JoNova

A science presenter, writer, speaker & former TV host; author of The Skeptic's Handbook (over 200,000 copies distributed & available in 15 languages).


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Cricket will be sport hardest hit by climate change “fundamentally changed” by summer rain

Forget the plight of snow skiers who won’t know what snow is – it’s cricket that will be hit hardest.

That’s why the sport must take notice of a report published by Climate Coalition, …

The document names cricket as the sport that will be hardest hit by climate change in England, stating that “wetter winters and more intense summer downpours are disrupting the game at every level”.

God forbid. This is a death spiral:

.. Glamorgan Head of Operations, Dan Cherry, …warned that climate change could “fundamentally change the game”.

“The less cricket we play, the fewer people will watch it, the less they will come to the ground and pay to enter, the less chance there is for young people to be inspired,” said Cherry.

This change, it seems, has already begun.

Wait til you see the evidence:

In international cricket, 27 percent of England’s home one-day internationals since 2000 have been played with reduced overs because of rain delays. The rate of rain-affected matches has more than doubled since 2011, with five percent of matches abandoned completely.

By crikey. That is a six year weather trend. Statistical significance p < 1 ( ± 4 or  6! ).

Hmm. Strange clue here in the first paragraph of this story:

Cricket has always been a sport at the mercy of the weather. In the 1930s, county cricket clubs in England were headed for financial ruin after a succession of wet summers. Twenty years later, persistent rain saw desperate clubs experiment with blankets, rubber mats and suction pumps.

So wet summers happened before, CO2 didn’t do it, and cricket survived. Hmm?

We’re talking about a game that is played from 45 degrees South to 54 degree North limiting it to about 90% of the population on Earth. But hey, it’s not like people play cricket in hot countries like India or Jamaica

Photo top:  Autographed photograph of the English batsmen, Jack Hobbs and Herbert Sutcliffe, 1928. Hobbs and Sutcliffe were the opening batsmen for England in the cricket test match held in Brisbane in 1928. John Oxley Library, State Library of Queensland.

Claiming fans would not buy a ticket,
To support their own team at cricket,
Because rain on the day,
Could have postponed the play,
Is a climate-change real sticky wicket.

–Ruairi

Hope to see you in Sydney the weekend after next!

Jo NovaI’ll be speaking with Ian Plimer at the ATA Friedman18 conference. It’s a great line up of speakers on May 25-27, or come for the Gala dinner. Get a 10% discount with the code Nova18. Bookings close this Sunday.

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Rating: 9.8/10 (47 votes cast)
Cricket will be sport hardest hit by climate change "fundamentally changed" by summer rain, 9.8 out of 10 based on 47 ratings

163 comments to Cricket will be sport hardest hit by climate change “fundamentally changed” by summer rain

  • #

    Since you’ll have already flown ~3,300 km from Perth to Sydney, Jo, it would be great if you could come just a bit further (about another measly 2,100 km) to Christchurch thence up here to sunny Nelson.

    We’ve got good wine, good pies, and I’d surely like to hear you speak.

    So how about it?

    81

    • #

      FijiDave, it’s a scandal that I haven’t been to New Zealand. I’d love to come. …?

      91

    • #
      sophocles

      … if and only if you paid the fare
      … arranged the flights …
      … arranged and paid for the venue … in advance
      … advertised it …
      … booked and paid for accomodation …
      … yadda yadda yadda and so on so forth :-)

      10

      • #
        sophocles

        not you, Jo. Us. :-)

        It could be an opportune time. There’s interest out there but how much is hard to estimate.

        I accidently sat stood through Guy McPherson’s “Abrupt Climate Change” (aka “We’re All Gonna Die!”) free lecture four years ago. It was in an AUT Lecture Theatre which was pretty successfully filled, with even the standing room well taken. However, we got what we paid for: Warmist Clichés and projections of “Disaster To Come”® pulled straight from the IPCC &/or the NYT, Guardian and wherever. Boring, boring and boring.

        The “Clathrate Trigger has been pulled, we were told at the start. I don’t think anybody in the rest of the audience was aware that the methane concentration in the atmosphere is parts per billion , let alone how small a billionth really is, or even what clathrates were. Predictably, McPherson did not so inform, making it sound impressive and scary, charging methane to be a Greenhouse Gas “thirty times stronger than CO2“. At about one four hundredth the concentration of CO2, it’s suddenly not scary any more.

        I don’t think he presented any evidence for any of his assertions nor did there seem to be much quantification of effects, or maybe my attention was elsewhere when he did. I admit to paying more attention to the audience than the speaker and to reading the NZ Socialist Party Manifesto which a little man carrying a battered suitcase was running around handing out. According to that, it was all The Capitalists’ Fault™. Yes, that made better reading than McPherson’s overhead slides and it was funny, too. :-)

        I was so strongly tempted to call McPherson on almost all his assertions but then the lecture would have become pretty badly disjointed. The audience was there to hear him, not me, so I held my tongue to not disappoint them. Rats. Most of the audience were “In Church“—they had that air.

        For all that, the lecture theatre was pretty well filled with maybe about two hundred attendees—I didn’t think to count. The presentation was an evening one. I don’t know how it was advertised nor where/when. Some attendees were obviously students; many of the seated weren’t—they were too well dressed. I attended quite by accident rather than by design.

        The trouble is, McPherson is likely to be right for all the wrong reasons. “Abrupt Climate Change” is coming with the Sun going quiet and the planet’s magnetic field weakening while the magnetic poles migrate with growing speed in preparation to switch. Cosmic Ray measurements are rising rapidly and cloud cover will increase. Space Weather (Solar Wind, and Solar Flares with CMEs) will change and so will the concomitant terrestrial weather. There may be more lower-power cyclones of Cat-1 to Cat-2 and far fewer Cat-3 to Cat5 ones.

        Higher levels of Cosmic Rays will create more cloud cover. Temperatures won’t be going up but down. Storms are heat engines which suck the heat of evaporation out of water vapour and use that energy to drive their winds and the re-condensed water as rain, ice or snow. A cooling climate gives a shorter so more intense temperature gradient, and thus a larger number of storms in the initial stages.

        We have a well documented example of the effects of a Solar Grand Minimum—the Maunder Minimum—and the not-so-grand Dalton Minimum and how they affected the Northern Hemisphere’s weather, food supply and society. (Never forget the Witch Hunts.) We know not what will happen, nor how hard, in the Southern Hemisphere. The Maunder and Dalton Minima effects in the Southern Hemisphere went unrecorded almost entirely, except by some proxies.

        Nor do we know how the Magnetic pole shift with the weakening of the magnetic field will affect us, either. Combine that with the Solar Cycle effects and we’re in deep unknown waters where everything is conjecture. Some conjecture is that cold times will last beyond the end of the 21st century.

        There’s the research from the last couple of years showing CO2 actually slightly cools the atmosphere rather than warming it.

        The spinning disaster of wind generation has to be communicated, too.

        These are all things people need to know so they can understand that the so-called “Greenhouse Gases” and “Greenhouse Effect” are very limited in what impact they have—if any—on the planet and that our pet neighbourhood star (or are we a pet planet?) is in control. It dictates what climate and weather we have, not us.

        So, guys ‘n girls: maybe FijiDave’s suggestion could be taken seriously, and maybe we could set something up for Jo and David? Along with a bit of sight-seeing? :-)

        Now, for some On Topic:
        Don’t forget: Cricket was alive and well and practiced through the 19th Century with Dr. W. G. Grace showing off his batting, bowling and fielding skills from 1864, through the 1870s until his retirement many years later c. 1908. A notable tast match on “Monday, 27 May 1878” (MCC v Australia at Lord’s—won by the Australians :-) ) is of note. 1878 was a “chilly and wet summer” [Wikipedia]. Cricket didn’t die then, and I think cricket will survive as it always has: in spite of the climate not because of it! :-) .

