JoNova

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Climate change bad: causes “longer growing seasons” but blamed for allergies

It’s a disaster: More plants, more crops, more flowers!

Pollen, flowers, allergy, photo, free-photos.

Between 1995 and 2011, fewer freeze-free days meant 11 to 27 days added to pollen season for most of the United States, research shows. The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, which does an annual survey of allergy season, noticed that it’s been growing each year.

It’s a spurious correlation: quick, build a wind farm!

The number of allergy sufferers has grown, research shows. One in 10 Americans struggled with hay fever in 1970, and 3 in 10 did by 2000. Asthma, which can be made worse by exposure to pollen, has become more common too, with higher rates among kids, low-income households and African Americans.

Warming cycles have always happened, and when times are good, plants have to ramp up the competition — it’s in their genes. Allergy cycles, we can bet, probably didn’t happen so often to paleolithic people who didn’t have access to Ventolin-trees or Epipen-plants.

Could it be that what causes asthma is not more pollen, but changes to breastfeeding, pollution, glyconutrients, diets, antihistamines, histamines, Vitamin D, parasites, cleaningbaby wipes, cesarean sections, less farming, less farm dust, less dirt, and adding preservatives, antacids and antibiotics and other things that kill off our gut flora?

Image: Free-photos

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Climate change bad: causes "longer growing seasons" but blamed for allergies, 9.5 out of 10 based on 71 ratings

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76 comments to Climate change bad: causes “longer growing seasons” but blamed for allergies

  • #
    Kevin Lohse

    To the dedicated alarmist, even good news is “worse than we thought”. The beneficial effects of increased atmospheric CO2 must be trivialised at any cost to reality.

    252

  • #
    OriginalSteve

    Climate science = junk science.

    232

  • #

    One of the most credible maverick scientists is Philippe Even, a retired French professor, drug researcher and major lab chief. He has stated that antibiotics are the greatest achievement of the last century, so he’s no hippie and certainly no ignoramus. However he has had far too much to say about the abuse of drugs and nature of research in recent decades and he’s now very much on the outer, especially for his comments on statins. I like to listen to guys like that, especially if someone has found a way to connect them to Big Tobacco or climate denial.

    Some years back I had a bad staf infection and took antibiotics for it. While I can’t prove it, I suspect that the fungal infestation of my sinuses which began right at that time was the result of those drugs. My health was good then and, surprisingly, I still have a healthy body apart from that infuriating sinus infestation (slowly getting better thanks to elaborate things I’ve learned to do with vinegar and mashed rosemary).

    I’m blaming nobody and I continue to regard antibiotics as a miraculous advance. Would I take them again in a situation which was not very urgent? No.

    There’s a downside to every chemical, every amenity…well, to every good thing, in fact. I imagine there is a very big downside to kids living with their heads bent down staring at screens all day, when the same kids fifty years ago would have been tussling in grass or dirt or the Pacific Ocean at every opportunity. It’s not a matter of condemning iPhones or antibiotics or antiseptics. It’s a matter of working out the downsides and being free to discuss the downsides without getting placed in the ranks of the flat-earthers (who are probably a state/corporate invention designed to humiliate dissidents and skeptics).

    But why look at embarrassing reality? It’s always going to be easier, though not cheaper, to blame climate and human activity’s effect on climate. When we had the Big Wet in 1950 then the great flood of 1955, people blamed the A-bomb when they weren’t blaming the H-bomb. Later Sputnik was behind the freak heat events of 1960. And now…

    Well, you guys know about now.

    302

    • #
      Mal

      All the bad things that happen in the world are due to daylight savings.lol

      112

    • #

      You’ve been here a while now mosomoso, so anecdotally, does the so called ‘extra’ CO2 have much of a growing effect on Bamboo that you may, or may not have noticed?

      Tony.

      132

      • #
        Steve of Cornubia

        Maybe not, but ‘shrooms love it, so poor mosomoso is in for a rough ride.

        72

      • #

        Tony, the big thing that matters to my moso is plenty of rain in spring starting late September. The good years came after the Millennium Drought, peaked at 2011…then it was all over till next favourable cycle.

        You can have saturated years which are no good for moso (eg 1974) because the falls are high but the patterns are no good. Some drought years can be okay because of a favourable pattern. Moso and I weren’t here in the driest year, 1902, but conditions in spring weren’t all that bad.

