JoNova

A science presenter, writer, speaker & former TV host; author of The Skeptic's Handbook (over 200,000 copies distributed & available in 15 languages).


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Weekend Unthreaded

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Weekend Unthreaded, 8.6 out of 10 based on 18 ratings

219 comments to Weekend Unthreaded

  • #
    Roy Hogue

    Another nice day is dawning here in the State of california. And again by dumb luck I get the first comment (I think).

    So may this be a nice day for everyone, full of good times, successful ventures and above all, the love of those you care about.

    220

    • #
      Annie

      It’s been a pleasant day here in good old Blighty but there is cloud spreading more thickly from the west. It was nice enough for people to be sitting out in on the pavements with their refreshments.
      My OH met someone last night who is another reader on the blog here.

      140

      • #
        Bobl

        My god, there are two d*****s in great Britain! Who knew?

        /sarc

        Enjoy your rare fine weather. I will think of you from sunny Queensland.

        50

      • #
        Sceptical Sam

        A bit overcast in Bath today, with rain expected to put the khyber on a BBQ. However, after five days of strolling through the Cotswolds we can live with that. The country-side is green and lush, the sheep fat and white and the cows are sitting down. Rain for sure I’m told. Perhaps the BoM should take a lesson.

        30

        • #
          Annie

          We were in the Cotswolds for a few days recently Sceptical Sam. I concur with your description! I didn’t have time to pick blackberries for our host but did sample them. They are large and delicious!
          I also notice that the trees, while tired, are nothing like as brown as they were in 1990. A lot are still very green. The exceptions are those with certain diseases, like horsechestnuts and some conifers.

          10

          • #
            Annie

            We are now ‘oop north’, trying to get washing done and out drying before the wet weather sets in. We have a fantastic view of the Cumbrian Fells from here. We have also been blessed with an enjoyable few days in Hampshire. There is so much lovely countryside still.

            10

        • #
          Annie

          Our cattle lay down at certain times of the day to chew the cud. Not sure that had anything to do with rain.

          00

    • #
      PeterPetrum

      Up here in the Blue Mountains west of Sydney we had a brilliant day at 21C – today is just as brilliant but at the moment (10am) it is only 6C! Now THAT’s Climate Change!

      50

      • #
        Environment Skeptic

        We (Au) had Global Cooling in the wheat belt very late in the winter…Crop damage is yet to be assessed after a bumper harvest was just announced as coming up.
        http://farmonlineweather.com.au/news/a-bit-late-to-be-this-cold/528493

        50

        • #
          Environment Skeptic

          The “Global Cooling” was detected elsewhere like…”Longerenong and Walpeup had their coldest morning this late in the year in more than 50 years”

          50

          • #

            Cold enough to cause an earthquake?

            10

            • #

              Ooops no that was Walpole.
              So to make up for that Mount Ginini a cold record for the 15 year old site of -7.4 the previous record as you would expect was last year at -6.6.
              And these.
              http://www.weatherzone.com.au/news/a-bit-late-to-be-this-cold/528493

              20

              • #
                Environment Skeptic

                From you tone……sounds like you are a ‘Global Cooling Denier’

                30

              • #
                Environment Skeptic

                *your

                20

              • #

                “global cooling denier”? More of a negative CO2 climate sensitivity believer. Think it works like this. Sunlight comes down to be absorbed by low albedo surfaces like solar panels to heat the surface. Then this heat energy loss from their hopeless inefficiency raises the temperature of the air. Then solar related magnetic coupling assists convection to move the warm air. Some of this heat will avoid wind turbines and thus arrive high up in the atmosphere. There the heat is trapped out by water vapour and CO2 etc such that it cannot get back down to the surface but can only radiate out to space. Thus while unreliables cause warming, CO2 defeats that warming by trapping heat out. When it is too cloudy cool for convection or heat from panels, the CO2 instead reduces extreme weather. So every Watt of destabilising unreliables needs to be compensated for by adding more CO2 to counteract the warming caused and this will also help to limit natural cooling. An unreliables tax could help pay for the required CO2.

                00

            • #
              Environment Skeptic

              97% of global cooling scientists predict global cooling…..however, i am skeptical about the environment scientists are in.
              It always goes back to the environment.
              There is no shame about being skeptical about ones environment,

              30

              • #
                el gordo

                In this hostile political environment there are few scientists who would gamely put up their hand for imminent global cooling. I’ll wander around in search of these active heretics.

                10

    • #
      yarpos

      Well Roy its still yesterday there when you look at the forum so its very likely you will be first on the grid if you are a frequent vistor. The international dateline is your friend :-)

      30

  • #
    Kinky Keith

    Hi Roy and Annie.

    Here in Newcastle we have finally turned out of Winter, we had our first warm day of Spring yesterday. Enjoy.

    KK

    80

    • #
      GD

      Here in Geelong, Victoria, we had a few days of Spring weather, then yesterday back-flipped to winter. 4 degrees C at the minute.

      60

      • #
        Ian1946

        Another perfect day here in Queensland, the sun is shining and a mid to low 20′s top expected for the day.

        70

        • #
          GD

          Don’t rub it in. I grew up in Townsville. It was 17 years before I knew what Winter was.

          60

          • #
            toorightmate

            GD – do you mean to say it was 17 years until you went to Mackay?

            70

            • #
              GD

              Probably. Why would I go to Mackay?

              As a kid, my family had many holidays in Bowen at Horseshoe Bay and Rose Bay. Beautiful beaches, and from memory they were free of stingers.

              As a teenager, I played in bands and we had to travel sometimes to get a booking. Ingham was a favourite. Great Italian community who loved music. Wonderful weather, when it wasn’t raining. Bowen and Ayr for the odd gig, but Mackay?

              The first time I went to Mackay was when I was 17 and on the road to Sydney to find fame and fortune.

              30

              • #
                WXcycles

                Beautiful day on the Strand in Townsville.

                I gigged in Mackay a few times, the pub by the bridge in town I can’t remember the name of it now. Gigged in Bowen, Ayr, thousands of times Townsville, tiny Mingula hotel of all places, Charters Towers, Ravenswood Railway hotel, Magnetic Island. Gigged at the pub in Rollingstone and Halifax a few times, but never played in Ingham, just the occasional outdoor gig at Mt Fox. Always seemed to play gigs in Tully and Mission Beach instead of Ingham. Played on ‘Hutcho’s circuit’ in the 1980s in band too, which meant constant up and down the QLD Coast plus over to Darwin and Alice Springs too. Think I played most of the playable places in QLD at some point. My fav gig was the Central Hotel in Cairns in the early 80s, but that was more about me than the gig.

                Bad hair day for Macau and Hong Kong. Outer bands of Typhoon Mangkhut just reached Hong Kong. Highest gust recorded so far is 101 km/h.

                20

              • #
                GD

                Played on ‘Hutcho’s circuit’ in the 1980s in bands too, which meant constant up and down the QLD Coast plus over to Darwin and Alice Springs too.

                It’s rather unexpected to find someone on Jo’s blog with a similar background to mine.

                I began playing gigs in Townsville in the early 70′s and then joined bands on the Ivan Dayman circuit. For a young bloke, that was the life. Good money, and free accommodation provided except when in Brisbane. We played residencies from Townsville to Perth and all stops between.

                By ’77 and ’78, I remember we dealt with Graeme Hutchinson rather than Ivan. Ivan’s office was still based at the historic Cloudland. I don’t know if Hutchinson went out on his own after that or took over from Ivan.

                I left the circuit mid ’78 and moved to the cold, hard music world in Sydney. From being a comfortable fish in a very comfortable pond, I went to being a very small fish in the Sydney music industry.

                10

          • #
            Hanrahan

            My first winter out of Qld was in a windswept WWII RAAF base at Ballarat. Jeez, it was cold.

            70

          • #
            yarpos

            So did my parents, they rarely talked about the stinking summers and mildew in the wardrobe. Ah, life before AC

            40

      • #
        Yonniestone

        We have a balmy 0.5C in Ballarat at the moment and yesterday it kept dipping under 4C through the day which was fun while concreting in the backyard.

        70

        • #
          Environment Skeptic

          Good beer drinking weather if concreting. Takes forever to set at those temperatures, so thank goodness for beer.

          50

    • #
      Dennis

      Until the high wind arrived on the midcoast NSW overnight, it was quite cold here this morning.

      60

    • #
      Roy Hogue

      KK,

      When I was flying I prefered winter weather. The storms were usually discrete and you knew when not to fly and the rest of the time it was clear and beautiful. The rest of the year brought coastal fog, clouds and no end of weather I would rather not be flying in, even though it met legal requirements for Visual Flight Rules (VFR).

      So grab the day and run with it, even in winter.

      And thanks for the good wishes.

      60

      • #
        John Westman

        So cold, yesterday, in Wagga that I gave up working on my aircraft engine. Found I had a blocked fuel line and blocked jets on the priming system.
        Liberals took a hit in the by election, and deservedly so. Labor also lost votes and the Greens were reduced to less than 3% of the count. An independent won.
        I would expect that the Nationals will probably take the seat at the elections next year

        91

        • #
          yarpos

          John, was this really a protest vote or did you just have a competent Independent? if that isnt an impossible question.

          70

          • #
            PeterPetrum

            Both, Yarpos, probably. The State Liberals, never mind the Federal ones, have really angered the country folk, who are not big on Labour anyway. Good to see the Greens go down, though. The independent is a well liked local.

            90

            • #
              John Westman

              I reckon that in matters political, there are always multiple reasons why the dramatic shift in the voting. Wagga was a blue riband seat for the Liberals.

