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Worlds biggest solar thermal plant axed in state that is God’s gift to solar

Despite the obstacles, the free market just saved South Australian’s $110 million dollars

Crescent Dunes, Solar Thermal Plant, California.

The Aurora plant was to be a bigger copy of Crescent Dunes, Solar Thermal Plant, California.

The Aurora Solar Thermal plant was going to be the biggest one in the world, but they couldn’t find enough private investors so it’s just been scrapped. That is despite the SA government being willing to give $110 million dollars, and the state being one of the sunniest, richest places in the world and with people already paying obscenely high prices for electricity. If Big-Solar could make it anywhere, surely there is no easier place on Planet Earth than in coal-less South Australia where competition from cheap reliable power has been completely extinguished?

A $650 million solar thermal power plant planned for Port Augusta will not go ahead after the company behind it failed to secure commercial finance for the project.

Despite all those fixed, unfair advantages, the market didn’t want to pay up for a 150MW bird frying power plant that would cost $650 million and probably only produce 30MW effectively. (The company’s prototype was Crescent Dunes which had a capacity factor of only 16%). Possibly investors also weren’t enthused about the dismal operation record of that smaller sister plant in California which was beset with maintenance issues and failed for one third of the time in its first two years. That 110MW plant cost $1.3b in 2015 and produced electricity at $178/MWh, nearly 6 times as pricey as the 53 year old Hazelwood coal plant managed in its last month of operation.

It was such a bad deal the government did everything it could to help:

Mr van Holst Pellekaan said the Government had done “everything it possibly can to support this project”, including extending deadlines, agreeing to changes to the project to add photovoltaic solar panels and introducing SolarReserve to potential financiers.

Earlier in 2017, the Federal Government confirmed it would grant $110 million in a concessional equity loan to support the project

The opposition (the same party that proposed the plant in 2017) blame its demise on the proposed $1.5b interconnector to NSW:

Opposition Leader Peter Malinauskas blamed the scrapping of the solar thermal power plant on the State Government’s plan for an interconnector to New South Wales.

He said the interconnector project, due to be completed by 2022, prioritised another state’s “dirty coal power over South Australian renewable power”.

“That was a bad decision and the people that are going to pay the price are the Port Augusta community, but also South Australian power consumers,” he said.

The unfree market can’t save us from stupid big government

That interconnector is a $1.5 billion project that will allow South Australia’s erratic electricity to help destroy baseload power in New South Wales just like it did in Victoria. Electricity prices are predicted to fall, but SA already has one interconnector to Victoria and prices have only gone up everywhere within 1,000km of that.

It takes big national planning to make big problems. Indeed, without the Heywood interconnector SA couldn’t have managed a state-wide blackout in 2016.

In the real economy, $1,500 million dollars buys a lot of electricity, or 6 gas fired plants, or most of one large advanced coal plant that could produce 2000MW of cheap electricity for 50 years (or indefinitely, as long we keep the maintenance going).

Kids are running the country.

h/t to Steve Hyland, Bill in Oz, Original Steve. Plus thanks to Graeme No 3 and AndrewWA in past comments for their help. And from TonyfromOz who says: “Everything about this SouthAus plant is the hyped to the max best case scenario that NO plant on Planet Earth has achieved yet…”

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Worlds biggest solar thermal plant axed in state that is God's gift to solar, 9.7 out of 10 based on 99 ratings

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117 comments to Worlds biggest solar thermal plant axed in state that is God’s gift to solar

  • #

    They knew Aurora was a turkey from the get-go. And those behind the interconnector and SA wind know that’s all a turkey. Think the boosters of Timmy’s Geothermia and the Illawarra Wave Generator were hoping to succeed? That’d be like watching Kojak and worrying he’ll get killed in the end and the baddie will get away. The only ones surprised are the public who continue to trust with no grounds for trust.

    We should stop wasting time persuading those who already know that their globalist green plans are all turkeys. But when they say “war”, as in War on Coal, believe them. Give ‘em their war.

    Gutta viridans delenda est. Green Blob must be destroyed.

    500

  • #

    Or mebbe…Stulti numquuam verificant.

    70

  • #

    Oops, lol. ‘numquam’.