        30

        • #
          sophocles

          You’ll notice I only gave a hint about atmospheric methane content myself. Just for the record it was c. 722 parts per billion (ppb) in pre-industrial times to 1800 parts per billion (1.8 parts per million) by 2014.

          You have to admit it: those are really really … tiny … quantities.

          30

  • #
    Stephen Richards

    I once played club cricket in 47°F in july on the east coast of England. Our spin bowler had six pullovers on. It’s called weather

    111

    • #

      I’d say that six pullovers is more like wether

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      • #

        What’s pullovers got to do with sheep?

        21

      • #
        Annie

        Several wethers needed GA! My husband has so often lost his afternoon’s cricket owing to rain :( It wouldn’t be much change from years and years of rain-cancelled matches and it’s often been pretty cold too.
        Having said that, the weather here in beautiful England atm is delightful. We are ‘oop North’ and admiring all the wild flowers, especially the bluebells. The cow parsley is just coming out and there are horsechestnut trees in full bloom. I can see the fells of the Northern Lakes from where I sit (but some of those birdmincers from where I sit to eat :( ( ).

        51

        • #
          Gee Aye

          thanks Annie… I know oop north very well

          32

          • #
            Annie

            Lots of sheep around too…some look like Texels. This area, Cumbria, is the home of the Herdwick really though. We hope to get over to the Yorkshire Dales and see some of my absolutely favourite sheep, the Swaledale.
            At home we have Dorpers, just a handful.

            10

    • #
      Alan

      Obviously Peter Siddle (and team mates) was wearing his beanie to keep out the rain in this recent game for Essex

      21

    • #
      Anton

      I’m English and we once played on in a snow flurry in our first game of the season. After 7 months of waiting we weren’t going to come off.

      30

  • #
    Yonniestone

    When Cricket gets involved that settles it, climate is over……..

    111

    • #
      OriginalSteve

      These people are idiots. In Blighty it usually rains during summer….a bit extra, so what?

      It means the turf will be a bit lusher. And funny how people like Joel Garner from the Windies is such a good player in a highly humid, heavy rainfall area…..talk about grasping at straws….its just not cricket…

      Try fielding in the Australian heat when its over 100 and you will appreciate a bit less heat and a little more humidity….

      81

      • #
        robert rosicka

        You’re wrong Steve! It never ever used to rain in summer before so this is really serious and it’s just not cricket .

        51

        • #
          WXcycles

          Flim Flam said it would never rain again!

          Now it’s going to rain forever.

          Same causation.

          Spot the inconsistency.

          81

    • #
      Sceptical Sam

      The uncoordinated enviro-nerds wouldn’t know a sticky wicket if they fell over on one.

      41

  • #

    This is serious. Someone in good faith goes to a great deal of trouble to make a frivolous and emotive claim about weather that hasn’t happened yet based on six years of weather that just happened…then Jo Nova checks and finds out that the 1930s and 1950s were similarly affected.

    For God’s sake, Jo Nova. This is 2018 and you are not supposed to check. If checking claims about climate was a good thing, don’t you think media, academia and government would be doing it?

    No more checking, okay?

    281

    • #
      TdeF

      Checking facts, even science like Free Speech is now White Supremacism.

      111

      • #
        OriginalSteve

        Or a microagression…..

        PC – the game no one can win…except the Leftists….where every word is censored and no thoughts are free….

        101

        • #
          PeterS

          Indeed. It can get worse. Thought crime, or perhaps just a thought tax.

          71

          • #
            Sceptical Sam

            Nope. A neurone tax.

            Or better still an IQ tax.

            Make it progressive. The higher the IQ the greater the tax.

            Most of the Progressives will need to access an IQ hand-out in the same way they access current hand-outs. They love a good hand-out. Of course.

            They can’t wait for artificial intelligence to turn up. It suits their culture. They can’t think now and won’t have to then.

            41

            • #
              TdeF

              That exactly matches a quote that you cannot understand US politics until you know Conservatives think Liberals(left) are stupid, while the Liberals think Conservatives are evil. You would agree.

              61

              • #
                Sceptical Sam

                I agree with the first part. Truth will out.

                The second is incorrectly appropriated. It’s no more that leftist projection.

                51

            • #
              WXcycles

              Ah yes, but would a true AI make of them?

              Laugh itself into a thermal runaway?

              Ignore and leave the area immediately?

              Mercy (involuntarily euthanize)?

              Exile (gulag)?

              Reprocess (Soylent Green)?

              Take seriously (all of the above)?

              41

      • #
        rapscallion

        . . . or white Privilege !

        20

    • #

      The thing is, I didn’t even “have to check” — I just quoted their own words.

      ‘Tis a scourge of blindness.

      91

      • #
        OriginalSteve

        There are no so blind as those who refuse to see….

        51

      • #
        Annie

        I wonder if ‘they’ ever stand back, so to speak, and just listen to themselves?! The cringe-worthy nonsense should, should, make them utterly ashamed of themselves. Of course, it doesn’t so they just spout on and bully us for disagreeing.

        21

  • #

    Back in the 1980′s all the tv gardening programmes here in the UK urged us to rip up our herbaceous borders and roses and Lawns, and plant those suitable for a Mediterranean climate, hot and dry.

    Some of our public parks and grand stately home gardens followed suit. Grants were available to tourist businesses, and talks organised, on how to adjust to a much longer and hotter tourist season.

    However in reality, Temperatures have been declining slowly since the start of this century as i noted here

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2018/03/04/the-rise-and-fall-of-central-england-temperatures-help-needed-to-find-missing-data/

    In that we match around one third of the world, that is also cooling.

    Tonyb

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    • #
      William

      What I found particularly interesting at that link Tony, is that Figure 4 shows a bit of correlation to US voting patterns – you just have to swap the colours. The heating must be because of the hot air coming out of the Democrat states.

      42

    • #
      el gordo

      Tony do you think the LIA was a Bond Event?

      41

    • #
      Annie

      They did indeed Tonyb. One strong proponent of the Med/arid style was Beth Chatto of very recent demise.
      Louise Gray of the DT was another who said roses and lots of other flowers, fruit and vegs would be impossible and I wrote back at the time to inform her that all those grow perfectly well in our place in Victoria…there was no response, naturally, it didn’t suit the narrative. We had roses and birch trees that survived the drought and heat in 2009.

      41

    • #
  • #
    TdeF

    Is there no end to the devastation wrought by an increase temperature of half a degree over a hundred years? The impact on cricket is clearly already beyond a disaster. The greatest moral challenge of a generation. Soon the world will be unliveable as humanity tries to adjust to endless drought and very slightly more rain, maybe. Only taxation and open borders and electric cars and the Green party can save us.

    121

    • #
      TdeF

      Climate Change and rain delay desperation leads to total frustration and that leads inevitably to ball tampering. It’s a wonder no one blamed Climate Change. Sage and fully woke leader Kevin Rudd warned us that Climate Change was a moral challenge. We didn’t listen.

      71

    • #
      PeterS

      Look on the bright side. When the music eventually stops we can then hear ourselves think.

      61

  • #

    Well, it’s just not cricket!

    51

    • #
      King Geo

      “It’s just not cricket” - 3 Aussie players were given severe penalties for “ball tampering” in a test match recently.