              What happened was that the local member, McGuire, was caught on tape trying to boost his commission on a property deal from 1.75% to 3%. The Chinese were involved and of course McGuire was looking for an extra dollar “on the side” to try and keep himself from penury. Corruption!! I am told, but subject to verification, that McGuire will get a pension of $140,000.00pa, but I have also heard $80,000.00pa.
              The intersting thing was the drop in the Labor and Greens vote. I don’t have the actual figures for you, as the connection is down.
              There were several strong independents, all of whom were probably conservative type candidates.

              80

    • #
      Graeme#4

      Still cold over in Perth, but at least it’s stopped raining and we are finally seeing some sunny days. Normally would have the bore watering system on by now but the ground is too damp. The good ole Bureau Of Mendacity is still claiming we will have a hot summer, but methinks it will be a repeat of the last two years, with the absence of the morning hot easterlies from the interior being replaced by cooler humid air from Antarctica.

      70

  • #
    David Maddison

    Clive Palmer is proposing to build a new 700MW coal power station which is, of course, a good thing, but I am wondering how it will work out with respect to regulatory approval and also the economics of running the power station in an environment where the government is trying to put coal power stations out of business?

    https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/state/qld/2018/09/10/palmer-promises-new-coal-power-station/amp/

    81

    • #
      Another Ian

      One might also wonder how it would work out in an environment involving Clive

      160

    • #
      Dennis

      When will he build the Titanic replica he used to gain publicity for Palmer United Party?

      And now his United Australia Party is using the name of a political party of before Menzies’ Liberals 1940s, which I understand is not permitted by electoral law?

      Clive Palmer was trouble last time, disunited dysfunctional tiny party and when he decided to attend Parliament he usually fell asleep.

      90

      • #

        Nodding off in Cantberra is understandable …
        At least the 242MW gas plant at Clive’s QNI Yabulu is still operating.

        60

        • #
          Another Ian

          Isn’t that without Clive’s assistance?

          70

          • #
            Hanrahan

            I doubt Clive has anything to do with it, it’s outside the fence. I suspect it was put there so they could do a deal outside the AEMO.

            10

        • #
          Dennis

          Probably dreaming about redeveloping his Coolum Golf Resort on the Queensland Sunshine Coast.

          Where he locked owners of dwellings out falsely claiming that they all had levies in arrears.

          He obviously did not know that one married couple who were an owner are a retired real estate chain MD and his wife a Barrister, she took Palmer or his company to court and won the case for all the owners. I am unaware of what compensation was awarded.

          As some might know, he installed dinosaur statues that have recorded growling and grunting noises to annoy people around the property and ran the hotel down to deter patrons from returning.

          60

          • #
            Phillthegeek

            “As some might know, he installed dinosaur statues that have recorded growling and grunting noises to annoy people around the property”

            Didn’t a couple of those ignite?? :)

            30

      • #
        Hanrahan

        Clive gets surprisingly good support in Townsville if the comments in the local paper are to be believed. Why, I don’t know after he welched on paying his workers at the nickel refinery after he closed it.

        70

  • #
    Another Ian

    “Planetary Healing Powers Of Presidents”

    https://realclimatescience.com/2018/09/planetary-healing-powers-of-presidents/

    And comments

    20

  • #
    Ruairi

    Renewables on graphs are just a trace,
    And very costly to the human race.

    Australians would much benefit from fracking,
    But challenging the warmist Greens is lacking.

    Coal-powered stations shut down and then sold,
    At forty years are foolishly deemed old.

    Some publishers when bullied, do as told,
    For fear of losing business, or fold.

    90

  • #
    David Maddison

    Tony Heller’s latest video.

    “Erasing America’s Climate History”. 16 mins 33 sec,

    https://youtu.be/Xfiwv1d0QMk

    61

  • #
    Dennis

    With due regard for the latest news, diesel generators being installed in Victoria’s Mornington Peninsular, it would be interesting to find out how many new diesel generators have been sold in Australia, that is TAS/SA/NSW-ACT/QLD over the past few years.

    Diesel to reduce coal makes no sense whatsoever does it.

    I hope more voters become aware of the deception.

    140

    • #
      David Maddison

      Diesel costs about 45 times more than coal for the same energy content.

      The quiet/secret installation of vast amounts of diesel generation is what’s forestalling the coming energy crisis.

      Diesel’s only appropriate use for electricity generation is 1) emergency operation, 2) remote mining sites and remote or offshore towns on islands and 3) third world countries while awaiting the building of coal plant.

      It’s insane to be burning this high value transport fuel for electricity when cheap coal exists.

      190

    • #
      David Maddison

      Diesel is for transport.

      Coal is for electricity.

      130

  • #
    TdeF

    Just heading off to India. At the bottom of the travel documents is

    Calculated average CO2 emission is 2,537.59kg/person. Very precise.

    A little less CO2 as a typical Indian would breath out in a year and there are 1,400,000,000 of them.
    Should I make a donation to the airline? Am I wrecking the planet with my callous indifference?

    90

    • #
      TdeF

      That was for the round trip of 20,000 km. Such guilt.

      80

      • #
        TdeF

        And I would generate more CO2 in walking there than by flying. Consider @50km/day for 400 days, so about 4 tons. Yep, less CO2 if I fly and get there faster. Rich countries should pay me carbon taxes to fly.

        100

        • #
          David Maddison

          And the aircraft uses much less fuel per passenger than a car would.

          80

        • #
          OriginalSteve

          I think you should wail and cry for “forgiveness” from the mythical Gaia at the airport terminal….. He he

          Elijiah taunts the false prophets of Baal….sound familiar?

          “27 At noon Elijah began to taunt them. “Shout louder!” he said. “Surely he is a god! Perhaps he is deep in thought, or busy, or traveling. Maybe he is sleeping and must be awakened.” 28 So they shouted louder and slashed themselves with swords and spears, as was their custom, until their blood flowed.

          29 Midday passed, and they continued their frantic prophesying until the time for the evening sacrifice. But there was no response, no one answered, no one paid attention.

          30 Then Elijah said to all the people, “Come here to me.” They came to him, and he repaired the altar of the Lord, which had been torn down. 31 Elijah took twelve stones, one for each of the tribes descended from Jacob, to whom the word of the Lord had come, saying, “Your name shall be Israel.” 32 With the stones he built an altar in the name of the Lord, and he dug a trench around it large enough to hold two seahs[a] of seed. 33 He arranged the wood, cut the bull into pieces and laid it on the wood. Then he said to them, “Fill four large jars with water and pour it on the offering and on the wood.”

          34 “Do it again,” he said, and they did it again.

          “Do it a third time,” he ordered, and they did it the third time. 35 The water ran down around the altar and even filled the trench.

          36 At the time of sacrifice, the prophet Elijah stepped forward and prayed: “Lord, the God of Abraham, Isaac and Israel, let it be known today that you are God in Israel and that I am your servant and have done all these things at your command. 37 Answer me, Lord, answer me, so these people will know that you, Lord, are God, and that you are turning their hearts back again.”

          38 Then the fire of the Lord fell and burned up the sacrifice, the wood, the stones and the soil, and also licked up the water in the trench.”

          ( 1 kings 18:27-38)

          50

          • #
            Kinky Keith

            O.K.

            But I do have some trouble with 38.

            20

            • #
              Sceptical Sam

              It’s pretty simple. Old Elijah used the pea and thimble or what is known as the “distraction/action” strategy. Raise your heads to the heavens he cried and as they did he slipped a Redhead into the tinder. Voila!

              Next?

              20

    • #
      GrahamP

      Just to keep things in perspective

      A new study by Icelandic and British geologists showed that Katla is emitting enormous quantities of CO2 – at least 20 kilotons of C02 every day. “Only two volcanoes worldwide are known to emit more CO2”, said Evgenia Ilyinskaya a volcanologist with the University of Leeds.

      from https://www.iceagenow.info/icelands-monster-volcano-katla-charging-up-for-eruption/

      60

      • #
        Dennis

        For a research grant of, say, $1 million dollars tax-free I will write a report on how to plug it.

        It might be possible using concrete but I would determine if renewable energy could be utilised in the process being mindful of “carbon pollution” from coal.

        The concrete would be tinted green.

        60

        • #
          scaper...

          Just throw a warmist female virgin in the volcano to appease Gaia. Only one problem…there are no warmist virgins older than twelve!

          52

          • #
            Yonniestone

            Au contraire its been ~30 years for warmists and a steady decline into lack of personal grooming, hygiene, negative outlook and a collection of stray animals will produce plenty of offerings to Gaia.

            Quick tip, if this does come to pass do not stand downwind of the volcano.

            22

            • #
              Yonniestone

              Second thoughts applying that amount of vacuum to a volcano would probably extinguish it…..or set off another Krakatoa…..which should be called @#$%^& Krakatoa because that’s what everyone says when they kick the bed leg…….

              41

      • #
        Tdef

        Or 10x Australia’s entire output. Shut more coal power stations and replace them with diesels running on imported fuel. Why?

        70

        • #
          Dennis

          Economic vandalism by globalists who also plot to lock up our natural resources using the excuse preserving for future generations.

          41

          • #
            OriginalSteve

            The Elite plan to eliminate 95% of the population via wars. So if they lock up coal and oil, then once most of the “useless eaters” are gone, they crack open the oil wells and enjoy themselves….with 500 million slaves at thier disposal…or so they hope….the outcome will be very different I think….but they have been fooled by the Devil to do his dirty work, so they arent that smart…

            10

    • #
      Bobl

      No, just think of the mass of vegetation that you are personally supporting and how many people that might feed.

