency drop.

                They must be placed near the cause of the voltage or frequency perturbation to be effective.

                They offer seconds to minutes of time for the upstream thermal plant tap changers and governors to react to the situation and thereby boost voltage or frequency to prevent grid collapse.

                They do NOT store energy that is useful for timeframes greater than a few minutes at low demands or a few seconds at high demands.

                They are a cheaper solution than building or firing a topping plant to act as instantaneous reserve power.

                But. If the downstream load perturbation is of a significantly increasing nature, or the perturbation exceeds the capacity of the synchronous condenser, then their contribution will ultimately fail and if the thermal plant cannot supply the necessary total power being demanded or sustain the line frequency, then grid safety relaying will open to protect the thermal plant and the grid will go black.

                They are a “band aid” for specific transmission issues. Not a panacea for widespread frequency or voltage problems. Also, even when not releasing power or stabilizing frequency, they consume about 20% to 30% of their rated output as a parasitic load on the grid. You have to feed the beast. And that costs money. The parasitic loss ultimately is paid for by the users on their monthly bill.

                Many mistakenly believe that a synchronous condensor is a magical solution to frequency and voltage stability. It is not. It is a “patch” that is only useful near the load causing the problem and even then only for a few seconds or minutes at best.

                50

            • #
              Hanrahan

              I’ve never heard of a synchronous condenser. I’ve heard of power factor correction but if it lost 30% of its power it would overheat and explode. They are being put in substations to correct phasing error caused by inductive inverters, or so my friendly gingerbeer tells me.

              An aside: Until recently I thought that windmills generated AC which had to be synchronised to the grid. Now I’m not so sure. Do they go through a DC phase?

              41

              • #
                Peter Fitzroy

                you could of course, look them up, or let me give you a link
                https://www.think-grid.org/synchronous-condensers-better-grid-stability
                either way

                18

              • #
                Hanrahan

                Looks like newspeak to me. Two AC signals can be synchronous, best they are if they are 50 Hz power, but a capacitor is merely a reactive element, 180deg different to an inductor.

                40

              • #
                Peter Fitzroy

                They are mandated in Australia – and the renewable crowd pays for them, and accepts the functional loss incurred in doing so

                110

              • #
                AndyG55

                “and the renewable crowd pays for them”

                BS.. the taxpayer pays for them, through subsidies and increased electricity prices.

                70

              • #
                Lance

                They don’t “lose” 30% of rated power. They consume it. It is effectively an alternator running as a motor with a high mass like an unfired turbine attached that stores kinetic energy. When loads demand voltage or frequency drops, they release the kinetic energy and the motor becomes an alternator.

                They are not a capacitor. in the electrical sense of having capacitive reactance. They are a kinetic energy storage device, somewhat akin to a flywheel.

                Wind and solar first produce DC which is inverted to AC and fed through a step up transformer or backfed through a secondary distribution transformer and injected into the grid. Cheap inverters produce harmonics that can play havoc with the transformer core and windings and cause frequency control issues.

                The inverters receive a line frequency signal from the thermal powered generation to synchronize the inverter frequency with the grid frequency. There are tolerances for voltage and frequency, but the problem is that the upstream power plant voltage tap changers and the prime mover governors were never intended to see downstream voltage higher than upstream voltage and this can be a control system nightmare.

                60

              • #
                tom0mason

                Well written Lance,

                I’ve try explaining such before however I tend to end up with far too much details (VARs, j-notation, explanation of reactances, etc.) Details that loose the audience.

                So once again, well done you’ve managed to write with clarity and cover all the basics.

                40

              • #
                destroyer D69

                They were installed at the open cut mines West of Mackay to control the brownouts in Mackay every time the draglines took a bite…..I remember being in Dysart when one was being installed and getting a simplified description of its working. Basically , spin the bejesus out of the rotating mass when the demand from the draglines is low (motor function). and use the energy stored and convert to generation function to compensate for power drops when the dragline loads hit the system.

                30

          • #
            AndyG55

            “at which their supply is connected with the grid”

            LOL ! PF puts his foot right in his mouth. :-)

            He is saying that the grid MUST have a synchronous signal, to synchronise to.

            That can only come from BASE LOAD coal or gas.. REAL ELECTICITY, not pretend.

            Without those big RELIABLE generators, the grid cannot exist.

            80

          • #
            toorightmate

            HOTSESHIT.

            11

        • #
          Another Ian

          Used to be referred to as

          “Founded firmly in mid-air”

          50

        • #
          Richard Ilfeld

          Thank you very much for your fine letter to the California legislature.

          There are a number of additional head shaking details one can only marvel at in the current travails of the golden state.
          There is a mandate that all new residential construction and many remodels include rooftop solar. Thus many of the homes in the fire
          impacted areas were blessed with state mandated and state-subsidized solar being generated during the grid outage. Unfortunately,
          it did them no good since the panel were designed to feed only the grid, and were not equipped to supply or back-up the local premises.
          (You can’t make this stuff up).

          One little remarked issue of bad choices like electric cars (in some cases) or forest non-management and subsequent fires & lawsuits is that
          bad policies use up just as much capital as good policies. California may choose to realize the error of its ways (or not) but they now face the
          future with a bankrupt electric utility, a tapped out emergency fund, a stressed populace with a lot of recovery to fund, and no obvious sources of
          capital for the investments they now have to undertake to provide for a safer future, if indeed they can mange to legislate them. One expects the preferred
          solution of many will be depopulation of the forest margins back into the cities which for all but the very rich will likely mean exiting the state.

          A possible benefit of losing a few million residents would be a partial recovery of some of the inland agriculture by freeing up water resources, although
          allocation back to agricultural use would not be a sure thing.

          Some far away from the US may wonder that high taxes, poop in the streets, and power outages don’t signal a change in government. It’s pretty unlikely.
          “Climate Change” is a big part of the big lie keeping a Public Union – Public employee – Limousine Liberal – government dependent oligarchy in power with a
          pretty large majority. If there is a change it will be among flavors of the left, as, unlike most state, the Republicans are not guaranteed a place on the ballot by
          a “jungle primary” system that often leaves two democrats facing off for office.