      “It’s just not cricket” – BOM have been consistently “tampering” with Aussie vintage temp data – waiting for the severe penalties – not holding my breath!!!!

      81

  • #
    kevin george

    “Children just aren’t going to know what snow cricket is,”

    Australia is begging to be colonized again

    101

    • #
      C. Paul Barreira

      Australia is begging to be colonized again.

      Quite so. Only the colonisers won’t play cricket, not in any sense.

      81

      • #
        el gordo

        The children of the new immigrants pick up the game fairly quickly and the Indians don’t need coaching.

        41

      • #
        Latus Dextro

        Australia is begging to be colonized again

        LOL. Not when they discover the colonisers prefer Mahjong. But then, on the other hand, there might be a shared focus around beer?
        Still, those over at The Con won’t have a chance. Frappé coffee won’t be on the menu – ever. Adapt or die.
        Simple.

        21

  • #
    Hanrahan

    What have cricket and climate got in common?

    There is always some sort of record being broken somewhere.

    141

    • #
      Ian Hill

      They both have seven letters.

      I was a cricket umpire for several seasons about ten years ago. I recall having a conversation with a coach of the juniors (Under 16) and we bemoaned the cancellation of a match because the forecast maximum was too hot. Somehow the kids in Alice Springs could cope with such weather. I said it’s only going to get worse in the future and the coach agreed. Didn’t happen.

      61

    • #
      Ian Hill

      If cricket scores were homogenised Bradman’s test average would now be 90.

      101

    • #
      MudCrab

      They both have tampering scandals when people involved weren’t getting the results they wanted?

      51

  • #
    David Maddison

    Did someone get a research grant for this?

    Cricket can be added to this list:

    A (Not Quite) Complete List Of Things Supposedly
    Caused By Global Warming

    http://www.whatreallyhappened.com/WRHARTICLES/globalwarming2.html

    61

  • #
    Timo Soren

    Your children will never know what cricket is!

    81

    • #
      DonK31

      I’m American. We’ve never known what cricket is.

      101

      • #
        William

        Yes Don, you play a version of another English game in the US, Rounders!

        71

      • #
        Don A

        Baseball is a derivation of cricket for people with a short attention span. Anyway the USA does have a half respectable cricket team.

        51

        • #
          beowulf

          Ah yes, 5 day test matches. Riveting stuff. Where the odd seagull invading the pitch and the merciful arrival of the drinks cart are the highlights of the day’s play; where you can actually watch the grass grow from Day 1 to Day 5. How I miss Ritchie’s whiny nasal voice. Bring on more rain or more streakers I say.

          Kerry Packer did wonders. Even my old grandma started watching cricket for the first time ever in 1978 at the age of 67 when “Come on Aussie” was doing the rounds. Finally a game of cricket worth watching, and Kerry’s improvements of 9 cameras plus stump cam, the super-sopper, day/night games, coloured uniforms, coloured balls, helmets and all the rest, brought the game into the 20th century. Big-slogging is so much more entertaining than watching some batsman block 30 consecutive balls before scoring a single. Good stuff. If Kerry can hover the Channel 9 chopper over the pitch to dry it out, why can’t the pommies?

          I can still recall Norman May’s sputtering incoherent apoplexy when it was announced that Packer and not the ABC would have TV broadcasting rights. Had it been left with the ABC we’d still be watching in black and white from 1 camera angle.

          51

      • #
        Hat Rack

        Don”t mean to be argumentative Donk, but I think you’ll find that cricket was reasonably popular in America before baseball took over. IIRC, Presidents John Quincy Adams and Abraham Lincoln were both interested in cricket, but don’t know if they played. First newspaper reports around 1750′s?

        31

  • #

    A bit of water never deterred the Brits. Since 1824 a cricket match was played on the notorious goodwinn sand banks in the english cuannel in Kent for about an hour at extreme low tide

    https://theisleofthanetnews.com/broadcaster-john-snow-and-historian-dan-snow-will-join-a-cricket-match-on-the-goodwin-sands-during-a-three-day-history-festival-in-ramsgate/

    It hasn’t been played for a decade but is being resurrected this year in a couple of weeks time.

    Tonyb

    82

    • #
      Latus Dextro

      Tonyb, one might presume that another inconvenient truth resides around the obvious, namely that the sea level rise hasn’t drowned it out?

      41

  • #
    Another Ian

    Well this projection on cricket might well cause questions like raised here

    “A question that gives pause: If Solar And Wind Are So Cheap, Why Are They Making Electricity So Expensive?”

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2018/05/16/a-question-that-gives-pause-if-solar-and-wind-are-so-cheap-why-are-they-making-electricity-so-expensive/

    81

  • #
    Latus Dextro

    Climatism is always the Trojan horse. The globalist aim is to dismantle societal identity by any means possible. And the bastion of cricket or at least its English heart is no exception. It has endured worse; body line, bouncers, gin slinging selectors, underarm delivery, seam lifters, sledging, death. It may yet survive a parody of gamesmanship precisely because it is so demanding of sportsmanship. It will survive eco-Marxist climatism.

    Now the MSM not only routinely and meaninglessly conflate daily weather with climate change, they line up anyone willing to spout the Alinsky-esque vomitus, which is much of the “liberal” MSM. Previously decrying as unqualified, any commentary that fails to emanate from anything other than the orifice of a UN accredited atmospheric climate scientivist, such opinions and utterances are now enthusiastically embraced, provided they embody the ‘change’ narrative of climatism cult. The groundsman in this article apparently fits the bill.

    So let’s correct an obvious typo in this low wattage puff piece and do a little editorial cautery of cut and paste, removing the ideological dross and uncertain rambling over drainage and finance. Thus, it becomes quite a short piece, supposedly appropriate for the limited attention span of a modern reader, leaving ample column space for more informative writing from the real World.

    ‘What impact is climate change having on cricket?’ 09 May – Cricket – Adam Drury – Beltway Insider abridged

    Cricket has always been a sport at the mercy of the weather.
    That’s why the sport must not take notice of a report published by Climate Coalition, the UK’s largest climate change action group, in February.
    Part of the problem with climate change in England is that it’s not always straightforward to identify. British weather has always been famously unpredictable. They deal with both in Australia, where the temperatures are twice as hot as here. Our new drainage system can take most of the storms we’ve had so far,” he says. “Whatever gets thrown at us, it’s our job to deal with it.

    61

    • #
      TdeF

      It was good to read yesterday the US ambassador to Israel blame the Media for the deaths on the Israel Gaza border. Surely the media know their attention is the real reason so many died? Surely using children with suicide belts might make them think that publicity is the entire motive for organized suicide? The fact is that terror doesn’t work without the full support of a complicit and enthusiastic media. Nor does any war on Western democracies, which exactly describes Climate Change. From Polar bears to coastal erosion to sinking islands to cricket, anarchist journalists and photo journalists love their fake news. It’s how they earn their living.

      111

      • #
        Latus Dextro

        A whole new category of news and weather terminology sanctioned, nay explicitly desired, by the establishment and peddled by the obsequious fourth estate (aka. the ideologically complicit fifth column) has emerged from pure climafiction. Its catastrophising vernacular is as predictable as it is tedious. Day by day more appear to tune out, if only for mental health reasons.

        41

      • #
        Geoffrey Williams

        TdeF,
        I have always agreed with your views on climate change.
        But regarding the situation in Gaza I cannot possibly agree with you. To me the death of so many unarmed Palestinian demonstraters with nothing more than slings & stones rests squarly with the Israeli military and it’s government.
        Regards GeoffW

        21

        • #
          TdeF

          I read that one of your slings and stones protesters shot down a drone with a hidden AK-47.
          The drone was dropping leaflets. Some carried bolt cutters. Who had knives? Sometimes it is not what you are told. It is what you are not told.

