JoNova

A science presenter, writer, speaker & former TV host; author of The Skeptic's Handbook (over 200,000 copies distributed & available in 15 languages).


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On Outsiders – Sunday 10:15am

Light posting as I am in Sydney at The Australian Taxpayers Association Friedman18 conference, and having a great time too. Fantastic panel with Ian Plimer and the wonderful former Senator Nick Minchin today.

I’m looking forward to appearing on Outsiders Sky at 10:15am with Ross Cameron and Rowan Dean. (Perhaps someone can record it or find the right link in comments thanks….) Podcast audio here.

KimH suggests those without Foxtel download the Foxtel play app on your windows device …

 

 

Dave posted some links:

They’re put a short segment up on twitter with a video.

Plus the full 10 minutes or so here!
https://www.skynews.com.au/details/_5790094599001

h/t Chris D too

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Rating: 9.3/10 (84 votes cast)
On Outsiders - Sunday 10:15am, 9.3 out of 10 based on 84 ratings

Tiny Url for this post: http://tinyurl.com/ycts6qwu

147 comments to On Outsiders – Sunday 10:15am

  • #
    TedM

    The link is here http://more.skynews.com.au/podcasts/

    Just scroll down to outsiders and click, then choose which date you want. Allow for a few hours before the program is posted. Sundays episode is usually posted about 1200 WA time.

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  • #
    TedM

    Lots of other good stuff on there too. NB: it’s only the audio.

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  • #
    MuzoftheRiverina

    Am away, but have set the Foxtel to record. Hope it works!

    You will be in safe hands with Ross And Rohan. Good Luck Jo!

    90

    • #

      Muz, thank you — I was really hoping someone would know how to do that : ) I’m glad you may have a copy, and if there is a way to get that to me, or on youtube, that would be great.

      It was fun, and yes hopefully we can do that again and via a hook u from Perth.

      Great to be talking to sharp guys who are not beholden to religious fantasies

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      • #
        Pauline Young

        Hi Jo
        Great to see you on Outsiders this morning….. for those who don’t have Foxtel subscription you can watch all the programmes on Sky News by downloading the Foxtel Go app and when the screen comes up press Live Tv and you have free access to all the Sky news including Andrew Bolt Chris Kenny Peta Credlin and of course the redoubtable Outsiders who now appear each Monday and Thursday evenings from *pm until (pm and Sundays 9am to 11am.
        Best wishes
        Pauline

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      • #
        cohenite

        Great interview Jo. The sad thing is these 2 guys plus Price and Bolt, Jones and Hadley and Dean Makin on 2SM are the only media types in this country who would even have a clue what you are saying. As for the politicians I’m sure Frydenberg knows but has sold out. As has the ALP and Lord Turnbull.

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    • #
      Treeman

      Muz, I’d love to know how to share a saved Foxtel clip as multiple episodes of Outsiders including this one are saved on the iq3.

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      • #
        MuzoftheRiverina

        Yes Treeman, so would I, as Jo asked above if I was able to send it/share with her somehow.

        If there is someone out there with the methodology, that can put it in plain English it would be appreciated!

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  • #
    TdeF

    Revealing article by Matthew Lesh in the Australian on diversity in universities. A single startling fact. 39% of US Universities have NO Republicans. Unbelievable. Quite self evidently, whatever their qualifications, whatever their skills and insights and value, Republicans are not hired as members of staff.

    How deep does this go? We know Ecology, Zoology, Botany are part of this but the real question is whether that generally includes Sciences, Engineering,Geology and Meteorology as well? Within the 61% of Democrat Universities, how much dissent is allowed? Who decides what is to be said, what opinions people have to have? What do they think of Christopher Columbus? Is he a white supremacist?

    So what’s next in this fight for intellectual freedom by the Democrats? Will white people exclude themselves from University to atone for their sins?

    This brutal self evident monoculture makes issues of racism and LGBIT irrelevant distractions. Diversity of opinion is banned. Sounds just like Their ABC/SBS where you only get debates between people with exactly the same point of view. What does their ABC/SBS say about denier Professor Reid? Or is that banned too?

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    • #
      CharlesM

      This statistic is impossible to comprehend. Even if only 20% of the population are Republicans, to employ 50 people at random without employing a single Republican, is only 0.0014%. There are over 1.5 million faculty at US universities (colleges). 39% would be almost 600,000, and even if the average zero-Republican college size was small, they surely represent over 250,000 people.

      Now, the odds of employing 250,000 people without bias, and not come up without a single Republican is so infinitesimally small that I don’t even know how to estimate the number of zeros before the first non-zero digit!

      60

  • #
    John in NZ

    I tried to watch it on Foxtel Go but was told it was only for Australia.

    Will try the podcast.

    30

  • #
    Jeff

    I can’t access Sky Outsiders.
    But there was a actually a good piece on ABC Insiders this morning.
    Saying that AGL should be forced to sell Liddell, by the government for energy security reasons.
    Then resold to Alinta.
    It showed clips of Barnaby Joyce and Tony Abbott arguing the case.
    Saying how AGL bought the power stations so cheap from the government.
    I think there could be more to play out in the future there.

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    • #
      toorightmate

      There is more to play out in the future.
      Unfortunately, Mal and Josh don’t know how to play.

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      • #
        PeterS

        One could say they do know how to play the game to their selfish and greedy advantage at the expense of the rest of us. The alternative is they are simply so dumb they don’t know what they are doing and are clueless as to the repercussion of their destructive actions. Either way they must go before it’s too late and the nation enters the next phase of crash and burn.

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    • #
      TdeF

      Liddell was built by the people for the people. As even AGL says, they were given it for nothing. Now $250Million is not enough?
      This is not a conservative government becoming socialist, the prerogative of the left, but a government wanting back what theirs in the first place and on the clear understanding that it would be maintained and the service continued.

      The real culprit here is the Federal laws which were inteneded to make coal power stations unprofitable and wind turbines immensely profitable by robbing one to pay the other. For nothing. Their Green electrons are better. As for gas, even exploring for gas is banned, coal seam gas is prohibited, fracking is banned and what is left in Bass Straight robbed for export because of the $400 a tonne RET money grab on fossil fuels.

      You would think the Federal government is the innocent party. Malcolm and his very Green friends are the ones behind the wholesale destruction of coal and then gas. We are importing diesel and diesel engines to cover the gap? The whole scene is nuts and nothing to do with electricity and everything to do with CO2 and indirect massive subsidies which are no more than robbery?

      Why is this not mentioned by anyone? Without the RET, AGL would never close Liddell. It would be a licence to print money, considering what people are paying for electricity and how cheap and plentiful coal electricity really is.

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  • #
    PeterS

    Just watched Outsides. Well done Jo. You should get a weekly spot there or on the Bolt Report.

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  • #
    Treeman

    Just watched it and Jo you were brilliant.

    If Outsiders allow you put up your segment on youtube please post the link so we can circulate.

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  • #
    Geoffrey Williams

    Just watched your interview on Sky . .
    Jo you absolutely nailed it.
    Fantastic display of ‘climate knowledge.
    Well done.
    GeoffW

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  • #
    Antoine D'Arche

    you were AMAZING!!!!!!!

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  • #
    toorightmate

    Agree, agree.
    Well done.
    I hope a few of the insiders took some time to watch the Outsiders, or do so during the week.

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  • #
    Latus Dextro

    Alinsky: “Control the language you control the people.”