          40

      • #
        Graeme#4

        Peter, if the GCMs were to be be used to predict a global cooling, then surely the feedback component of the GCMs would need to be altered from positive to negative? This round be a major change in the models.

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        • #
          Graeme#4

          Would need to be a major change…

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        • #
          Peter Fitzroy

          What I’m thinking is that without a feedback loop you can not get to an ice age by net solar change (ie cool sun, albedo etc). It is like the example of Daisy world which was popular last century

          18

          • #
            Graeme#4

            Yes, I also believe that there needs to be some sort of reinforcing feedback, because the sun itself doesn’t change its solar output that much.
            However…
            I also don’t believe that CO2 plays any major part.
            For example Svensmark may be correct with his cosmic rays forming clouds hypothesis, and this could be regarded as a feedback. To enhance global cooling.
            Any major activity from volcanoes also could be regarded as a form of reinforcing feedback.
            Others in this forum have also offered other reasons for a feedback effect.

            40

            • #
              tom0mason

              “Yes, I also believe that there needs to be some sort of reinforcing feedback, because the sun itself doesn’t change its solar output that much.
              However…”

              … we neither properly understand, nor do we have the complete data on what the sun’s effects on this planet. TSI and sunspots can only tell you so much, and obviously is not the complete story for how the sun operates.

              40

      • #
        Hanrahan

        Would this cooling be enough to trigger a positive feedback loop. For example, if the oceans cool, then they will hold more CO2 in solution, removing it from the atmosphere.

        You have just described the obverse of “global warming” so if you believe one then you must believe the other.

        Me? Not so much. When Gore published his “Inconvenient Truth” I watched the rebuttal first, then Gore’s piece, he was doomed in my eyes. The thing that stood out most then, and still does, is that the CO2/Temp curves rise together with geologic time on the X axis, but when separated CO2 lags temperature by abt 200 years. The late Bob Carter used to demonstrate this well. This is very logical, the oceans are broad and deep, they take a long time to warm and expire the CO2.

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        • #
          Peter Fitzroy

          I also mentioned H20, and I should not have used the ‘trigger warning’ – CO2 as it does tend to distract.

          07

    • #
      tom0mason

      el gordo,

      So CO2 now controls Sudden Stratospheric Warming, or does it?

      60

  • #
    • #
      Latus Dextro

      Your linked graph depicts change from 1978 and therefore, considered it or claiming it as a “tipping” point is nonsensical.
      Good sea ice data is found from 1920′s and satellite data prior to 1978 reveals quite a different picture (4:47)

      Arctic Sea Ice – Same Thickness As 60 Years Ago

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      • #
        el gordo

        Good morning LD, my tongue was firmly planted.

        40

      • #
        el gordo

        While you’re there, on the previous thread I gained an interest in the New Testament. Not the characters or stories, my focus is on the authors of the complete set of gospels in the 4th century.

        The anecdotes had clearly been around for awhile, carried word of mouth and influencing human behaviour. Who compiled the collection and what was their intent?

        30

        • #
          Peter Fitzroy

          you should have glanced at my link.

          09

          • #
            Greg in NZ

            In tents and poypoises?

            https://www.britannica.com/event/First-Council-of-Nicaea-325

            Intent: “The council attempted but failed to establish a uniform date for Easter”.
            The Purpose? Kah-ching!

            The NT really should be labelled, or known as, Saulianity, as Paul/Saul, a Roman/Pharisee who killed/saved the elect, allegedly penned MOST of it. Then again, his bipolar/schizophrenic ramblings and letters just get so mixed-up and multi-faced that his PR ‘story’ turns into a modern-day road to Damascus… boom! BOOM! Dust to dust

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            • #
              OriginalSteve

              The council of nicea didnt really represent the church. Roman catholicism, yes, actual biblical christianity, no.

              Paul was highly educated, a pharasees pharasee.

              50

              • #
                Peter Fitzroy

                I’m saying that a lot of what ended up in the bible, came from earlier, eastern sources.

                15

              • #
                el gordo

                If the New Testament was written in 360 AD then its possible Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox traditions influenced the outcome.

                20

              • #
                Greg in NZ

                Steve, it’s late on a Sunday night and I’ve had a wonderful, peaceful day off, so just a few quick lines of scripture for you to ponder; verses which have put a wry smile on the face of many an intelligent Pharisee to which I have shown them, to wit:

                King James Bible, The Acts of the Apostles, by Saul/Paul/whomever:

                9:3 And as he journeyed, he came near Damascus: and suddenly there shined round about him a light from heaven:

                9:7 And the men which journeyed with him stood speechless, hearing a voice, but seeing no man.

                Then later, recounting (in the first-person) his ‘vision’ to the crowd:

                22:6 And it came to pass, that, as I made my journey, and was come nigh unto Damascus about noon, suddenly there shone from heaven a great light round about me.

                22:9 And they that were with me saw indeed the light, and were afraid; but they heard not the voice of him that spake to me.

                So be it… R’amen.

                10

              • #
                el gordo

                ‘The tradition of John the Apostle was strong in Anatolia (the near-east, part of modern Turkey, the western part was called the Roman province of Asia). The authorship of the Johannine works traditionally and plausibly occurred in Ephesus, c. 90-110, although some scholars argue for an origin in Syria.

                ‘According to the New Testament, the Apostle Paul was from Tarsus (in south-central Anatolia) and his missionary journeys were primarily in Anatolia. The Book of Revelation, believed to be authored by John of Patmos (a Greek island about 30 miles off the Anatolian coast), mentions Seven churches of Asia.