      40

      • #
        Another Ian

        SFA out of the woody veg increase in western Qld rangelands.

        Wouldn’t be so bad if we were allowed to manage it.

        “Why do western Queensland graziers wear elastic sided boots?

        Because Queensland government regulations won’t let them tie their own shoe laces”.

        70

    • #
      theRealUniverse

      Do they add in the daytime absorption by plants..and the oceans (depending on the water temp.) Probably not much left.

      20

      • #
        theRealUniverse

        In note Katla in Iceland.. “A new study by Icelandic and British geologists showed that Katla is emitting enormous quantities of CO2 – at least 20 kilotons of C02 every day.”

        20

  • #
    TdeF

    In fact the extra billion people in India since they were starving in the 1960 generate 3 billion tons of CO2 a year by just breathing.

    Consider the Guardian 4 Aug 2017

    “Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions are rising to the highest figures seen in years, according to official government figures, increasing 1.6% in the last quarter and 1% in the past year.

    The country’s emissions in the year to March 2017 are the highest on record at 550.3m tonnes of CO2 equivalent when emissions from land use change are excluded – a sector where the government says its figures have a high degree of uncertainty.”

    So India’s CO2 ‘emissions’ from the extra 1 billion extra people is 6x our entire output. Does anyone see a problem with Australia? Who needs an industrial revolution to push up CO2? Now if the UN could just bring in a single child policy, or in fact a huge tax on s*x. The bankers dream would be realized. Taxes on s*x and breathing.

    80

  • #
    David Maddison

    This is a video explaining how the J-58 turboramjet engine, as used on the retired SR-71 spy plane worked.

    It had its maximum fuel efficiency at Mach 3.2.

    I doubt Millennials could design something like this.

    https://youtu.be/F3ao5SCedIk

    52

    • #
      OriginalSteve

      No doubt done with slide rules too….

      50

      • #
        Dennis

        What, no app?

        I am reminded of the story of an apprentice carpenter not many years ago who was asked to fetch a spirit level from the builder’s truck. The apprentice reached for his mobile phone and retrieved a spirit level which he handed to his boss.

        He was sent to the truck.

        40

    • #
      Graeme#4

      When visiting the USS Intrepid in New York, I was talking to a guide about the displayed starting plant for the Lockheed A12, forerunner of the SR71, also used to start the SR71. He mentioned that the plant used two V8 engines, and when starting the aircraft, the plant was run so hard the V8s rarely survived more than a few starts.

      40

      • #
        Phillthegeek

        Lol. SR71 also leaked fuel like a sieve on the ground. Launched like that and when the fuselage warmed up the leakes stopped and would be refueled by tanker. All to do with tolerances and expansion so it could cruise fast. Materials tech has moved on but it was a magnificent aircraft in its day. Origins in the A12, nuclear armed cold war interceptor apparently.

        10

    • #
      Another Ian

      From “Not Much of an Engineer”

      Concorde at flat chat had a thermal efficiency of about 43%

      30

  • #
    Roy Hogue

    Since it’s wide open weekend here’s another little thing they’re using to keep research going full speed whether there’s a use for it or not.

    We got a letter from Edison about the supposed danger of 60 Hz electromagnetic fields. They cannot say they’ve found a single link to anything. Not even the WHO, an outfit with a vested interest in keeping up the level of fear about everything they can, is able to say they have a connection between power lines, appliances or anything else and any health problem.

    Yet they keep research going on the principle that experts believe the connection is just below our current level of ability to find it. How many good studies does it take to kill a bad idea?

    Answer — you can’t kill a bad idea with any length of time or amount of research that shows no problem. There must be a problem or the WHO and the rest of the nannies are out of business.

    Edison regularly sends out letters like this. And in every single one they cleverly steer you to believe there might be a problem while being totally unable to say there is one.

    I worked for a man who worked daily with high voltages in amplifiers and his opinion of this scare was just laughter. If it’s not ionizing radiation how can it hurt you? Only by generating a dangerous level of heat. And that’s hard to do at 60 Hz or 50 for you in Australia and New Zealand. When growing up I lived close to high voltage power lines and here I still am with no known harm.

    As Jo would say about the global warming scare, where is the evidence that 60 Hz will hurt anyone. And the answer will be silence while the research goes on at our expense.

    70

    • #
      Roy Hogue

      Why not say that after extensive research over X years there is no problem to be found and then stop taking about it?

      40

    • #
      Graeme#4

      The silly thing about 50/60 Hz radiation is that its energy spreads out in every direction i.e. across the surface of a sphere. So the energy reduces by the cube law of distance, meaning it decreases very rapidly with distance. The same folks who worry about this energy also place mobile phones near their brains for extended time periods, which may have a far greater impact than 50/60 HZ energy ever would.

      50

      • #
        Bobl

        It depends, if you have an iron implant and stand too near your induction cooktop maybe the magnetism will cause a problem >3 Tesla mri scans give me vertigo so yes the induced currents from low frequency magnetism can cause biological effects. The field from power lines are several orders of magnitude below that. It’s not impossible they cause disturbance to our electrical biology (brain/nervous systems) but very unlikely to cause cell damage or death.

        Even microwaves have to exceed the bond energy in DNA compounds in order to cause oxidative damage to cells. Sensible precautions like shielding work fine.

        The problem with medicine is that it is statistically based rather than science based. For example you won’t get a new drug on the market without a statistical double blind trial even if the science proves it works. A phase 3 double blind study denies 50% of the participants a potentially life saving drug that has already been proven scientifically to work.

        Some medicines do need to be assessed statistically, others can be proven using science, biopsy, scans, and other objective measures. These should be available much earlier.

        This scare about EMR from power lines is one of those statistical things where there is no scientifically downfalls damage, but statistically a test population is almost but not quite identical to the control population. At this Level the correlation is meaningless.

        60

        • #
          Graeme#4

          It’s still a distance thing, and the very quick drop off. I don’t have any field strength values to reference, but because power lines are mostly straight and not wound around a toroid, I would very much doubt that their emissions at ground level are measurable. I can understand in MRI cases, the concentrated magnetic energy may cause problems to human cells. It’s also not a good idea for children to stand close to rail gate smart card readers for any length of time.

          20

        • #
          Roy Hogue

          Bob,

          An MRI scan subjects you to a very powerful magnet and they won’t let you near one unless your body is free of magnetic material. That’s because of the possibility of mechanical damage to your body when the thing is running. When it’s actually running the field is rapidly reversed to cause all the cells of your body that are in the machine to emit an RF pulse. But even that has no known potential to case harm. But there’s always bound to be a point where if you go beyond it bad things can happen.

          I can’t think of a reason why the MRI causes you to become dizzy but I’ll believe your statement that it does. The noise is enough to drive anyone up the wall all by itself.

          Dizziness is a funny thing. I talked myself right into a good case of vertigo one day just telling the guy I was working with about something that had happen to me during a flying lesson days before. I had to lie down on the floor for about 5 minutes to recover. And naturally everyone in the office had to walk by just then — embarrassing.

          10

          • #
            Roy Hogue

            The amazing thing about MRI is the work the computer does on those little RF pulses to pick out just the ones coming from the part of you body they want to look at.

            Someone did some complicated analysis to get the first MRI machine up and running. The only thing that can differentiate one pulse from another is time of arrival at the antenna.

            20

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      Another Ian

      Remember Victor Borge’s uncle, the one that invented

      “the cure for which there was no disease”

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        Graeme No.3

        Gin was invented by Doctor Silvius, who wanted a medecine that would cure the many fevers and agues that inhabitants of Holland was prone to; and so successful was he that within a year the whole of Holland was suffering from illnesses that required a dose of Dr. Silvius’s medecine.

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      JoKaH

      If you try to reason with a warmist for long enough you often find your head Hz.

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    David Maddison

    I think President Trump needs to make a formal declaration that based on real science (as assessed by honest scientists) there is no evidence of anthropogenic global warming.

    Paris and freeing up the US coal industry was a good start but he needs to keep moving with this.

    I am also disappointed that his EPA director has not rescinded the status of CO2 as a “pollutant”.

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    Peter C

    Temperature of the Moon

    This week I attended a lecture of the Astronomical Society in Melbourne. They had a DVD of Moon maps and photos , which I bought. As a result I became aware of the lunar heat flow experiment, part of a package of experiments left on the moon by the Apollo astronauts.

    The objective of the Apollo Heat Flow Experiment was to measure the rate at which the moon is losing thermal energy. That in turn gives an idea of the internal radioactivity of the moon and its internal composition.

    A vertical probe with 12 thermometers was placed in a drill hole 2.5m deep. Two probes were placed at each of the landing sites of Apollo 15, 16 and 17. The Apollo 16 experiment failed , probably because the astronauts did not connect the cables properly. Data from the Apollo 15 and 17 sites was radioed back to Earth up to 1977.

    So what did NASA do with this incredibly expensive and valuable data. Well they LOST it.

    Now some of the lost data has been found in an archive in Washington and partially recovered. It shows warming of the Moon’s surface from 1971 to 1977! Wow,what could cause that?

    The researchers then evaluated several previously proposed explanations for the warming, which have been debated in recent years. These include slow cyclical changes in the Moon’s orbital axis, radiation from Earth, solar radiation into the drilled holes, and increased solar heat absorption by the surface after astronauts disturbed it with their activities.

    Needless to say the fourth explanation is the only one that the scientists consider feasible.