    “Diversity” means division and diversity is inclusive unless you hold a diverse view. If one is a member of civil society, one doesn’t need this explained.
    Divest and save the world from climate change and discrimination, except that climate change is prima facie dependent on the presence of 1 or more members of Homo sapiens and identity politics discriminates in order to assert identity. But species discrimination must be so non-woke.

    This all makes perfect logical sense, particularly if you come from a tertiary safe space in Journalism/Communications, Law, and Psychology.
    And no surprises regarding the subject of the worst offender.
    Econ Journal Watch. Scholarly Comments on Academic Economics. Faculty Voter Registration in Economics, History, Journalism, Law, and Psychology. Langbert et al. (2016)

    We investigate the voter registration of faculty at 40 leading U.S. universities in the fields of Economics, History, Journalism/Communications, Law, and Psychology. We looked up 7,243 professors and found 3,623 to be registered Democratic and 314 Republican, for an overall D:R ratio of 11.5:1. The D:R ratios for the five fields were: Economics 4.5:1, History 33.5:1, Journalism/Communications 20.0:1, Law 8.6:1, and Psychology 17.4:1. The results indicate that D:R ratios have increased since 2004, and the age profile suggests that in the future they will be even higher.

    It is hard to know how we will deflect a new ‘dark age’ and return to more rational, evidence-based discourse. In the meantime, what comfort there is may reside in the obvious: suppression and oppression have equal and opposite consequences … eventually.

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    • #
      PeterS

      Very similar to what Hitler did, where he said “Let me control the textbooks, and I will control the state.”. That’s exactly what’s happening with our schools and Universities today where the textbooks have been tainted with all sorts of BS on climate change. Some are now saying they are not going far enough. What does that mean? I suspect means any climate change sceptic found at school will be expelled.

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      • #
        Latus Dextro

        PeterS, I agree that the historical parallels are as compelling as they are frightening though given an increased local populous, internet comms, billions more in a diverse global population wedded to progress, one might expect the t1/2 of Green totalitarian regressivism to be considerably shorter than the longevity of the National Workers Socialist Party, although other independent variables like societal cost and pain, deprivation of liberty, destruction of prosperity, persecution of deniers may not be any less intense, even if the duration of exposure is less.

        Small comfort.

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      • #
        treeman

        I have a regular joust with a certain alarmist professor who along with his club of Rome aficionados would have global governance delivered via a war footing driven by climate activists. Suffering illusions of knowledge he will be furious should he read this comment!

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        • #
          PeterS

          Yes I have had a couple of “friends” like that. Fortunately I’ve lost contact with them a long time ago. They were so closed minded it was scary. I’m always fascinated how anyone let alone a supposedly intelligent academic refuses to be objective and open minded enough at least to consider other views that contradict theirs. They kept saying there is plenty of evidence supporting their theories. The point they missed is the evidence supported nothing. It’s the interpretation of the evidence that was key. In other words, the exact same evidence can be interpreted by different people to support contradictory ideas. Then they failed to understand that science required a healthy discussion about the various interpretations to come up with the most likely one. I am not necessarily talking about Ockham’s razor although often that can be included in the toolbox of scientific analysis. The evidence does not change. Today though it’s much worse than ever before although it’s not really new. Now the evidence itself is sometimes fabricated or altered to support their view. Such duplicitous activity has been conducted throughout all of history in science but it’s got out of hand now. That’s not science of course, it’s a deliberate act of dishonesty. I for one am opened minded enough to have my view modified if someone showed me the actual evidence is best interpreted in such a way that CAGW is real. At this stage and as far as I know that’s not the case. So I am sticking to the most reasonable and scientific view that CAGW is total nonsense.

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          • #
            Latus Dextro

            Nice, PeterS.
            After establishing their understanding of the UNFCCC defined term “climate change,” I ask them to give me their top five published scientific empirical clinchers (modelling not allowed) “proving” CAGW, or just AGW and demonstrating its subtle clarity above the raging noise of UNFCCC defined “climate variability.”

            Without fail, at that point they argue from authority or more usually, frank insult.
            I believe that the time is almost up for this kind of ideologically infected intellectual regressivism.

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          • #
            WXcycles

            @PeterS

            ” … The evidence does not change. … ”

            err … it does, see BOM, climategate, satellite data revisionism.

            Use sarc next time Pete.

            00

    • #
      David Maddison

      A good video on the subject.

      https://youtu.be/K-58HoTHWQk

      “Control the Words, Control the Culture.”

      00

  • #
    Richard Knights

    Have just found Jo Nova on Outsiders today.
    Got me quite excited listening to her. Great talk.
    Feel all is not quite lost just yet.
    Good work Outsiders

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  • #
    Serge Wright

    The left wing alarmists who wathed the interview will be clawing the walls and tearing their hair out ! :)

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  • #
    Doc Smith

    Great interview on Outsiders this morning. Joanne mentioned how solar and wind renewables have completely distorted the energy market including adding $billions in infrastructure and maintenance costs which in turn adds hugely to the energy costs borne by consumers. The point is well made and should be obvious to anyone looking at their ever rising electricity bills but it’s not the only way we are paying for this. Solar has become considerably cheaper in recent years BUT is still so expensive to install that even with a possible reduction in your power bill the average 5kw system will still take over ten years of operation to pay for itself. So where’s the value? Right now the ubiquitous spread of solar panels on roofs has also distorted the housing market to such an extent that the average system costing say $5000 will add $10000 to the value of the house regardless of any (modest) savings in energy costs. Houses with solar are now worth more than those without, regardless of any actual reduction in power costs. This will drive the market in solar. For that reason alone the $billions in taxpayers money used in continued government subsidies for renewables is insane.

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  • #
    Rod Stuart

    I have suggested to Ross and Rowan that Joanne should have her own show on Skynews. A fantastic half hour exposure.

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    • #
      PeterS

      That would be fantastic. Alternatively, as I said Jo should appear on their show (remotely of course) every week even if it’s for a very short time to give everyone an update of events.

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  • #

    Aw shucks guys. Thanks. I’m so glad you enjoyed it.
    I hope we can get a copy. :-)

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    • #
      PeterS

      Jo please, pretty please see if you can convince them schedule a regular segment on their show to keep informing the public of the truth about climate change. It has the potential of being a great game changer and expose the truth not only about climate change but also the state of our electricity supply and where it’s heading. Perhaps you can join forces with TonyfromOz. We desperately need a much broader exposure on the airwaves even though it’s only on Foxtel and not free to air. Surely it would seep into the rest of the community by word of mouth, and more importantly stir up the two major parties into a frenzy as they fight like mad for being painted into a corner they can’t escape thus exposing them to the whole nation they have taken us all for fools. As you are aware this is desperate times and we the people can force a change but only if enough people know the change is not only necessary it’s critical to the survival of this nation.

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      • #
        PeterPetrum

        PeterS – if one has an iPad or iPhone one can download the “FOXTEL Go” App. Although one needs a subscription to view most programs the “Live TV” link lets you view the current program free. We watch the Outsiders, Bolt, Credlin and the “Peta Allen” show with Peta Credlin and Allan Jones. Beats the ABC anytime.

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        • #
          PeterS

          I didn’t know that. Thanks for letting me know. I’ll pass that info on to others who don’t have Foxtel when I want them to watch something important. As for the ABC, I value my critical thinking abilities too much to let them be destroyed by watching the ABC. The odd times I do watch the ABC, which is about two or three times a year, convinces me it’s in a different Universe so to speak. I shudder to think how it affects people who watch it regularly. It has to be something like having a lobotomy.

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          • #
            MuzoftheRiverina

            PeterS, good news, Foxtel has signed a deal with WIN to run SkyNews on a new dedicated “free to air” channel within the WIN network.

