JoNova

A science presenter, writer, speaker & former TV host; author of The Skeptic's Handbook (over 200,000 copies distributed & available in 15 languages).


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Midweek Unthreaded

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Rating: 9.3/10 (17 votes cast)
Midweek Unthreaded, 9.3 out of 10 based on 17 ratings

74 comments to Midweek Unthreaded

  • #
    robert rosicka

    Where’s the pics of the trip Jo ?

    40

  • #

    Craig Kelly challenges the alarmist junk from the CSIRO and the RBA.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9qCwD7mGl38

    100

    • #
      Kalm Keith

      He makes his feelings known.

      Is he the first honest, effective politician I’ve seen speaking?

      90

      • #
        Peter C

        Craig Kelly is good.

        I think we can add a few more:
        I nominate; James Patterson, Amanda Stoker, Andrew Hastie, Mark Latham, Malcolm Roberts

        100

    • #
      Graeme#4

      He’s right. Lazard and the U.S. EIA also only specified 25 years as the lifetime for a coal power station, which completely distorts the overall cost of coal energy compared to other energy sources. It’s a common trick to say that coal energy is expensive.

      140

      • #
        Hanrahan

        Same, same with nuclear. But bean-counters’ spreadsheets always amortise such assets over short periods. I can understand if they are talking to a board which will want to write off such an asset over ten years and bank profits thereafter. National planning IS DIFFERENT!!!

        100

  • #
    Greg in NZ

    Last 3 days snowfall for Morocco:

    https://www.snow-forecast.com/maps/dynamic/ib?over=none&symbols=snow&type=snow.last3days

    North Africa received its first winter dusting (10-20 cm) of carbon emission fallout powder this week.

    Will miracles never cease?

    120

    • #
      Hanrahan

      We are due for a change of season here. The koel, AKA stormbird, rainbird, cooee bird has been back from New Guinea and calling day and night for a week. The pheasant coucal, another cuckoo, is also calling and the dead-horse tree on the footpath is flowering. All for nothing, dry as far as the radar can see.

      50

      • #
        Graeme No.3

        Many years ago (1989) I saw a strange large bird in the back blocks of east Gippsland. The only description I could match to it was a Koel, and was told flatly that no such bird was found within 200km. of there.

        On a road trip back to S.A. (2003) I saw a small flock of an unusual small bird by the roadside past West Wyalong (during very dry weather). Despite doing over 100 k.p.h. I identified it as similar to a noisy Miner with one difference (a black rump). Again I was told no such bird existed. About 7 or 8 years later I stumbled across a mention of a small sub-species of noisy Miner (with black rump) existing about 100 km. south of my sighting.

        Remember Birds are smarter than bird brains.

        80

        • #
          Hanrahan

          It’s easier to hear koels than to see them. They will come into our mulberry tree occasionally and I remember one spreadeagled in the tree having fun in the rain. The male is a handsome black, female, not so much.

          30

      • #
        beowulf

        We’ve had a Koel here cooing at 2am in the Hunter for about a week too, which is pretty much on schedule. Don’t know what it’s going to eat this year though. Pickins are mighty slim as the dry takes hold. All the other fruit-eaters have departed except for one lonely sub-adult male Satin Bower Bird. In good year I’d have 10 bower birds and a full bower in my back yard, complete with blue clothes pegs, straws, bottle tops, flowers and other trinkets.

        40

        • #
          Kalm Keith

          Before the drought we had a group of half a dozen magpies come visit.

          Now we have one straggler and a single butcher bird and the peacock can be heard screeching across the road.
          Still dry.

          40

  • #

    I have been developing a new way of looking at temperature anomalies. To see whether global warming is changing the distribution of temperatures.

    Global warming is changing the “average” temperature, but is it also changing the “standard deviation” of temperature?

    I am looking at the distribution of temperature anomalies, after correcting for the amount of global warming, to see if the temperature distribution is becoming more extreme, less extreme, or staying the same. The short answer, is that the temperature distribution is not changing much.

