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A science presenter, writer, speaker & former TV host; author of The Skeptic's Handbook (over 200,000 copies distributed & available in 15 languages).


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China and the imaginary EV “market”

With headlines like these, you might think that electric vehicles are competitive:

China holds the keys to the electric car revolution -

In the third quarter, global sales of electric vehicles (EVs) soared 63 percent”

–Business Insider

You might think your nation is way behind:

Australia debates value of electric vehicles while China pushes ahead

In 2017, 652,000 plug-in battery cars were sold in China, up 59 per cent, or almost half of worldwide sales.

–Sydney Morning Herald

But then there is this:

Tax incentives for electric vehicles were stopped in Hong Kong, and sales collapsed

Tesla car sales in Hong Kong fell from 2000 to just 300 cars in one year, a crushing indictment of their competitiveness and … No wait, it’s worse:

Data from Hong Kong´s Transport Department shows Tesla sales fell to just 32 between April and December 2017, a dramatic decline from the near 2,000 sales notched up over the same period of 2016.

The removal of tax incentives in Hong Kong almost doubled the price of some Tesla models.

In total, including non-Tesla models, just 99 electric cars were registered in Hong Kong over the last nine months of 2017.

It’s rare we see the complete evaporation of a market. In Denmark, when subsidies stopped, sales of EV’s and hybrids only fell by 60%.

Holey Moley, look at those government incentives?

We get some idea of why so many Chinese people are “willing” to buy EV’s by reading the SMH. By Kirsty Needham:

Beijing’s annual quota for conventional tail-pipe licence plates was more than halved this year, from 90,000 to 40,000, and the capital is among seven major Chinese cities to restrict conventional licence plates. Would-be drivers wait years in an annual lottery. Those willing to get behind the wheel of an electric vehicle wait just a few months, with 60,000 plates on offer.

Once she had the plates, Ms Dan went shopping. Government subsidies brought the price of her zippy white car with electric blue hub caps down to 70,000 Chinese yuan ($A13,800).

Is this writer, Kirsty Needham, a journalist for the SMH or a PR marketer for the EV industry?

Lecture coming:

In Australia, the Turnbull government is debating the merits of electric cars, with conservative Liberal and National politicians pushing back against the suggestion of government subsidies while complaining about the impact on fuel tax excise and the environmental cost of electric vehicles if they are charged using coal fired electricity. Meanwhile China is simply getting on with converting its enormous fleet.

Greenpeace interview following:

Greenpeace’s China energy analyst Lauri Myllyvirta: “The share of coal in the electricity mix is on track to fall below 50 per cent by 2030, which is the earliest that you could expect a substantial share of the car fleet to be electric,”…

“The popular simplification that China’s power generation comes almost exclusively from coal is no longer true, and emissions from manufacturing and charging an EV – as well as from manufacturing a gasoline car – are falling at a significant rate in China.”

So sometime after 2030, if any of today’s Chinese EVs are still running then, they will be only 50% coal fired.

 

h/t GWPF

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87 comments to China and the imaginary EV “market”

  • #
    Richard Ilfeld

    Fortunately, there is a proven final use for electric vehicles.
    All that’s needed is a couple of aftermarket golf club racks.
    I think there are already enough cupholders.

    120

  • #
    sceptic56109

    Surely the Australian government can force the gentle citizenry to drive only electric vehicles. The government has already forced energy suppliers to buy all the green energy that is produced, and the government has already confiscated almost all of the guns the citizens used to own.

    80

    • #
      yarpos

      Please dont proliferate the gun confiscation meme. They in no way confiscated “almost all of the guns the citizens used to own”. Australians own more firearms than ever. The focus was on specific types of long arms. Many people took the opportunity of the prices being offered in the buy back to dispose of older tired firearms and update to new gear.

      70

      • #
        AndyG55

        I had a friend you went round his mates doing a collection, and was able to “sell back” 3 dozen broken old firearms.