                ‘The First Epistle of Peter (1:1–2) is addressed to Anatolian regions. On the southeast shore of the Black Sea, Pontus was a Greek colony mentioned three times in the New Testament. Inhabitants of Pontus were some of the very first converts to Christianity.’ wiki

                20

          • #
          • #
            el gordo

            ‘Paul could be considered a proto-gnostic as well as a proto-Catholic.’ wiki

            20

            • #
              Greg in NZ

              Saul was a high-ranking member of the Pharisees’ Club who, by his own admission, dealt to those new breakaway upstarts with his sword (same as today if you believe certain news reports). That he infiltrated them, ‘became’ one of them (after his contradictory Road to Damascus ‘experience’), then steered the various groups in a certain direction, appears to be the classic, self-chosen tribe’s way of controlling the opposition.

              No wonder ‘the Church’ didn’t want their taxpayers/faithful to ‘read’ the scriptures for themselves (Latin, anyone?) as they would find discrepancies and contradictions the size of jumbo jets and/or skyscrapers on a clear, bright, sunny morning.

              Pharisaios, Greek, from Aramaic prīšayyā, ‘separated ones’, related to Hebrew pārūš ‘separated’,
              ancient Jewish sect, distinguished by strict observance of the traditional and written law,
              commonly held to have pretensions to superior sanctity,
              a self-righteous person, a hypocrite.
              Shalom?

              10

  • #
    redress

    Conspiracy theory or fact?? Discuss………………

    AV Weather Live is a real time weather service for subscribers only.

    https://twitter.com/AV_Weather?fbclid=IwAR2uuufIAUSVX8XlClM5mA5k8r9eJAYFtepkQ4pixaxOYm_71c_IA-KgQ1s

    It has begun in SA, EMFs hammering already and the heating has begun, to limit the rainfall tomorrow. All of the clouds developing now spaced apart perfectly. #manmadedrought

    20

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    pat

    7 Oct: PV Mag: Will DOE take the Crescent Dunes solar project into bankruptcy?
    Amidst operational problems and a terminated power contract, a lawsuit by developer SolarReserve warns that a DOE takeover of the project could push it into bankruptcy
    by Christian Roselund
    Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) has had a rough decade…
    Crescent Dunes appears to have struggled for some time; despite signing an engineering, procurement and construction agreement in 2011, the plant only “commenced commercial operations” in 2015. It appears that there is still a debate as to what went wrong with the molten salt storage system, which SolarReserve blames on the construction contractor.
    This is not the first U.S. CSP plant that has had problems…

    FROM COMMENTS:
    Larry Stewart: I wish someone would provide an explanation of what difficulties technical and otherwise they were encountering!

    Christian Roselund: Unfortunately I don’t think SolarReserve is talking about this publicly. There was limited information in the press release – they mostly blamed the EPC and said there were problems with the molten salt.

    Larry Stewart: I would think that high temperature molten salt would be very corrosive and this would cause problems. Would like some explanation if this is possible.

    Christian Roselund: Molten salt has been used successfully as an energy storage medium in many CSP projects. I haven’t looked deeply into the technology, but my guess is that it’s easy to use tanks with anti-corrosive lining.
    https://pv-magazine-usa.com/2019/10/07/will-doe-take-the-crescent-dunes-solar-project-into-bankruptcy/

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      pat

      9 Oct: Townhall: Crescent Dunes Solar Is Doomed as Taxpayers Pick Up the Tab
      by Ross Marchand
      Congressional Democrats are as determined as ever to sneak Green New Deal language into unrelated, important pieces of legislation, with cumulative costs running into the trillions of dollars. But lawmaker shenanigans are just the tip of the iceberg; taxpayers just can’t seem to catch a break from failed “green” energy boondoggles…
      The Crescent Dunes saga began in 2011 when the DOE agreed to loan project owner Tonopah Solar Energy $700 million to fund their large-scale solar endeavor…

      It’s easy to dismiss Solyndra and SolarReserve as one-offs, but other parts of the DOE’s portfolio haven’t proven promising either. Established in 2007, the agency’s Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan (ATVM) program has thrown billions of dollars at large automakers developing “advanced” fuel-efficient vehicles. Two of the five loan recipients (Fisker and VPG) have gone out of business since receiving taxpayer loans, while a third (Tesla) is having serious financial and management issues (LINK)…READ ON
      https://townhall.com/columnists/rossmarchand/2019/10/09/crescent-dunes-solar-is-doomed-as-taxpayers-pick-up-the-tab-n2554430

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        pat

        8 Oct: LasVegasReviewJournal: EDITORIAL: Future of Crescent Dunes solar plant near Tonopah appears bleak
        Now, in another example of how green energy promoters routinely oversell wind and solar as reliable alternatives to fossil fuels, it appears the sun is about to set on Crescent Dunes — and on a $737 million taxpayer handout approved by the Obama administration’s Department of Energy in 2011…

        The developer of Crescent Dunes had also talked up plans for other solar projects throughout the state, including one described as equaling Hoover Dam in power generation. Notably, such proposals appear to have vaporized faster than a nighthawk caught in a solar plant’s concentrated beams of sunlight.

        Far from being a “first-of-its-kind” solar project, Crescent Dunes fits the depressingly familiar pattern of many highly touted green energy projects: Proponents lowball the costs and overhype the economic benefits in order to gain political support and federal “loan guarantees.” They then fail to deliver on their promises, leaving taxpayers holding a bad check.
        “Americans need to take a critical second look at whether our failed or faltering federal solar initiatives deserve continued support,” David Williams, president of the Taxpayers Protection Alliance, wrote in 2015 for Forbes. “With so little to show for so many costly initiatives, it should be clear to the objective observer that federal solar power efforts haven’t been a productive or prudent use of precious tax dollars.”…

        But as the Crescent Dunes project highlights, taxpayers should be wary of green energy promoters selling magic beans as an alternative to traditional energy sources.
        https://www.reviewjournal.com/opinion/editorials/editorial-future-of-crescent-dunes-solar-plant-near-tonopah-appears-bleak-1866768/

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      Graeme No.3

      pat:

      At the time they claimed leak of the molten salts and it would be fixed quickly. The fix dragged on for nearly 10 months, with no further information.

      The amount of generations subsequently doesn’t seem to have been near the claimed capacity.

      The salts mixture is usually sodium and potassium nitrates, not that corrosive in the RIGHT material. It looks like there may have been a design bungle.