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            • #
              PeterS

              Let’s hope that includes Outsiders and the Bolt Report. Would be much nicer if it wasn’t just restricted to regional TV. Imagine the screams from the left residing in the major cities if it was allowed to be broadcasted there. It would be like thrusting a wooden stake into a vampire so to speak.

              30

        • #
          glen Michel

          I downloaded “whooshka”,it seems to work for Sky.

          10

    • #

      JOANNE ENOUGH , we have just seen Tommy Robinson arrested for nothing , and yet not a word on your blog , you just as much live in a bubble as those we are fighting against .

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      • #
        Annie

        Not so DD. I think it has been mentioned already on the previous unthreaded.

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        • #
          Annie

          Also, Jo has had more than enough to cope with during the past week. She has done brilliantly so please stop carping when you are in one of your late evening whinging modes.

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      • #
        PeterS

        Perhaps it’s because he is considered to be friendly towards white supremacists, a very hateful group of people. However, whether he is or not is beside the point. He has every right to do what he did outside that court room. Free speech should never be considered to be hate speech under the law. Otherwise, governments can change the law to clamp down on all kinds of free speech, as we are all seeing elsewhere today more and more.

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        • #
          Rod Stuart

          It is ironic that after that noble effort 70 years ago to slay the Fascist hoard, that the UK is becoming rather like Germany of the 1920′s, don’t you think? Here is some food for thought on that topic.

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          • #
            PeterS

            I am not surprised. In fact I expected it for a long time. It’s no coincidence that certain English elites before and during the 2nd WW were close to the Nazis. The government as depicted in the movie “V for Vendetta” comes eerily close to what I was expecting to happen in real life, and still expecting. Whether it does come about though only time will tell but it’s not looking good. I see the same for the rest of the West. This is why the left might not be our real enemy. The real one might be using the left in a very devious way as a diversion to prepare us to allow the fascist/extreme right to take over. That’s how Hitler came to power. He first goaded the communists to cause problems and took advantage of the situation to take over and stamp them out before he turned his focus on the Jews.

            10

          • #
            PeterS

            Stefan Molyneux just did a show (link below) highlighting what’s happening in the UK. In effect more and more people have come to the realisation it’s a lost cause and are abandoning ship where they can. He is also coming to Australia to warn us that we are at the cross-roads. IMHO I believe we’ve past that and heading the way of the UK but there is still hope we can turn things around but only if the voters wake up and act accordingly in every election from now on. It’s probably a false hope but I hope that hope has some merit :-) :-(
            The War On Tommy Robinson | Lauren Southern and Stefan Molyneux

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      • #
        toorightmate

        Jo’s blog relates to climate.

        10

  • #
    scaper...

    Well done, Jo! It will be interesting to know if the appearance has increased your hits here. The more exposure, the better for the cause of the truth about this scam!

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  • #
    Dave

    They’re put a short segment up on twitter with a video.

    Plus the full 10 minutes or so here!
    https://www.skynews.com.au/details/_5790094599001

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    • #

      Ever watched something and wished there was more?

      I could have listened to that for hours.

      A lot more relaxed also than anything from 7.30.

      Joanne, you make Ross Garnaut look like C-3PO.

      Tony.

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      • #
        PeterS

        Yes Jo was interrupted a few times and I felt telling the guys to just shut up and let her talk. Still it was marvellous. I hope this is not the last time it’s done, and as I said earlier it would be great if Jo appeared on their show regularly to provide updates. It could be called the “real climate change” segment of the show.

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      • #
        Treeman

        “I could have listened to that for hours”

        To true TfO.

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    • #

      Just caught the interview. Well done, Jo. Very well done indeed.

      Be aware that this is NOT the beginning of an ABC career for you. But plenty of people never had an ABC career and got by. It’s mostly for the Undead anyway, apart from a few rural reporters and sports callers they have to recruit from amongst the Living.

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    • #
      RickWill

      Thankyou for the link. The title is not quite accurate as it is contradicts what Jo discussed:

      “There is no Evidence of Climate Change”

      In fact Jo made the point that there has been climate change and will be climate change but the causes are uncertain.

      Anyhow a great interview.

      With regard to solar and wind generators, I take the view that the most compelling argument against the RET is that the subsidies are paid by the disadvantaged who do not own a roof or cannot afford to install solar. The burden falls very unevenly on the disadvantaged. Those who can afford their own solar system can neutralise the impact of rising power prices but it comes at a cost of greater intermittency, higher prices and will eventually cause the grid to collapse economically if taken to the extreme. It simply becomes cheaper for those with a roof or open space to install enough panels and batteries to be self-sufficient; as we now see in South Australia.

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      • #
        PeterS

        Indeed I often see the rich have the really big solar panels costing around $20k, well beyond the means of the average worker let alone the old age pensioners. There’s a sort of discrimination against the less rich, poor and helpless in this nation. I thought the left were the other way around. Apparently they are not. Of course the left in both major parties are just hypocrites of the higher order.

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        • #
          RickWill

          PeterS

          I thought the left were the other way around.

          There is a mixture. Labor still has attachment to unions. That is why I feel that this is the best way to attack the RET. Point out where the subsidies come from and who gets them. Making this point on Renewenergy is the trump card. It temporarily silences the support for intermittents. I believe the majority of people still believe the subsidies come from general revenue so is just an added tax.

          The other point that really needs to be pushed strongly is the meaningless of LCOE (Levelised Cost of Electricity). This is the basis of the arguments that wind and solar industry and supporters promote strongly. Jo made the point that intermittents increase cost because of system interactions. This does not have meaning to most. The point that networks having high market share of intermittents also has expensive electricity was well made. However in Australia that is countered by the fact that Abbott slowed investment in intermittents so there is not enough competition now.

          The key points are:
          1. The RET has caused transfer payments from the disadvantaged to the wealthy who own a roof and will continue till at least 2030 under current legislation.
          2. Comparing LCOE of ambient energy sources to reliable generation is meaningless unless there is infinite system storage – there is negligible storage in the Australian NEM.
          3. The word “renewable” is a misnomer. In polite company “ambient” is a good descriptor. A more derogatory term is “intermittents”. And to tell it how it really is the term is “run-whenever-you-like”.
          4. The intended aim of ambient electricity generation of reducing CO2 cannot happen on a global scale because they cannot produce enough energy over their life to enable their replication – they are indeed unrenewable. Germany is facing up to this reality as a significant portion of their wind fleet is up for replacement at a time of diminishing subsidies.

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      • #
        Kinky Keith

        Got it in a nutshell.

        20

    • #
      Peter C

      Thank You Dave!

      I was able to watch the 11 minutes of Jo. I thought it was very entertaining and informative. The answers and the questions were excellent.

      Ross Cameron asked; “How has Australia vandalised its own electricity system?”, which was partially answered.

      Another question is; “Who has vandalised Australia’s electricity system” The answer is Federal and State Governments.

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      • #
        Kinky Keith

        And if that message is repeated over and over in the public’s presence they may get the message that the electricity system, ie. production and distribution, has been vandalised by those two levels of government.

        The smart ones may even associate that message with cost.

        KK

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  • #
    John of Cloverdale, WA, Australia

    About 56:30 minutes in.

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  • #
    Rob Leviston

    I just watched the 10 minute clip. Wow! Good work Jo, and I learnt something? You were once a Vegan Greenie? I did not know that! Well, you didn’t actually say you wee no longer vegan……………….

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    • #
      robert rosicka

      Some of us if not most got sucked in to the initial CAGW religion until we seen the light , well done Jo excellent interview .