        Brought himself a couple of nice high-end pig and roo hunting rifles.

        He was obviously quite happy with the deal :-)

        You won’t prise guns out of the hands of country boys and gals too easily ;-)

        91

      • #
        Roy Hogue

        When Obama offered to buy back old clunkers all he accomplished was a waste of so much money I was shocked at the total. How much did Australia waste on buying back old worn out guns?

        00

  • #
    Dennis

    Let the market decide, free market capitalism, freedom of choice for consumers to pick winners or losers.

    No more subsidies.

    However, the brain washing is working and there are some people with more money than common sense who are buying EV in Australia. A few days ago I observed a young mother driving a small BMW EV and I later did some research, that EV is approximately three times the price of a similar size Toyota ICE but has a driving range of less than half the distance between recharging.

    100

    • #
      Rereke Whakaaro

      No Government likes free market capitalism. It gives the people too much discretion, over what they might, or might not, choose to do in any given situation.

      Besides, if the citizenry are allowed to make their own choices about anything and everything, what would all of the Pubic Servants do?

      Let us not forget that the job positions filled by Public Servants are all that stand between between a well functioning and ordered society, and total anarchy.

      Can you imagine how much mayhem, several tens of thousands of out-of-work Public Servants might cause?

      10

      • #
        Roy Hogue

        …what would all of the Pubic Servants do?

        Hopefully they would either get a real job or starve. It’s nice to poke fun at the situation, complain about it or mock the government. But the world has a glut of “public servants” who are doing nothing useful. Many are doing something harmful and I don’t understand why we don’t change things. But reelecting the same people will only get the same result. Yet that’s the result of far too many elections all around the supposedly free world.

        00

      • #
        sophocles

        Let us not forget that the job positions filled by Public Servants are all that stand between between a well functioning and ordered society, and total anarchy.

        Then fire the lot of them for NOT doing their jobs, There’s too much anarchy lying around.

        00

  • #

    Electric cars may have a place. I’m sure a serious, ambitious metro system which leaves the roads free for motorised vehicles has a place in any large city. Even cycleways don’t have to be an expensive joke (but probably will be). My experience of Very Fast Trains has been good. Despite crony capitalists and unions, there are worse things you could do with the public quid than build serious long-term infrastructure for moving humans, and not just to where Alan or Frank or Rupert would like them to go.

    When you have abundant, constant, modernised and affordable COAL power you can at least talk about such things. The man holding a handful of aces can talk sheep stations and not get laughed at.

    Us they laugh at.

    80

    • #
      Dennis

      I also believe that EV has a place in metropolitan areas to reduce pollution created by ICE moving from traffic light to traffic light and idling for long periods in peak hour traffic conditions. But before that can be achieved first address the electricity supply and pricing.

      Providing the replacement infrastructure to charge EV Australia wide would be ridiculously expensive, and then the scrapping of the ICE fleet cost.

      70

      • #
        el gordo

        EV in the cities accompanied by efficient trams might be the future.

        ”China has built the largest number of public electric vehicle charging poles worldwide as new energy cars are gaining momentum in the world’s largest car market.

        ‘By the end of 2017, China was home to 213,903 public EV charging poles, ranking No 1 in the world, said Liu Kai, an official at the China Electric Car Charging Technology and Industry Alliance on Thursday.

        “In the past year, around 6,054 poles were built a month on average,” said Liu.

        China Daily

        30

      • #
        Another Ian

        Dennis

        “I also believe that EV has a place in metropolitan areas to reduce pollution created by ICE moving from traffic light to traffic light and idling for long periods in peak hour traffic conditions. ”

        Isn’t that just moving it to someone else’s back yard?

        30

        • #
          AndyG55

          “Isn’t that just moving it to someone else’s back yard?”

          Actually no. It cuts down on real pollution in the Chinese cities, which cannot be anything but a bonus.

          But it also cuts real pollution in China as a whole, because new coal powered fire station are very clean it nearly all real pollution removed.