    I categorise all temperature anomalies into groups, based on how many standard deviations they are away from the average:
    - warming, between 0 and 1 standard deviations from the average (light-orange)
    - warming, between 1 and 2 standard deviations from the average (medium-orange)
    - warming, between 2 and 3 standard deviations from the average (dark-orange)
    - warming, between 3 and 4 standard deviations from the average (light-pink)
    - warming, between 4 and 5 standard deviations from the average (medium-pink)
    - warming, greater than 5 standard deviations from the average (dark-pink)
    - cooling, between 0 and -1 standard deviations from the average (light-green)
    - cooling, between -1 and -2 standard deviations from the average (medium-green)
    - cooling, between -2 and -3 standard deviations from the average (dark-green)
    - cooling, between -3 and -4 standard deviations from the average (light-blue)
    - cooling, between -4 and -5 standard deviations from the average (medium-blue)
    - cooling, greater than -5 standard deviations from the average (dark-blue)

    This lets me create a “normalized” temperature anomaly map, for each month. I have created one for every month from January 1880 to July 2019.

    Because there are so many of them (1675), I have put them into a video, which you can watch like a movie.

    The advantages of this method are:
    - you can instantly identify unusual temperature anomalies, because they are pink (warming), or blue (cooling)
    - all temperature anomalies within 3 standard deviations (not unusual), are orange (warming), or green (cooling)
    - You can easily see that “warming and cooling” events have been happening over the whole interval from 1880 to 2019. Warming and cooling events are NOT new. But most people are not aware of the historical warming events, so they think that modern warming events are caused by global warming. My video shows the real situation.
    - warming and cooling events are different to global warming. For example, El Nino’s and La Nina’s are warming and cooling events. Global warming is happening as well.
    - it is fun to watch El Ninos happening over the whole period from 1880 to 2019. When an El Nino occurs, the Pacific Ocean to the left of the top of South America turns pink (unusually warm temperatures).

    A video of all the “normalized” temperature anomaly maps, looking at one month every second, takes about 30 minutes to watch. This is too long for most people. So I have created a range of videos with different speeds.

    Watching a fast video doesn’t take long, but you miss some of the detail. Watching a slow video takes more time, but you see all the detail.

    You can choose from videos which last 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, 27, and 30 minutes. They all show exactly the same thing, but at different speeds.

    The menu to access all of the videos, is at:

    https://agree-to-disagree.com/nta-map-video-menu-page

    I am interested in getting feedback.

    51

  • #
    Carbon500

    A local paper in the UK, The Rutland Mercury, published a report a week ago about a charity walk that had taken place to raise money for the Lincolnshire and Nottinghamshire air ambulance.
    Describing the walk, one of the participants said “We experienced the highest temperatures that they had had for over 40 years and it just shows that climate change is affecting everywhere. We were expecting temperatures in the 30s but around 11.30am it was like someone had turned the thermostat on. It just took your breath away.”
    Does anyone have a link to actual reliable temperature data for the Sahara regions, or would like to comment on this?
    The walkers started out from Marrakesh – one of the two was hospitalised after two days because of the heat, despite a support team. I suspect that they hadn’t done their homework very well before venturing into a desert. Your comments, please!

    80

    • #
      yarpos

      Mad dogs and Englishmen (or persons)

      Just classic naivety and /or stupidity and why we routinely lose some Euro tourists in the outback on a regular basis. They transplant themselves into a hostile environment , with little conditioning and often inadequate supplies, then bad things happen.

      To be fair I have been guilty of the same thing in reverese by underestimating the challenges and dangers of cold when I lived in Europe for a few years. But that was close to home and just resulted in a few Homer Simpson DOH! moments. I didnt charge off into the Alps exploring. The cold would do you in far quicker I think , at least with heat you generally have a couple days not just hours.

      60

  • #
    beowulf

    Audrey sees the light dark at the end of the tunnel. Why do we bother training electrical engineers when all we need to run our national grid is a foreign greenie activist lawyer?

    Ms Zibelman repeated calls for changes to Australia’s rules to create a “day-ahead” market that would require generators to guarantee fixed supply and pay to acquire it if they were unable to supply it. The proposal is the latest in a series of moves by AEMO to insure the market against the risk of blackouts and load shedding, a risk that has been rising with the increased outages at ageing coal-fired plants.

    That’s right Audrey — blame blackouts on the over-worked coal plants that haven’t been blown up according to your master plan yet.

    And that is not what she was spouting two and a half years ago, pushing the use of wind power by doing your washing at 3am etc. Let’s not mention Hazelwood which she was so delighted to see shut down and her historic tweet before it shut: “Retaining it in the market is inefficient. Would rather double the market price by closing it!!”