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  • #
    David Maddison

    Tony Heller, global warming scam debunker, must be over the target since he’s copping so much flak. Watch the Elite scammers try to silence him.

    Here is his latest video.

    https://youtu.be/OnM01-MnQDg

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    Dave in the States

    I send stuff to people. Occasionally they reply. I got this reply from an engineering friend:

    “I have been reading your posts and will very much like the following, given that the After-Greta movement has been stirred in my country: which are the basic, scientific based, arguments that demolish global warming? Aside from Patrick Moore, which other scientists have been arguing against this coasi-religion? Books? Articles?”

    I prepared some links. This the one I put right at the top:

    https://www.thegwpf.org/content/uploads/2018/10/Lindzen-2018-GWPF-Lecture.pdf

    What would you have put at the top?

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    • #
      theRealUniverse

      Heller’s stuff as linked above by Latus Dextro and others before, he demolishes the data, which is far better than trying to demolish the theory as that is not comprehensible to non science people, they see it as just a ‘debate’ not actual proof.

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      Graeme#4

      This quote from Richard Lindzen:
      “Future generations will wonder in bemused amazement that the early 21st century’s developed world went into hysterical panic over a globally averaged temperature increase of a few tenths of a degree and, on the basic of gross exaggerations of highly uncertain computer projections combined into implausible chains of inference, proceeded to contemplate a roll-back of the Industrial Age.”

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    Furiously curious

    Maybe this has been mentioned here somewhere? There is a smartphone app – ‘inconvenient facts app’- that puts at your fingertips, 10 freebie graphs, and another 40 for $2.99, of many of the climate graphs, that appear on websites questioning global warming. Makes finding the odd fact pretty simple.

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    pat

    reminder:

    5 Jun: UNFCCC: Tennis World Unites in Fight against Climate Change
    All four of the world’s Grand Slam tennis tournaments are uniting in the fight against climate change by joining the Sports for Climate Action Framework…
    Signatories to the Framework, including these 4 Grand Slam tournaments, commit to five clear principles:
    •Reduce overall climate impact
    •Promote sustainable and responsible consumption ETC

    These principles, when translated into actions, can mainstream the integration of the climate dimension into the world of sports, thereby engaging a very wide public, and helping to foster a groundswell of climate action. Thus, the Sports community can do its part to contribute towards the goals of the Paris Climate Change Agreement…

    “In the face of the climate crisis urgency, we must combine our strengths and generate peer-pressure with other events – especially the four Grand Slams, including athletes, partners, and all of our stakeholders”, said Roland Garros President Bernard Giudicelli…
    In a further boost to the Sports for Climate Action Framework, the World Surf League yesterday announced it would become carbon neutral globally by the end of 2019…
    https://unfccc.int/news/tennis-world-unites-in-fight-against-climate-change

    Tennis bad boy’s $300k car in grand slam Kyrgios drama
    Daily Telegraph – 13 Oct 2019
    “The car would have been doing a burnout because there were skid marks all over the road,” a witness, who did not want to be named, said…
    “The area is notorious for people driving erratically.” … Tyre marks on the road show the path the car took…
    Kyrgios bought a Dodge Hellcat in 2017 but sold it a year later… In 2018 he purchased the Dodge Challenger SRT Demon…

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    • #
      pat

      there has been a rush to report Kyrgios was not the driver, and may not have been a passenger either:

      13 Oct: Daily Mail: The Grand Slam he didn’t want! Tennis bad boy Nick Kyrgios is left devastated after his mates crash his $300,000 black Dodge Demon into a power pole
      •Nick Kyrgios filmed speaking with police after muscle car smashed into pole
      •Kyrgios’ $300k Dodge Demon smashed into the power pole near Canberra
      •Tennis bad boy was not driving at the time and no one was injured in the incident
      •The expensive super car is only one of four in the country of its kind
      By Adam Mccleery
      The tennis bad boy’s Dodge Demon, one of only four in the country, was badly damaged after crashing into the pole in Bonner, ACT, on Saturday afternoon.
      Footage obtained by The Daily Telegraph, shows a number of Kyrgios’s associates milling around the wreckage.
      Police were seen speaking to the sports star who looked deeply shocked.
      According to police Kyrgios was not driving the car at the time of the crash but could not confirm if he was a passenger…

      It’s alleged up to five of Kyrgios’ associates approached a photographer at the scene, encouraging him to delete the pictures he had taken…
      One witness filmed the aftermath before shouting out to Kyrgios from his moving car.
      ‘Has Nick Kyrgios, wrapped his car around a pole? Unlucky Nick bro,’ the witness said as he drove past.
      Australian Federal Police ACT spokeswoman said officers attended the scene before issuing infringement notices for negligent driving, an offence which generally carries a $385 fine…
      https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7566791/Nick-Kyrgios-left-devastated-mates-crash-300-000-black-Dodge-Demon-power-pole.html

      40

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        pat

        2018: TopGear: Everything you need to know about the Dodge Demon
        The ‘firsts’, ‘mosts’, ‘biggests’ and ‘fastests’ that make this the ultimate Top Trumps card
        by Rowan Horncastle
        Ah, the Dodge Demon; star of episode four of all-new TG TV. It’s an unhinged, drag-racing ultra-muscle-car that spanks the bonkers 707bhp Dodge Hellcat into second class citizenship of Muscle Car world.
        How? Well, it’s all thanks to 840bhp, 770lb ft of torque and some of the craziest drag tech ever put on a production car. And did we mention that it’ll do wheelies? Yep, Dodge has gone mad and we love it…
        https://www.topgear.com/car-news/top-gear-series-25/heres-everything-you-need-to-know-about-dodge-demon

        28 Jul 2017: WhichCar: Nick Kyrgios has bought a Dodge Challenger Hellcat
        By Chris Thompson
        When asked on Facebook why Kyrgios didn’t opt for the even more expensive Dodge Demon, he gave two contradicting answers:
        “Coz I can always have both,” he replied to one user, complete with devil-horned hand emoji, while also telling another commenter, “No room for my tennis rackets or my passengers in the Demon big fella. I’m not a drag racer.”
        We’re sure Kyrgios would find it rather challenging to get his hands on a Demon. Plus, driving one is a good way to land in court…
        https://www.whichcar.com.au/news/nick-kyrgios-has-bought-a-dodge-challenger-hellcat

        26 Jan 2018: SportingNews: Nick Kyrgios puts car up for sale on Facebook … again
        For the second, glorious time in nine months, Kyrgios is flogging one of his prized possessions in a way, frankly, more of his fellow celebrities should – on Facebook…
        “Only buy this car if you want to feel like Vin Diesel in Fast and the Furious,” Kyrgios…wrote.