    The first thing I did was go to check what happened to the Earth’s temperature over the same period. Unfortunately the UAH record did not start until 1979. NOAA shows warming during that period.

    https://eos.org/research-spotlights/the-case-of-the-missing-lunar-heat-flow-data-is-finally-solved

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    • #

      “This finding supports the hypothesis that disturbance of the lunar surface by astronauts’ footprints and other activities increased its roughness”
      Wouldn’t that increase the cooling surface area?

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        Peter C

        Yes, very likely.

        No scientist (who wants to keep their job) can challenge the CO2 climate meme.

        If the moon’s surface soil temperature went up and the temperature of the Earth went up at the same time, that would (IMHO) point to increased SOLAR IRRADIANCE as the cause for both.

        JO has said more than once; ITS THE SUN!

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    min

    Scomo is between a rock and a hard place . He has to avoid losing majority , has been threatened not just by labor and greens but also independents like the woman from Indi re removing RET and other greenie nonsense. I think he is waiting for report from Angus Taylor who does not believe in it however Scomo will not release it until after he knows what the numbers are . He needs to get back the million conservatives who walked away when Turnbull knifed Abbott and will still not come back until Paris Accord left etc.
    If he is forced into an election then see what he says.

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      PeterS

      I agree Morrison is stalling for time to see what magic trick Taylor can come up with to highlight the truth that coal must be our key power source not only for now but well into the future while at the same time trying to appease those who believe renewables are the way to go. In other words he wants it both ways, which won’t work as no one will be happy. Such dilemma will mean he will lose even more votes than Turnbull. Wish washy appeasement spoken in doublespeak never works. Clear cut direction does.

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      Peter C

      ScoMo has to decide why he is in politics. What does he stand for?

      Most politicians say that they went into politics because they wanted to make a difference. Mostly they can’t explain what they mean by that, when asked.

      ScoMo is being asked the question right now.

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  • #
    Hanrahan

    Dr Finkel is still at it, proposing pie in the sky projects while ignoring proven technologies:

    DEMAND from Japan and South Korea has Australia on the brink of developing a new industry, and there is an opportunity for North Queensland to be involved.

    More research is being done to make hydrogen an energy source and export commodity, a reality.

    Australia’s Chief Scientist Dr Alan Finkel said the opportunities were huge for Australia.

    “The idea of using it for energy such as heating our houses, driving our trucks or generating electricity has been around for 50 years, but it has got nowhere,” he said.

    “So why are talking about it now … it’s an export opportunity.”

    Dr Finkel said Japan and South Korea had made it clear they would be long-term importers of hydrogen.

    The two countries import 94 per cent of their energy through coal, gas or natural gas and Dr Finkel said Japan was committed to reducing its emissions.

    “The only way it can do that into the future is by replacing some of that imported fossil fuel with a low emissions alternative — there are only two, one is electricity and the other is hydrogen,” Dr Finkel said.

    He said electricity was not practical for Japan so they had decided to focus on hydrogen. There are two known ways to produce hydrogen, the Hydrogen Strategy Group chaired by Dr Finkel says.

    https://www.townsvillebulletin.com.au/news/townsville/huge-new-industry-has-potential-for-regional-areas-like-north-queensland/news-story/3adbed060d910c623fc820bbc7599bfd?nk=04246a0ce11a4cf27e14420e5f717419-1537054411

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      Bobl

      Absolute bleeding rubbish, for god sake the global warmists themselves say water vapor multiplies CO2 GWP by 3 so water has a global warming potential much greater than CO2. When you burn hydrogen in oxygen what do you get? Water vapor.

      Also there isn’t a huge natural path for water to be converted back into hydrogen and oxygen, so when you burn hydrogenated fuels you tend to deplete the air of oxygen. Burn coal you get only CO2 and the plants turn that back into more fuel/food and oxygen for us. Hydrogen is low density fuel for example methane holds 1 carbon and 4 Hydrogen in a given volume while hydrogen has just 2 hydrogen in the same volume and pressure, hydrogen is a small molecule and diffuses easily, can’t be liquefied to get higher energy density and causes containers/pipes to become brittle,

      hydrogen is a crappy fuel unless you are using it in a fusion reactor.

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      • #
        Another Ian

        As Willis E put it a while back

        It is pre-burns – you can’t go and open up a hydrogen mine

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      • #
        Bruce J

        Hydrogen is also extremely flammable, so it is very hazardous to transport and store. Being odourless, a leak cannot be detected by smell like petrol or diesel, so the first you know about a leak is when it catches fire, and water or dry powder don’t work to put it out. Best extinguisher is BCF, but that is practically banned as it worsens the hole in the ozone layer! Hydrogen also has a very wide flammable concentration range, from about 2% to 94 % by volume compared with petrol or diesel at around 2% to 14% by vapour volume (after the liquid fuel has vapourised), so only a very small, virtually undetectable leak is needed for a fire to start.

        We call petrol highly flammable, but compared to hydrogen, it is almost benign!

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        angry

        Hydrogen Airship Disasters ….

        http://www.airships.net/hydrogen-airship-accidents/

        Not very clever to use Hydrogen!

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      Graeme No.3

      Hanrahan:

      The hydrogenists have been all over this approach since the 1980′s. Yes, if carefully burnt with pure oxygen you get lots of heat and no pollutants, but supplying the pure oxygen goes close to doubling the cost.
      Making hydrogen from coal and water was first industrialised in 1873, but no-one thought of separating the hydrogen out, just burnt the mixed gas; that will be another added cost. There are major problems with transport of hydrogen, it takes far more energy to liquify than natural gas, and it can leak through metals. Also, the calorific value is lower than natural gas so household pipeline networks would all have to be rebuilt. I presume that the colourless flame and odourless nature of hydrogen could be overcome by addition of some foul smelling chemical like a (rather toxic) mercaptan, which might help reduce the risk from its wide explosive range mixed in air.

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        RickWill

        Hydrogen burnt in air has 2.5X the calorific value of natural gas burnt in air.

        Hydrogen is more challenging to liquify and transport then natural gas but if it is being produced using energy that would not otherwise be collected then the energy component is not significant.

        As grids are infected with increasing levels of dumb energy the capacity factors of all generators falls off making them all uneconomic unless there is vast amount of energy storage capacity. Hydrogen energy storage is already lower cost than batteries for large scale storage.

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        • #
          Peter C

          Rick,

          You use the term Dumb Energy.

          I see that someone has published a book by that name.. Have you read it

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          • #
            RickWill

            Have not read the book but the term is much more accurate then any word/s that implies wind and solar energy sources are sustainable at this stage of their development.

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      David Maddison

      And where is the hydrogen to come from? Finkel says either coal, in which case he says you have to sequester the CO2! So why not just burn coal directly and sequester the CO2, which in any case is massively expensive and energy intensive? The other method he proposes is electrolysis of water with electricity from unreliables.

      The stupidity is simply mind boggling.

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        Hanrahan

        Also in the article they presented this fraud of being generated by renewable energy:

        The other is renewable hydrogen — made from water electrolysis using electricity generated from renewable sources.

        This is where Australia and potentially North Queensland can come in.

        Given the multitude of new and planned renewable projects in the region, there is an opportunity to tap into them and develop a potential billion dollar-plus industry.

        “We can do that in volume in Australia, we’ve got the solar, wind and hydro, if you’re going to go the fossil fuel pathway we’ve got the coal and natural gas,” Dr Finkel said.

        So they are going to spend billions on this project and only run it when we are generating EXCESS wind/solar power. WOT ROT! They will power it with thermal electricity.

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      • #
        angry

        Finkel the NON SCIENTIST….

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      • #
        OriginalSteve

        There has been promising research into using low power plasma reforming of alcohol, so presumably wouldnt be too hard to trick it up to dissociate water…plasmas generally run in 5000-7000k range, so more than enough heat..

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      Mark M

      Always a great reference for the hydrogen power myth …

      Horvath’s hydrogen Fairlane

      Queensland’s premier Joh Bjelke-Petersen was an inventor himself and the fact he had let himself be duped by such a ridiculous scam made Queensland a national laughing stock.

      Queensland Rail even selected a diesel-electric locomotive for conversion to hydrogen power and Horvath announced plans to convert the Howard coal-fired power station, near Maryborough.

      http://www.couriermail.com.au/archive/news/horvaths-hydrogen-fairlane/story-e6freoro-1111119160884

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      PeterS

      BS. Japan and many other countries are building large numbers of coal fired power stations. Even if new energy sources become available it will be many years if not decades before they become economically viable and technologically sound. Otherwise, they wouldn’t be bothering to build so many coal fired power stations in the first place. I’d be the first one to adopt any new power generation system but it takes time. I would love to see us using ZPMs but thus far it’s mostly science fiction. We can’t afford to wait so we must join the rest of the world and start bolstering our existing coal fired power stations and build new ones when necessary, which is probably right now. So all this talk of revolutionary power generation systems is just a diversion. They will come in due course but not soon.

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    pat

    Sunday laugh. our 50C cities:

    AUDIO: 14mins11secs: 15 Sept: ABC: Blueprint for Living: Coping with the 50 degree city
    The Northern Hemisphere just had one of the hottest summers on record and in Quebec, in a little over a week, 90 people died because of the heat.
    Dealing with heat is considered by some as the ‘next big inequality issue’ with only a small percentage of the global population able to access air-conditioned comfort.
    So what does it feel like to slowly die in oppressive heat and how are Australian cities faring as the world continues to heat up?