        I don’t know what CO2 has wrought, but I can guarantee that the same old Aussie mish-mash of too wet/too dry prevails now just as it did in 1882, when our records started. Dorothea was right and the climatariat are wrong. Again.

        222

    • #
      OriginalSteve

      I was reading that Menieres disease may be a fungal infection…..

      51

    • #
      greggg

      Lactobacillus sakei as found in kimchi, helps sinus infections.
      https://lactobacto.com/tag/sinusitis-treatment/

      30

  • #
    BruceJ

    Another “scientific” study conducted and written to produce a pre-determined result based on statistics with no real causal link, but no doubt funded by a Government grant provided too show how a Government supports scientific research. Beware any discipline which purports to be scientific and has the word “science” in its name, e.g. “Environmental science”, “climate science”, “behavioural science”, and be sceptical of any so-called study produced.

    202

  • #
    John F. Hultquist

    Let’s go for a fully ice covered Earth.
    That will fix those pesky plants.

    162

  • #
    Dennis

    Food for thought, no pun intended, people and not well informed politicians should consider this example of why unreliable wind and solar farms are a waste of space and money;

    Capital Wind Farm near Canberra has 67 wind turbines with nameplate/installed capacity of 140 MW or capacity factor of 30 per cent just 42 MW and is located on 15,000 acres of land.

    I mention land area because when compared to Liddell Power Station which AGL have decided to shut down as follows the stupidity of wind farms is obvious.

    Liddell has 4 generating units of 500 MW, total generating capacity 2,000 MW, “capacity factor” around 95-98 per cent. So 1,960 MW available. That would require 48 wind farms of 140 MW nameplate capacity to replace.

    Bayswater Power Station nearby in the Hunter Valley New South Wales also has 4 generating units, 2,640 MW or “capacity factor” 2,587 MW available.

    Then add all of the other coal fired power stations along the electricity grid.

    Governments have advisors and consultants, how could the politician allow the RET and subsidies to meet Paris Agreement emissions reduction target knowing that unreliable energy farms could not possibly replace power stations even if suitable land was available?

    And then add the cost of transmission lines from the “farms” to the main grid transmission lines and the back up generators essential for maintaining grid stability.

    Money, money, money. No wonder the merchant bankers and other wealthy investors feel like “Born Lucky”.

    302

    • #

      Huh!

      There are 53 wind plants in Australia, with (around) 3000 individual wind towers, and a Nameplate of 6106MW,

      The combined total yearly output from ALL those wind plants STILL is less than the yearly output from Bayswater.

      Tony.

      362

  • #
    Steve of Cornubia

    I’m not a scientist, which is probably why I cannot reconcile “longer growing seasons” with the numerous forecasts of reducing harvests.

    Could a clever person please explain how that works? Does climate change hate wheat but love flowers?

    182

    • #
      Sceptical Sam

      I’m not a Gaian priest but maybe this will help you understand.

      Climate change is the Earthly manifestation of Gaia.

      If you knew your Gaia you’d know that in Flowers II, Chapter 5, verses 2 – 6 in the Great Book of Gaia it is written:

      “2. Flowers are the Earthly smile of the great orb, the Sun, the maker of life on Earth, the creator of the winds of the air and the currents of the seas,

      3. As the flower smiles so the great orb expands in the joy of the warmth it returns.

      4. Wicked is the seed which expands its life at the expense of its sister the flower. Biodepletion shall visit its house and merciless shall be its vengeance. The tears of the moon shall be its handmaiden who shall hold back her blessings so that the seed shall cry out in thirst.

      5. Such seed shall rot, shrivel and become nought but sustenance for the birds of the air and the slippery things which inhabit the ground.

      6. Blessed are the flowers which bloom but give not sustenance to that which lives by seed alone.”

      I hope that helps. Alternatively, you might consult that great auricle and prophet Fitz.

      151

    • #
      Bobl

      Apparently.
      There is no doubt the increased CO2 means you need to mow the lawn more often but increased plant productivity is never a bad thing. Indeed in my opinion it’s CO2 increase at about 2ppm per year that is supporting the population growth of around 1%. Without CO2 growth famine would not be far away. If we wound back to 350 ppm (350.org aim) we would reduce food availability by about 30% – that’s famine territory.