    60

    • #
      TdeF

      Of course. A Latin typo. The Romans used to do it all the time and they were slated for it.

      160

    • #
      Yonniestone

      I saw the best electrons of coal generation destroyed by madness,
      sulfer hydrogen nitrate,
      dragging themselves through the national grid at dawn looking
      for a renewable fix,
      bituminousheaded hoppers burning for the ancient heavenly
      connection to the steamy dynamo in the machinery of night,

      120

  • #
    Bill in Oz

    The new inter-connector is being touted here in SA, by the state government, as a way of accessing the cheap reliable coal fired power of NSW.

    Given the constraints on what the Heywood inter-connector can transmit to SA from the Latrobe valley in Victoria, that seems to be the truth. And presumably we here in SA be able to enjoy the benefits of reliable cheap coal power.

    I certainly hope so as there is bugger all chance of a coal fired plant being actually built here. So buying it from 2500 Ks away ( ho, ho, ho ! ) seems the only option.

    But the potential for SA’s windy turbines to undermine NSW’s coal fired generators is also a concern.

    How could this be avoided ? What rules & regulations would be essential ?

    Maybe Tony From Oz has some thoughts on this

    171

    • #
      Bill in Oz

      PS : Does the fact that the Commonwealth government now does not have to spend $110 million on this boondoggle project, mean that the budget is even more in the black ?

      171

    • #
      C. Paul Barreira

      How much use will this much-vaunted inter-connector be when Liddell closes? The farce (and the betrayal) deepens. Prices and reliability have each only one way to go; too bad they are in opposite directions.

      250

    • #
      ivan

      But the potential for SA’s windy turbines to undermine NSW’s coal fired generators is also a concern.

      How could this be avoided ?

      Shouldn’t need any regulations NSW just need to install phase shifting transformers at its border to allow the state to rejecting imports just as some countries in Europe, Netherlands, Poland and the Czech republic, are doing with Germany.
      https://new.siemens.com/global.en/products/energy/high-voltage/transformers/phase-shifting-transformers.html

      90

    • #
      John in Oz

      Doesn’t the NATIONAL Electricity Market (NEM) mean that ALL generators get paid the same price, based on short time-period guesstimates of demand (15/30 minute???)?

      If so, it does not matter how electricity is generated, interconnector or not. Having access to NSW generation may provide security but not lower prices.

      Could someone with industry knowledge offer an opinion on this?

      20

    • #
      yarpos

      Why would they want to access nasty NSW coal power of any colour? surely they would be looking to export their wind power goodness at times that suited then regardless of demand. I mean like it would do so much to strengthen the NSW grid. Go Gladys!!!

      00

  • #

    Evil coal once again foils attempts to save the world.

    120

  • #
    OriginalSteve

    Renewables = flogging a dead horse….an activity generally acknowledged as a waste of time and energy…

    110

  • #
    Travis T. Jones

    No offence, but you have to be off your medication to think building solar panels into your energy grid will build an extreme weather controlling machine … Oh wait … the 97% CSIRO … they’re 100% serious …

    Data models for energy consumption

    “In times of rapid change in the energy sector, we need rich data to plan for the energy system of tomorrow,” said Dr Berry.

    This is particularly true in summer when the Australian energy system is most under strain due to high consumer demand and the increased likelihood of extreme weather events,”

    https://www.innovationaus.com/2019/02/Data-models-for-energy-consumption

    Wait. What?

    How many solar panels must Australia build before Australia prevents it’s first extreme weather event?

    140

    • #
      OriginalSteve

      My 13 yo daughter wanted to watch the clumate disaster movie “Geostorm”. She wanted to watch it as she reckoned she just wantd a good laugh…..and it was laughable…..people outrunning exploding gas mains in tiny electric cars…so funny….

      130

  • #

    What can I say? (I’d probably never stop)

    However, remember that meme that renewables are cheaper than coal fired power.

    This now failed proposal was going to cost $650 Million in total.

    That’s for a plant that has a Nameplate of 150MW.

    Going on the Capacity Factor (CF) of this technology, which is around 30% (28.7% from my research) so, that’s effectively just an equivalent power generation of 45MW. So, in reality, this technology has a CF no better really than wind power.

    A 45MW plant for $650 Million. Please don’t even begin to tell me plants like this are cheaper than coal fired power.