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  • #
    Treeman

    Just watched it again and Jo you were simply brilliant!

    For mine, Insiders are the leading the charge in Australia for the Intellectual Dark Web.

    The worm is turning and The IDW are only recently impacting in this country thanks to Jordan Petersen and just yesterday, Janet Albrechtsen with a fine summation of the world today.

    You are in esteemed company and it was a most timely appearance on Outsiders!

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  • #
    mmxx

    Jo’s reasoned and widely-supported position on global warming surely deserves at least equal billing on the Victorian school curriculum as their accepted Safe Schools minority stuff.

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    • #
      TdeF

      Unsafe schools. People would be locked up for what is being taught now under the cover of Safe Schools.

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      • #
        Kinky Keith

        Met and talked with Libby Down Under and checked out one of her articles in the Spectator.

        The Friedman 18 conference was full of pleasant surprises including “Libby” and Jacinta Price.

        Jo, in her presentation, got the message across brilliantly using liberal doses of irony. How to ruin a perfectly good grid.

        KK

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    • #

      Alack! Gramsci-Alinsky long march through the institutions,
      un fait-accompli … William Ridd, a case-in-point. Jordon
      B Peterson argues the take-over of education. Veritas, Trump,
      challenge medja-leftist dissemination of fake news, Chiefio,
      E.M Smith, observes internet intrusions into citizen privacy
      rights… Say, who will bell the goddam cat?

      Thx Jo ‘n the Liberty forum fer what you do, serfs’ appreciate.
      Will send, not turnips, :( , but chocolates, tho’ ne jamais
      le Belgium chocolat! Tsk!

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  • #
    bill west

    Hi Jo,
    You are an interviewers dream – knowledgeable and animated. In N.Z. we get ‘outsiders ‘ which we record but when i heard you were coming on i withdrew from the rain & watched live. I do visit your website often & have read some years ago blogs by your husband who had a great background to ridiculing man made global warming.
    Regards Bill

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  • #
    Yonniestone

    Not surprising Jo came across so well, this on top of being the best article writer in Australia today, our children need more positive influences like her.

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  • #
    pat

    thanks for the link Dave.

    great stuff, jo. if only you had a weekly spot on TV or radio. it would be a game-changer for the CAGW disinfo mob.

    why doesn’t 2GB drop one of their regular American correspondents and give you a spot instead. at least the audience would be well served.

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  • #
    Don B

    Slightly OT:

    “South Australia transmission company ElectraNet says it has found a cheaper solution that using the state’s gas plants to provide system strength to the local grid, which is now dominated by wind and solar.

    “ElectraNet says it proposes to install three “synchronous condensers” in key areas of the state – at a cost of around $80 million – to ensure that  gas-fired generators will no longer need to be switched on just to ensure the grid remains stable.”

    https://reneweconomy.com.au/cheap-condensers-to-displace-gas-as-renewable-energy-back-up-29544/

    Does that make sense? What is the article leaving out?
     

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    • #
      Rod Stuart

      A synchronous condenser is rotor synched with grid to provide power factor correction. It is a DC-excited synchronous machine whose shaft neither delivers nor absorbs rotational energy. By varying the excitation through a voltage regulator it can used to either generator or absorb REACTIVE power, hence assisting with PF correction.
      They are typically required to assist with grid voltage control in situations in which windmills disconnect because of too little or too much wind.
      The power factor correction thus provided comes at a cost. Spinning constantly requires energy input from the grid. They require input energy, and provide no output. To suggest that a synchronous condenser can replace spinning reserve, as the statement suggests, is complete nonsense.

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    • #
      RickWill

      Does that make sense? What is the article leaving out?

      The title is misleading. The prime function of the synchronous condensers is added system rotating inertia. They will consume some power due to magnetising and windage losses but not much. They will not generate “real” power. Fundamentally they act as flywheels in the system so if the is a power surge or system fault the frequency will not shift too rapidly for the frequency controllers at the large generators to adjust.

      At the present time that stabilising inertia is mandated by AEMO to avoid system collapse and is coming from gas plants connected and spinning but not necessarily producing much. The gas plants are being paid for this service above any sale of electricity unless they are scheduled to generate. You will find there are always 3 or 4 gas generators running in South Australia and the wind turbines are capped at around 1200MW despite wind being available to produce more.

      The synchronous condensers can be used as a source or sink of “reactive” power so can alter voltage at their point of connection. Typically they supply reactive to compensate for line inductance. In that regard they act like the capacitor in the old fluorescent lights.

      If you have not studied electrical engineering it would take a long post to explain “real” and “reactive” power. Instead I offer this not so good link:
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AC_power

      There is potential for the synchronous condensers to reduce gas usage by eliminating need to have gas plants running and connected in periods of good to high wind. With increasing number of wind turbines and solar installation in SA the ambient generators will more often have capacity to supply 100% of the energy demand but the system would have near to zero inertia to handle sudden changes in the system.

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        Rod Stuart

        I agree that rotational inertia is provided by a synchronous condenser. This is valuable when a system bears the impact of large motors occasionally stopping and starting.
        However, when the wind changes in a particular locale it affects many giant fans simultaneously. In that case, the rotational inertia that can be imparted lasts for only a few seconds. It is the governor on that coupled turbine that protects the system frequency from freefall. When the system loses significant generation instantaneously, rotational inertia in the form of a non-driven rotor has little effect.

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        • #
          RickWill

          The rotational inertia provides the vital seconds to enable the governors on dispatchable generators to respond in time. There is always running reserve on the grid but would not normally be in SA if the wind turbines are meeting demand because they only have gas plant – no low cost coal. The condensers avoid having unloaded gas turbines sitting on-line burning gas turning over but not generating much. So the effect of the condensers is to save gas. The existing gas turbines in SA are acting as synchronous condensers but highly inefficient because they burn gas just turning over and staying warm.

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    OriginalSteve

    O/T but related…..

    http://www.intellectualdark.website

    Anti-PC intellectual dark web… The New Reformation has begun….

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    • #
      Peter C

      Thanks Steve,

      Janet Albrechtsen wrote an article about the intellectual dark web in the Weekend Australian.

      Jordan Petersen is there on the intellectual dark web. Also Dr Jonathon Haidt. I heard about him for the first time during the Liberty Conference on Sunday ( The one that Jo was a speaker. Jonathon Haidt has founded a group called the Heterodox Academy, which is attracting University academics who think that the progressive left monoculture in Universities has gone too far.

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    OriginalSteve

    Im still highly amused…..

    Its like “do anything, no matter how dumb, just dont do coal…the cause Comrades…the cause…”

    I wonder if they will install a monster water slide and make it into a theme park while theyre at it?

    “AGL is working with Japanese firm Idemitsu to transform a Hunter Valley coal mine into a pumped hydro storage power plant to replace the energy lost when AGL closes the Liddell power station in 2022.
    “AGL is investigating the feasibility of establishing a pumped hydro project in the Upper-Hunter,” the company told Fairfax Media.”

    https://www.smh.com.au/business/companies/agl-to-transform-coal-mine-to-pumped-hydro-for-liddell-shortfall-20180525-p4zhgr.html

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    • #
      PeterS

      Talk about stupid. Here we have AGL desperate to shut down a coal fired power station and working with Japan to build a pumped hydro power plant while Japan are building and planning to build over 40 new coal fired power stations. This country is nuts and the sooner voters wake up and act accordingly at every election from now on the better. Otherwise, the Australia we know can and will be obliterated.