      It’s my opinion that nothing should be done with industrial CO2 other than feeding it to plants. It’s a travesty that we don’t support our food supply by deliberately piping industrial CO2 onto farms.

      Jo, you published an article about how corn fields draw down CO2 to subsistence (170 ppm was it) by 11AM each day, why we don’t give the plants our waste CO2 is beyond me. A few square km of corn is all it would take. More food, more oxygen, what’s not to like.

      You can also scrub CO2 out of exhaust by dissolving it in water, I wonder whether you could just irrigate with slightly carbonated water to get the CO2 benefit to the plants dissolved in water. The outgassing from the water would be slower and possibly improve plant Carbon uptake. Any horticulturalists out there know whether you can do this or does the slight acidity negate the CO2 benefit?

      101

  • #
    a happy little debunker

    but blamed for allergies

    Surely, not a thing to sneeze at?

    92

  • #
    Peter C

    Climate change bad: causes “longer growing seasons” but blamed for allergies

    It seems incredible that the loonies can see disaster in everything. But it is true.

    A good local example was the Vegans protest which stopped Melbourne this week.
    These people know no bounds of decency. Everything they do or want is detrimental to all. They must be opposed and if possible stopped.

    152

  • #
    Hanrahan

    The last para tells the story.
    The number of cesarean sections continues to rise, mums are now “too posh to push” and doctors no longer wish to have their weekend interrupted. Trouble is the babe doesn’t get inoculated with vaginal juices so misses out the flora that populate a healthy skin. “Slip, slap, slop” has given us a generation desperately low on D3. The US is said to have 80% of the population deficient. With fewer blacks and a sunnier climate we would not be so bad but I’d bet there is still a high percentage deficient. The bad joke is that D3 is a major antagonist for cancer generally. So by trying to reduce melanoma we increase the susceptibility of the population to cancer. And antibiotics kill off gut microbiota. Has anyone had a doctor recommend probiotics after a course of antibiotics? Me neither. My GP is so up to date she still hates butter and salt.

    Don’t blame CO2 for bad medicine.

    121

  • #
    Maptram

    A link to an ABC story a few days ago was put on this site, repeated here, was about a wind farm on a property in Tasmania.

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/rural/2019-04-08/beef-farmers-tasmania-wind-farm-dreams-reality/10976378

    In the news item, the wind farm is 31 wind turbines.

    “The bases of the turbines require 700 cubic metres of concrete to hold the turbine down and beneath those foundation we have 130 holes to be able to stabilise the ground underneath,” Mr Frearson (Project Manager) said.

    According to Wikipedia, concrete includes cement, and for every tonne of cement, 1 tonne of CO2 is produced.

    Again, according to Wikipedia, a tonne of concrete weighs about 2364 tonnes, so the total concrete bases for the 31 wind turbines is 51,270 tonnes. On the ratio 3:2:1 for concrete, 1 being the cement, that means 8545 tonnes of cement and 8545 tonnes of CO2. This does not include andy concrete required for other building, foundation requirements etc, or any CO2 that would be generated from the shipping, manufacture, transport and installation of the wind turbines.

    If the same sort of foundation has been used for the 3000 wind turbines, 25,635,295 tonnes of CO2 has been generated from the production of the cement.

    143

  • #
    Steve of Cornubia

    At the time of writing this, most posts had received exactly two down votes. Perhaps Jo needs to up here game if she’s attracting just two Leftist trolls, however diligent they might be?

    Wait for it …

    83

  • #
    Peter C

    Again, according to Wikipedia, a tonne of concrete weighs about 2364 tonnes

    Maybe not.

    Perhaps a cubic metre of concrete weighs 2.4 tonnes.

    Just checking. I think the CO2 calculation is ok.

    72

  • #
    TdeF

    America has changed. Socially, lifestyle, genetically. They travel more, live differently, eat differently, are exposed to more things. With a million uninvited South American guests a year, the place is changing faster than ever.

    One unfortunate American woman with whom I worked was part Choctaw Indian. So many Americans have Indian ancestry, except perhaps Elizabeth Warren who has been found to be at least 99% non Indian. This particular woman would choke up, her air passages would close down instantly when exposed to the smell of onions cooking as we walked past a restaurant. Dangerous? Terrible! Asthma? Allergy certainly.