          Are you so sure that the lives of the border guards were not at risk and the lives of the people they were defending? A knife is a deadly weapon at close quarters. Slings and stones too. Lethal weapons. This is a tiny place and the declared threat was terrible if Hamas breached the border. Hamas have said that 46 of the 56 deaths were members of Hamas. This a declared terrorist organization who threaten death to all Jews.

          Then where is the explanation from Israel? Where is the video from their side? I have seen nothing and scoured what has been presented for a balanced view. Until then I reserve my judgement but do not resile from the view that this whole awful thing was planned to produce what happened and this was obviously for publicity to vilify Israel. To that extent it worked, at an awful price.

          Again, where can any of us get our facts when the media are only filming on one side of the fence? Literally. It is why I comment on this blog, to contribute my understanding. In the media, we only see what we are meant to see and I try to read between the lines, but I would expect the armed border guards showed enormous restraint and bravery against a huge and lethal force in a planned deadly assault, until someone can demonstrate otherwise.

          30

          • #
            Geoffrey Williams

            I’ve given you a green tick TdeF because you responed with your honest opinion. But we are miles apart on this issue I have to say.
            Will there ever be peace in the Middle East? It has been going on for all my lifetime and so I do not have much hope.
            Regards GeoffW

            10

        • #

          Geoffrey, whilst agreeing with your sentiments, but my experience in Fiji during the 2000 and 2006 coups there taught to treat everything you read in newspapers or see on television as bovine/equine waste. Sometimes you’d never get to the truth. Some of the stuff I heard from the foreign press was invented. Some of the reporters thought that they were the story.

          It never pays to make a judgment from afar based on what you have deduced is happening on information garnered from the MSM. But this appears to be kosher – time will tell I guess.

          30

  • #

    I live well north of Sydney, but cricket is played here just as it is in Sydney. Fewer people now sacrifice summer weekends to cricket than in the last century but the reason cannot be found in wet weather.

    Our rainiest summer was in 1889-90, our rainiest December was in 1970, our rainiest January was in 1895 and our rainiest February was in 1929 (very wet!). As for hottest summers, they occurred between 1910 and 1920 around here. Driest, no surprise, were those summers after 1900, toward the back-end of the Fed Drought.

    Some may be surprised that the big east Australia washout of 1950 did not affect cricket so much, but that’s because the bucketing occurred in cooler months which are normally drier. Moreover, the west of the continent was pretty parched in that freaky year of the unmoving low over Qld and NSW.

    There are other and obvious reasons for reduced participation in weekend sports since last century and before. But to find these reasons would require the exercise of reflection and commonsense, albeit very brief. Not going to happen in 2018. Our temple priests, soothsayers, shamans and theologians have warned against encouraging that sort of thing.

    91

  • #
    TedM

    So climate change can make what happened before, happen again. Will there be no end to the devious machinations of the CO2 phenomenon?

    101

  • #
    Ruairi

    Claiming fans would not buy a ticket,
    To support their own team at cricket,
    Because rain on the day,
    Could have postponed the play,
    Is a climate-change real sticky wicket.

    71

  • #
    tylos

    One day internationals have become the third-rate version of the game since the introduction of T20 about 2010. The season will now favour Tests and T20s during the best weeks of the year to capitalise on their popularity, whilst ODI are relegated to the start or end of the playing calendar – thus where rain interruptions are more likely.
    Pi55 poor science, that.

    31

  • #
    Eddie

    Cricket fans don’t know they’re born. When rain stops play at Wimbledon Cliff Richard is likely to pop up & lead a sing-song.

    41

  • #
    Eddie

    England gave cricket to the hotter countries & regularly gets thrashed by them. Seems they could use a bit of warming for themselves.

    41

  • #
    Another Ian

    Being as we are in an area where your choice is

    - Cricket on ABC

    - Allan Jones

    - That well known station OFF

    So! No cricket AND rain – what’s not to like?

    But no doubt the rain will be “elsewhere”

    61

  • #
    Kinky Keith

    Used to play cricket in the backyard with some of the other local kids.

    Also watched my grandfather playing in a comp game for a quarter of an hour one Saturday afternoon.

    Apart from that my involvement with cricket consisted of walking past games in progress on the way to the beach for a body surf.

    Fancy us humans having to face up to the weather every day.

    Life can be harsh.

    KK

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    Hanrahan

    Even without an “Unthreaded” this story is too good to miss.

    From a blog “What does it mean”.
    May 15, 2018

    Bombshell Report Reveals President Putin Presented Special Counsel Robert Mueller With “Hero Of The Russian Federation” Medal

    Just when one thought that there was nothing left to boggle the mind in the ever-changing Trump-Russia collusion fairytale that’s embroiled the entire American political system for over the past year, a bombshell new Security Council (SC) report circulating in the Kremlin today reveals that, in May-2013, President Putin personally awarded to then FBI Director Robert Mueller the “Hero Of The Russian Federation” medal, which is the highest medal Russia can bestow—and was presented to Mueller in recognition of his strengthening Russian-United States intelligence and security cooperation by his personally involving, at great personal risk to himself, Russian-Jewish billionaire Oleg Deripaska in a highly classified mission to free a captured FBI agent named Robert Levinson.

    I have been hearing about this chap Levinson, a 30 yr veteran of the FBI, for a couple of days now. He was captured by Iran in 2007 while working undercover for FBI/CIA/Whomever and his task must have been very dark because the US has made no effort to have him returned, quite the opposite. This guy Deripaska had his jet on the tarmac in Iran and all that was needed for his release was for Clinton, as SoS, to take a statement absolving Iran and she refused and it was aborted. His very existence is an embarrassment. The US pretends to have a motto: “No man left behind”. Humbug!

    It is too long to cut’n paste but too important to pick out bits. This is not some individual’s ramblings, the blogosphere is full of it. Read it all at:

    http://www.whatdoesitmean.com/index2562.htm

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  • #
  • #

    Well, it is about cricket.

    The gentleman on the left in that image is Jack Hobbs, arguably the greatest batsman the game has known, Don Bradman notwithstanding.

    In a day and age when players struggle to remain good enough at the game in their early 30′s, Jack Hobbs played First Class Cricket until he was 52 years old, and was still batting well enough to hold his place in the team, Surrey, in English County Cricket.

    Perhaps the pinnacle of cricket is to score 100 First Class Centuries, and the only way you can do that is to play English County Cricket, (for a very long time) except for one, Sir Donald. There are only 25 batsmen in the history of the game to achieve this amazing feat. Of that total, only four of them are not English, and other than Bradman, the other three non English players, (Viv, Zaheer, and Glenn Turner) all had lengthy County Cricket careers.

    Just to get on that select list is an achievement, and even since the turn of this Century, only three names have been added.

    Far and away at the top of that list is Jack Hobbs, from that image above, and he scored 199 First Class Centuries. He also has the highest number of first class runs in the game, (61,000 Plus) another record which will never even be approached, even using binoculars.

    Those days are gone forever, over a long time ago.

    Tony.

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    • #

      I say Dravid was the greatest. To pull off what he did with Laxman at Eden Gardens in 2000 against the best (McGrath-Warne!) means he was either the greatest or in league with demons. Nobody does that…but the Wall did it.

      Also, I just like him.

      41

      • #
        toorightmate

        Dravid’s knock will never be emulated BECAUSE rain will continually stop play.
        Don’t you read the latest research my good man?