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          pat

          a similar tale in Jamaica recently, which was highly amusing, given how quickly the story unravelled…and then died:

          VIDEO: 20 Aug: LoopJamaica: WATCH: Reckless driver says sorry for daring stunt
          The suspected driver of a black Mercedes Benz motorcar that was captured in a viral video recklessly doing ‘donuts’ on a major public thoroughfare has met with the police and apologised for the stunt…
          “I was wrong and I am really sorry; it won’t happen again,” Dennis Dietrich said during a brief meeting with the head of the Public Safety and Traffic Enforcement Branch (PSTEB), Assistant Commissioner of Police, Bishop Dr Gary Welsh, on Tuesday afternoon…
          Dietrich said he’s the personal assistant of West Indies cricketer Andre Russell (20/20 CRICKET ROCKSTAR KNOWN AS “DRE RUSS”)…
          http://www.loopjamaica.com/content/watch-reckless-driver-says-sorry-daring-stunt

          VIDEO: 12sec: 21 Aug: LoopJamaica: WATCH: New video raises fresh questions about the stunt Benz
          We’ve all seen it – the viral video showing a Mercedes Benz being used to perform a number of dangerous stunts at a busy Corporate Area intersection…
          But less than 48 hours after the head of the Public Safety and Traffic Enforcement Branch, Assistant Commissioner of Police, Bishop Dr Gary Welsh held a meeting with the reported driver to highlight the error of his ways, the matter is far from closed…

          Police have reportedly re-opened their investigation into the case after another video surfaced on social media showing the incident from a different angle than the initial video, and also showing the immediate aftermath of the illegal display…
          Only one of the duo is seen clearly, the passenger, and that gleeful figure resembles West Indies cricketer Andre Russell…

          In reacting to the development, social media users have since raised questions about whether the person who met with the police may have taken the blame for the act as a cover for another individual or individuals who was/were in the vehicle.
          http://www.loopjamaica.com/content/watch-new-video-raises-fresh-questions-about-stunt-benz

          globe-trotting Warnie:

          14 Sept: Wisden: Shane Warne wants cricket to be proactive in dealing with climate change
          The Hit for Six report (LINK), published on Tuesday, September 10, drove home the effects of climate change on the sport and how unprepared cricket is to deal with it…
          All of which prompted Warne, who received a preview of the report last month as part of the MCC World Cricket Committee, to urge authorities to be proactive in dealing with it. “At times in the past, it has been hard to know who to believe, but I think we all have to admit now that climate change is a huge issue,” Warne was quoted as saying by The Guardian. “Scientists with proven facts are telling us things we can’t dispute about the rising temperatures, the rising sea levels…

          The report said climate change was “humanity’s most pressing challenge”, and Warne concurred…
          “I have got three children – 22, 20 and just about to turn 18 – it’s a different world for them. People want to put their head in the sand, and say I’m not going to be around in 50 years. That’s just wrong.”
          https://www.wisden.com/stories/archive/news/shane-warne-cricket-proactive-climate-change

          what a laugh from the recent meeting of Commonwealth countries (they all flew in) in London:

          TWEET: The Commonwealth UK
          The #Commonwealth’s work focuses on the ***intentional use of #sport as a tool in advancing sustainable development and strengthening governance, #genderequality and the protection of #humanrights
          Learn more about how sport contributes to the #SDGs
          VIDEO: 2min Oliver Dudfield, Head of Sport for Development & Peace, Commonwealth Secretariat
          4 Oct 2019
          https://twitter.com/commonwealthsec/status/1180053076591427584

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            OriginalSteve

            V8s…accept no substitutes

            While doibgvstuff like this is stipid, nothing wrong with large cube V8s.

            Had I the dosh, one of those huge dodge Ram ( very useful for moving my daughters future horse float and equine ) woukd be the ticket. Love the sound too… :-)

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            • #
              Another Ian

              Maybe better stayed away.

              Rumour via US machinery blogs seems to hath it you might be fitting a new wiring loom at around 100,000 miles at costa lotta

              20

          • #
            Graeme No.3

            Advice from Shane Warne?????

            20

            • #
              Greg in NZ

              Advice from World Surf League?????

              Your Dave Rastovich, a so-called professional ‘free surfer’ from Byron Bay, has been playing the Pied Piper for 20 years or more. He’s done well for himself, yet a lot of younger surfers (predominantly women) think he’s the new messiah leading everyone into blissful renewable green nirvana – or sumpthink.

              https://stabmag.com/news/dave-rastovich-transitions-into-ambassador-role-with-patagonia/

              OK, so he was born in NZ but he’s one of yours – like Warnout.

              30

            • #
              toorightmate

              Climate scientists are sure pulling out the big guns now.
              I reckon Warne might be about as smart on climate AND science as Peter Fitzroy.

              30

  • #
    beowulf

    The Sierra Club is at it again, burying extensive evidence of the harmful effects of wind turbines from a report that the club itself commissioned.

    https://stopthesethings.com/2019/10/10/bound-to-gag-sierra-club-buries-evidence-of-health-effects-caused-by-wind-turbine-noise/

    See also
    https://docs.wind-watch.org/Deever-silent-menace-1.pdf
    https://docs.wind-watch.org/Deever-silent-menace-2.pdf

    Some snippets:
    A military medical study conducted in Portugal over a 20-year period . . . concluded that 70% of individuals are susceptible to the development of Vibroacoustic Disease due to the cumulative effects of noises below the threshold of human hearing.