    Well she exceeded her wildest dreams didn’t she, with bids hitting the $14,000 ceiling and average prices through the roof. She was fresh in from organising the destruction of New York’s power grid back then; her patron Hillary had lost the election the election stolen from her by the Russians, and Big Mal was casting about for a green zealot to wreck our grid. Perfect match.

    Since early 2017 Auds seems to have had a partial epiphany, but only partial. Perhaps she has glimpsed the axe with her name on it, backpedalling furiously as power shedding in SA, VIC and NSW looms over summer, flinging blame left and right. By the time she gains a fuller understanding we’ll all be using whale oil lamps and telling the kiddies wondrous tales about this strange thing called electricity that we used to have.
    http://catallaxyfiles.com/2019/10/10/will-ms-zibelman-please-explain-what-she-means-by-strategic-reserves-of-power/

    Then all we would need is an actual PM, not a clownish cardboard cut-out with a stupid grin and a truck load of excuses. If the nation’s woes could be solved by holding hands and singing Kum-ba-ya, then Scotty would be an outstanding PM — but only then. Doctor Do-Nothing is utterly unimpressive.

    Angus Taylor needs to extricate his digit too, as do a number of his senior cabinet colleagues. So far they are a big nothing-burger. We need action on so many fronts, not a constant trickle of empty words.

    80

    • #
      Kalm Keith

      Problem nicely stated.

      Was AZ installed in the reign of MalEx444?

      Our political system is in dire straits.

      20

    • #
      yarpos

      “………require generators to guarantee fixed supply and pay to acquire it if they were unable to supply it”

      The Oscar for the slipperiest weasel words in a supply contract goes to…………

      40

  • #

    So then, evidently we must discard the past and embrace the future. Coal fired power is the past and wind power is the future. So let’s just embrace the future shall we.

    Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday. Three days, 72 hours.

    Wind power total Nameplate – 6702MW.

    Monday average power generation – 1112MW, so that’s at a Capacity Factor (CF) of 16.59%. Total power generated – 26.69GWH
    Tuesday average power generation – 727MW, so thats at a CF of 10.85%. Total power generated – 17.45GWH
    Wednesday average power generation – 891MW, so that’s at a CF of 13.23%. Total power generated – 21.40GWH

    At the low point on Monday, only 2 wind plants, both in Tasmania were doing anything of significance. Take away those two plants, and every Mainland wind plant, and that’s 53 of them were generating a total of 82MW, and that’s at a CF of 1.3%. At that same time, all the wind plants, those two in Tasmania included were generating 0.94% of the total generated power from every source.

    On that same Monday in South Australia, all of that State’s wind plants, all 22 of them with a Nameplate of 2142MW went back to zero for three hours. Zero output. THREE HOURS.

    On Tuesday it was even lower at the low point for the day. All 55 wind plants could only manage 109MW from a Nameplate of 6702MW and that was 0.44% of all the generated power at that time, so less than half of one percent.

    In Victoria for this day, there are 17 wind plants with a Nameplate of 2116MW. The average for the day was 50MW, The high was 134MW and for two hours, the total was at zero, in fact less, because they were drawing power from the grid.

    On Wednesday, thank heavens the wind picked up a bit at 7PM. However in Victoria. in those earlier 19 hours the average from those 17 wind plants and 2116MW Nameplate was 42.5MW at a CF of 2%.

    So, keeping in mind that we need to ‘embrace the future’ of wind power, then adding up all that total power delivered by wind power in ….. THREE DAYS, 65.54GWH well that total was delivered by coal fired power in, umm ….. TWO HOURS AND FIFTY MINUTES.

    Now finally, pretend you’re one of the two foreign owners of Macarthur Wind Plant, the largest operational wind plant in Australia, with 140 towers and a Nameplate of 420MW. The only source of income you have as that foreign owner is from the sale of electricty, because you have magnanimously ceded all income from the certificates to your plant operator AGL. As an Owner, and each of those two offshore non Australian owners owns 50% of the plant, on a good day, from the sale of electricity, you could make half a million dollars and on an average day you might make 300K, so around $110 Million a year, just from the sale of the electricity.

    Over these last three day, all each owner has made is $80,000 instead of the (average) almost $1 Million.

    On Monday this plant was at zero output for 17 hours, and it operated at a CF across the whole day of 1.2%
    On Tuesday this plant was at zero output for 15 hours, and it operated at a CF across the whole day of 1.3%
    On Wednesday this plant was at zero output for just under 10 hours, and it operated at a CF across the whole day of 2.4%

    Across all three days this plant delivered a total of 1488MWH of power and 715MWH of them were in the last 5 hours after the wind picked up late on Wednesday evening.