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      • #

        To late Pete, Australia’s economy is going to crash & burn in the next 5 – 7 years. Each state should have already started building new coal fired power stations. Liddell and “pumped hydro” is a major distraction (deliberate) by AGL and politicians. When all this game playing is over, everyone will wonder what happened. The Australian voters are clueless, fast asleep and lazy to read/learn what is really happening to this country. Agenda 21 and 2030 has been implemented alongside other socialist strategies to undermine western civilization (The Frankfurt School has 11 objectives to destroy society – developed during the 1930′s).

        THE 11-STEP PLAN OF CULTURAL SUBVERSION

        - The creation of racism offences.
        - Continual change to create confusion
        - The teaching of sex and homosexuality to children
        - The undermining of schools’ and teachers’ authority
        - Huge immigration to destroy identity.
        - The promotion of excessive drinking
        - Emptying of churches
        - An unreliable legal system with bias against victims of crime
        - Dependency on the state or state benefits
        - Control and dumbing down of media
        - Encouraging the breakdown of the family

        How does Australia look today (Posted by Robyn Todhunter on XYZ)?

        We have a farcical judicial system (at all levels)
        We have terrorism bollards scattered throughout OUR country
        We have third world internet
        We have out of control indiscriminate immigration
        We have schools indoctrinating our children with lies and social engineering marxist drivel
        We have no guaranteed, affordable electricity (again third world)
        We have academic standards free-falling to third world standards
        We have taxpayer-funded education openly hijacked by the Gonski rot
        We have governments who kowtow to the UN at the expense of all Australians
        We have a corrupt banking system
        We have corruption at council levels (throughout the country)
        We have insufficient fuel to defend OUR country if attacked
        We have a welfare system which is corrupt
        We have a biased left-wing main stream media
        We have degenerated so far as a society, our essential services personnel need police protection
        We have a police service (was once a force) who can’t/won’t react to overt violence
        We have no go-zones in our cities
        We have a choice of two leftist political governments who are driven by the dictates of the UN
        We have universities so corrupt that they terminate tenure of scientists offering debate
        We have no audible platform to challenge the corrupt UN Paris Climate scam
        We have a foreign aid program giving billions of OUR tax $$$ to corrupt governments
        We have organisations like Hizb ut-Tahrir, which have been declared terrorists, flourishing
        We have a taxpayer-funded National Disability Scheme being rorted to the hilt
        We have been informed by OUR leader that the threat of islamic terrorism is now part of daily life
        We have a family court/domestic violence judiciary placing /leaving children in danger
        We have farmers who feed us, suiciding while we give unaccounted foreign aid
        We have indigenous babies/children living in peril because to help them is racist
        We have a taxpayer-funded AAT overriding Home Affairs and allowing criminals to remain here
        Are we still the lucky country?

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          Rod Stuart

          The thing that makes this so sickening is that it is for all intents and purposes indisputable.

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          • #

            Exactly Rod. More synonyms come to mind:

            Incontrovertible, incontestable, undeniable, irrefutable, unassailable, beyond dispute, unquestionable, beyond question, indubitable, not in doubt, beyond doubt, beyond a shadow of a doubt, unarguable, inarguable, undebatable, unanswerable; unequivocal, unambiguous, unmistakable, certain, sure, definite, definitive, proven, positive, decisive, conclusive, final, ultimate; clear, clear-cut, straightforward, plain, as plain as a pikestaff, transparent, obvious, manifest, evident, self-evident, staring one in the face, patent, demonstrative, demonstrable, observable, palpable; uncontroversial, accepted, acknowledged; marked, pronounced, express, emphatic, categorical, compelling, convincing, clinching, airtight, watertight; rareirrefragable, apodictic

            There are some of these which relate/describe the politically correct environment we are living in.

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            • #
              Ian Hill

              The thing which drives me nuts is that at any gathering of people for whatever reason, the person running the meeting or event feels compelled to apologise for holding it wherever it is lest someone be offended. In Adelaide at least. Of course they don’t quite say it like that, but that’s the intention.

              I wonder if this happens in other states?

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          PeterS

          Stall, I tend to agree and the timing is about right. It might stretch out to 10-15 years depending what the US does. The longer it lasts the bigger the fall. After the crash and burn we will have a lot if not all of our freedoms taken away and be under some kind of worldly authoritarian system. I’m pretty much convinced there is nothing we can do, not because we as the public can’t make the necessary changes, it’s just that most don’t care to know. They are too busy with distractions and work.
          You left out an important fact in your list although you alluded to it in your introduction:

          We have far too many voters who don’t think before they vote and as a result we get the government we deserve.

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        Rob Leviston

        I don’t get the attraction with pumped hydro. It is a net user of power, and in real terms, does not make economic sense! At best, it is 80% efficient. Most likely worse, how much worse? Maybe 70%. That is using a lot of power, for no real benefit!
        Makes far more sense to have reliable 24/7/365 generating power, that works no matter the weather!
        Not a fan of Snowy 2.0. Bring on an HELE plant at minimum, or a nuclear plant!

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    • #
      PeterS

      The bottom line is this. Any isolated nation like Australia that relies too much on renewables without a significant supply of base load power (coal or nuclear) is effectively signing their own economic death sentence, not so much due to the cost, which is certainly a contributing factor but because if and when the wind stops blowing enough, the cloud cover increases for long periods and at the same time there is not enough rainwater, which is not out of the question, we will end up with a perfect storm that would create a scenario equivalent to a major terrorist attack on all our power generation infrastructure. Although we are not there already we are certainly heading that way soon if we continue with the two-party solution to increase our reliance on renewables. Of course the lefties will come back and say we could use more backup batteries to overcome such an event. The reality is the cost of doing that would send this nation bankrupt in no time. It would make the NBN cost look like the cost of buying something at the Reject Shop compared to buying something at the most expensive store at upper 5th Avenue NY.

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        OriginalSteve

        “…..if we continue with the two-party solution to increase our reliance on renewables.”

        Yes and that right thus us why a circuit breaker of say the ACP is so important. We have a duopoly politicallt, but a single party state in real terms. ACP could trash the entrenched powers if Bernardi gets his act together, he could become a force to be reckoned with, assuming the globalists dont put a horse head in his bed…which they could do…

        A lot of pollies should logically be up on t*****n charges right now over the green mess….

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      el gordo

      If Peter Hannam says its a ‘non-story’ then its bound to be true.

      ‘It’s understood the PM’s office did not inform AGL of any Chinese interest and considers the report to be a “non-story”. Nor was the NSW Energy Ministry alerted.’

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    Ian Wilson

    Fantastic interview on the Outsiders Jo! It is so refreshing to hear an educated science journalist talking about the real evidence for climate change. Hopefully, a few more people might open up to the revolutionary idea that that big yellow-white ball in the sky (that comes up over the eastern horizon each morning) might have something to do with climate change.

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  • #
    pat

    read all. Reuters is just breaking this story, but has no details up as yet:

    27 May: RenewEconomy: Giles Parkinson: CWP brings in Partners for 1,300MW of wind, solar and batteries
    Australian renewable energy developer CWP Renewables has joined forces with global private markets investment manager Partners Group to build a total of 1,300MW of wind, solar and battery projects that they say will beat coal power on price and reliability.
    The commitment from Partners Group will see the 135MW Crudine Ridge project south of Mudgee begin construction soon, but Partners will inject a total of $700 million to ensure CWP’s entire 1,300MW portfolio of wind, solar and batteries goes ahead.