    The study refers to pilots and flight crews subjected to prop and jet infrasound. Unlike wind turbines, air travel performs a useful function and air crews get the choice of working in that noisy environment. Home owners living near wind turbines have no such choice when subjected to the effects of that useless technology for any duration, at any time of the day, on any day of the year, in the place where they must live.

    In New Mexico, infrasound from sixty wind turbines could be detected 90 kilometers from the source under favorable conditions at night. Sound travels even further over water due to temperature inversions, so offshore turbines won’t save you.

    In 1999, a report in the International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health,[4] which stated, “Owing to its long wavelength, infrasonic noise is less attenuated by walls and other structures, it is able to propagate over long distances and may affect the human organism even though the latter is far from its source.”

    A 2017 report from the Max Planck Institute found that infrasound, even though it is inaudible, can produce measurable effects in recorded brain function.

    . . . sustained exposure to noise [infrasound] can lead to an increase of catecholamine and cortisol levels. In addition, changes of bodily functions, such as blood pressure, respiration rate, EEG patterns and heart rate . . .

    Etc etc

    Then there are non-medical effects such as:
    “Wind turbine noise effects on seismometer stations have also been investigated and reported . . . [to record] the increasing influence of wind turbines on seismic records . . .” This suggests that wind turbine infrasound could interfere with the monitoring and prediction of earthquakes and associated tsunami warnings.

    A few days ago I also posted on the severe disruptive effects turbines have on radar images for aircraft guidance and for Doppler weather radar to track tornados etc.

    Apart from serious human impacts, given the big hoo-hah about honey bee population decline, the following might also be interesting:

    Important honey bee communication takes place between 12-13 Hertz. [infrasound is <20Hz] How the production of infrasound from wind turbines might effect [sic] their ability to communicate directions may represent a threat to bee populations and pollination and needs to be investigated.

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      Kalm Keith

      Well put together.

      About 20 years ago I had to study this and was shocked to find that the only information that had been gathered about it was in the iron curtain countries.

      It became obvious that this was due to the fact that in those countries there was no recourse to legal action if your employment harmed you and the opposite in the West.

      Road and rail transport drivers plus drivers of heavy mining equipment would be likely litigants but there has been deliberate steps taken to keep it out of view in the medical field.

      To make matters worse it has been deliberately covered up as Noise, which it isn’t.

      Government sometimes looks after it’s supporters rather than the governed public.

      A familiar situation.

      KK

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    AndyG55

    BOM exposed.

    https://realclimatescience.com/2019/10/smoking-gun-of-fraud-and-collusion/

    About half way down Tony starts looking at long term Australian sites

    Well worth a look !

    See just how much a LIE the BOM data has become after its farcical* “adjustments” using the homogenisation methodology..

    *I was going to say frãũďulent but thought I better not

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    • #
      Bill in Oz

      Andy
      Much more important is
      Ken Stewart’s
      Check of all the BOM’s weather stations.
      So far there are 137
      (One Hundred & Thirty Seven )
      BOM weather stations
      Which do not meet the BOM’s own
      Guidelines for ensuring accurate readings
      And there are a number of the BOM’s ‘Sacred’ ACORN sites that list
      Plus many more which are used to ‘adjust’ ACORN data.
      https://kenskingdom.wordpress.com/

      50

      • #
        AndyG55

        Yep, the whole of the BOM ACORN-2 non-data is a load of *****ulent CRAP

        20

      • #
        Peter C

        137 BOM sites do not meet standards, so far!

        Almost incredible Bill except that the first site he checked was Mount Barker, which is the one nearest to you hence you could attest for yourself how bad it was.

        Even worse sites found subsequently.

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      • #

        Just adding to that…

        Our automated gauge a few miles from my home registered only a sprinkle yesterday, while it was wet for much of the day up and down the region. Another time it registered a real flood on a dry day, no rain anywhere but a flood in that gauge.

        Makes you wonder.

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        • #

          Good news and bad news, moso. Good news the rain, bad news, the gauge. Weather measurement up the creek!

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          • #

            Those are just days I happened to check. Maybe someone was washing down his Cessna with a big hose when we were awarded our dry flood. Who can know? Don’t know how they managed just a fraction of a ml yesterday when the rest of the coast copped plenty.

            I’m sure it’ll all come out in the (Cessna) wash.

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  • #
    el gordo

    Van Dieman’s Land

    ‘Australia’s island state is known for its rich history and pristine environment — it also provides 50 per cent of the raw materials that go into the powerful painkillers at the centre of the United States’ opioid crisis.’ ABC

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    • #
      beowulf

      So the ABC kicks the farmers instead of the pharmaceutical companies. What a surprise.

      https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-10-13/tasmania-poppy-farmers-in-crosshairs-of-us-opioid-crisis/11588766

      Sounds like the Melbourne woman with an opiate addiction is looking for an avenue to litigate as well. Perhaps she would have preferred a life of migraine pain?

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    • #

      The role of drugs in long and remote wars is hard to deny. The Opium Wars were as monstrous as they sound, but when you are faced with paying for tea in gold or tea in opium your choir days at Eton and Oxford won’t affect your decisions for too long. Discouraged where it was produced in India, pushed ruthlessly where it was sold.

      Illegal but state protected drug production, smuggling, distribution and addiction have followed protracted war because plunder, human trafficking, arms deals and all the rest are still not enough to meet the phenomenal expenses, not to mention the phenomenal greed of the Sassoons of this world. We are now told that 90% of heroin starts in Afghanistan, and before that we were told about SE Asia and the Golden Triangle…but we are not supposed to put two and two together?

      Legal opium production, whether in Rajasthan or Tassie, will be targeted in the mockingbird media (turned them off yet?) because illegal-but-not-really production sees it as competition. Fentanyl use and abuse are more likely to bring peace to Afghanistan than anyone’s good intentions. (And, yes, I know how ugly any peace would be in the wake of this mess.)