    As you’re all aware, sometimes, well often really, I use Bayswater as an example. Bayswater currently has Unit 4 off line for an Overhaul and Upgrade to, umm, extend the life of the plant, further accentuating the fact that AGL is umm, ‘getting out of coal’. Really? So with one Unit off line, the maximum Bayswater can generate at any one point in time is a little under 2000MW.

    So, over these last THREE DAYS this largest wind plant in Australia delivered the same power as Bayswater at three quarters capacity delivered in umm, ….. FIFTY MINUTES.

    So if we embrace that wind powered future, what is there to look forward to? This was not just the one isolated wind plant across the vast coverage area. This was the whole fleet of 55 wind plants, around 3700 individual wind towers, and 6702MW total in Nameplate, and it failed miserably for three days.

    Some future, eh!

    Incidentally, it might surprise you just how many of those 55 wind plants are foreign owned, either wholly or partly. I wonder if the CO2 ‘savings’ are in those foreign owner’s Country or here in Oz.

    Tony.

    Australian Daily Wind Power Generation Data – Monday 21st October 2019
    Australian Daily Wind Power Generation Data – Tuesday 22nd October 2019
    Australian Daily Wind Power Generation Data – Wednesday 23rd October 2019

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    • #
      Roy Hogue

      Aww Tony, don’t spoil their dream with facts. That’s not fair and the poor babies’ heads will explode.

      On the other hand, that might be fun to watch. Maybe you should throw them a good dose of reality.

      60

    • #
      Kalm Keith

      Thanks Tony.

      Are we doomed, this whole business is just so surreal.

      At least Solzhenitsyn knew he was headed for the gulag, we on the other hand have been quietly maneuvered tbere by people we should have been able to trust.

      Someone has declared and enacted war on Australia.

      Someone’s, are responsible, we need to find out who they were and seriously confront them.

      Electricity in this formerly sane nation is now so riddled with ripoffs that even offices running a few lights and computers are near breaking point.
      As for Manufacturing, forget it!

      KK

      60

    • #
      Robber

      “We need to recognise that coal is the wrong type of generation to firm renewables. Right now, the price for firming energy is not enough to ensure that what we need to make the system reliable will be built,” Origin CEO Mr Frank Calabria will tell a CEDA lunch.
      In other words we need higher electricity prices to move “the market” towards 50% ‘intermittent ruinables’.
      Higher prices – good for Origin Energy, bad for business and consumers.
      Exactly what type of “firming energy” will higher prices deliver? Batteries, pumped hydro, imported LNG and diesel?
      We might as well tell all energy intensive industries to move their businesses overseas, and then proudly proclaim that we have met our Paris commitments and beyond. Never mind that Australia will go broke – after all, we are heading towards extinction anyway, aren’t we?

      100

    • #
      Ross

      Tony

      I am sure you have done it before but you should send and continue to send this data to the MSM. I would pick out someone at the Age, the SMH and the ABC(and not really expect them to do anything with it) and also send it to the guy at The Australian, Andrew Bolt and Alan Jones.
      The latter 3 are likely to do something with it and then after a few times they could point out the Age, SMH and ABC have the same information — that is, shame them into taking notice.

      60

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    David Wojick

    Joe Bastardi says El Niño caused all the satellite warming, as have I:

    Joe’s latest:
    https://www.cfact.org/2019/10/24/more-super-el-ninos-not-so-fast-my-friend/

    Joe’s picture of the El Niño step up in global temperatures, with nothing but pauses on either side:
    https://www.weatherbell.com/images/imguploader/images/pause_step_up.png

    My description of this big step up, from 22 months ago:
    https://www.cfact.org/2018/01/02/no-co2-warming-for-the-last-40-years/

    There is no CO2 warming in the entire 41 year satellite record. Just a step up warming due to the super El Niño 20 years ago. We may now have a second El Niño step warming but it is too soon to tell.

    No CO2 warming at all! CO2 is harmless.

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    • #
      Another Ian

      And

      “What moral, functioning Canadian human could possibly justify voting for you?”