          In a place like China, trying desperately to clean up the air in its major cities, EVs are a pretty good idea. Chinese are not used to driving long distances like Aussies and Americans are, so will probably just use them as local run-abouts.

          But its NOTHING to do with reducing atmospheric CO2 …

          because IT DOESN’T

          71

          • #
            el gordo

            Indeed the air pollution problem in China is mainly from cars and families burning coal in their homes, this is a very serious matter and needs to be remedied quickly.

            It seems the charging stations are key to the success of EV, so the race will be on to create a quick charge.

            ‘Rapid charging points are the fastest way to charge your electric vehicle, providing up to 80% charge in as little as 30 minutes. Although it sounds counter-intuitive, even electric cars that can’t charge at 22kW can often charge at rapid speeds.’

            PodPoint

            00

            • #
              yarpos

              “Rapid charging points are the fastest way to charge your electric vehicle” guess they would be if they call then Rapid.

              All of that statement lacks context. Sure you can charge something to 80% in 30 minutes. That could apply to anything, the range you have after 30 minutes is the only important bit of information really and of course its left out/glossed over. My phone charges in 30 minutes, I’m excited!

              10

              • #
                el gordo

                Yep, the tyranny of distance is a big hurdle.

                00

              • #
                Bobl

                Of course, my diesel I30 charges in under a minute on a high flow pump, meaning I can be 50km away by the time your ev is even moving with only am 80% fill. Not only that but a small ev would have to charge at least 3times before my tank is empty, meaning I’ll be at least 150 km in front of you by the time I have to Refuel

                60

              • #
                el gordo

                I agree Bobl, the convenience of fuel is there for all to see.

                Subsidies for EV is a waste of taxpayers money and any government coercion to force rapid change will fall on deaf ears. London cabbies have not embraced the EV concept with enthusiasm, take-up is slow.

                10

          • #
            Kneel

            ‘Actually no. It cuts down on real pollution in the Chinese cities, which cannot be anything but a bonus.’

            A new, Euro emissions spec, vehicle would likely have less pollution from the tailpipe than ambient air in large Chinese cities. So driving them would actually clean the air!

            10

      • #
        Rereke Whakaaro

        … before that can be achieved first address the electricity supply and pricing.

        I have seen a technical proposal for inductive charging of electric vehicles, while they are stationary at traffic lights, etc. I did not climb into it – not my pay grade – but it looked like it was intended to be serious, and it certainly was not April 1.

        10

        • #
          Kinky Keith

          Has the army assessed that proposal?

          I’m just concerned about the privates and induction gear being in such close proximity.

          00

          • #
            Graeme#4

            Would be asking exactly the same question KK. Think any close proximity high-energy radiation would most certainly not pass with today’s emissions regs. You can’t emit more than a couple of watts close to humans.

            10

      • #
        sophocles

        Dennis:
        Most of the pollution you refer to is caused by diesel engines. Petrol-powered engines from the last 20 years are very very clean. Surprisingly so.

        10

    • #
      D. J. Hawkins

      The problem with trains as passenger conveyance is cost. You can’t realistically charge passengers enough to cover their cost. All light rail everywhere is subsidized. Even in it’s heyday, US passenger rail service was a money loser. Freight is where the money is.

      30

      • #
        Another Ian

        “I am mostly going to leave highways out of this post. Most evidence I have seen is that the numbers do not actually show highway infrastructure to be getting worse. To the extent highways are underfunded, in my mind it is because gasoline taxes paid by drivers and meant for highway repair and construction have been shifted to grand projects like light rail that get politicians excited but carry at least an order of magnitude fewer passengers per dollar spent than do highways.