    The investment is designed, and timed, to take advantage of the closure of Liddell, and is built on expectations that closures of other coal fired generators will follow.
    “We can, from this large portfolio, produce 24/7 baseload renewable power at very competitive prices,” CWP chief executive Alex Hewitt says. “This is the future of large-scale generation in Australia.

    These projects – dubbed the Grassroots Renewable Energy Platform – include the 230MW Sapphire solar farm and 70MWh battery storage, which will combine with the 270MW Sapphire wind farm near Glenn Innes (pictured above) that is nearly complete.

    It also includes the 140MW Bango wind project, the Glen Ellen and Sundown solar projects, and the massive Uungula wind and the solar project that will total 400MW of capacity, along with other storage.

    Hewitt says these projects will allow morning and evening wind generation to be combined with daytime solar generation and battery energy storage.
    This will provide the ability to deliver “base-load” capacity, or, at the very least, a “firm” supply of energy for business and other customers. The ability to firm is not just essential for business users, but could also be imperative under the new National Energy Guarantee…

    Hewitt points to problems surrounding Liddell, and the decision of its owner AGL to close down the ageing and decrepit generator because the costs exceed alternatives. Hewitt says it is clear renewables and storage can beat coal generation.
    “The cost of these coal plants is becoming way too expensive to continue running, but we are constantly amazed how far solar is falling, and wind is also dropping, and now we have storage,” he says…

    Hewitt says the combined cost of wind and solar and “firming capacity” is cheaper than the $100/MWh plus cost of keeping Liddell open, or for that matter building new coal generators.
    “We applaud AGL’s stance (to close Liddell) against government pressure. One way or another that amount of generation will be replaced,” he says, noting also that CWP and Partner Group’s own portfolio amounts to 50 per cent of that capacity.
    “These projects will help with the transition away from fossil-fuelled electricity in the State,” and Hewitt suggests that other coal-fired generators in the state were also likely to close earlier than previously flagged…

    The Crudine Ridge project has landed a $133 million debt facility provided by the Clean Energy Finance Corporation, Westpac and Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation…
    Partners Group is a global private markets investment management firm with over $100 billion in investment programs under management in private equity, private real estate, private infrastructure and private debt.
    https://reneweconomy.com.au/cwp-brings-in-partners-for-1300mw-of-wind-solar-and-batteries-66935/

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    • #
      Kinky Keith

      Pat,

      It all sounds so convincing; that now, renewables are cheaper.

      Then the unstated rider comes back to memory: only as long as the cost penalty on coal fired is maintained to keep the price very very high.

      KK

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      • #
        pat

        yes, it all relies on killing coal. hard to find stuff on Partners Group, but this tells us something:

        Sept 2015: SMH: Carrie LaFrenz: Swiss, Canadian capital search for renewable energy investments
        Swiss private investment firm Partners Group AG and one of Canada’s largest pension funds, OPSEU Pension Trust , are eyeing further investments in renewable energy projects in Australia citing a stable investment climate and bipartisan support for the renewable energy target.

        Partners Group – which was started by three former Goldman Sachs bankers in 1996 and has been operating in Australia for seven years with a fairly low profile – would like to complete one to two local deals a year, deploying up to $300 million a year. The company has €1 billion of dry powder that it can access for direct infrastructure investments globally…
        “While we stay away from [large privatisations]… we still believe there are very attractive opportunities in infrastructure in Australia,” said Benjamin Haan, Partners head of private infrastructure Asia-Pacific…

        Partners Group, which manages €42 billion ($70 billion) of assets, and Canada’s OPSEU Pension Trust (OPTrust), were part of a global consortium that recently won the right to build and operate a $450 million wind farm in Ararat, Victoria, the third-biggest in Australia…

        “The market in Australia, it is over-supplied in terms of power generation, but there are significant retirements of coal-fired generation expected over the coming years. Wind is now is the cheapest way to generate power. The amount of renewables needs to double over next five years if we are going to meet this target that we have bipartisan agreement on. We hope it will last and even improve…

        ***In Asia, it’s largest investment was a $220 million solar platform in Japan.
        OPTrust, which manages $C16 billion on behalf of the Ontario Public Service Employees Union, echos Mr Haan’s interest in renewables…
        https://www.smh.com.au/business/swiss-canadian-capital-search-for-renewable-energy-investments-20150910-gjjivp.html

        ***30 Jan 2018: RenewablesNow: Partners Group sells stake in 610-MW Japanese solar platform
        Swiss investment manager Partners Group AG said on Monday that it has sold to a consortium led by Global Infrastructure Partners (GIP) its stake in Japan Solar LP, owner of a 610-MW solar platform.
        The value of the transaction was not disclosed, but the seller said it has generated a blended gross return of 3.2 times the original investment.
        “The successful sale of our stake in Japan Solar ahead of our original exit timeline provides an attractive return to our clients and endorses our strategy of platform-building in markets supported by transformative trends,” said Benjamin Haan, Partner, Head of Private Infrastructure Asia, Partners Group.

        In early 2014, Partners Group and Equis Funds Group announced they had led a USD-250-million (EUR 203m) equity investment for Japan Solar, with plans to develop utility-scale projects with long-term power purchase agreements (PPAs) under Japan’s feed-in tariff (FiT) programme. The Swiss investment manager then made a further equity investment into the platform, thus becoming its largest shareholder.
        Partners Group noted that, at the time of signing the stake sale agreement, Japan Solar’s portfolio included 27 secured projects with a combined capacity exceeding 610 MW. More than 200 MW of this was operational and contracted into long-term PPAs with Japanese electric utility companies.

        Earlier this month, Partners Group also sold its stake in US solar power firm Silicon Ranch Corporation to Shell.
        https://www.renewablesnow.com/news/partners-group-sells-stake-in-610-mw-japanese-solar-platform-599861/

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      • #
        PeterS

        According to the left in both parties electricity is going to get cheaper with renewables. At least they are consistent; everything is up-side-down back-to-front in the world of the left, very much like Orwellian speak. I just wonder how long this can go on for before the people wake up to what’s going on. I suspect not until it’s too late but let’s wait and see first at the next bi-elections then at the next federal election. I am waiting that long before making my final decision as to whether Australians are as dumb as they appear to be or they are actually as smart as some say they are.

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        • #
          pat

          PeterS -

          the more I think about CAGW, the more I think it is Enron on steroids – an attempt to corner the world energy market:

          May 2014: Ritzholts.com: Enron 2.0: Energy Prices Manipulated
          Wall Street Manipulates Energy Prices … and Every Other Market
          (Barry L. Ritholtz is the co-founder and chief investment officer of Ritholtz Wealth Management LLC)
          The U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission says that JP Morgan has massively manipulated energy markets in California and the Midwest, obtaining tens of millions of dollars in overpayments from grid operators between September 2010 and June 2011.
          Pulitzer prize-winning reporter David Cay Johnston notes today that Wall Street is trying to launch Enron 2.0:

          (excerpts) The price of electricity would soar under the latest scheme by Wall Street financial engineers to game the electricity markets.
          If regulators side with Wall Street — and indications are that they will — expect the cost of electricity to rise from Maine to California as others duplicate this scheme to manipulate the markets, as Enron did on the West Coast 14 years ago, before the electricity-trading company collapsed under allegations of accounting fraud and corruption.

          The test case is playing out in New England. Energy Capital Partners, an investment group that uses tax-avoiding offshore investing techniques and has deep ties to Goldman Sachs, paid $650 million last year to acquire three generating plant complexes, including the second largest electric power plant in New England, Brayton Point in Massachusetts.