    Guests:
    Camilo Mora, Associate Professor – Department of Geography, University of Hawaii Manoa
    Marco Amati, Associate Professor – International Planning at RMIT University

    Presenter: Jonathan Green
    Producer: Buffy Gorrilla
    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/blueprintforliving/coping-with-the-50-degree-city/10246356

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    Bobl

    You know what, when we get hot in Oz we strip off and go to our wonderful beaches, local pool or even the local air conditioned library/pub.

    When I was little we used to just run around under a sprinkler, you know our coping strategies, even the old ones work fine and we don’t need some university wonk to tell us we are all going to die because we’ve forgotten how to run under a sprinkler or drink a cold beer.

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      toorightmate

      Bob;,
      You’re lucky you are still alive.
      It was freezing cold back in those days – BOM homogenised records tell us so.
      I can not fathom how you did not die from pneumonia.

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    pat

    15 Sept Guardian: Hurricane Florence is a climate change triple threat
    by Michael Mann
    If we don’t act on climate change, the destruction potential of slow-moving storms such as Harvey and Florence will only get worse
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/sep/14/florence-climate-change-triple-threat

    14 Sept: UK Independent: Investment firms controlling £23tn launch campaign to combat climate change
    Group piles pressure on US to stick to terms of Paris agreement
    by Harry Cockburn
    A group of almost 400 of the world’s leading investors, controlling over $30tn (£23tn) in assets, have agreed to work together to back initiatives to combat climate change and help meet the objectives of the Paris agreement…

    Investors including the BBC Pensions Trust, Transport for London pensions fund, Aviva, the Environment Agency pension fund, Legal and General, and the Joseph Rowntree Charitable Trust are calling on the companies in their portfolios to reduce their carbon footprint, support clean energy, and strengthen climate-related financial disclosures…
    https://www.independent.co.uk/environment/climate-change-funding-global-warming-investment-company-investor-agenda-a8536286.html

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    PeterPetrum

    Craig Rucker from CFACT has, with some of his team, slipped into some of the functions at the California Climate Talk fest.

    He attended a dinner last night also attended by the “Minister for Climate” from the Australian Capital Territory.

    He managed to embarrass him by asking him how he intende to go 100% carbon free

    “I also asked the Minister from Canberra how in the world is his city going all renewable, since I knew such energy can’t power a modern city by itself. He answered by confessing that Canberra wasn’t really going all renewable, per se, but simply putting all the electricity Canberra generates from the sun and wind into a national pool and then drawing from it. When I asked him if that “national pool” also consists of energy generated from coal, he reluctantly (and downheartedly) responded “yes.””

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    • #
      Kinky Keith

      The power of thought and imagination.

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      Bobl

      He needed to ask how he was going to eliminate the carbon dioxide from transport fuels, farting cows, embedded Co2 emissions in concrete or even the CO2 breathed out by him or his pets?

      100% carbon free does NOT mean just electricity.

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    el gordo

    The Opposition leader reckons the Denialati has taken over the Liberal Party.

    ‘Bill Shorten has indicated the ALP is prepared to adopt features of the government’s junked NEG if it wins power.’

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    pat

    16 Sept: MorningBulletin: Major highway closures to transport wind turbine blades
    MAJOR sections of highway, including the Toowoomba Range, will be forced to close to transport enormous wind turbine blades for the Coopers Gap Wind Farm.
    AGL project manager Tim Knill said the largest blades heading along the Warrego Highway were 67.2m long and weigh 22 tonnes – the largest ever transported in Australia.

    “Several shipments of wind farm components, including the blades, have arrived at the Port of Brisbane and are in storage awaiting transportation,” Mr Knill said.
    “The movement of such large pieces of equipment requires detailed planning and we are predicting approximately 1,200 oversize movements, involving blades, hubs, tower sections and nacelles.”

    Overnight transportation of the blades will continue throughout the remainder of the year following a trial delivery last week.
    “We aim to minimise the impacts on commuters so many of the movements are done at night time,” Mr Knill said.
    “However, at times we will need to have major sections of highways, including the Toowoomba Range, closed to align with our commitment to safety. Delays can be expected and we ask for patience at these times.
    “The long blades ensure more energy is captured by every wind turbine. This brings down the cost of generation, but creates a high level of complexity in managing the transportation.”

    The wind farm, situated between Dalby and Kingaroy, will be the largest in Australia when construction wraps up in 2019.
    https://www.themorningbulletin.com.au/news/major-highway-closures-to-transport-wind-turbine-b/3522631/

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    pat

    15 Sept: Japan Times: Japan to more than halve its solar power feed-in tariffs
    The government has decided to more than halve the country’s solar power feed-in tariffs by around the mid-2020s, informed sources have said.
    The move is aimed at reducing the public burden of electricity bills, which include part of the costs of power companies’ mandatory solar power purchases from households and other companies under the system.

    The industry ministry aims to cut the price for solar power generated by companies to ¥8.5 by around fiscal 2022 to 2024, from ¥18 per kilowatt-hour in fiscal 2018, and that for solar power made by households to ¥11, from ¥26, around fiscal 2025 to 2027, the sources said.
    The planned reductions are expected to lower the Japanese tariffs to levels similar to those in European countries…

    In fiscal 2018, power utilities’ purchasing costs under the system are projected to total ¥3.1 trillion, up 13 percent from the previous year. Of the total, ¥2.4 trillion would be borne by their customers…
    https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2018/09/15/business/japan-halve-solar-power-feed-tariffs/

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    pat

    ***thanks to the spate of dangerous hurricanes in recent years? Bloomberg can’t help themselves. no updates on this as yet – too early:

    13 Sept: Bloomberg: Hurricane Florence’s Brutal Winds Will Test the Carolinas Solar Boom
    By Brian Eckhouse; With assistance by Chris Martin
    The nation’s second-biggest solar region is facing the first real-time test of its systems, with Hurricane Florence threatening the Carolinas with winds well in excess of 100 miles per hour and torrential rains.
    The Category 4 storm was packing 130 mile-per-hour winds (210 kilometer-per-hour) as of Wednesday, with landfall expected by the weekend. While most newer systems are designed to withstand 140 to 160 miles-per-hour winds, the Carolinas haven’t sustained a direct hit by such a large hurricane since its solar boom expanded in 2014…

    The mix of large farms and rooftop systems in the region has solar proponents concerned.
    “Absolutely,” said Tom Werner, chief executive officer of SunPower Corp., said by phone Tuesday. “If the panels were vertical to the ground, it would be like a sail to the wind. That would be the worst case.”

    SunPower has already begun preparations, including shifting the angles of its solar-power trackers, according to Werner. It’s a type of preparation new to the Carolinas, but one that solar companies are getting used to, ***thanks to the spate of dangerous hurricanes in recent years. SunPower had a “dry run” last month when a hurricane hit Hawaii, Werner said…

    In 2017, many solar farms withstood devastating hurricanes elsewhere by taking such actions. Some, though, fell short with “airborne solar modules, broken equipment and twisted metal racking,” according to a June report by the Rocky Mountain Institute (LINK)…
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-09-12/florence-s-brutal-winds-will-test-the-carolinas-solar-boom

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    pat

    first two stories behind paywall:

    Liberal Party had been taken over by climate denialists: Bill Shorten
    The Australian-2 hours ago
    The Opposition Leader said the framework of the NEG could be used by a future Labor government to create a policy that would lower carbon emissions.

    16 Sept: UK Times: Robert Watts: A convenient truth as profits soar at Al Gore’s Generation Investment Management fund
    Profits at the sustainable fund manager set up by former US vice-president Al Gore and ex-Goldman Sachs banker David Blood jumped by 66% to a record £248.5m last year.
    Generation Investment Management, with assets of $18.5bn (£14.2bn), backs companies that “provide goods and services consistent with a low-carbon, prosperous, equitable, healthy and safe society”.

    Turnover at the London-based operation grew to £293m last year, according to its recently filed accounts, which also reveal that one of Generation’s senior staff received a £41m cut of the £193m in profits distributed to the firm’s 32 members…

    15 Sept: Townhall: Paul Driessen: Keep Carbon Taxes in the Ground
    https://townhall.com/columnists/pauldriessen/2018/09/15/keep-carbon-taxes-in-the-ground-n2519189

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    pat

    14 Sept: NYT: Ivan Penn: It’s a Climate Summit. Why Is the Electric Shuttle Nearly Empty
    SAN FRANCISCO — It’s not easy going green. Offer electric buses and some still choose hulking Chevy Suburbans. Require paperless brochures and some hawk their colorful booklets…
    For the convention, name tags were produced with recycled paper. Program details appeared in digital formats. Solar panels powered registration booths and metal detectors. Event-sponsored transportation focused on bicycles, cars and buses that ran entirely on electricity…

    But the conference proved that even those in the green space sometimes cling to carbon-based conveniences.
    City Councilman Mike O’Brien of Seattle noted that some attendees commuted in oversize sport utility vehicles, while he grabbed an electric bike on multiple occasions to get around.
    “To be fair, there(sic) are mayors and governors,” he said. “I’m a just a City Council member.”
    The chairman of his Council’s transportation committee, Mr. O’Brien figured he would lead by example to avoid adding to the congestion on the clogged thoroughfares, though others didn’t reflect the same conviction.
    “This is the first time I’ve used a public one,” Mr. O’Brien said of the electric bike. “I went to visit a friend up one of these hills. These things kick butt. I was pretty impressed.”…

    Mayor Alan Webber of Santa Fe, N.M., tried to do his part, but he did it alone. On the full-size electric bus with its flashing digital sign proclaiming “zero emissions,” Mr. Webber was the l..one passenger on the one-and-a-half-mile shuttle from the Fairmont Hotel to the main conference location at the Moscone Center, a route that often had few riders.
    “It’s important to send the right signals, to do the right thing,” Mr. Webber said…

    (Adam Scow, California director at the environmental group Food and Water) criticized Gov. Jerry Brown for allowing increased oil drilling and continued use of natural-gas fracking, while the governor also takes credit for signing a measure into law this week that mandates 100 percent carbon-free electricity in the state by 2045.
    “We’re not getting enough walk, and we’re getting too much talk,” Mr. Scow said. “Until we decrease oil and gas production, we’re not going to meet the challenge of climate change.”…

    And the ride-sharing companies Lyft and Uber, both based here, made their own gestures.
    Uber offered bonuses to drivers with electric cars who picked up conference attendees from the Moscone Center.
    Brian Oden, a 41-year-old San Jose resident who drives an electric car — a Chevrolet Bolt — got an email from Uber on Monday offering $10 a ride extra for rides he provided on Thursday and Friday.
    “I plan to do it all day,” Mr. Oden said.