        41

      • #

        I quite agree that trains are subsidy-needy, but I’m not opposed to subsidy, large public undertaking etc. Since the Left discovered “user-pays” and the “market” as favourite mechanisms I’m even less inclined to be a purist about such things. My idea is that public enterprise should not compete with private but rather do those things that would otherwise not get done. Even the appalling ABC might have a role. (I shudder as I say that.) The rules for publicly subsidised utilities should be: low-cost, no-frills, heavy use, general appeal…and if you even think of slowing or abusing the system you’ll wish you were in Singapore.

        The justification for trains is that they solve an otherwise unsolvable problem. Light rail does not solve the problems and costs of traffic because it is traffic. The frustrations and small business bankruptcies that come with Sydney’s light rail – not to mention its dodgy commercial destinations – are a delight only to the creepy advocates of Sustainable Development and the cronies who suck off its green thingies. Sydney’s light rail is just traffic added to traffic, frustration added to frustration. (No doubt there’s a long-term plan to use the frustration to supplant traffic as we know it, but we all know about Bosheviks and their long-term plans.)

        No. I’m talking about subsidised transport which reduces traffic, transport such as the Paris metro. It’s designed to take people to any place in the city, and it is usually possible to find a connecting station by walking a very short distance. There is also no mucking around with distance fares, and no mucking around with access barriers etc. Trains are bare, fast and frequent. Even this magnificent system has been under strain for some decades, but if you are serious about having a functional city that’s also really big it’s what you do.

        Of course, till we have heaps of modern coal plants, public or private, cranking out serious power there will be just two-bob compromises, green fair-floss and hyperloops-in-neverland.

        40

        • #
          sophocles

          Since the Left discovered “user-pays” and the “market” as favourite mechanisms …

          User-pays is almost always mis-used and abused, with the mis-identification of the true users, which is why “user-pays” is so often ineffective and unpopular.

          For example: “the motorist” is often identified as “ the road user” and taxed for daring to use the roads. Superficially, it’s a plausible identification but it is wrong. Pedestrians, cyclists, horse riders, horse-drawn carts, skateboarders, and skaters use the roads too, not always legally, and are seen to be not paying anything for that use. In the meantime, the real road users profit by pocketing the contributions they should be making towards road upkeep and maintenance—tax—they should be paying but aren’t.

          00

      • #
        Curious George

        “No publication either before or since the invention of printing, no theological treatise and no political or scientific creed, has ever been as narrowly dogmatic or as offensively arbitrary in its prejudices as a railway timetable.” [Rex Stout, The League of Frightened Men]

        10

    • #
      tom0mason

      Back in the day when we oldies were young milk and groceries were delivered very early in the morning by electric vehicles.
      http://pics.imcdb.org/0is151/ldp82.7351.jpg
      For this function within urban areas they are ideal and IMO should be brought back.

      Back then milk bottle were made of glass, and after use were washed, sterilized and reused. In those days many people saved aluminium foil scrapes for recycling, shopping bags were made of durable materials and lasted years, packaging was paper and cardboard, cloths, furnishings and tools were made to be both durable and repairable.

      You know back in those days when we had less but efficiently did more with what we had.

      Kids today think they invented this recycling idea.

      20

  • #
    manalive

    The share of coal in the electricity mix is on track to fall below 50 per cent by 2030, which is the earliest that you could expect a substantial share of the car fleet to be electric …

    To clarify, it doesn’t mean the total coal consumption will necessarily drop, just that it is projected to form a smaller but still dominant share of the growing electricity demand — at least as projected.

    40

  • #
    TedM

    ““The popular simplification that China’s power generation comes almost exclusively from coal is no longer true, ”
    Because now it comes almost exclusively from coal and “NUCLEAR“.

    Wouldn’t it be nice if the MSM and Govt. told us the whole truth.

    80

    • #

      The most recent data from China, end of year 2017 (only 5 weeks ago) shows the following for China’s electrical power generation: (with the breakdown below the total)

      Total power generation – 6418TWH

      Thermal Power – 70.9% (and coal fired power is 96.5% of that total)
      Hydro Power – 18.6%
      Nuclear Power – 3.9%
      Wind Power – 4.7%
      Solar Power – 1.8%

      Source – List of 2017 National Power Industry Statistical Express Bulletin (when the link opens, go to the second major text box titled Annual data and click on that top link which starts with 2017. When the next widow opens, click on the link in the top text box which starts with National Electricity…..)