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  • #
    Peter O'Brien

    Cricket is not the victim. Cricket is the problem:

    http://catallaxyfiles.com/2015/05/16/guest-post-global-warming-a-parody/

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  • #
    PeterS

    What impact does climate change have on cricket? Come back in several centuries and we will find out. Meanwhile weather always changes even within the same day.

    41

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      toorightmate

      We must start taxing cricket.
      A cricket tax.
      It makes more sense to me than a carbon tax.

      31

      • #
        bobl

        Don’t give them ideas, they’l be asking us to buy compulsory STCs (Sustainability Toll for Cricket) which will subsidise cricket by making those that don’t believe that cricket can be played sustainably and therefor enjoy other sports to pay for their dream of renewable cricketers. After all the current edition of cricketer wear out very quickly and emit scads of evil CO2.

        41

    • #
      WXcycles

      People are not worried about rubbish weather affecting the cricket, or else the Melbourne Cricket Ground would never have been built.

      QED

      51

      • #
        Annie

        We were given tickets to the Boxing Day test one year. Good seats. By the time we reached Richmond station the rain was bucketing down, absolutely torrential. There was no point leaving the station! Caught the next train home, turned on the heating (yes, it was cold too!) and ate our picnic lunch. Play started at about 4pm and we went back to the MCG, by which time our good seat tickets were unnecessary and we could sit anywhere we wished. Hmmm.

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  • #
    Ross

    O/T but could someone please explain what this guy is talking about when he says

    “The Tesla big battery in South Australia has already taken a 55 per cent share in the state’s frequency and ancillary services market, and lowered prices in that market by 90 per cent, new data has shown.” What does he mean when he says “frequency and ancillary market”?

    https://climatecrocks.com/2018/05/16/teslas-giant-battery-saving-consumers-huge-dollars-gas-turbines-in-trouble/

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    • #
      RickWill

      This is a good explanation of the ancillary services market in AEMO:
      https://www.aemo.com.au/-/media/Files/PDF/Guide-to-Ancillary-Services-in-the-National-Electricity-Market.pdf

      The Samsung/Tesla battery can respond in the order of milliseconds to changes in voltage and frequency to the limit of its capacity, which is 120MW load and I think 120MW demand (although I am not certain about its demand capability). Of course to be able to supply its needs some stored and to be able to absorb it needs to be less than fully charged. On load levelling duty it normally operates at 30MW so that leads about 90MW available for FCAS market.

      As an example consider the situation where 30 x 3MW wind turbines are running at 50% output then a wind front takes them to 100% and their protection shuts them down to prevent damage. Their contribution over a matter of seconds could be from 45MW generation, to 90MW generation to zero generation. The battery could be connected but just voltage following before the front. It sees rising voltage so it kicks in to absorb the sudden excess of 45MW then when the wind generators trip it goes to supplying 90MW.

      It does not need to operate for very long because other plant can ramp up or down in minutes.

      Historically the FCAS market has been inherent in the high inertia generators but as more low inertia wind and solar generators get connected the FCAS market is becoming more important. Batteries and their electronics can respond very fast to load swings. If there were 10 or so similar batteries around the grid they could handle most frequency and voltage disturbances.

      If South Australian businesses and households continue to instal rooftop solar at the present pace there will be a growing need for storage in the state. Some households are already having their solar constrained by local over voltage due to the level of solar installations in the area. Not much point owning solar if it ends up shut down at its peak output period because the grid cannot absorb the output.

      41

  • #
    • #

      Patronising slop from our Green Betters at the woeful Conversation. Surely not even the Guardian, Age or ABC can be this smug…although the day is still young.

      71

      • #

        thanks for your clear answer to my question

        22

        • #

          Thank you for such a clear question.

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          • #

            OK. I’ll spell it out. Open the link and search for “Ecout” read what the anonymous person wrote and how they wrote it and see if you agree with my assessment of the possible author.

            22

            • #
              Mark D.

              So GY in reading your link, once I read the word “denier” I stopped reading and jumped to the conclusion that you are completely without bias.

              51

              • #

                just read the one bit! I never said read the article.

                23

              • #
                robert rosicka

                Not his lordship Ben ,not even close .

                I’m the real Ecoute Savauge and so is my wife !

                11

              • #
                Gee Aye

                and me. I’m Ecoute too

                10

              • #
                Gee Aye

                who is Ben though?

                20

              • #
                robert rosicka

                Ben Marshall and you have a lot in common , namely your signature move of distraction without adding anything useful except mindless drivel preprogrammed by your green master .

                Aka

                “As far as I can make out, you’re in the second category. Has the overwhelming evidence, and consensus about that evidence, from hundreds of scientific institutions, and thousands of scientists, from all around the planet, over many decades, shifted your position an inch?”

                This sort of blind faith is similar to your “pastes” whereas the great Lord Moncton has next to nothing in common with what you think is his hand .
                His style would be equations most likely some Latin and heavy on detail .

                20

              • #

                Latin will solve the problem and win the argument.

                10

            • #
              Dave

              Got it!

              I think you’re wrong on this Geeaye!

              I reckon it’s a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA person!

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              • #
                Gee Aye

                why? because what he or she wrote was pretentious rubbish?

                21

              • #
                robert rosicka

                You would know all about pretentious rubbish because you’re a master at writing ,eerrrrrrrr pasting it .

                10

              • #

                pretentious? Moi?

                20

              • #
                robert rosicka

                Do I need to cut and paste from that blog of yours to prove it leaf ?
                So does that mean you are Ben does it ?
                I can understand people not using their real name if connected with the other side of the argument say for work etc but when all you ever do is troll its perfectly understandable why you won’t use your real name .
                It just means you have no convictions , no shame , are easily brainwashed and while you may be the full six pack you lack the plastic thingy that holds it all together .

                10

              • #
              • #
                robert rosicka

                Don’t suppose you would care to correct “Ecoute’s” post , claim for claim showing us where he was wrong in your own words but put links at the bottom so we can check .
                Only evidence that I can see that elevated Co2 levels do anything at all is increased food production and greening deserts .

                10

              • #

                only if he puts up his evidence claim for claim with links, otherwise it is a bit hard to know what he is meaning specifically. That is the main problem with his post btw. Did you understand it?

                10

              • #

                his or her I mean

                00

              • #
                robert rosicka

                Reread his post but this time put your coke bottle glasses on or get an adult to splain it slowly , plenty there for you to counter .
                He is clearly saying there are too many variables involved in trying to predict / model the outcome which is an honest assessment.
                Or is this just you banging on about how models save our lives everyday again and anyone who dares to say otherwise needs to be distracted .
                You have what he said it’s clear enough even to me so counter it and show how he is wrong .
                He is basically saying computers cannot predict anything accurately with out using all the variables and he is right the computers can’t even model past let alone future it’s nothing more than a WAG .
                And if these computers were so good why can’t they predict the winner of a horse race which has far less variables than the climate after all .
                Rubbish is all you have and an ideology tied to faith that the sky is falling and nothing can or will change that .
                If we went into a 100 year iceage tomorrow your side would blame Co2 and if we went into a 100 year drought same thing or 100 year flood same again there is nothing that cant be blamed on Co2 as long as you have faith .
                Faith and no ability to prove your faith is real , no repeatable experiments needed for your side just words like may , could , research suggests etc etc to infinity and beyond .

                10

              • #

                thanks for the rhetoric rr.

                10

              • #
                robert rosicka

                No worries and in return one day I’ll teach you how to count to 14 which shouldn’t be too hard but teaching you that 8.3 is a bigger number than 6.9 might be impossible I fear .