    As to that Capacity Factor, that’s from what I did back in 2013, when I researched every one of these type of plants in Spain, and back then, there were 24 of them, and now there are 34 of them in Spain. That Post is at the following link.

    Solar Thermal Power (Concentrating Solar) Fail – Just Look At Spain

    At the linked Post, there’s a graph which shows the insolation versus power generation for this technology, and click on the image to get it at a larger size on a new page.

    The more heat diverted to the heat retention power block, the less power generation during daylight hours, and keep in mind that in most cases for those 24 listed plants in Spain, they use natural gas fired power to start up the turbine generator and deliver power until the solar function is hot enough to take over. There was one case in the U.S. where one of these plants was actually going to be reclassified as a natural gas fired plant because that source was in use more than the solar function.

    At the bottom of the Post is a link to the current list for these plants, and if you go to the link, note the Nameplates, none higher than the much troubled Ivanpah plant in the U.S. The main problem is that they can only get enough heat from the Sun to drive a turbine capable of actually driving a 125MW generator, and Ivanpah has three of those 125MW generators. Most are in multiples of 50MW generators, so a 150MW plant has 3 X 50MW generators.

    Tony.

    310

  • #
    Latus Dextro

    The Aurora Solar Thermal plant was going to be the biggest one in the world, but they couldn’t find enough private investors so it’s just been scrapped. That is despite the SA government being willing to give $110 million dollars…

    Of course the State would be ecstatic to virtue signal their way with your money, all the way down the yellow brick, green unicorn road to the fetid swamp of Venezuelan bankruptcy; that’s what a socialist eco-Fascist boondoggles look like. You can be sure that the elite will still be swilling champagne and quaffing snails in Paris or wherever the current bubble-bound Green-fest de jour will be held.

    In the meantime, one can’t wait for those useless trick cars and their hapless self-righteous, virtue signalling occupants to get hit with their “fair share” of the liquid fuel tax converted to a tax per km, once the proportion of trick cars reaches 2%.
    It’s inevitable and it will be truly hysterical, as hysterical as their laughter is now when they believe they’re not only saving the planet and the grandchildren, but that its all a free ride into the Green sunset ad infinitum.
    Back of envelope calculation suggests a NZ$ tax charge of around 12c / km ($120 per 1000 km or $1200 per 10000 km).

    I can hear the prescient screeches, especially from the virtue signalling eco-Fascists.
    But there’s just no avoiding that Leftist idea that everyone must pay their “fair share.”

    170

  • #
    Robber

    Just noticed that my local shopping centre has installed two EV charging bays, rated at 6.6 KW, so seems that’s about 240 volts times 25 amps. As Telsa 3 has about 60 kWhr battery, I calculate that’s 9 hours to charge? So much for Silly Billy’s photo op standing by an EV charger saying it could charge in 8-10 minutes.

    260

  • #
    ЯΞ√ΩLUT↑☼N

    Going by the pic of Crescent Dunes at top, the new plant would be viable if we removed the solar reflectors and instead replaced them with pedal generators manned with pollies and greenies 24/7. I know the noise from worker complaints would be unbearable and so it should be built far from the rest of us clever people.

    The rain would keep the “plant” cool and somewhat clean, hail would encourage faster pedalling and thereby output if we convince workers that it would cause hailproof covers to raise (pfft.. too expensive). Hot conditions would provide them with fluid from their sweat which they could drink. They’ll be paid when they’re finished because “Arbeit Macht Frei”.

    Easy peasy.

    200

  • #
    thingadonta

    In first year chemistry at University we were told ‘energy cannot be created or destroyed’.

    They didn’t tell us that politicians had special exemptions from this natural law.

    230

  • #
    TdeF

    So who’s running the show?

    This ongoing parody of real government and responsibility is a circus. States have ceded power to the Federal Government which is run by accountants and Greens.

    You have to say our defence is run the same way. Diesel submarines which are no better than what we have for another $30Billion and run on a fuel which we have to import and for which we have 7 days reserve. Absolutely defenceless, both before and after we spend the money. Then the Australian Submarine company has spent millions on putting in their own diesel power plants because they cannot rely on South Australia’s grid for manufacturing, let alone the massive price of power.