          Five weeks after the deal closed, Energy partners moved to shutter Brayton Point. Why would anyone spend hundreds of millions of dollars to buy the second largest electric power plant in New England and then quickly take steps to shut it down?

          Energy partners says in regulatory filings that the plant is so old and prone to breakdowns that it is not worth operating, raising the question of why such sophisticated energy-industry investors bought it.

          The real answer is simple: Under the rules of the electricity markets, the best way to earn huge profits is by reducing the supply of power. That creates a shortage during peak demand periods, such as hot summer evenings and cold winter days, causing prices to rise. Under the rules of the electricity markets, even a tiny shortfall between the available supply of electricity and the demand from customers results in enormous price spikes…READ ON
          http://ritholtz.com/2014/05/enron-2-0-energy-prices-manipulated/

          sounds a bit familiar, doesn’t it? with all the buying & selling of “renewables” that goes on, who knows who will own what when the sh*t hits the fan?

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      • #
        Ian1946

        Renew economy completely divorced from reality as always.

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        • #
          PeterS

          Renew? That brings back some memories of the old sci-fi movie Logan’s Run. Relevant part of the script:

          Hysterical…starting to chant…
          CROWD
          Renew!
          The man continues to strain:
          CROWD
          Renew!
          CLOSE ANGLE – THE MAN

          Almost a blur…but still straining:
          CROWD’S CHANT
          Renew!
          CLOSE ON – LOGAN AND FRANCIS
          LOGAN AND FRANCIS
          (chanting with the rest)
          Renew!
          etc.

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    • #
      Chad

      If thy believe 1300 MW of Wind, Solr, and Battery can provide “firm supply” …..then they have not bothered to even casually review the situation in SA.
      Somewhere there is a financial game being played, at our expence !

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    pat

    27 May: SouthChinaMorningPost: Eric Ng: Cross-strait risks cannot be ignored, insurer warns offshore wind farm firms chasing lucrative Taiwan projects
    Heightened geopolitical tensions in the Taiwan Strait, the narrow sea channel between Taiwan and mainland China that has become an offshore wind farms investment hotspot, has raised concerns on the adequacy of insurance coverage for the sector, according to an insurer focused on renewable energy.

    International developers – mainly European – have flocked to grab a share of lucrative wind farm development rights recently awarded on projects mainly in the seas west and northwest of the island, lured by excellent wind resources and high guaranteed long-term power prices.
    “The prevailing attitude is one where they are almost discounting the likelihood of that risk because they are treating the Taiwan Strait as if it is the North Sea or the Baltic Sea,” said Jatin Sharma, the president of California-based GCube Insurance Services, which focuses on insuring renewable energy projects, in an interview with the South China Morning Post.
    “The current political climate would dictate they should be exploring financial ways to protect their investments.”

    At stake is the security of wind farms worth at least US$22 billion that are expected to be built in the next five to seven years, which face war and asset expropriation risk, he said…

    Other risks facing Taiwan’s projects include higher typhoon and earthquake occurrence and an undeveloped wind farm installation domestic supply chain, which meant their premiums are at least a third higher than similar projects in Europe, he noted…

    CHART: Global cumulative offshore wind capacity…

    Taipei is targeting offshore wind capacity to reach 5,500 MW by 2025 from 8 MW last year, making it one of the world’s investment hotspots. Some 18,814 MW were installed globally at the end of last year.

    European developers, which have already built up a cost-competitive supply chain in their home markets, consider Taiwan an attractive nascent market where guaranteed power prices are among the highest in the world – around triple those in Europe’s largest wind power markets where profit margins have been squeezed by falling prices due to competitive bidding…

    Returns on both onshore and offshore projects on the mainland are expected to fall as Beijing last week said all new projects will be subject to competitive bidding from next year, in which price is the biggest factor for project awards.
    http://www.scmp.com/business/article/2147998/cross-strait-risks-cannot-be-ignored-insurer-warns-offshore-wind-farm-firms

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    pat

    reply to PeterS in moderation re: May 2014: Ritzholts.com: Enron 2.0: Energy Prices Manipulated

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    robert rosicka

    Not really OT just heard on ABC radio the comment that power prices have soared 65% over the last ten years and it would be great to see a graph of that time frame showing price increase and renewable increase to see how they correlate together .
    Of course correlation doesn’t link to causation necessarily.

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    Another Ian

    Hopefully these questions will take less time to arrive here

    “Asking the Right Questions: According to P. Gosselin who translates reports in German, after 20 years, some in Germany are asking the right questions regarding the problem of storing and transporting solar and wind energy. When the systems produce, there is an excess of electricity, but when they don’t, there is a shortage. According to Gosselin: Dr. Björn Peters wrote a summary of a meeting attended by political and industry leaders on Germany’s energy future that featured surprising realism.

    It is only now, after the construction of over 100 gigawatts of power generation capacity, that the realization is beginning to take hold that the expansion of ambient energies is not getting us closer to the purpose of replacing chemical energy sources.

    The technological components of an energy supply system based on sun and wind first need to be developed. Just the development of suitable power storage cells for bridging windless and sunless periods still requires many decades.”

    “the sticking point is that it is only the weather-dependent ambient energies that can be expanded greatly, but they have neither the quantity nor the consistency to meet the requirements for a steady and affordable power supply.”

    “Peters summarized:

    “In total there was the impression that the numerous unanswered questions of the ‘Energiewende’ have finally dawned on the energy sector. While only a few years ago hope for rapid solutions to the technical challenges was high at the industry conferences, the degree of realism that has since spread is hard to surpass today. Not only are solution[s] to the know[n] problems being sought, but the industry representatives and policymakers are finally beginning to ask the right questions regarding technical concepts, costs and economic impacts.’”

    [Boldface in original] (My boldface here if preview was right)

    Until a suitable technology is commercial available to store electricity, making the problem EU-wide, does not solve the problem, but only expands it. See links under Questioning European Green.”

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2018/05/27/weekly-climate-and-energy-news-roundup-317/

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    Ian1946

    Yet another good article from stop these things. Will the polititions and MSM ever discover reality and end this madness before we destroy the economy.

    https://stopthesethings.com/2018/05/28/looking-for-reasons-why-wind-power-can-never-work-heres-the-top-21/

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    • #
      Lionell Griffith

      Some people say they know because they believe. Others believe because they actually know.

      Unfortunately, the believer group try to make the knowing group pay for the mistakes caused by the believed things that are false. It is founded on the believe that simply believing is enough. Interestingly, reality doesn’t care what you believe, It goes on being what it is dealing out rewards and punishment for actions taken without regard to race, religion, ethnicity, disability, or sexual orientation.

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    StephenP

    An interesting sideshow in Brazil shows how much we depend on fossil fuels, where a truckers strike has almost brought the country to its knees.
    The truckers were objecting to the high cost of diesel fuel, and set up blockades to stop deliveries of all sorts throughout Brazil.
    The president of Brazil has reduced the price of diesel in an attempt to get the drivers to stop their strike action.

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      Another Ian

      Trucking is particularly important in Brasil. A country about a million sq km larger than Australia with negligible railways. The communication system (IIRC built since about the 1960′s) depends on bitumen roads and diesel trucks.

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    Kinky Keith

    Today’s newspaper had a comment that didn’t surprise me with respect to it’s content.

    The item was about AGL.

    It seems that wife of a prominent politician has been engaged as a consultant by AGL.

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    • #
      robert rosicka

      Should come as no surprise to anyone really it’s just the sort of thing that Trump campaigned on and what he meant by draining the swamp .
      How this is meant to be anything other than a favour for a favourable decision?