                10

    • #
      Mark M

      Now that’s irony.
      The conversation, in one of their endless articles about climate communication with deniers defiers of their doomsday global warming cult, ponder why they fail, only to moderate out any comment posted by a denier defier.

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      • #

        The worst part is how they decorate their low-grade drek with university crests and government/corporate logos. I could live with the fact that they bilk tax money and eat-us-last corporate bribes to propagandise in such a blatant way. It’s the windy self-importance that gets to me.

        It’s like they imagine we all live in fear of a patronising smirk from Brian Cox or DeGrasse-Tyson. News flash, Conversation: It’s nearly over for your snobby little echo chamber. There is an actual conversation going on, and it’s not yours.

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      • #

        once you’ve finished being offended, what about my question?

        21

        • #

          I’m not offended, just nauseated. Doesn’t that come across? I’ll try not to miss next time.

          As for your question: ““Ecoute Sauvage” His Lordship CM?”…I have no answer, though French is a second language I’ve spoken most of my life. There you have the better of me. If I spent more time working out the sense of your question I might grasp it. But I won’t be spending the time, since it involves wading again into that putrid swamp of smugness called the Conversation.

          On a brighter note, I gave you a green thumb for “six pullovers is more like wether”.

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          • #

            thanks for the thumb… you only have to read one comment by someone who disagrees with the premise of the article. Unless you are literally nauseous even when not reading the other comments.

            Single phrases are easily translated online too… and it fits with my assessment.

            21

            • #

              Okay, I searched the comments while holding my nose. It was Monckton, or someone mimicking Monckton?

              More importantly, the author of the article stands out, even in the ranks of the Conversation, as a smug, patronising, pious twerp. He suggests persuading conservatives by appealing to their hard natures and god-bothering. Bratty little Holocene denier wouldn’t know a conservative if one was floating in his morning soycino.

              Where do they find these preening fops?

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    • #
      el gordo

      ‘…we have nonetheless failed to sell the truth.’

      That’s because its only the troof, CO2 doesn’t cause global warming.

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    • #
      manalive

      Jamie Freestone PhD student in literature at U of Q uses “denier/denial” 6 times, “narrative” 11 times and “climate change” 22 times, incessant repetition of spin words inducing an effect similar to semantic satiation where the reader or listener perceives them as meaningless mantra.

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    ROM

    Unlike the climate change catastrophists who never let an chance go by without predicting the future of their invariably perverted version of climate change end times, I too will now make a prediction that unlike the predictions of the climate change catastrophists, is 100% guaranteed to be accurate!
    .

    Assorted climate activists, PhD endowed but primarily ignorant academic hack jobs operating in areas of Earth knowledge they have Zero knowledge of and assorted eco-nazi deep greens and climate catastrophists, all with a real world knowledge index of Zero, WILL CONTINUE TO MAKE PREDICTIONS that are so bad that they are not even “wrong”.

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    robert rosicka

    First the polar bears now the poor little crickets ,where will it end ?

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    Mark M

    ICYMI:
    Alan Jones interviews Josh Frydenberg today:

    Jones vs Frydenberg: ‘You’re as green as the Labor Party and the Greens!’

    https://www.2gb.com/jones-vs-frydenberg-youre-as-green-as-the-labor-party-and-the-greens/

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    • #
      Hanrahan

      Jones is hopeless. No one should ever talk to him. This interview is meaningless.

      Pumped storage does not live or die on the base cost of power, it depends on the arbitrage between that base and the marginal cost and as we go towards 50% unreliable that arbitrage will grow larger. None of us know the real costs but this may become essential the way our politicians are going. Norway finds it a nice little earner.

      And Josh makes a point, it is a 100 yr plus scheme. [The costs of replacing turbines after 25 yrs pales in comparison with the civil works.]

      31

    • #
      robert rosicka

      Certainly stuck it to him and no real answer except for Josh repeating the mantra about lower cost of renewables and Allan’s nostalgia for coal .
      It’s not nostalgia it’s a fact on a level playing field coal is king .

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  • #
    neil

    I visited the UK in 2003 & 2004 in the middle of summer for about a week each time, and it rained every day. Not torrential all day but there was some rain every day, even on the day that recorded 100F in London for the first time since records started. So what’s going to change? And unlike the whimpy umpiring we get here the English often play through the rain.

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    pat

    what I do know is spectators – and even some night match players – were rugged up at the Madrid tennis last week, and spectators and officials at the Rome tennis this week are even more rugged up.

    meanwhile, the cricketers in Dublin for Ireland’s first test match vs. Pakistan (Ireland lost) which just ended were wearing sweaters, plus lost a day due to rain. no doubt May will be declared Europe’s hottest ever in due course.

    14 May: UK Telegraph: Winter returns to the Alps as resorts prepare for more than a metre of fresh snow
    By Lucy Aspden, Online Ski Editor
    This morning Val d’Isère posted pictures of its village, which sits at 1,850m, covered in a thick layer of snow, a reported 30cm, and the forecast suggests it’s not over yet.
    The popular French resort, which shares its ski area with neighbouring Tignes, looks set to see up to 85cm of new snow in the next seven days.
    “The Espace Killy was cold and very snowy last night,” said Paul Wiseley from myweather2.com.
    “There will be snow across many parts of the Alps through the next 24 hours and it will stay cool throughout this week.”.

    Zermatt in Switzerland also looks likely to be one of the resorts to be hit hardest by this unexpected weather front – the forecast suggests up to 163cm of snow will fall there in the next week.

    The Swiss resort is currently open for skiing and snowboarding on the glacier it shares with Cervinia, across the Swiss/Italian border. Snow depths on the upper slopes, which rise to 3,900m, are 350cm deep and the week ahead will top this up substantially. Cervinia is expected to see 124cm of fresh snow.

    It’s been a winter of unexpected weather fronts and historic snow depths for ski resorts across Europe. Earlier this month Val d’Isère announced that for the first time in its 82 year history it will open some of its winter pistes in June, before it opens its glacier…

    At this time of year the Alps would normally be enjoying sunshine, warm temperatures and clear skies. However all signs of spring seem to have disappeared and while the UK basks in tropical temperatures resorts in the Western Alps will experience minus figures. Tomorrow Zermatt will see the mercury plummet to -10ºC on the glacier…

    The return of Winter comes at a cost for local people who have had to put their preparations for summer in the mountains and activities such as climbing and mountain biking on hold. “Locals have seen enough of snow for this year,” said Wisely…
    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/ski/news/winter-returns-to-the-alps-as-resorts-prepare-for-fresh-snow/

    10

  • #
    pat

    16 May: £23bn goes up in smoke! Chris Huhne’s pet scheme to fit ‘green’ energy boilers is open to fraud and makes pollution worse
    Billions wasted as only 60,000 boilers installed in four years amid pollution fear
    The Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) could also be open to fraud, it has emerged
    Ministers wanted five times the number of new systems installed under scheme
    by Daniel Martin
    Half were boilers that burn biomass such as wood, which cause a ‘serious public health issue’ by pumping out smoke and worsening local air quality, said the Commons public accounts committee.