    It is all such a ridiculous farce, you can see Venezuela’s Maduro laughing at our utter stupidity. Socialist Australia. A country brought to its knees by endless laws about electricity. Brought to you by the Labor party, the Greens and the Liberal party all working to serve their masters in the 100,000 unelected bureaucrats in the EU and UN.

    There was a time politicians felt a twinge of responsibility, but after party animals Julie Gillard, Julie Bishop and Christopher Pyne from SA, who cares? Helen Carbon Clarke is now third in charge at the UN, having pushed her country into UN carbon taxes.

    We used to have real people as politicians, Bob Menzies, Gough Whitlam, Bob Hawke, Kim Beazley and Tony Abbott. Even Paul Keating was for the greater good. Good men with vision. Now we have self serving wimps, useful idiots like Malcolm Turnbull and Union lackeys like Gillard and Shorten. Woe is us.

    Is no one home in Canberra?

    190

    • #
      ЯΞ√ΩLUT↑☼N

      Just be aware that Whitlam signed us into UNIDROIT in 1973 and all the thieving liars that took his post since haven’t fixed it, so the country’s inherent wealth is being siphoned away to Washington and Rothschild.

      80

    • #
      Yonniestone

      Central planning Tdef, the more power concentrated in one spot the less chance of others questioning the decisions, Hawke was a big supporter of eliminating state governments.

      80

      • #
        OriginalSteve

        The local council amalgamations are based on the Soviet model of larger regional govts replacing state ones, but these report to the Supreme Soviet ( Federal govt ). This is why the amalgamations were pushed on people. its just implementing the Soviet model.

        50

  • #
    Bill in Oz

    Off Topic but interesting :

    “When a giant iceberg breaks away from near Britain’s Halley research base, it won’t be because of climate change.”

    Quite a lengthy article about a glacier which is about to calve huge iceberg..And the scientists who are studying the glacier say it is NOT due to climate change.

    I think we need to set up a Go Fund me” program for them as they will surely be outed by the dopey consensus mob.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47817510

    92

    • #
      ЯΞ√ΩLUT↑☼N

      If green twits want to stop glaciers calving they simply need to stop it snowing first, which they proudly called called Global Warming™©® which they say causes less snow and also cooling and more snow blah blah. Hold them to an honest answer and their soiled pants tell the truth.

      101

  • #
    BoyfromTottenham

    So this wonderful solar project / boondoggle located in ‘sunshine central’ couldn’t get funding even with the government guaranteed 100% LRET subsidy (approx AUD 60-80 per MWH delivered to the grid), and probably with help from the Clean Energy Finance Corporation to provide cheap financing at AU taxpayer expense? Wow – it must be a real DOG of a project. Thank god it didn’t happen. Remind me – who was promoting this crud?

    120

    • #
      yarpos

      Its interesting that they canned it now with so much “certainty” coming down the track. Renewables always need “certainty” , no business risk for them, just a gauranteed conveyor belt of money. Cough…Hepburn Springs….cough.

      60

  • #
    Serge Wright

    It’s a bit amusing to see the ex-premier blaming the planned NSW interconnect as the reason for the project not being able to secure funding. Amusing because he is admitting that his pet project was going to produce electricity at a higher rate than the rest of the country and was therefore going to gouge consumers even harder, creating even more energy poverty and job losses.

    With this slip of thhe tongue, at least we now know how he really feels about the people who once voted for him.

    100

  • #
    NuThink

    Looks like a giant Fresnel lens, or the vinyl record that MAD magazine put in one issue.
    The record had about 5 or 6 different endings, as there were 5 or 6 tracks starting at the outer edge of the record and which track played depended upon which track the stylus engaged. The first part of each track was the same tune, just the endings different.

    30

    • #
      John F. Hultquist

      I noticed that and wonder why the off-sets.
      Could it be for easier access to repair or replace?

      10

    • #
      Curious George

      Mirrors (flat mirrors, BTW) are set in concentric circles. 13 outermost circles are incomplete and slowly peter out on the southern side. Look at the shadow of the tower, the picture is taken around 2 pm. Apparently mirrors south of the tower would contribute less.

      10

  • #
    Kinky Keith

    It’s important to keep the truth as given in this post up in front of people.