    As part of the conference’s last day, an electric car was to begin a journey from California to New York in hopes of rallying the nation to support efforts to reduce carbon emissions.
    “America is one of the only countries where climate change is polarized,” said João Talocchi of the Purpose Climate Lab, which is behind the car trip. “We need to change perceptions.”
    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/14/business/energy-environment/summit-carbon-california.html

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    pat

    a must-read – Australia, Ontario get covered:

    15 Sept: National Review: California Climate Policies Facing Revolt from Civil-Rights Groups
    By Robert Bryce
    (Robert Bryce is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute and the author and producer of the forthcoming book and documentary Juice: How Electricity Explains the World)
    Hugely expensive green mandates will hit poor Californians the hardest.
    In April, civil-rights groups sued to stop some of California’s policies designed to address climate change. Then on Monday, California governor Jerry Brown signed into law SB 100, which requires the state’s utilities to obtain all their electricity from carbon-free sources by 2045…

    High electricity prices should be a concern for California policymakers, since electric rates in the state are already 60 percent higher than those in the rest of the country. According to a recent study by the Berkeley-based think tank Environmental Progress, between 2011 and 2017 California’s electricity rates rose more than five times as fast as those in the rest of the U.S. SB 100 will mean even higher electricity prices for Californians.

    In addition to cost, the all-renewable push set forth in SB 100 faces huge challenges with regard to energy storage. Relying solely on renewables will require a battery system large enough to handle massive seasonal fluctuations in wind and solar output. (Wind-energy and solar-energy production in California is roughly three times as great during the summer months as it is in the winter.) According to the Clean Air Task Force, a Boston-based energy-policy think tank, for California to get 80 percent of its electricity from renewables would require about 9.6 terawatt-hours of storage. This would require about 500 million Tesla Powerwalls, or roughly 15 Powerwalls for every resident. A full 100 percent–renewable electricity mandate would require some 36.3 terawatt-hours of storage, or about 60 Powerwalls for every resident of California…

    Since 2015, more than 200 government entities from Maine to California have voted to reject or restrict the encroachment of wind-energy projects. In 2015 the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted unanimously in favor of an ordinance banning large wind turbines in the county’s unincorporated areas. Three other California counties — San Diego, Solano, and Inyo — have also passed restrictions on Big Wind. Last year, the head of the California Wind Energy Association lamented that “we’re facing restrictions like that all around the state,” adding that “it’s pretty bleak in terms of the potential for new development. The result of the anti-wind restrictions can be seen in the numbers. Last year, California had about 5,600 megawatts of installed wind capacity. That’s roughly 150 megawatts less than what the state had back in 2013.

    The land-use problem facing Big Wind in California is the same throughout the rest of the U.S. and Europe: People in cities like the idea of wind turbines. People in rural areas increasingly don’t want anything to do with them. Those rural landowners don’t want to see the red blinking lights atop those massive turbines, all night, every night, for the rest of their lives. Nor do they want to be subjected to the harmful noise — both audible and inaudible — that they produce…READ ON
    https://www.nationalreview.com/2018/09/california-climate-change-policy-hits-poor-residents-hardest/

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    pat

    google translation:

    13 Sept: RuseauActionClimat France: Alliance of interests between Polish coal and French nuclear
    In a confidential note we reveal about the reform of the European electricity market, it appears that France and Poland intend to join forces to maintain financial support for coal and nuclear power plants in Europe…
    The Polish government has hastened to welcome this agreement which will allow it, if the legislation is adopted, to start the construction of new coal-fired power plants on its territory, like that of Ostroleka C – giant power plant of more than 1GW….

    By favoring the primacy of national assessment over a European assessment, states may continue to award subsidies to coal, gas or nuclear power plants, without taking into account the electricity capacity of their European neighbors. This is an important financial windfall that is unfortunately attributed to nuclear rather than energy savings..

    This alliance of interests between Polish coal and French nuclear runs counter to Emmanuel Macron’s speeches on the priority for the climate and the end of coal and is likely to keep Europe in its dependence vis-à-vis live on fossil fuels…
    DOWNLOAD NOTE IN ENGLISH
    https://reseauactionclimat.org/alliance-interets-charbon-polonais-nucleaire-francais/

    15 Sept: Edmonton Sun editorial: Feds need to step up pushing Trans Mountain (pipeline)
    Even before the Alberta government took out full-page ads supporting the Trans Mountain pipeline in newspapers across Canada this week, it had tried several campaigns to promote the project.
    Most of the attempts have been quite clever – and effective in our opinion.

    Last November, Premier Rachel Notley made a well-publicized cross-country speaking tour to convince business and opinion leaders of the wisdom of the expansion project…
    The Notley government even got itself into a bit of trouble with other lefties earlier this summer when it was discovered to be behind a campaign of robocalls and spam text-messages masquerading as an objective poll on pipelines conducted under the “Tell City Hall” label.

    And then there is the Alberta government’s keepcanadaworking.ca website and associated television ads. The website makes the most convincing arguments anyone has made – government or business – in support of Trans Mountain…
    Until Trans Mountain is built, the ads explain, “Canada is forced to ship oil by more expensive, more environmentally damaging means — and to sell Canadian oil to America at a discount.”
    The Alberta government even urges readers to let Ottawa know it “should minimize any delay” to the expansion. Can you believe that, Rachel Notley urging Canadians to put political pressure on her best friend Justin Trudeau? Amazing…

    But how come Ottawa is leaving it up to Alberta to do the heavy-lifting regarding public opinion?
    The Alberta ads are just another reminder that the Trudeau Liberals have never made a clear statement about the worth of the pipeline and never introduced the bill they promised to invoke federal jurisdiction over construction…

    Despite having sunk $4.5 billion tax dollars into Trans Mountain, the Trudeau Liberals seem only too happy to let the Notley NDP do most of the work.
    https://edmontonsun.com/opinion/editorials/editorial-feds-need-to-step-up-pushing-trans-mountain#comments

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    pat

    15 Sept: Euronews: German police remain at Hambach Forest
    By Louise Miner
    Thousands of German police vans are being deployed to the illegal tree houses in the Hambach Forest, where people have chained themselves over plans to clear the trees to expand the coal mining industry.
    Authorities say the 30-60 make-shift dwellings there are unsafe.
    Police clashed with activists during the week even though the protesters say it’s a peaceful sit in, but local residents say it’s been rather tense.
    Erhard Nimtz, a local resident from Kerpen, said: “When we left the forest in a police car, suddenly two masked people attacked us by throwing Molotov cocktails at us. It was a very frightening experience for us.”
    The tree dwellers were given 30 minutes to evacuate the area on Thursday and they didn’t resist and were removed by the police.

    Cranes were used to reach people sitting in the trees. Authorities expect to take several days to clear the forest of people and the RWE energy company will start to clear the forest from the beginning of October.
    http://www.euronews.com/2018/09/15/german-police-remain-at-hambach-forest-over-the-weekend

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  • #
    toorightmate

    Why didn’t they not bring the protesters to the ground by using chain saws so that the tree houses became ground houses.

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  • #
    Hanrahan

    The [Australian] liberals are committing suicide insisting on quotas for women in parliament. Let’s face it, it is women who are white-anting the party in sympathy with Turnbull. They are only successful in socialist parties.

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    • #
      toorightmate

      I am a firm believer in “best person for the job”.
      However, for a perfect example of how bad a gaggle of girls can be in parliament, look no further than Queensland.
      Many good women must be walking around with their heads hung in shame at the pathetic shambles which is the Queensland Government.

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        PeterS

        Recently the LNP has been a great believer in hiring the worst person for the job at the top. We are hoping they have broken that recent trend but we are still waiting to see if that’s the case. Until it is the case it’s pointless to be concerned with quotas and the like. They are just a diversion.

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      • #
        robert rosicka

        Let’s see now
        Julia Gillard
        Palace chook
        Julie Banks
        Both of the Bishops
        The NSW premier
        To name but a few of the hopeless women in politics and yes the list of men who were duds is much longer .

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      • #
        angry

        So many examples of poor choices for women in parliament……

        Palachook in Qld
        Julie Bishop and her majic pudding cheque book
        gillard
        penny wrong
        SHY
        nsw premier

        etc etc….

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      destroyer D69

      With the new same sex laws we now have does a “man” who chooses to “identify” as a “woman” meet the requirement to be qualified for preferential selection under the quota ? Or can a “man” chosen on this basis decide to “re-identify”an order to allow another member to be chosen, using their actual ,or,”identified”, sex, if the quotas become unbalanced? The permutations of possibilities are endless.