    The Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) is also open to fraud, added a scathing report.
    Under the initiative, businesses and households pay for a renewable energy boiler upfront then receive payments for up to 20 years depending on the amount of heat they produce.
    However, it is open to ‘gaming’, said MPs…
    Some unscrupulous homeowners can double the amount they produce by using heat generated under the RHI to dry wood or other materials.
    This can then be fed back into the boiler to burn it and generate even more heat – and money from the public purse…

    The scheme was started in 2011 by Chris Huhne, then Liberal Democrat energy secretary, for businesses then extended to domestic customers three years later…
    As the scheme is open to applications until 2021, final payments to participants will run to at least 2041. By this time, the bill for taxpayers is expected to hit £23billion…

    Many of the new systems would have been installed anyway so the scheme did not offer value for money, added the committee…

    The regulator Ofgem is meant to monitor the emissions and ensure biomass boilers pumping out too much smoke should not attract taxpayer payments. But the MPs said these checks were not being carried out…
    The second way involved ‘the use of multiple boilers to take advantage of more generous tariff rates’. Officials and Ofgem were aware and had taken action, added the report…

    The RHI was at the centre of a green energy scandal in Northern Ireland which cost the taxpayer close to £500million.
    Firms were paid subsidies to switch to renewable heating which were higher than the cost of the fuel, leading them to burn resources needlessly.
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5734035/23bn-goes-smoke-Chris-Huhnes-pet-scheme-boilers-open-fraud.html

    10

  • #
    pat

    comment in moderation re: 16 May: Daily Mail: £23bn goes up in smoke! Chris Huhne’s pet scheme to fit ‘green’ energy boilers is open to fraud and makes pollution worse

    I forgot to type “Daily Mail” in the comment I posted.

    30

    • #
      Sceptical Sam

      Never mind Pat. You gave it in the citation/link at the bottom.

      That made it clear where it came from. :-)

      Love your work.

      30

  • #
    pat

    a Daily Mail comment with the banned “f” word in the headline is in moderation.

    16 May: WUWT: Singer: The Sea Is Rising, but Not Because of Climate Change
    There is nothing we can do about it, except to build dikes and sea walls a little bit higher.
    By Fred Singer, WSJ
    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2018/05/16/singer-the-sea-is-rising-but-not-because-of-climate-change/

    20

  • #
    RoHa

    Cricket hit by Climate Change?

    IT’S WORSE THAN WE THOUGHT!

    41

  • #
    tom0maason

    °£3

    21

  • #
    Andrew

    If this trend continues, in 6 years Durham will have the climate of Leeds!

    41

  • #
    Phoenix44

    So let’s do the numbers. England play around 10 ODIs in England each summer. 25% is two matched affected. Half of that is obviously one affected.

    So “doubling” the number is amazingly easy – one shower during a match does it.

    That will happen randomly a few years in a row.

    When you have very small numbers affected by very common things, “doubling” is utterly meaningless.

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    • #
      Phoenix44

      PS I have rounded the 25% to two matches as they don’t always play 10 and you cannot have half a match.

      21

  • #
    pat

    16 May: 9News: AAP: Climate change impacts Vic emergency fight
    Victoria’s emergency services are coming under increasing strain due to climate change, a state parliamentary inquiry has been told, with access to internationally-shared firefighting aircraft negatively affected.

    Emergency Services Minister James Merlino told a budget estimates hearing on Wednesday the state’s fire season was starting earlier, lasting longer and was more intense, and the state needed more aircraft.
    “Climate change is real and it’s having an impact on our emergency services,” Mr Merlino said…

    The Department of Justice and Regulation currently measures climate change’s impact on fires but a broader look at other disasters should be considered, the hearing was told…
    Mr Lapsley said an Emergency Management Victoria staffer works within the state’s climate change office, ensuring that work is not done in isolation…
    https://www.9news.com.au/national/2018/05/16/14/30/climate-change-affecting-vic-fire-effort

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    pat

    forgot to factor in economic growth?

    15 May: UK Independent: Worst-case climate change scenario could be more extreme than thought, scientists warn
    Economic growth could prompt greater greenhouse gas emissions than previously forecast, study says
    Harry Cockburn
    Scientists may have to recalibrate their projections of what a “worst case” climate change scenario is, as new studies take into account greater global economic growth than previously forecast.

    Climate scientists forecasting how the earth’s climate will change over time examine trends in greenhouse gas emissions, which are largely dependent on how the global economy behaves. As countries get richer, the amount they consume goes up, and so too do greenhouse gas emissions…
    Scientists use four scenarios called representative concentration pathways (RCPs) that attempt to depict possible futures for our planet…

    “Our estimates indicate that, due to higher than assumed economic growth rates, there is a greater than 35 per cent probability that year 2100 emissions concentrations will exceed those given by RCP8.5,” Peter Christensen told the New Scientist (LINK)
    Glen Peters of the Centre for International Climate Research in Norway points to the rise in carbon emissions in Europe over the past four years as economic growth has sped up. In 2017, EU emissions rose by 1.8 per cent…

    However, the worst case scenario remains unlikely as economic growth does not rule out environmentally-beneficial policy. “We’ve already locked in a certain amount of climate policy,” Mr Peters said…
    https://www.independent.co.uk/environment/climate-change-model-scenario-rcp85-global-warming-illinios-study-a8353346.html

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  • #
    pat

    Global surge in air-conditioning set to stoke electricity demand
    Financial Times-15 May 2018
    IEA … Electricity used for cooling in the US is almost as great as the entire demand for power in Africa. … Under the IEA’s baseline scenario the worldwide number of cooling units, … with significant growth also in Africa where usage today is low…

    15 May: IEA Press Release: Air conditioning use emerges as one of the key drivers of global electricity-demand growth
    A new IEA report – “The Future of Cooling” (LINK) – shows that without new efficiency standards the world will be facing a “cold crunch” from the growth in cooling demand in coming decades.

    Global energy demand from air conditioners is expected to triple by 2050, requiring new electricity capacity the equivalent to the combined electricity capacity of the United States, the EU and Japan today. The global stock of air conditioners in buildings will grow to 5.6 billion by 2050, up from 1.6 billion today – which amounts to 10 new ACs sold every second for the next 30 years, according to the report…

    The issue is particularly sensitive in the fastest-growing nations, with the biggest increase happening in hot countries like India – where the share of AC in peak electricity load could reach 45% in 2050, up from 10% today without action. This will require large investments in new power plants to meet peak power demand at night, which cannot be met with solar PV technology…

    “The Future of Cooling” is the second IEA report that focuses on “blind spots” of the global energy system, following the “The Future of Trucks,” which was released in July 2017. The next one in this series – “The Future of Petro-Chemicals” – will examine ways to build a more sustainable petrochemical industry. It will be released in September.
    http://www.iea.org/newsroom/news/2018/may/air-conditioning-use-emerges-as-one-of-the-key-drivers-of-global-electricity-dema.html

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  • #
    Roy Hogue

    The less cricket we play, the fewer people will watch it, the less they will come to the ground and pay to enter

    Yes, I see exactly what’s on their mind. It’s too bad that the rain won’t cooperate with them. Or will it? I wonder what complaint they would make if no one had ever told them about climate change. Do you suppose they would be complaining about rain? After all, rain happens and they should be used to it by now.

    A little farther down the page Jo nails it by letting them know about the 1930s. Human memory is short and I suspect that’s why we write things down. But of course you need to go read the history. Or so I thought.

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    pat

    China? maybe, cos they won’t say:

    16 May: WaPo: Someone, somewhere, is making a banned chemical that destroys the ozone layer
    by Chris Mooney
    Emissions of a banned, ozone-depleting chemical are on the rise, a group of scientists reported Wednesday, suggesting someone may be secretly manufacturing the pollutant in violation of an international accord.
    Emissions of CFC-11 have climbed 25 percent since 2012, despite the chemical being part of a group of ozone pollutants that were phased out under the 1987 Montreal Protocol

    “I’ve been making these measurements for more than 30 years, and this is the most surprising thing I’ve seen,” said Stephen Montzka, a scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration who led the work. “I was astounded by it, really.”…

    The finding seems likely to prompt an international investigation into the mysterious source…

    “Somebody’s cheating,” Durwood Zaelke, founder of the Institute for Governance and Sustainable Development and an expert on the Montreal Protocol, said in a comment on the new research. “There’s some slight possibility there’s an unintentional release, but … they make it clear there’s strong evidence this is actually being produced.”