    Then so many more have been diagnosed with allergies to common food like celiacs and wheat, barley and rye. So many people now have food allergies that it is common for waiters to ask. People are recognizing these problems as we get world food and with intermarriage these problems will disappear from the gene pool, like the total inability of ab*riginal people to metabolise alcohol, like 40% of Japanese. Ab*riginals never had it in their environment, sugar or grain, fruit, so no alcohol.

    Think of Italians before 1492 and Columbus. No tomato, potato, maize/corn/polenta, tobacco, capsicum, chilli and the list goes on. No spices except pepper and cardamon. No coffee or tea. Clinically also the South American Indians had never had the scourges of Europe like small pox and Europeans had never had syphilis. The ‘allegies’ and differences in resistance and the cost of resistance are endless. People now have rows of spices. We still have salt and pepper on every restaurant table in the world. Chilli in Italy. The spices now in our food are fantastic, but at what cost? Allergic responses are cumulative in severity, like bee stings. And people are living longer.

    Then think of the people in Colarado at 6,000 feet in the snow dining now on tropical prawns or people smelling beautiful roses in Australia imported daily from Ecuador.

    Plus the massive changes in living from 80% on the farm in the 19th century to 80% in the city in crowded cities 21st century. Domestic pets sharing living space and the common allergies to cat fur, for example. Chlorine in the water for swimming pools and drinking. Aerosol perfumes, shaving cream, whipped cream, spray paint. The paints themselves, the concrete, the glues, the plastic fabrics reeking of fixers and even the new car smell sprayed by car vendors. The common cleaners. Even superglue has a cyanoacrylate base.

    However it is all obviously man made Global Warming. What else could it be?

    171

    • #
      TdeF

      Actually the Ecuadorian roses have no smell. I was carried away. Give me a Mr Lincoln any day. Or a Just Joey or Fragrant Plum of any of the Delbard french roses, but the Ecuadorian roses are long lasting and very pretty when our season is over. Still if you go around sniffing things, one day you will discover something to which you have an allergy. Climate Change. It smells.

      111

      • #
        Annie

        Bought roses rarely seem to have much scent. One of my favourites is Abraham Darby, I also like L G Braithwaite and Othello. There are others. A rose must have a good scent to be a proper rose.

        20

    • #
      Graeme No.3

      TdeF:

      vanilla and chilli and allspice came from the americas. The last so called from its recognised resemblance to things known to europeans. Actually, Europe was short of spices in 1492 because of excessive pricing by middle men. Hence the fortunes made by Vasco da Gama and the survivors of the Magellan expedition. And some fellow called Drake.
      Coffee from Arabia (really Ethiopia) and was popularised after the (unsuccessful) Turkish seige of Vienna. By 1720 it was the ‘rage’ in England. Tea came from China and was promoted by the East India Company as more healthful than beer for breakfast, even when the government put excessive taxes on it.
      Roman and medieval cooking was “saturated” with spices, also Morrocan (and Turkish cooking to a lesser extent). Neither tomatoes (pomodoro) nor potatoes were accepted in Europe at first (Parmentier had to ‘convince’ locals to steal potatoes).
      https://www.thevintagenews.com/2016/10/02/order-popularize-potatoes-france-parmentier-placed-armed-guards-potatoes-fields-instructed-guards-accept-bribes-let-people-steal-potatoes/
      Tobacco is worthy of your scorn as it is poisonous, even the lesser form of Virginian tobacco. The original type used in Europe was Nicotiana rustica which had about 16 times the alkaloid dose and induced oblivion.
      It was the Spanish who adopted capsicums (and chillies) and curiously the Hungarians, REMINDER cook a goulash tomorrow.

      71

      • #
        TdeF

        A few years ago I realized why the Russians and the Italians called tomatoes pomedoros. We in Australia know only the bright red varieties, apart from the relatively new Russian black tomoatoes. When I spent time in America I realized they came in the same range of colours as chilli. Plus dot. Red with green dots. Yellow with red dots. Whatever. Most importantly they came in yellow.

        So pomedoro. Golden apples.