      The answer is none. But “functioning” Canadians are an increasingly rare commodity. As A fellow said a few days ago, on the National Post’s comment section:

      “Canada’s problem is much deeper and much more serious than Mr. Trudeau, who is a mere symptom of what ails Canada. Blaming the Prince of Fools should not blind anyone to the vast confederacy of fools that made him their Prince. The country can survive a Trudeau, who after all is merely a fool. It is less likely to survive a multitude of fools who made him their leader.” “

      90

  • #
    el gordo

    A meandering jet stream and blocking highs are indicative of global cooling.

    https://www.weatherzone.com.au/synoptic.jsp?d=0

    10

  • #
    el gordo

    Found this at Notrickszone, a strong solar influence on the AMO but not the PDO.

    ‘There is robust statistical evidence that Atlantic multi-decadal oscillation (AMO) has intrinsic positive correlation with solar activity in all datasets employed. The strength of the relationship between AMO and solar activity is modulated by volcanic eruptions and complex interaction among modes of ocean variability.

    ‘The observational dataset reveals that El Niño southern oscillation (ENSO) has statistically significant negative intrinsic correlation with solar activity on decadal to multi-decadal timescales (16–27-year) whereas there is no evidence of a link on a typical ENSO timescale (2–7-year).

    ‘The Pacific decadal oscillation has no link with solar activity, however, it has positive intrinsic correlation with volcanic eruptions on multi-decadal timescales (47–54-year) in reconstruction and decadal to multi-decadal timescales (16–32-year) in climate model simulations. We also find evidence of a link between volcanic eruptions and ENSO, however, the sign of relationship is not consistent between observations/proxies and climate model simulations.’

    10

    • #
      David Wojick

      This statement — “The strength of the relationship between AMO and solar activity is modulated by volcanic eruptions and complex interaction among modes of ocean variability.” — is code for the correlation is weak.

      Climate science is full of weak statistical correlations that might be causal. I suggest not taking them seriously.

      20

      • #
        el gordo

        Thanks David.

        00

      • #
        el gordo

        Some authors think the PDO behaved differently before 1850.

        ‘Our analysis suggest that solar forcing fluctuation on quasi‐centennial time scale (Gleissberg cycle) could be the pace‐maker of the PDO before 1850, and the PDO behavior after 1850 could be due, in part, to the global warming.’

        Caiming Shen et al 2006

        00

  • #
    Robber

    Does anyone know the mechanism by which Victoria will enforce its 50% renewables target by 2030?
    There are lots of govt PR on more jobs, and lowering prices by $32 per household, but I can’t see anything on the rules.

    30

    • #
      robert rosicka

      Robber if you remove more coal fired power and add more unreliables the blackouts will be more frequent and of a longer duration .
      If your house or business doesn’t have electricity you’re not being charged for consumption so therefore your bills will be cheaper , it’s quite simple really .
      Also a baldrick cunning plan .

      40

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    • #
      beowulf

      EG I’m not real sure about that Nullschool graphic. If I’m interpreting it correctly it is showing cold water off western India where there is currently a cyclone forming SW of Mumbai. Ventusky is showing the SST there at 29 deg. The monsoon is still very active around India/Sri Lanka.
      https://tropicalcyclones.blogspot.com/
      https://www.ventusky.com/?p=17;83;2&l=rain-3h&t=20191025/0000

      Unless Nullschool is showing anomalies, but that doesn’t match either.
      https://www.tropicaltidbits.com/analysis/ocean/
      There appears to be a warm spot forming in the mid-Indian Ocean.

      I find it much harder to track down informative IOD info than ENSO info. What’s your take on the likely prognosis for the IOD?

      10

      • #
        el gordo

        ‘IOD breakdown occurs when the monsoon trough moves into the southern hemisphere in early December. With the monsoon trough having a record-late retreat from India this year, the shift into the southern hemisphere may also be later than usual.’ BoM

        That seems about right. We should probably look at the significance of late monsoons.

        20

  • #
    David Wojick

    The French are not putting up with XR protests. They are tear gassing them en mass. Cool!

    https://www.climatechangenews.com/2019/10/23/emmanuel-macrons-war-climate-activism/

    This is interesting: “The 21 September march will be remembered as the first time the police violently broke up an authorised climate protest, said Victor Vauquois, a climate activist and member of the video channel Partager c’est Sympa.

    “In social protests, people are used to this kind of treatment by the police, but not in climate protests. People were really shocked, it was palpable,” he told CHN.”

    Apparently these fools do not see that climate protests are radical social protests.