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    Hanrahan

    I still don’t get it. NSW is generating 127 MW by running water downhill. At the same time they are using 319 pumping it back uphill. That makes no sense.

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      toorightmate

      Hanrahan,
      Surely you are not hinting that Turnbull was an outright dill, despite always being the smartest person in the room!!!

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      • #
        Dennis

        He lacks judgement, and his political compass is flawed and therefore facing RET problems and voter anger he would not concede that power stations must be retained so he dredged up an original but abandoned Snowy Mountains Scheme project and called it Snowy 2.

        Maintain the deceptive transition to renewable energy, blah, blah, blah, don’t look at family company investments please.

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      robert rosicka

      Sounds like typical government economics to me , why waste millions when we can waste billions and keep the green vote .

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  • #
    pat

    13 Sept: BBC: Paul McCartney on handling crowds, and why he calls Donald Trump “the mad captain”
    by Mark Savage, BBC Music reporter
    The most famous musician on the planet is fully aware of the effect he has on lesser mortals and, 56 years after Love Me Do, he’s become adept at soothing people’s nerves before they collapse like a bouncy castle in a power cut…
    And, on the rare occasion he takes public transport, he says people are often too distracted by their phones to spot him…

    But the album’s angriest moment comes on Despite Repeated Warnings – a diatribe about climate change deniers, with a lyric that couldn’t be more timely or relevant: “Those who shout the loudest/May not always be the smartest.”
    “People who deny climate change… I just think it’s the most stupid thing ever,” says the star.
    “So I just wanted to make a song that would talk about that and basically say, ‘Occasionally, we’ve got a mad captain sailing this boat we’re all on and he is just going to take us to the iceberg [despite] being warned it’s not a cool idea.’”
    That mad captain, could it be anyone in particular?
    “Well, I mean obviously it’s Trump but there’s plenty of them about. He’s not the only one.”…
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-45482360

    Paul knows what the Beeb likes to hear!

    6 Nov 2017: BBC: Sir Paul McCartney: President Trump’s resistance to climate change is madness
    Interview by Jimmy Blake, words by Steve Holden
    Sir Paul McCartney has criticised President Trump’s attitude towards climate change, stating that some of his actions are “madness”.
    He’s accused the American leader of turning around “a lot of the advances that have been made” to help the environment…

    Sir Paul, who rarely gives interviews, was speaking exclusively to Radio 1 Newsbeat about a new short film that looks at the impact animal agriculture has on the planet.
    He’s encouraging people to go meat-free for one day a week, arguing that reducing the need to eat meat would help the environment…
    In 2016, a study found that global agricultural emissions must be slashed to prevent the planet warming by more than 2C over the next century.
    Following another recent climate change report, a spokesman for the White House said it supported “rigorous scientific analysis and debate” but added that the climate was “always changing”.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/article/41864305/sir-paul-mccartney-president-trumps-resistance-to-climate-change-is-madness

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    • #
      Kinky Keith

      We, have a long way to go.

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      Graeme No.3

      And Sir Paul’s qualifications?

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        pat

        Graeme No.3 -

        Paul McCartney Net Worth: $1.2B. Paul McCartney’s net worth is estimated at $1.2 billion, according to Celebrity Net Worth.

        celebrities do depend on the CAGW-infested MSM for publicity, remember.
        this one is cute!

        15 Sept: Boston Herald: Ex-pop star Gary Numan connects with darker side
        Finding his groove
        by Brett Milano
        Synth-pop pioneer Gary Numan doesn’t spend much time missing his early ’80s days as an international pop star. He’s glad those days are over.
        “I’m not a pop star by any stretch of the imagination, but I was one briefly,” he said this week. “At the moment, I can have an enjoyable life, full of adventures still to come. But I can also live an ordinary life, go to Disneyland with my children and not be hassled. When I started out, everything was manic, and I’d never want to go back to that. You can’t have a family when everybody knows who you are.” …

        Though he’s upbeat in conversation, Numan’s music has grown considerably darker over the years, closer to the industrial sound of Nine Inch Nails (and he now sports Trent Reznor-like, jet-black hair to match). His two latest albums, “Splinter (Songs from a Broken Mind)” and “Savage (Songs from a Broken World),” deal with his struggles with depression and the prospect of a global-warming apocalypse…

        Gary Numan with Nightmare Air at the Paradise, Thursday.
        http://www.bostonherald.com/entertainment/music/2018/09/ex_pop_star_gary_numan_connects_with_darker_side

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        destroyer D69

        Sir Paul who??????

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    • #
      joseph

      “People who deny climate change… I just think it’s the most stupid thing ever,” says the star.
      “So I just wanted to make a song that would talk about that and basically say, ‘Occasionally, we’ve got a mad captain sailing this boat we’re all on and he is just going to take us to the iceberg [despite] being warned it’s not a cool idea.’”

      I thought all of the icebergs had melted by now . . . .

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      angry

      Paul McCartney has taken too many drugs and has lost his marbles…

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  • #
    pat

    saw this -

    15 Sept: NBC San Diego: AP: Global warming means worse hurricanes: Scientists
    For every degree the air warms, it can hold nearly 4 percent more water and offer measurably more energy to worsen the storm
    The Associated Press consulted with 17 meteorologists and scientists who study climate change, hurricanes or both. A few experts remain cautious about attributing global warming to a single event, but most of the scientists clearly see the hand of humans in Florence…

    AND KNEW INSTANTLY IT COULD ONLY BE AN ARTICLE BY THE GREAT SETH BORENSTEIN, WHO WAITS UNTIL THE VERY END FOR A BRIEF MOMENT OF SANITY:

    15 Sept: AP: Scientists: World’s warming; expect more intense hurricanes
    By SETH BORENSTEIN
    Global warming didn’t cause Florence, they say. But it makes the system a bigger danger.
    “Florence is yet another poster child for the human-supercharged storms that are becoming more common and destructive as the planet warms,” said Jonathan Overpeck, dean of the environment school at University of Michigan. He said the risk extends beyond the Atlantic Ocean, such as Typhoon Mangkhut, which hit the Philippines on Friday.

    For years, when asked about climate change and specific weather events, scientists would refrain from drawing clear connections. But over the past few years, the new field of attribution studies has allowed researchers to use statistics and computer models to try to calculate how events would be different in a world without human-caused climate change.
    A couple of months after Hurricane Harvey, studies found that global warming significantly increased the odds for Harvey’s record heavy rains.
    “It’s a bit like a plot line out of ‘Back to the Future,’ where you travel back in time to some alternate reality” that is plausible but without humans changing the climate, said University of Exeter climate scientist Peter Stott, one of the pioneers of the field.

    A National Academy of Sciences report finds these studies generally credible. One team of scientists tried to do a similar analysis for Florence, but outside experts were wary because it was based on forecasts, not observations, and did not use enough computer simulations…

    “I think we can say that the storm is stronger, wetter and more impactful from a coastal flooding standpoint than it would have been BECAUSE of human-caused warming,” Pennsylvania State University climate scientist Michael Mann wrote in an email. “And we don’t need an attribution study to tell us that in my view. We just need the laws of thermodynamics.”
    Georgia Tech climate scientist Kim Cobb looks not just at basic physics but all the peer-reviewed studies that especially link climate change to wetter storms.
    “We have solid data across decades of rainfall records to nail the attribution — climate change is increasing the frequency of extreme rainfall events,” Cobb said.

    “The amount of water that comes out of hurricanes is certainly the most robust connection that we have,” National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration climate scientist Jim Kossin said.
    And to look at Florence specifically, “it’s very likely that climate change has warmed the ocean such that the hurricane’s intense rainfall is more destructive than without global warming,” said Weather Underground Meteorology Director Jeff Masters, a former hurricane hunter.
    The warmer air and water also makes storms more intense or stronger, Stott said.
    A Kossin study this year showed that tropical cyclones — a category that includes hurricanes and typhoons — are moving slower and even stalling. Kossin said “it’s happening a lot more than it used to.”

    ***Meteorologist Ryan Maue of weathermodels.com cautioned that observers should “stick to overall trends around the world and not individual cases.”
    University of Miami hurricane expert Brian McNoldy said there are too many ever-changing factors that make it hard to blame climate change specifically.
    “If you are trying to make climate policy,” Maue said Friday, “you don’t want to make it on a storm-by-storm basis.”
    https://apnews.com/f3503534662140adad76a7290b8f5745
    The Associated Press consulted with 17 meteorologists and scientists BLAH BLAH…

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    • #
      RickWill

      Don’t let facts get in the way of a good yarn – the total precipitable water in the atmosphere has declined this century. That may be a factor in the downward trend in severity and number of tropical storms over the past decade.

      Any weather that could not be classed as calm, balmy conditions gets labelled Climate Change – its sickening!!

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  • #
    nc

    I have a question, up here in Canada marijuana will soon become legal, is the growing, cultivation, processing, sale and smoking of marijuana carbon neutral? Trudeau 2.0 wants to bring in a carbon tax though that is not going well and he got elected with help from the bong intellectuals promising them to legalize marijuana if elected.

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  • #
    robert rosicka

    So WA just had an earthquake, how long before the green crowd blame Co2 ?

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    • #
      el gordo

      The Shire of York is apparently ‘one of Australia’s most active earthquake regions.’