    The scientists don’t know exactly who, or where, that person would be. A U.S. observatory in Hawaii found CFC-11 mixed in with other gases that were characteristic of a source coming from somewhere in eastern Asia, but scientists could not narrow the area down any further…
    Their results were published in the journal Nature.

    There is a small chance that there is a more innocent explanation for the rise in CFC-11 emissions, the scientists say…
    “They’re going to find the culprits,” Zaelke said. “This insults everybody who’s worked on this for the last 30 years. That’s a tough group of people.”…
    “Knowing how much time and effort and resources have gone into healing the ozone layer and to see this is a shocker, frankly,” Montzka said.
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2018/05/16/someone-somewhere-is-making-a-banned-chemical-that-destroys-the-ozone-layer-scientists-suspect/?utm_term=.a39f94d600e2

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    pat

    DM will unquestioningly carry any CAGW rubbish these days:

    17 May: Daily Mail: Boost for renewable energy? Global warming could make UK and large parts of northern Europe far windier, claim scientists
    UK and large parts of northern Europe could experience much stronger winds
    This could result in a ten per cent increase in UK onshore wind energy
    This could power the equivalent of 700,000 homes a year
    By Phoebe Weston

    If global temperatures reach 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels, the UK and large parts of northern Europe could experience much stronger winds, scientists say.
    This is because it would cause a northward shift in the Atlantic jet stream which would lead to a significant increase in winds over the UK and northern Europe and a decrease over southern Europe, researchers say…

    Researchers from British Antarctic Survey, the University of Oxford and the University of Bristol combined data from 282 onshore wind turbines collected over 11 years with climate model data.
    Their study found large areas of Germany, Poland and Lithuania could be more viable sources of wind power in the future.
    However, the largest increase would be in the UK with marked seasonal shifts in wind.

    ‘We see an increase in power generation potential over much of Europe, with the greatest increase in load factor over the UK of around four percentage points’, researchers wrote in the paper, published in the journal Environmental Research Letters…
    ‘While there is the potential for Southern Europe to see a reduction in their wind resource, these decreases are likely to be negligible’ researchers wrote…

    ‘In future, nine months of the year could see UK wind turbines generating electricity at levels currently only seen in winter’, said lead author, climate modeller Dr Scott Hosking at British Antarctic Survey.
    ‘Future summers could see the largest increase in wind generation.’…

    Last month it was announced the world’s largest wind turbine would be tested in the UK.
    When its built, the 853ft Haliade-X turbine will be taller than the One Canada Square office block in London’s Canary Wharf which is 774ft high.
    It will be tested in ‘extreme conditions’ in Blyth, Northumberland in 2020.

    As well as being the largest on Earth, the turbine is also set to be the most powerful.
    General Electric says under normal wind conditions it will be able to generate enough clean power to supply 16,000 homes.
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5736189/Global-warming-make-UK-large-parts-northern-Europe-far-windier.html

    even Carbon Brief is sceptical:

    17 May: Carbon Brief: Jocelyn Timperley: UK onshore wind energy potential could ‘rise by 10%’ with 1.5C warming
    The research (LINK) is the first to look at this question using new climate models specifically designed to assess the small changes between current global temperatures and 1.5C of warming…
    However, the results appear to contradict a previous study (LINK), which found wind potential would fall with rising temperatures…

    Last year, a study covered by Carbon Brief (LINK) came to the opposite conclusion to today’s work, finding warming would reduce wind power potential in the UK.
    One difference is that this research looked at significantly higher levels of warming than today’s research.

    Hosking is not concerned about this contrasting result. He says:
    “The changes in wind with changes of global temperature are non-linear; we don’t expect the same patterns of wind change at different levels of global warming. So at this lower level of global warming at 1.5C…our paper showed that we’ll see an increase.”
    “The HAPPI dataset is specifically designed for the IPCC special report on 1.5C warming, so we’ve based our analysis on the best available data for a 1.5C warming world… Other climate model datasets which are used for general climate change are not suitable for this kind of analysis.”…

    Still, it is important to emphasise the complexity in pinning down future wind speeds. For example, the North Atlantic westerly winds are highly variable, making it challenging to predict how they might change as the world warms. The IPCC’s Fifth Assessment Report, published in 2007, said:

    “Confidence in future changes in windiness in Europe remains relatively low. Several model studies have suggested increased average and/or extreme wind speeds in northern and/or central Europe, but some studies point in the opposite direction.”…
    https://www.carbonbrief.org/uk-onshore-wind-energy-potential-could-rise-by-10-with-1-5c-warming

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    Anton

    The real miracle is that the English invented cricket in their climate.

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    Anton

    On April 24th, 1981 play was suspended in a first class match (Cambridge University vs Essex) due to the cold. The Laws do not in fact refer to rain but merely to unreasonable or dangerous conditions.

    And in the Derbyshire vs Lancashire match held in 1975 a day’s play in June was not rained off, but snowed off.

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    Mike S

    One silliness after another. As John Brignell said on his NumberWatch site about why he’s stopped updating the list of claims about things global warming will cause:

    Starting it was based on the naïve assumption that the rate of appearances would decline as opposing evidence accumulated, but the reverse happened. … There have since been hundreds more claims of an increasingly ludicrous nature.

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    Chad

    Australian Wholesale electricity prices to drop 40%….
    …..says the Government ,!
    Somehow , out wonderous leaders are predicting that wholesale electricity prices will fall by 40% next year due to the extra generating capacity available to the grid because of the rapid fall in solar prices ????…. What ??9
    And to reinforce this belief , they propose to reduce the FIT for home solar from 12.5 c/kWh , down to 7.5 c/kWh !…..duh ?
    God help us with fools like this leading the way !

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    Further to my allegations of an untruthful MSM, Radio New Zealand broadcast an

    uneducated, ill-informed, deeply biased, unbalanced, and false account of recent events in Fiji.

    It is difficult to convey the frustration, the anger and the disappointment when you realise that organisations that you always thought were bastions of truth and integrity were nothing more than shills for those lurking somewhere in the shadows – distorting reality for some unknown political/economic or personal goal.

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    michael hart

    Sounds like twaddle to me, for reasons too numerous to bother listing them all. A few years ago the Met Office was promising us not downpours, but a Mediterranean climate due to global warming, until they realised people were cheering.
    And I don’t trust their statistics about rain-affected games. There has been public criticism that poor choices have been made for the location of some of England’s matches in recent years. Locations like Cardiff and Durham have been featured even though these are grounds already known to have a higher risk of loss of play due to poor weather. They have relatively cold and/or wet climates, even by British standards.

    I recall reading some years ago that the English county championship is
    inherently biased against northern clubs because of the climate: A successful club will always need to win a high fraction of their games but the northern clubs will always have more draws than those in the London area simply due to the amount of time lost to rain.

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    graphicconception

    I can never understand why global warming is so hard to measure. There are more proxies than you can shake a stick at – now including cricket.

    http://www.numberwatch.co.uk/warmlist.htm

    For the record, my earliest recollections of cricket in the UK include: “Silly mid on” and “Rain stopped play”. Maybe this cricket/weather thing has been round for a while?

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