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      • #
        Kinky Keith

        Are we allowed to make that sort of deduction here Robert?

        I’m almost certain that there is no connection between that bit of news and the other recently discovered facts that U.S. eco activists have found their way to the top of the food chain, or very close to it, at both AGL and James Cook University.

        Positions like those were once seen as a reward for effort and competence.

        A member of the public yesterday observed in a newspaper options column, that two senior members of the Federal government had expressed concern about the recent events at JCU and that the head of that institution should now do the honorable thing and resign.

        Our President, sorry, make that Prime Minister, is a humble, caring person and always has our best interests at heart.

        Politicians are expected to reciprocate the trust invested in them by the voting public, but looking at our situation from that perspective it is becoming more evident that we, the voters, have made some serious errors in judgement.

        Mitigating climate change™ is a costly business.

        For the taxpayers.

        KK

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    Kinky Keith

    Today’s newspaper had a comment that didn’t surprise me with respect to it’s content.

    The item was about AGL.

    It seems that wife of a prominent politician has been engaged as a consultant by AGL.

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  • #

    The interview was great, gratulations Mr. Nova!

    But the title is wrong and we should always point that out: there is lots of evidence of climate change, climate change is the norm. There is no evidence of catastrophic anthropogenic climate change!

    Regards, Freddie from the Swiss mountains

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    • #
    • #

      Yeah, good point there, Freddie. The climate industry thrives on sloppy and useless terminology like “global warming” and “climate change”. As if the globe doesn’t warm and climate doesn’t change! The cataclysmic changes in just one millennium after 9,500 BC – the climate change that dares not speak its name in these priest-ridden times – is proof enough.

      No matter how much they pretend to scientific rigour, they love these slack terms, presumably because they can retreat through a back door left cunningly ajar. They can always say “regardless of what is causing climate change, nobody can deny etc…”. But they can also exploit the emotional charge which has been given to the terms through constant repetition and media conditioning.

      As I’ve recently experienced, climate activists in academia and media tend to be conceited mediocrities who’ve found a purpose. They rely heavily on verbal stunts, among other stunts. I say starve them of their slack terminology and get them to define every time.

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      Rod Stuart

      Please provide the name of a region, for example, whose Koppen-Geiger classification has permanently changed in the last hundred years. I am interested in the “lots of evidence” that climate, a REGIONAL parameter, has change recently.

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        That kind of change, Koppen-Geiger classification, in one century is a bit of an ask. I guess that could happen at the start of an interglacial (the Eemian and this present one came on very suddenly), but otherwise I reckon you are looking at millennia.

        However (since we have a Swiss visitor) there have been interesting studies of chilling and lack of flooding in Switzerland during what we loosely regard as the pointy end of the LIA. The 1690s brought a big freeze to Europe and Switzerland, but while the snows over London were thick (most known) glaciers did not advance in Switzerland because winters were so dry. But, my, how those lakes froze. All this was in strong contrast to much of the 1500s for example. And one reason there was so much tourism and mountaineering in the latter part of the 19th century was the warmer and drier summers in Switzerland as the LIA drew down.

        These (simplified by me) accounts of change are visible after a few centuries. However, if you had tried to deduce Swiss climate from a few decades there would be too many contradictions (eg glacial retreat and more frequent warm summers from the 1630s to 1680s). Of course, nowadays we have a bizarre cult that soothsays the long trend of future climate just from conditions of 1979 to the present. Somehow we have to send those bizarros back to the basement.

        But I do get Fred’s point and reckon it was a point worth making.

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        irrelevant to the fact that it is always changing.

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          Beyond cryptic. Incomprehensible remark.

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            Kinky Keith

            There’s never any discernible point.

            This is the new “sub_critical” intellectualism on which academic verbalese thrives.

            The art is in filling a page without saying anything.

            I’ve known writers who write for both Labore and Liberal and to aid economy simply add a different introductory paragraph and conclusion while using the same 400 words of verbalese as padding.

            Nobody reads the padding.

            KK

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          My apologies, Gee Aye. I think I now get your meaning, namely that climate is always changing and that a change of Koppen class is not the only form of substantial and recognisable change. If that was your meaning…obviously we agree!

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            we do and you figured out my crypticness.

            I just don’t get people who understand climate change yet say, “hey it has been the same where I live for 50 years therefore the climate is not changing”. Human perceptions are not a good metric.

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            Kinky Keith

            Mosomo,

            I don’t like it when people, who have lived in the same area for the last 50 years say that the weather has changed and that therefore we have Climate Change™.

            You should always give both sides of the story.

            KK

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              it is the same side of the story – human perceptions are not a good metric.

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                Mack

                “Human perceptions are not a good metric”
                I don’t know about that, Gee Aye.
                When I blow on a hot bowl of soup, ie adding more air, I perceive that the liquid cools more quickly.
                When I turn on the fan, then up a notch, adding more air, I perceive that I cool more quickly.
                When I stand outside on a cold day, I perceive wind chill.
                You might think, from all these perceptions, that the atmosphere (air) would cool the Earth’s surface rather than warm it,or keep it warm, eh ?, Gee Aye?
                Aye spy with my little eye, won’t cut it, Gee Aye.

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                Mack

                “Human perceptions are not a good metric”
                I don’t know about that, Gee Aye.
                When I blow on a hot bowl of soup, ie adding more air, I perceive that the liquid cools more quickly.
                When I turn on the fan, then up a notch, adding more air, I perceive that I cool more quickly.
                When I stand outside on a cold day, I perceive wind chill.
                You might think, from all these perceptions, that the atmosphere (air) would cool the Earth’s surface rather than warm it,or keep it warm, eh ?, Gee Aye?
                Aye spy with my little eye, won’t cut it, Gee Aye.

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                fascinating Mack but we are talking about measuring and quantifying things using those perceptions. Just because you perceive something doesn’t mean your measurement of it is useful or accurate and if you don’t perceive something it doesn’t mean that there is nothing to measure (absence of evidence is not necessarily evidence of absence).

                Your tests of my statement are wholly consistent and supportive my meaning.

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                Mack

                “(absence of evidence is not necessarily evidence of absence)”
                Yes, that’s right, Gee Aye….evidence of the absence of a “greenhouse effect” cannot be evident, because, as you loons keep telling us, the evidence is “overwhelming”.
                Say it after me, Gee Aye….
                the evidence is overwhelming
                the evidence is overwhelming
                the evidence is overwhelming
                the evidence is overwhelming
                …..say it often enough and you’ll actually believe it.

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    John

    Over in UK at present saddened by the monstrous windmills that are sprouting up like mushrooms all over the once beautiful landscape. Listened to the podcast of 2 great interviews in bed this am – Stein and Nova. Great work I’m sure Rowan and Ross would be open to give Jo a regular appearance.

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    Melbourne Resident

    Jo great interview. I listened late last night. One point that has been nagging at me since is the bidding process. Several years ago I attended a talk on S.A.P.S. stand alone power systems. It was all good stuff but the economic price for wind power was stated to be about $100 per kilowatt hour. I questioned this and was told that in SA the big wind farms would bid zero to supply. This ensured that they were always taken up. Then as you said in the podcast, everyone got paid the final rate. This therefore depends on the remaining balance being expensive to make a profit. No wonder that they want to kill cheap coal. The economics will have changed since then, but the principles remain the same. There would be a simple solution to this if the regulation changes to a real free market and everyone got paid what they bid.

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      Kinky Keith

      You mean that we should expect politicians to “get real”?

      They don’t make a cent out of what’s happening but as the song says: “that’s what friends are for”.

      KK

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