        I have to disagree about Roman food being stuffed with spices. There were only two, three at most. They stuffed everything with pepper which even in the time of Samuel Pepys, was like gold. Drake was a professional pirate who raided ships carrying black pepper. The raids on Spanish ships led directly to the Spanish Armada, where luck and bad weather destroyed the huge Spanish fleet. It was not just about Catholicism but commerce. And pepper.

        61

        • #
          TdeF

          I mean pommes, apples. Pomme de terre, potatoes. Apples from the earth. Pomme d’oro. Golden apples.

          41

        • #
          Hanrahan

          I thought russian was a heritage variety. I wish I could grow them, they are terrific tomatoes.

          20

          • #
            Bill in Oz

            Diggers have ‘Black Crim’

            An old Russian variety from the Crimea.

            And then save the seed.

            Most of the time tomatoes breed true because they are self pollinating and with bugger all all pollen or nectar honey bes ignore them. ( But in Tasmania the feral Bumble bees do cross pollinate tomatoes..So watch out Tassie Folk )

            40

  • #
    TdeF

    I would like to add that you will not find this explanation anywhere including Wikipedia. It is mine. Like Ann Elk’s brontosaurus.

    61

  • #

    What your ancestors did for a thousand years, ate, inhaled, is yr immunity… If I’d grown up in the heather, eating oats ‘n such, pro’ly wouldn’t have been a child-asthmatic allergic to rye grass, wattle and dust from the sun-burnt plains. Can drink cows milk, supposedly that goes with the gene for blue eyes, seems ancestors around the Black Sea developed this capacity to digest cow’s milk… Raspberries and cream, yum.

    81

  • #
    TdeF

    I am also amazed that potatoes were used by the Dutch to make Vodka. My second hero after Rene Descartes is Grigory Potemkin, consort of Tsarina Catherine II of Russia. If you want to know why, read Sebag Montefiori’s Prince of Princes. He introduced the potato to Russia and along with it came Vodka. The impact of new food around the world was one of the great motivations for exploration but also introduced small communities to very different food and raised the probability of allergic reactions and intolerances like nuts, onions, wheat, rye, barley and even chilli.

    71

    • #
      TdeF

      Red Thumbed too? Vodka? Potatoes. Not clear what has offended our red thumber tonight. Then I doubt they can read.
      Illiteracy is a curse.

      71

  • #
    Bill in Oz

    ‘Climate change bad: causes “longer growing seasons’
    Well bugger me !

    Experience counts for nought !

    I’m 72. I’m currently cleaning up my Summer gardena and putting in my Autumn Winter garden.

    Here is my experience :
    1: I have noticed no effect what so ever on growing season from increased CO2.

    2 Whether the season is wet or dry has a huge impact on the Summer growing season, In Spring a dry season means colder nights and more frosts later into Spring..So the Summer season stuff is sown or planted later or dies from cold. This happened in Spring 2018 : lots of cold nights and late frosts. In Springs when there are more rain & clouds , there are fewer cold nights and late frosts . So Summer plantings get off to a good early start

    3 Whether the season is wet or dry also has a huge impact on the Autumn Winter growing season. Dry weather means again cold nights and more frosts. ( We’ve already had nights of 3 degrees this April !!!!! ) That means soils cool down and plants grow slower…

    All this is bloody dead simple.

    And it has been this way since I started my first vegetable garden in 1965 at age 17 in my parents back yard. CO2 has changed NOTHING, NOTHING NOTHING,,,

    Repeats for emphasis – my apologies !

    The climate greenist dodos want us to ignore what is actually happening in front of our eyes, our own experience, in favor of dopey stuff from far away… .

    111

    • #
      Graeme No.3

      But Bill, the BoM says that you’ve only had minimums of 7℃ for this month. I’ve been wondering as I’m just upstream from you (Woodside) and had ice on the car window one morning last week, and my outdoor thermometer measured 2.5℃ that morning, and has been below 7℃ numerous times. But I notice that the Mt. Lofty figures are always above 7℃ so with the atmospheric lapse rate it must mean that they are right and my thermometer is wrong.