      But surely the ABC wouldn’t be in cahoots with with the Lords of War! Why, as recently as 2003 some of them had No War stickers on their Subarus. Right where they now have No Coal stickers. Yep, the Posh Left used to dislike war, as evidenced on some bumpers of those who haven’t upgraded to the latest green “solution” car. If you look real hard…

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    • #
      Bill in Oz

      The magnificent reason why
      Pharmaceutical companies advertising prescription drugs
      Is Banned in Australia !
      May it always remain so !

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      • #
        Greg in NZ

        In the ‘civilised’ world it’s only the USA and New Zealand where it’s ‘legal’ to push Big Pharma on the laughing box, but as I gave that up yonks ago, I’m not amongst their ‘target audience’. You don’t know how lucky you are, Trev! And Bill.

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  • #
    pat

    read all:

    13 Oct: Daily Mail: How Extinction Rebellion climate change zealots – including a baronet’s Cambridge-educated granddaughter – are paid £400 a week to bring mayhem to our streets
    •Extinction Rebellion activists are being paid up to £400-a-week to lead protests
    •Activists have been paid more than £200,000 since the start of the scheme
    •The eco-protest group privately fears it could face six-figure tax bill from HMRC
    •Tory MP calls on HMRC to launch an investigation into the group’s tax affairs
    By Holly Bancroft and James Heale For The Mail On Sunday
    Extinction Rebellion is paying activists up to £400 a week to lead the protests that have brought chaos to the streets of Britain, documents seen by The Mail on Sunday reveal.
    Protesters have received payments totalling more than £70,000 in four months alone…

    XR co-founder Roger Hallam asked for £300 a week. The revelations come as the number of activists arrested in the current XR protests approaches 1,300.
    Last night, one Tory MP called on HMRC to launch an immediate investigation into the movement’s tax affairs…
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7566515/Extinction-Rebellion-files-reveal-climate-zealots-paid-400-week.html

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  • #
    pat

    begins & ends with effusive praise for Greta. attacks the Insiders’ token conservative in the middle:

    13 Oct: news.com.au: ABC’s Insiders program ends with snide swipe at teenage activist Greta Thunberg
    As the ABC’s Insiders program started to wind down on Sunday morning, one of the panellists couldn’t resist taking a shot at Greta Thunberg.
    by Sam Clench
    She has become an inspiration for climate change activists — and a focal point for their critics.
    One of those critics is conservative columnist Gerard Henderson…
    He focused on her “failure” to win the Nobel Peace Prize, which was awarded to Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali on Friday.
    “I am not surprised that Greta Thunberg failed to win the 2019 Nobel Peace Prize. After all, international bureaucrats of the kind that judge these prizes and hang around the UN and Nobel Prize places are heavily into flying. Heavily into flying,” Henderson said.
    “And the idea that you would give an award to someone who is heavily into flight-shaming, as she is, is most unlikely. So I’m not surprised. I don’t think she’ll win any award that affects the right of international figures to fly around the world telling us all to reduce our emissions.”

    To put it more succinctly, Henderson thinks the Nobel judges snubbed Ms Thunberg because she critcises people who fly a lot.
    “I think it might have been more to do with the fact that she was 16. It is probably a little early in her career,” host Fran Kelly quipped.
    There were some quips from viewers on Twitter as well…
    https://www.news.com.au/technology/environment/climate-change/abcs-insiders-program-ends-with-snide-swipe-at-teenage-activist-greta-thunberg/news-story/4b66071882839d6de96b5ad2bab10972

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  • #
    Zane

    Gupta is still talking up his solar steel mills and down coal.

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  • #
    pat

    just broadcast on ABC News Radio:

    6min30sec to 7min20sec: Bolsonaro has accused these depts of being hotbeds of Marxist teaching. these cuts could fuel conspiracy theories. (sound grab) when you attack scientific institutions, you open the door to non-scientific ideas – that say that the earth is flat, that global warming doesn’t exist. we are in the 21st century. those ideas were defeated a long time ago.

    AUDIO: 7min54sec: 11 Oct: Deutsche Welle: WorldLink: Brazil’s students protest cuts
    by Michael Fox
    Students at one of Brazil’s top universities have been on strike since the beginning of September, protesting a government measure that would see roughly 30% of their funding cut. In the traditionally conservative state of Santa Catarina, nearly three-quarters of voters support President Jair Bolsonaro. Students there say his policies are going too far, and they fear it could get even worse.
    https://www.dw.com/en/worldlink-brazils-students-protest-cuts/av-50795682

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  • #
    pat

    10 Oct: BBC: MSPs approve powers for workplace parking tax
    The new local tax power is part of a package of reforms to transport, including a shakeup of bus services and low-emission zones in cities.
    An attempt by Scottish Labour to remove the parking levy aspect was defeated during a debate on Wednesday.
    After two days of debate, the Transport (Scotland) Bill approved by a vote of 56 to 29, with 18 MSPs abstaining.

    The move was hailed by green groups, who said it would help “combat congestion and air pollution in our city centres”…
    The SNP agreed to back the workplace parking levy proposals as part of a budget deal with the Scottish Greens, giving them a majority in parliament to pass the plans into law despite opposition from other parties…

    David Lonsdale, director of the Scottish Retail Consortium, said the plan was a “charter for extra cost and complexity”.
    He added: “The introduction of a levy will see firms’ taxed twice for the parking places they provide for staff, on top of the business rates already paid on those spaces.
    “The dearth of any business and regulatory impact assessment to accompany the introduction of this new tax is bewildering, and suggests MSPs risk voting for a pig in a poke.”
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-scotland-politics-49991051

    10 Oct: HeraldScotland: Scots face paying out hundreds to park at work
    By Alistair Grant
    Attempts to halt the levy were defeated by the SNP and the Greens during a mammoth debate lasting seven hours – clearing the way for the tax to be rubber-stamped this afternoon as part of the wide-ranging Transport Bill.
    Green MSP John Finnie said: “The new powers over workplace parking levies will allow local government in our biggest cities to tackle congestion, air pollution and the climate emergency.
    “Councils have been asking for these powers for years, and I’m delighted that Greens have been able to deliver this simple and effective change, which will raise much needed funds to improve local public transport services.”…