      21

      • #
        Graeme#4

        My brother was living in York at the time of the 1968 Meckering earthquake which wiped Meckering off the map. He was thrown out of bed and ended up across the other side of the room. Damaged Perth a lot – if it had gone on another 30 seconds, the damage would have been substantial.

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    • #
      PeterS

      Well the Pacific islanders are already blaming us for the rising sea levels so I don’t see how it would be any different with earthquakes. Our reluctance to move to 45% to 100% renewables might be used by them and others as a way to blame us for not stopping the earthquakes. Too bad that countries like Japan, China, India and many others are building massive numbers of coal fired power stations. Perhaps the CO2 from Australia has some magical qualities that causes global warming, earthquakes, volcanoes, etc. while CO2 from everywhere else is totally harmless.

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      • #
        angry

        Thay just think Australia is a “soft touch”.

        10

        • #
          Chad

          any farmers going along with the CAGW scam – especially those being enticed by “carbon farming” or “wind/solar farm” $$$ needs to think again:

          Whilst i cannot see the consumption of meat reducing significantly in the foreseeable future, ….everyone will still need to eat..
          any farmers that might be concerned can always switch to other forms of cropping.
          Vegegetables, grains, greens, fruit, fish and foul, are all cash crops that will have to be increased to substitute for any reduction in meat consumption.
          Oddly, i believe i have seen a report of a farmer in the Aussie bush, who makes his living by farming fish .!

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  • #
    pat

    any farmers going along with the CAGW scam – especially those being enticed by “carbon farming” or “wind/solar farm” $$$ needs to think again:

    15 Sept: UK Independent: Europe must halve meat and dairy production by 2050 to save planet, expert says
    Major report endorses Greenpeace call for drastic reduction to avoid dangerous climate change
    by Toyin Owoseje
    A report from Rural Investment Support For Europe (RISE) supports Greenpeace’s campaign to drastically reduce global meat and dairy production by 2050 to keep the Paris climate agreement on track.
    The EU’s former environment commissioner, Janez Potocnik, said: “Unless policymakers face up to this now, livestock farmers will pay the price of their inactivity. ‘Protecting the status quo’ is providing a disservice to the sector.”

    Research from non-profit organisations the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy and GRAIN published in July found that meat and dairy companies were on track to surpass the fossil fuel industry as the world’s biggest contributors to climate change.

    China, the US, the EU, Canada, Brazil, Argentina, Australia and New Zealand are collectively responsible for over 60 per cent of global meat and dairy emissions…

    Scientists are concerned about the gases caused by tens of billions of cattle, sheep, pigs, poultry and other animals in three main areas: methane, land use and respiration.
    Professor Allan Buckwell, the paper’s co-author, said that beyond the implications for global warming, it was a health issue…

    Mr Buckwell told The Guardian: “We’re talking about fewer meat meals, less meat portions and moving to flexitarian diets without being dogmatic about it,” he said…
    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/europe-meat-dairy-production-vegan-2050-climate-change-a8539176.html

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      robert rosicka

      Pat we in oz have the same constraint if we want to stick to the Paris agreement.

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    • #
      Annie

      Not dogmatic then…eh? A lot of their ruminations sound pretty strong to me. I think most of these vegan types don’t want to know about the huge numbers of large and small wildlife that breathe out CO2 and (ahem) produce other outgassing. To blame the livestock that is valued by the bulk of humanity for food is anti-human.

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  • #
    dinn, rob

    please see http://balance10.blogspot.com/2018/09/nurbiye-nurtay-uighur.html can’t tell you why–Chinese
    state secret

    00

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    pat

    15 Sept: South Bend Tribune: Former U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon speaks at Notre Dame
    By Caleb Bauer
    SOUTH BEND — Former Secretary-General of the United Nations Ban Ki-moon criticized resistance to action in the face of climate change and urged attendees to think of themselves as global citizens at his Asia Leadership Forum speech at the University of Notre Dame Wednesday.

    Ban stressed the importance of the United Nation’s 17 “Sustainable Development Goals,” also known as the 2030 Agenda, which seek to address social and economic development issues including poverty, hunger, health, education, global warming and others.

    But on the issue of global warming, Ban focused on a “ticking clock” when it comes to the window to reverse the negative effects of climate change, and publicly denounced the United States’ decision in 2017 to withdraw from the Paris Agreement…
    “I must take this opportunity to express my deep disappointment with the current (U.S.) administration’s decision to withdraw from the Paris Agreement,” Ban said. “Economically speaking, it is irresponsible. … President Trump will be on the wrong side of history.”

    Ban also urged attendees to rethink the way they look at the world, and begin considering themselves as global citizens.
    “Global citizens are those who identify themselves not as a member of a nation,” Ban said. “But instead as a citizen of the world.”…

    Ban’s focus on global citizenship has led to the creation of the Ban Ki-Moon Centre for Global Citizens in Vienna, Austria, where he hopes to continue his work to battle global poverty, hunger, youth empowerment and more, while instilling a sense of global citizenship in others…
    Ban also touched on the severity of an ongoing global refugee crisis…
    “(Global citizens) build bridges rather than construct walls,” Ban said. “They look beyond the narrow prism of national and personal interests and work for a better world.”
    https://www.southbendtribune.com/news/business/former-u-n-secretary-general-ban-ki-moon-speaks-at/article_351d3321-bd4f-507d-95e5-2effce484fce.html

    InnerCityPress always has plenty of UN gossip…and, consequently, is always having problems with their press credentials at the UN, partly because of Ban Ki-Moon, so this page makes a good – though VERY messy & lengthy – read:

    6 Sept: Inner City Press: BanKi-moon’s Nephew Sentenced to 6Months for FCPA Violations asGuterres Son UNdisclosed
    By MatthewRussell Lee
    Ban first evicted Inner City Press from the UN, where it still remains restricted, and called it all “fake news. “Now, with Ban’s successor following his censorship example even further, on September 6 Ban’s nephew Dennis Bahn (a/k/a Joo HyunBahn) after pleading guilty in January under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, has been sentenced to six months incarceration…

    Today 9 April 2018, with Kwon under fire at the UNESCO meeting in Paris, in China Ban has gotten himself another sinecure, this time with the Boao Forum on Asia. Given the corruption of the UN under Ban Ki-moon, not only bribery by Ng Lap Seng and Patrick Ho of CEFC China Energy but his own brother and nephew Dennis Bahn, the further deterioration of the UN under Antonio Guterres who won’t even raise or respond on these issues comes into focus…

    Ban Ki-moon is trying to re-invent himself with a bogus foundation in Vienna, see here (LINK), and “Ban Ki-moon Centre for Global Citizens will work together with other organizations, such as UNESCO, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and the Federation Internationalel’Automobile (FIA).”…
    http://www.innercitypress.com/bankimoon130eyeontheprize090618.html

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  • #
    PeterS

    Climate change has stalled for over a century. I’m sick and tired of alarmists still sprouting lies.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=20&v=L4w24sRoJ7s

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  • #
    yarpos

    Big techno dance festival thing in Penrith this weekend.

    2 drug deaths, much breast beating about the war against drugs, policies, dear leader Gladys outraged etc.

    Personally I dont see the problem. You want to push the boundaries in a closed environment up to and including death, then so be it. Its a bit of a mix of risk management/self managing system/darwin principle. Should be more like The Purge, no rules for 12 hours then clean up, rather than the Nanny State trying to manage the unmanageable.

    Harsh?

    13

    • #
      el gordo

      Well, they are young and keen to take risks. What they don’t tell us is how many young people get into strife with alcohol, which leads to a premature death.

      11

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  • #
    David Maddison

    I don’t understand why people like Finkel seriously believe that carbon sequestration is economically possible. Does he not realise that the volume of liquid CO2 produced from burning coal is about 1.8 times the original volume of coal (by my calculation but I have seen figures higher than that)? That’s not even considering the fact of the huge energy cost to seperate the gas from the exhaust stream and then to liquify and pump it deep underground. I have also seen figures that suggest CCS would consume 40% of the power of a coal plant.

    There is a very good reason that with massive subsidies available for “green” and unreliable energy production there is still no viable CCS scheme, not that any are required. The correct place for this valuable component of the biosphere is in the atmosphere where it will be converted to plants, not underground.

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  • #
    OriginalSteve

    In case anyone tjought google were neutral…

    the_worlds_most_important_funeral_googles_answer_to_trump.htm

    “Forget the lamentations for John McCain. Ditto the wailing for Aretha Franklin. This week, we just learned about the biggest and most significant funeral dirge in the history of the world: the private and confidential gathering of tens of thousands of Google employees to mourn the election of Donald Trump.

    And their plans to make sure nothing like that ever happens again.

    All led by the people who run Google – i.e., the world.

    Thanks to Breitbart.com, who brought this 45-minute dirge of constant sorrow to our attention, we now know there was not a dry eye in the house.

    You have to see it to believe it. It is easy to find at Breitbart.”

    https://www.breitbart.com/tech/2018/09/12/leaked-video-google-leaderships-dismayed-reaction-to-trump-election/

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    el gordo

    “Malcolm has got to go,” Mr Murdoch told Mr Stokes, according to multiple re-tellings of the conversation, relayed back to Mr Turnbull by Mr Stokes.

    Mr Stokes told Mr Murdoch that rolling Mr Turnbull would deliver government to Labor, that the industrial relations landscape would see the likes of the CFMEU thrive.

    Mr Murdoch’s reply? One version, told to the ABC, is that Mr Murdoch told Mr Stokes:

    “We have got to get rid of Malcolm. If that’s the price of getting rid of him then I can put up with three years of Labor.”

    ABC

    00