    Eventually the weight of true comment must be seen as credible and consumers will demand cheap power available from Any Source but Renewables.

    KK

    81

  • #
    David from Texas

    Crescent Dunes is in Nevada not California. I have lived in both states and they both suck.

    50

  • #
    PeterS

    Oh that’s a shame. We could have used it to fry the cult leaders of the CAGW scam.

    80

  • #
  • #
    Tom Anderson

    Just a sidelight on the issue: In the high-minded tradition of every environmentalist project, the US solar thermal power plant at Ivanpah (California? Nevada? whatever) has never generated its projected power. It uses a diesel generator to reach full power. Better yet, in the course of its ongoing major failure, it causes rafts of avian fatalities by incinerating birds that fly too close to the receiving tower. Locals call these occurrences “streamers” because of the smoke trails of burning plumage the dying birds leave in their plunge. The daily kill includes raptors and every other bird that wanders too close to the tower’s concentrated solar energy. Streamers occur, I understand, about every two minutes during daylight hours.

    Airline pilots also complain that the mirrors are blinding when flying past them.

    Congratulations, Aussies, for a wise decision.

    140

  • #
    Tom Anderson

    Just a sidelight on the issue: In the high-minded tradition of every environmentalist project, the US solar thermal power plant at Ivanpah (California? Nevada? whatever) has never generated its projected power. It uses a diesel generator to reach full power. Better yet, in the course of its ongoing major failure, it causes rafts of avian fatalities by incinerating birds that fly too close to the receiving tower. Locals call these occurrences “streamers” because of the smoke trails of burning plumage the dying birds leave in their plunge. The daily kill includes raptors and every other bird that wanders too close to the tower’s concentrated solar energy. Streamers occur, I understand, about every two minutes during daylight hours.

    Airline pilots also complain that the mirrors are blinding when flying past them.

    Congratulations, Aussies, for a wise decision.

    100

  • #
    Tombstone Gabby

    I’ve been checking AEMO’s Data Dashboard twice a day for several months now. When the wind blows in South Australia, yup – they can sell excess to Victoria – cheap. When the wind isn’t blowing – up goes the price of imported power. The ‘good word’ of the day is ‘intermittent’…..

    I note that Tasmania also has some pretty steep prices on occasion.

    The Internet – I can sit 7,000+ miles away and get a good idea of wind conditions (and thunder storms) in Australia. (And yes, Vegemite is available in the US.)

    https://aemo.com.au/Electricity/National-Electricity-Market-NEM/Data-dashboard#nem-dispatch-overview

    10

    • #
      yarpos

      Good to hear food of the gods is available to our septic cousins.

      00

      • #
        Tombstone Gabby

        “Septic”? I’m old enough to remember WW2, and having US Army and RAAF personnel in the house for a Sunday chicken lunch – and a game of cricket in the back yard afterwards. Is Coral Sea week still celebrated? Long memory…..

        20

  • #
    Planning Engineer

    You should expect new/alternative technologies to prove themselves in niche markets before widespread adoption is warranted in the mainstream. This article effectively describes an atypical market (maybe not quite a niche but with similar characteristics) where costs are high, need is great, the area is well suit d to the particular resource and yet it is not competitive. If people paid attention to important things like costs, practicality and logic – most would be realizing solar is not ready for prime time in broad applications.

    110

    • #
      yarpos

      Sadly, probably no lessons will be learnt amongst the groups that need to learn them , mainly our political class and the mindless renewables fanboys.

      This project was trumpeted as a major event/win for SA. All the usual hubris and claims of powering X thousand homes were there. In failure you might see a couple of paragraphs and some finger pointing. I have an interest in such things bit missed the announcement as it was quietly ushered through the media. Hot rocks, tidal and wave energy projects have all followed the same cycle.

      I am not sure how the fanboys adjust their brains to deal with the concurrent ideas that renewables are way cheaper the coal and gas, and yet you cant get a solar project off the ground with all kinds of subsidies/contributions, tilted playing fields and all possible following winds. I guess the uncommercial “no brainer” is due to some conspiracy.

      90

      • #
        OldGreyGuy

        > I guess the uncommercial “no brainer” is due to some conspiracy.