      101

  • #
    PeterS

    The really stupid thing about all this climate change catastrophe nonsense is not many governments around the world believe it. Otherwise the hundreds of coal fired power stations being built would be immediately halted. Only stupid countries like Australia are bucking the trend of common sense ad reality. The quicker Australia crashes and burns the better to put it our of its miserable stupidity and come out of the ashes anew.

    101

    • #
      TdeF

      The argument is man made Global Warming. Climate Change has never been explained, let alone man made climate change. Nor has there ever been any proof that the extra CO2 since 1900 is man made or that the increase in CO2 is responsible for any warming. It is all just made up stuff, given that there is no verifiable explanation for anything or any real science. Lawyers, communists and opportunists. As usual. By lawyers I mean politicians. By opportunists I mean lawyers.

      90

    • #
      skeptikal

      The quicker Australia crashes and burns the better to put it our of its miserable stupidity and come out of the ashes anew.

      If Australia crashes and burns, nothing will come out of the ashes… it will just remain a smouldering wreck which the rest of the world will laugh at.

      Over the last few decades, Australia has been busily de-industrialising. When industry goes away, it’s very difficult to get it back. You don’t just lose some jobs, you also lose the equipment, the knowledge and the expertise. This can’t just rise from the ashes.

      Farmers are doing it tough too, with a lot of the smaller farmers going broke and those who are still managing to hang on are having their nuts squeezed so tight it’s bringing tears to their eyes. Services are closing down in country towns and people are leaving those country towns and heading for the big cities. Less food is being produced now and Australia is becoming more and more dependent on imported food. You won’t get farmers back onto the land while they have to compete with cheap imported foods.

      The only bright light in Australia’s economy is mining, but mining works in boom and bust cycles so there’s no guarantee of a mining boom to drag anything out of the ashes… and with foreign multinational companies setting up mining operations here now, even if there is a mining boom there’s no guarantee of future mining jobs for Australian workers as these multinationals like to bring in their own ‘specialist’ workers. Australia will end up being the world’s quarry, but very few Australians will actually benefit from the resources being mined.

      Australia’s democracy is really a two-party communist state, with both of the major parties equally committed to continuing the country’s decline into oblivion. It’s been a slow progression which is why people have been so accepting of it. When the crash does come, it will hurt and most of the people will end up living in abject poverty… but the politicians will be telling us how lucky we are because it could have been so much worse.

      91

      • #
        PeterS

        I tend to agree but the more likely scenario is China will take us over and rebuild Australia under their terms. Then Australia will have all the coal and nuclear power stations we/they need. If only our politicians and the voters could understand that they would not allow us to get to that state in the first place. Stupid is as stupid does; so crash and burn will follow.

        60

  • #
    Bill in Oz

    And yes I had ice on the rear windscreen of our car the other morning as well…

    Nice cold early Autumn . But still bloody dry..

    I am comparing the BOM’s 4 day mean atmospheric pressure with the 7 day outlook from Weatherzone.

    One is saying it will be fine and warm next Wednesday ( BOM )

    Weatherzone says we will get a much needed fall of rain !
    http://www.weatherzone.com.au/synoptic.jsp?d=4

    60

  • #
    Dave in the States

    Meanwhile in North America we are still waiting for spring. Winter still holds its icy grip, a month after the equinox and two months from the summer solstice. It’s going to be a short growing season this year.

    80

  • #
    Mike Smith

    Climate change bad: causes “longer growing seasons” but blamed for allergies

    The increased pollen is almost certainly due to increased atmospheric CO2.

    Climate change is a completely different and largely unrelated issue.

    30

  • #
    graham dunton

    This is highly educational, Patrick Moore describes the history of golden rice GMO development,
    You can download soundcloud broadcasts.

    The Heartland Daily Podcast
    Current track: Golden Rice and Netflix Lying About Walrus Suicides (Greenpeace Co-Founder Patrick Moore)Golden Rice and Netflix Lying About Walrus Suicides (Greenpeace Co-Founder Patrick Moore)

    https://soundcloud.com/user-694711047/golden-rice-and-netflix-lying-about-walrus-suicides-greenpeace-co-founder-patrick-moore

    60

  • #
    Roy Hogue

    The world will race rage on about one thing or another. I suppose it’s better to have them raging over a non existent problem than, say a thermonuclear missile already headed for Los Angeles.

    On second thought, if that millile could… No, can’t do that. ;-)

    00

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