    80

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    Slithers

    One for Tony from Oz I think
    The man (Not Elected) responsible for the electricity supply, well for paying the bill of the Shoalhaven Entertainment Center has been most helpful.

    He provided this information.

    The SEC has an annual electricity load of 510,000 kWh. The solar PV will generate around 112,000 kWh per year. The system was designed to maximize self-consumption of the solar power so only a 5% export to the grid is expected. This is because the SEC is not fully open on Sundays. Council pays significantly less for its electricity on long-term bulk buying contracts than residential customers so payback periods are longer.

    Hope they have deep pockets…..
    and of course its the rate payers who forked out for the 81kw PV system. I will be asking about insurance next as well as the possible effect upon the local electricity supply.

    40

  • #
    Slithers

    The nice man also came up with this info.

    There is no storage battery installed at the SEC. The high pricing and payback period for batteries is still not that viable. The SEC would eventually be a very suitable site for a storage battery given the shows and events that it runs at night. The 81kW solar PV system just completed was called Stage 1 so there could always be a Stage 2 project in a few years that might include battery storage once the costs come down on the batteries. Council did install its first storage battery (20kWh size) at the Berry Wastewater Treatment Plant earlier in the year to pair up with a 22.5kW solar PV system. This was to help with the intermittent nature of the batch wastewater treatment process. Shoalhaven Water is now adjusting the system to maximize its use so this is a trial to see how battery technology can integrate with electrical systems etc.

    30

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      Serp

      There’s early adopters and then thers’s innumerate dills; irrespective of which class the SEC belongs to the result will be bankruptcy.

      10

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      Hanrahan

      Stage 2 project in a few years that might include battery storage once the costs come down on the batteries.

      Err, Who said battery costs are coming down? The humble lead/acid battery has been mass produced for 100 years. Bought one lately? They rapidly become a commodity.

      Just did a quick search on Tesla powerwall 2 and found this:

      Price Updates
      March 2019 – Prices for the Powerwall 2 and installation cost have increased between $1,000 – $2,500 due to industry changes.

      30

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    Another Ian

    Building on Jo’s “Very hot days” post

    “Global Warming is producing fewer “very hot days” ”

    http://catallaxyfiles.com/2019/10/25/global-warming-is-producing-fewer-very-hot-days/

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    el gordo

    Tim Blair at Quadrant.

    ‘Remember when you had to invest considerable effort in discovering the worth of a person? Suppose you’re at a crowded bar, or surrounded by people at a dinner party. Might any of the individuals present reward deeper attention? In days past, you’d begin by seeking out common ground on movies, music, events of the moment and so on. It was a process.

    ‘Now it’s the work of an instant. Just venture a gentle line about mankind’s greatest invention— “Say, what do you reckon about all of this climate change malarkey?”—and you’ll know immediately if whoever you’re addressing is someone with whom you may share further thoughts, a fence-sitter and potential ally, or a challenged type for whom you must speak far more slowly.’

    00

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    dunn, rob

    world news https://www.theepochtimes.com/expensive-climate-policies-sparked-the-chile-riots-just-like-the-yellow-vest-protests-in-france_3127717.html
    In the Democratic Republic of the Congo rates of deforestation have doubled in the past five years….In Africa much of the demand for logging comes from China, which has taken a strategic interest in the continent, buying land and doing resource deals with governments in exchange for internal investment and development cash.
    “African timber is exported to China, and this is one of the three dominant causes of deforestation. China could act on illegal timber and be very effective, for instance if the Chinese government put in a requirement on tracing [timber and forest goods],” said Streck….
    Globally much of the economic pressure that drives deforestation comes from consumers’ increasingly unhealthy eating habits. Demand for meat drives demand for cheap animal feed https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/sep/12/deforestation-damage-goes-beyond-amazon

    II, i, 9. Who can improve shall possess. This concerns lands, forests and waters. All mechanical achievements and various types of inventions are subject to the same principle. Leaves of Morya’s Garden 1925
    …………………………………..…..
    630. One must bear in mind that people have destroyed the resources of Earth without mercy. They are ready to poison the earth and air. They have laid waste the forests, these storehouses of prana. They have decimated animal life, forgetting that animal energy nourishes the earth. They believe that untried chemical compounds can take the place of prana and earthly emanations. They plunder the natural resources, unmindful that the balance must be maintained. -M: Fiery World 1933

    00