      Tony.

      30

      • #
        Another Ian

        O/T Tony

        This might ruin your weekend

        “Study: Avoiding blackouts with 100% renewable energy”

        https://wattsupwiththat.com/2018/02/08/study-avoiding-blackouts-with-100-renewable-energy/

        IIRC the suer again

        00

      • #
        TedM

        Thanks for the correction Tony.

        00

        • #

          TedM,

          it wasn’t meant to be in the form of a correction, just as the most recent information.

          Actual accurate data is difficult to come by at the best of times, well, for journalists anyway, and they’ll believe anything.

          That actual data shown at the link has probably never been seem by a journalist, as why would they even bother, when they can just make it up from what they hear as scuttlebutt and rumour.

          Incidentally, China’s total power generation is now almost 60% higher than the U.S. having only been around equal barely 5 years ago, and that data from China is released on a basis of four to six weeks before the most recent data is released in the U.S. where the most recent data is as of November.

          China generates 10% more power just from coal fired power alone than the U.S. generates from every source,

          Tony.

          10

  • #
  • #
    Robber

    If you have ever been to Beijing and experienced the heavy pollution on calm days, with people walking the streets wearing masks, then you will appreciate the policy to restrict the number of new cars – unclear if it applies to motor cycles and dirty diesel trucks and buses. So EV is one step. But Beijing is surrounded by heavy industry – you may recall for the Beijing Olympics they shutdown lots of industry for the duration.

    40

  • #
    Robert R

    Freezing temperatures and Chicago under considerable snow, some records for cold weather are being broken in Chicago today. Alas, mankind is not doing a very good job at global warming!

    90

  • #
    Lionell Griffith

    Peak stupidity is a long way off.

    40

  • #
    el gordo

    India is keen to get on the EV bandwagon, presumably to clean up the cities, but there is considerable uncertainty.

    https://qz.com/1201216/at-the-auto-expo-indian-carmakers-are-racing-electric-cars-in-their-dreams-far-from-reality/

    10

  • #
    PeterS

    Placing aside for the moment the issue of whether electric cares is the way to go or not short or long term, there is no point even contemplating Australia adopting them on a significant scale unless we start building coal fired and/or nuclear power stations, just as the Chinese and others are doing. We are simply placing the cart before the horse. Until we start building coal fired plants, electric cars here are just a novelty.

    What’s interesting though is if the world trend is going to move towards electric cars in the long run (probably is inevitable regardless of whether it’s good or bad) then we will be one of the very few countries bucking that trend and having to pay much higher prices for traditional cars as the rest of the world slows down their production. What happens if they eventually stop? This is yet another good reason why we have to start building more base load power plants instead of closing them down gradually. Otherwise, we are displaying what the rest of the world probably already knows – that we are stupid. Stupid is as stupid does.

    30

    • #
      yarpos

      There is a quote (forget the source) that Governments dont solve problems, they just rearrange them. So really cart before the horse is just another option.

      20

      • #
        toorightmate

        yarpos,
        How can you possibly say that?
        I am certain that EV subsidy schemes will be just as “smart” as renewable energy subsidy schemes AND the NBN – what a pillar of success is the NBN?

        20

        • #
          yarpos

          Both smart and “game changing” no doubt.

          We must be an outlier on the NBN scale. For us its bought a more reliable service and good enough bandwidth. We are in regional VIC and can enjoy all the streaming options available these days. A couple of friends down in Ringwood (eastern Melb suburb) have far worse service, they are standed on poor quality ADSL services for quite a while for some reason.