    Nottingham is currently the only place in the UK to have introduced such a levy. It charges employers with more than ten bays £415 per space. Many choose to pass this on to staff…
    Tory MSP Murdo Fraser said: “The simple fact is that the car park tax is a bad idea.
    “It is a bad idea because it is a regressive tax likely to cost up to £500 a year which will hit lowest paid workers the hardest…
    https://www.heraldscotland.com/news/17958176.scots-face-paying-hundreds-park-work/

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    • #
      Graeme No.3

      The fact that it was scottish LABOUR against it must raise a few doubts.
      Of course people can travel to work by public transport provided
      There is enough of it.
      That it delivers them where they want to go.
      There aren’t sudden collapses in availability.

      I spent 6 years in Sydney relying on public transport. A healthy mile walk to the station and slightly less back as I always went to Parramatta (the next stop**) in case I wanted to do any shopping. In that time I calculated the Peak Hour (actually 90 minutes) number of trains stopping at Parramatta went from 28 to 23, while the number stopping at Harris Park went from 7 (or 8) to 3 with timetable revisions.
      Then there were the frequent strikes, outages etc. When I moved I was influenced by a convenient train that stopped at the local station (Telopea) and delivered me to my destination (Flemington) at the right time to walk to work. It was cancelled by a NEW Timetable the week I took up residence and I was was faced by a trip to 1 station, a wait then another trip, and and third trip to the right station. I took to driving to work.
      **Besides more trains stopped there.

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  • #
    Another Ian

    “Delingpole: How President Trump Can Beat St Greta and Save the Planet”

    https://www.breitbart.com/europe/2019/10/13/how-trump-can-beat-st-greta-save-the-planet/

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  • #
    Furiously curious

    I took a quick look to see if there was any info, on whether there has been much of a boom in diesel generator sales in Victoria and SA, but nothing popped up easily. I’m wondering if anyone has any info on this, as I have come across anecdotal comments, that this is quite a big thing?

    SA

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  • #
    Paul Miskelly

    Peter Fitzroy,
    At: #15.1.5.3, you said:
    “All the Australian renewable generators are required to use a synchronous condenser at the point at which their supply is connected with the grid. you only need one grid.”

    Would you kindly provide a reference to support this statement?

    Regards,
    Paul Miskelly

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  • #
    Speedy

    You’ve probably seen this one – it’s where a Californian police car (Tesla) runs out of juice while trying to catch the bad guys..

    https://abcnews.go.com/US/tesla-police-vehicle-ran-power-car-chase-california/story?id=65878312

    Cheers,

    Mike

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  • #
    pat

    behind paywall:

    11 Oct: WSJ Editorial: The Electric-Vehicle Subsidy Racket
    The $7,500 tax credit is going to many buyers who don’t qualify
    Federal subsidies for electric vehicles are an income transfer to the affluent, and now comes news that significant numbers don’t qualify. The Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (Tigta) in late September reported that the feds handed out nearly $74 million to undeserving EV owners from 2014 through 2018.

    “The [Internal Revenue Service] does not have effective processes to identify and prevent erroneous claims,” said Tigta, meaning filers are applying for credits largely on an honor system…
    https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-electric-vehicle-subsidy-racket-11570834263

    12 Oct: BizPacReview: Oops! California’s expensive solar panels to fight climate change don’t work during blackout
    by Samantha Chang
    https://www.bizpacreview.com/2019/10/12/oops-californias-expensive-solar-panels-to-fight-climate-change-dont-work-during-blackout-838403

    12 Oct: News12 NJ: Blade falls off windmill narrowly missing homes in Ocean Gate
    It happened in Ocean Gate around 10:45 a.m. Samantha Albin says that it was like something out of a movie.
    “It was really scary. It was kind of like one of those ‘Final Destination’ things,” she says…
    “I heard a really loud boom. I thought it was maybe like a car accident or something, so I ran outside. I noticed my cable line was down, there was a tree branch down,” she says.
    The blade hit Albin’s neighbor’s driveway and then bounced into the roadway. Ocean Gate’s police and fire departments responded and blocked off the road until the blade was secured.
    The power to the turbine and a second one nearby was shut off…
    The neighbors now say that they are afraid that the wind turbines may not be safe…
    The two wind turbines will be shut off until the company is able to determine what happened.
    http://newjersey.news12.com/story/41173053/blade-falls-off-windmill-narrowly-missing-homes-in-ocean-gate

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  • #
    beowulf

    Some (possible) good news. Rain is on the way for a good chunk of the east coast and inland by the end of the week — Weatherzone.

    https://t.co/7XYayUM2k6

    Also the Prime Minister and NSW Premier have announced $1b funding for Wyangala Dam (near Cowra) upgrade, and a new dam at Dungowan (near Tamworth), with “bulldozers in the ground” next year. The process will by-pass the recalcitrant Independent Planning Commission, with the Minister taking charge to fast-track things.

    https://www.weatherzone.com.au/news/prime-minister-and-nsw-premier-announce-1b-funding-for-wyangala-dungowan-dam-projects/530342

    Right on cue, the announcement was immediately attacked by the head of the Nature Conservation Council, Chris Gambian, who said he was worried about losing the usual checks and balances around these dam projects.

    “Bypassing biodiversity assessments is only going to make the problem worse,” he said.

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  • #
    RicDre

    U.N. Cries Poor: Cash Crisis Sees Water Coolers Empty, Meetings and Foreign Travel Slashed

    The United Nations has begun a series of cutbacks at its New York headquarters, starting with the heating being turned down, the diplomats’ bar shuttering early at 5pm and meetings canceled along with diminished first class global travel budgets.

    https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2019/10/13/u-n-cries-poor-cash-crisis-sees-water-coolers-empty-meetings-and-foreign-travel-slashed/

    50