        Yep, we have one in our office, in his words coal is expensive, renewables are the way of the future as they cost nothing, etc. Every time we are lured into an argument about this as he preaches at us at least once a week he is convinced that Big Oil or Coal is buying up these projects and wrecking them.

        10

  • #
    Tezza

    Further to TonyfromOz’s comments at #8, there is an historical angle to this Australian infatuation with the Crescent Dunes example of solar thermal. It was the centrepiece of the ABC’s Four Corners program of 7 July 2014 called Power to the People.
    The program made hysterical claims about Crescent Dunes powering Las Vegas by night, etc. The broader context was to claim, yet again, that the world was on the verge of major renewable breakthroughs, and that PM Tony Abbott’s Warburton review into reducing Australian renewable energy targets was retrograde.

    It was already clear the ABC program was a complete concoction, so I complained to the ABC internal Audience and Consumer Affairs team about lack of mandated impartiality and diversity of perspectives. When they (of course) pronounced themselves well-pleased with the program, I further complained to Australian Communications and Media Authority, which also decided it could not intervene. Its report of the whole schmozzle is at:
    /TV-investigations/Word-document-2015/3266-ABC-Four-Corners-docx.docx?la=en

    We now go to an election with competitively idiotic energy policies from the major parties, coasting on the public misinformation from our national broadcaster about allegedly game-changing renewable technologies.

    110

    • #
      Serp

      Sing out when you find an authority with teeth Tezza.

      The ABC behemoth is getting noticeably grumpy and impatient today because the Prime Minister has shown no sign of calling the election to its timetable; he’s only obliged to petition for a half senate election and could continue his spluttering drive to a House election as late as November. What a far cry from Julia Gillard’s approach to election dates.

      40

      • #
        Bill in Oz

        A half senate election would be a good idea.It would get rid of some of the dopey senators in the current list..
        Might see some of the greenists and extreme right wing nutters all booted

        And thus allow for some legislative progress between July 1st and mid November when a House of Reps election is required.

        And in the meantime folks have extra cash in their pockets courtesy of the tax cuts in the budget..

        I’m not Sco-Mo, but if I am was him, that would be my secret plan.

        And of course Labor will be screaming ” We wuz robbed ”

        All good !

        21

        • #
          tim

          Who are these extreme right wing nutjobs? Can you list them with examples of the extreme right wing things they have said?

          10

  • #

    Another blow to billy ocasio cortez.
    How did he get a mobile phone mixed up with a car? 7 to 8 minutes?
    A doughhead for our prime minister.
    I can’t put up wiff that.

    80

  • #
    Tezza

    Incidentally, Jo, you should correct the caption on the photo. Crescent Dunes is in Nevada, not California.

    00

  • #
    Ken Stewart

    What Electricity Bill is promoting with his vision of 50% of new vehicles being electric is simply that households should be purchasing new, very large, very expensive, and very power hungry electrical appliances that will require even more baseload generation. You can fool some of the people, but hopefully not enough to get him elected.

    40

  • #
  • #
    MudCrab

    As an Adelaide boy I must confess to getting a slight warm fuzzy when I read this post this morning.

    Although, in the interest of full disclosure, that fuzzy may also have been from my Saturday night cooking… :-D

    20

  • #
    Cloudbase

    It’s about time Australia stopped supporting the vasket case that is SA.Make them learn to live within their means. No bailout interconnects or submarine project…and cartinly no more subsidised industries like the failed car industry.
    Make them move to were there is work…or no dole money. They have been a tick on Australia’s back for far to long.

    40

  • #
    Chad

    S depressing that it took this long,….. and then only due to some foreign based finance decision, …..for this project to be seen as the farce it always was going to be.
    You didnt even need the glaring examples of ivanpah or Spain to tell you that a 150 peak MW solar thermal plant with only 8-10 hours of storage, was a joke,
    The proposal was obviously predicated on conning the gullible politicians of SA into subsidy rich contracts to enable a “Rebate Farm” to be constructed ,with no real regard for the trchnical or practical viability of the technology. !
    I believe some of the proposed solar and Wind farm projects are also under review now ?

    20

  • #
    Chad

    Truely depressing that it took foreign finacial logic rather than Aussie common sense, to kill off this project .

    10

  • #

    Thank God this bird torturing monstrosity has been canned. Pure, vile evil.