          00

  • #
    robert rosicka

    OT but alarm bells are ringing for the upcoming unprecedented deadly dangerous extreme heatwave to hit Queensland, Rockhampton to get five consecutive days over 36 and Birdsville is looking at temps up to 45 oh the humanity .

    30

    • #
      toorightmate

      That’s not all – Brisbane is going to be over 30 for 5 or 6 days!!!
      Heaven forebid!!!

      30

      • #
        yarpos

        My cousin will be bleating, she lives in Brisbane. Hates heat and humidity (!?) has no kids or strings attached and still wont move. Just likes a bit of a grizzle I guess. I will prepare for the emails detailing her suffering.

        30

  • #
    James Murphy

    I was in China (Shenzhen and Zhanjiang) a couple of weeks ago, and the number of electric scooters and bicycles was… significant. Electric cars, I didn’t notice any, but then, I didn’t really look…

    A surprising number of shops had chargers set up outside on the footpath – for their own personal scooters, not, as far as I could tell, for random people to use.

    30

  • #
    Another Ian

    Focused on the Paris agreement but applicable to EV’s IMO

    “The unintelligible in pursuit of the unattainable”

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2018/02/09/the-unintelligible-in-pursuit-of-the-unattainable/comment-page-1/#comment-2739684

    10

  • #
    pat

    walking back…but still using dodgy figures/data, and ***needing at least the same amount of money!
    oh, and then there’s the war on coal, which continues on:

    9 Feb: Bloomberg: Eric Roston: Climate Change Just Got a Little Less Terrible
    There are some 20,000 research papers listed on Google Scholar, a search engine for academics, that mention the worst-case scenario for climate change, one where an overpopulated, technology-poor world digs up all the coal it can find. Basically, it’s the most cataclysmic estimate of global warming.
    This scenario is important to scientists. It focuses minds on the unthinkable and how to avoid it. According to a provocative new analysis from the University of British Columbia, it’s also wrong…

    A new analysis rules out the worst case scenario. But without radical change, we’re still in plenty of danger
    The researchers contend that current goals of reducing coal, oil and gas consumption may be closer than we think, thus allowing us to set the bar even higher in our efforts to reduce pollution…

    The basic issue has to do with coal. Quite simply, the more we burn, the faster we destroy the atmosphere. The darkest scenario assumes much more coal burning will take place in this century than is likely to happen, according to the study’s authors…

    For example, the most extreme worst-case storyline assumes that by 2100 coal would grow to 94 percent of the world energy supply..
    The new work, published this week in Environmental Research Letters, shows just how much all that phantom coal may be distorting our picture of what the future may look like…

    If Ritchie and Dowlatabadi are right, and the very worst probabilities aren’t probable, then policymakers can set tighter goals ***at the same cost…
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-02-09/climate-change-just-got-a-little-less-terrible

    9 Feb: Phys.org: ‘Sinking’ Pacific nation is getting bigger: study
    The Pacific nation of Tuvalu—long seen as a prime candidate to disappear as climate change forces up sea levels—is actually growing in size, new research shows…

    Co-author Paul Kench said the research, published Friday in the journal Nature Communications, challenged the assumption that low-lying island nations would be swamped as the sea rose…
    “The study findings may seem counter-intuitive, given that (the) sea level has been rising in the region over the past half century, but the dominant mode of change over that time on Tuvalu has been expansion, not erosion.”…
    https://phys.org/news/2018-02-pacific-nation-bigger.html

    10

  • #
    Bevan Dockery

    “Meanwhile China is simply getting on with converting its enormous fleet.”
    More fool China. I thought that they were more clever than that.

    21

    • #
      yarpos

      China doesnt really have a great history of making the right decisions. You could argue they had a 1000 year head start on the west in terms of their development but then proceeeded to screw it up by either not advancing the technologies they had or make catastrophic social and political choices. Even now after elevating themselves by becoming the worlds factory they have to deal with environmental and social consequences.

      The lack of desirable , or really just even well known, global native Chinese brands puzzles me.

      30

      • #
        Roy Hogue

        I know of one Chinese brand. Look up OPPO Electronics. They make a superb Blu-ray player at a subsidiary, OPPO Digital based right here in Cupertino, California.

        So not everyone in China is asleep at the switch.

        This Wiki article seems to have been done by someone to whom English is definitely not their first language. It’s also deficient according to Wiki. But it shows that someone is making Chinese branded items and I can vouch for the quality of the BDP-103 Blu-ray player, also for the quality of their tech support where they have people answering email and presumably the telephone who know what they’re talking about.

        00

        • #
          Roy Hogue

          I’ve almost never seen such good technical support. Only one other company I’ve ever done any business with or bought their products has as good a tech support operation, Cree.

          00

  • #
  • #
    • #
      pat

      John of Cloverdale WA -

      the only report I have found, but it would be interesting to hear more:

      6 Feb: Tass: Russia should not copy foreign methods of climate change control, Putin’s adviser says
      Russia should not replicate foreign systems of greenhouse gas emissions control, because its economy is fundamentally different from those of countries that have already introduced such technologies, Russian presidential adviser, special presidential envoy for climate issues, Aleksandr Bedritsky, told an ecological forum of the Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs, held in Moscow within the Russian Business Week – 2018.

      “The Russian economy is greatly different from the economies of states that have introduced this or that system of controlling greenhouse gas emissions. Replicating foreign solutions, even successful ones, looks totally unacceptable to me in our case. We should seek our own optimal way,” Bedritsky said…
      http://tass.com/science/988692

      20

      • #
        Roy Hogue

        OK, I get it. The Russians want to screw up their economy their own way. It’s about like saying everyone else is jumping off the cliff feet first so I think it would be better for me to dive off head first.

        Funny thing, the bottom is there either way.

        00

  • #

    OT but music to my ears:
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/67el2bwe525khi2/RiddonTB.jpg?dl=0
    Opinion item on Peter Ridd’s campaign in the Townsville Bulletin. they rarely kick ar$e like this.
    I cannot provide more at this stage as the online TB has better than average blocking of non-subscribers,
    I’ll go the hard yard (walk 100 of them down the road) and actually buy a paper copy :-O

    50

  • #
    pat

    has this piece been posted?

    8 Feb: Fox News: Science or silence? My battle to question doomsayers about the Great Barrier Reef
    Opinion: by Professor Peter Ridd
    My emails have been searched. I was not allowed even to speak to my wife about the issue. I have been harangued by lawyers. And now I’m fighting back to assert my right to academic freedom and bring attention to the crisis of scientific truth.

    The problems I am facing are part of a “replication crisis” that is sweeping through science and is now a serious topic in major science journals. In major scientific trials that attempt to reproduce the results of scientific observations and measurements, it seems that around 50 percent of recently published science is wrong, because the results can’t be replicated by others.

    And if observations and measurements can’t be replicated, it isn’t really science – it is still, at best, hypothesis, or even just opinion. This is not a controversial topic anymore – science, or at least the system of checking the science we are using, is failing us…READ ALL

    http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2018/02/08/science-or-silence-my-battle-to-question-doomsayers-about-great-barrier-reef.html

    20

  • #
    Roy Hogue

    Tax incentives for electric vehicles were stopped in Hong Kong, and sales collapsed

    Why say anything more when that says it all right there in 13 very unlucky words for EVs and for government forcing behavior it thinks is better than what people decide for themselves?

    30

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    John PAK

    The ICE has a fair way to go before being superseded. I fitted a tube of tin pellets in the fuel line just before the injection pump on my 4.2 diesel work vehicle. Immediately it has better torque at 1000 rpm and will now rev out to 4000 rpm quite comfortably. I’ve not yet checked the milage but others get ~7% improvement on similar vehicles. This a is a fit and forget low-tech item that every car should be built with. We don’t need a high tech new paradigm yet.

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