    40

  • #
    destroyer D69

    Wanna win an election??????
    Cut the beer tax and win a landslide a la Ontario
    Posted on 5:22 pm, June 15, 2018 by Rafe Champion

    Creativity and sex have long been linked, as has art with the contravention of bourgeois values. Long may it be so. By the way, what is wrong with bourgeois values?

    On a main topic, apparently James Allen has a super post in The Spectator this week. Mine has not arrived but it looks as though the whole thing is posted on Facebook The Australian Climate Skeptics Group. The word has been around for a few days that the left liberals in Ontario Canada were recently wiped out by the Conservatives. This is the winning platform.

    1/ Repeal the existing climate change policy that instituted a cap-and-trade system as well as opposing a minimum price on carbon emissions and any sort of carbon tax.

    2/ Repeal the existing Green Energy Act.

    3/ Scrap a planned hike of the minimum wage.

    4/ Cut corporate taxes by almost 20 per cent as well as cutting middle-class income taxes by precisely 20 per cent for those earning between $42,960 and $85,923 per annum.

    5/ Cut petrol taxes at the pump by 10 cents a litre by ending the 4.3 cent a litre carbon tax.

    6/ Scrap an existing ideological sex education curriculum and replace it with one after real consultation with parents.

    7/ Get rid of the new age methods of teaching maths and bring back old-fashioned, proven methods of teaching.

    8/ Change the laws and taxes so that beer can be sold at pre-2008 prices.

    Obviously it was the beer tax that did it, a record turnout despite non-compulsory voting.

    And this left-wing Liberal Party that espoused every fashionable global warming cliché going and which had closed gas-fired electricity plants and driven power prices through the roof was slaughtered. There is no other word for it. In the post election legislature (now increased from 103 to 124 spots) it won 7 seats. Yes, 7 – the fourth prime number. That’s 7 out of 124, a total so low that the Liberals lost official party status. Indeed, it was the worst wipeout result in Ontario electoral history.

    Meanwhile the Conservatives or Tories made all of the pledges I listed above, all of them, and won 76 of the 124 seats on offer – a massive majority. Of the remainder, a hard-left union party won 40 (becoming the official opposition) and the Greens took the final seat. Oh, and in this jurisdiction of non-compulsory voting it was the biggest voter turnout in 20 years. I suppose one thing you could say is that the Tories in Ontario were lucky not to be taking advice from Mark Textor and actually opted to put a Grand Canyon-sized gap between their policies and those of the lefties.

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      David-of-Cooyal-in-Oz

      Thanks D69,
      I’ve sent your reply to my local federal member. In hope.
      Cheers,
      Dave B

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    Gerry, England

    Capitalism is quite easy to understand. If it will make money they will invest, if it doesn’t they won’t.

    Here in the UK we are edging our way to blackouts and a recent GWPF post suggests grid failure, as coal is replaced by wind and the hoped for CCGTs are not getting any takers as investors don’t see a return.

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      Serp

      Yes, the UK is so far down the path to ruin it’s hard to see how it can turn back.

      Their failure is epitomised by the conversion of Drax coal fired power station to the burning of imported wood pellets as though the principal benefit coal brought to society, saving its forests, had been unlearned.

      Australia is on a frolic all its own determinedly pushing for east coast grid failure and the AEMO which must be able to see this coming is yet to petition for embargoing the further closing of coal fired power stations without equivalent despatchable generation in place –oh yeah, its head Audrey Zibelman was one of the jubilant applauders of Hazelwood’s shutdown…

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        Gerry, England

        Are we the first generation of humans to regress?

        You mention Drax and they are now the subject of protest as they propose converting the remaining plant to gas. It is quite straightforward, they are being hit with global warming carbon taxes for using coal, the government won’t hand them any more taxpayer cash to burn trees, so gas is the alternative.

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    Hivemind said April 6, 2019 at 9:31 pm · [Tasmania also exports hydro power, pretty much 100% of the time.]
    Not so – as shown by Open Nem for Tas – if you pick the 1Y option
    https://opennem.org.au/#/regions/tas
    you can see they exported heavily June through Sept which happened to be a wet spell and that depressed prices so they made little. For about half the last 12 months they were mainly importing.

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