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Low Fat consensus was wrong: High carb diets increase death rates

How many people have died prematurely because they swapped their fats for carbohydrates?

US Food, Diet, Recommended Daily intake.

More fat meant less death (left). More carbs (right) meant the opposite (at least above 60%). (Click to see the full table of Figure 1 results).

New research published in the Lancet shows that low fat diets could increase your risk of death.

Specifically, those who are in the top fifth of carbohydrate-eaters are also about 28% more likely to die than the fifth eating the lowest amount. This is a correlation (only), but the PURE* study was tracking the thing that matters most — all-cause mortality –  and they followed the diets of 135,000 people in 18 countries for 5 – 9 years.  Loosely, if people avoided high carbohydrate diets, they were less likely to die.

The graph flattens off below “60% carbs” (that’s a percentage of total calories). However, the mortality numbers keep improving for the highest fat intakes which rather skewers 40 years of headlines. I’m guessing that some people who kept carbs below 60% ate more protein instead, which, judging by the “fat” graph, wasn’t as useful.

The McMaster University team announced this quiet bomb, slightly obscured, in a press release about three papers at once under a tame headline, “Moderate consumption of fats, carbohydrates best for health, international study shows.”

Read carefully:

higher fat consumption was associated with lower mortality; this was seen for all major types of fats (saturated fats, polyunsaturated fats and mono unsaturated fats), with saturated fats being associated with lower stroke risk.

So saturated fats might reduce strokes?

Total fat and individual types of fat were not associated with risk of heart attacks or death due to cardiovascular disease.

This is not the dietary approach that 97% of experts and officials recommend.

The current government consensus, backed by thousands of scientists and doctors, and running for decades, tells people to limit fat and eat a high grain diet (which means carbohydrates). See the US Dietary Guidelines.

The message has generally been to “limit fat”, be careful with protein, and fill up all the empty spaces with carbs.

US Food, Diet, Recommended Daily intake.

The current US Food guidelines puts a big emphasis on grains (carbs).

Like the US, the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating still recommends eating a lot of grains (more than any other category).

Guideline 2 recommends  “Milk, yoghurt, cheese and/or their alternatives, mostly reduced fat. Guideline 3 tells us to Limit intake of foods containing saturated fat,

Australian experts remark that “Low fat diets are not suitable for children under the age of 2 years.” They don’t say that low fat diets may increase the risk of death in people over 2.

 

Australian food dietry intake, recommendations, diagram.

Grains make up the largest part of the food plate in Australian Government Recommendations. | Click to enlarge

The news that fat is no demon, will come as no surprise to people who have been looking at medical papers, internet forums, and some popular diet books for the last twenty years. (Though notably, the percentages assessed in the PURE study are not remotely “keto” levels of low carb which are in the 5% carb range and 75% fat as per the Atkins, or Keto-style diets.)

Presumably the mainstream consensus and recommendations will shift in the next 5 – 10 years to soften up on the anti-fat dogma, and start to warn people that just making your bread wholemeal doesn’t neutralize the carbs and turn it into a superfood. When will food pyramids and guiding-plates drop the non-essential “essential grains” meme?

In the meantime, the people who obediently follow the official experts can be sure that “consensus” is self correcting eventually — but the process can still be deadly.

For those who want the gritty details, the lowest quintile of carbohydrate intake ate about 46% or less of their calories from carbohydrates. The highest quintile — 77% or more. So most people won’t have a clue, (or an inclination) but if you do, there is good software available online to estimate these numbers (and a lot more). It’s easier than you think.

On saturated fats, the researchers write that things are complicated, but we appear to need some small base level:

Collectively, the available data do not support the recommendation to limit saturated fatty acids to less than 10% of intake and that a very low intake (ie, below about 7% of energy) might even be harmful.

Sat-fats might not be so bad, but at 10% of daily intake we are only talking of 20 grams a day in a 2000 calorie diet. It’s still not a lot.

On monounsaturated fats, the finding is consistent across many big studies:

We found an inverse association between monounsaturated fatty acid intake and total mortality. Consistent with our findings, two large cohort studies of the Health Professionals Follow up and the Nurses’ Health Study showed lower total mortality by higher monounsaturated fatty acid intake.46

Monounsaturated fats means olives, avocados and some nuts.

And of course things can be confounded by the fact that carbs are cheap, cheap, cheap, and maybe some people who are eating lots of carbs just don’t have the money to afford the more expensive fats and especially proteins. (Though they did adjust for income, education, wealth, etc to try to consider that).

Finally, at least they do recommend that the consensus shifts, and it’s worth mentioning that they refer to other enormous separate studies (Health Professionals Follow up and the Nurses’ Health Study) as well as some randomized trials:

Global dietary guidelines should be reconsidered in light of the consistency of findings from the present study, with the conclusions from meta-analyses of other observational studies and the results of recent randomised controlled trials.

The Abstract:

Look for HR = 1.28, meaning a 28% higher risk of dying.

During follow-up, we documented 5796 deaths and 4784 major cardiovascular disease events. Higher carbohydrate intake was associated with an increased risk of total mortality (highest [quintile 5] vs lowest quintile [quintile 1] category, HR 1·28 [95% CI 1·12–1·46], ptrend=0·0001) but not with the risk of cardiovascular disease or cardiovascular disease mortality. Intake of total fat and each type of fat was associated with lower risk of total mortality (quintile 5 vs quintile 1, total fat: HR 0·77 [95% CI 0·67–0·87], ptrend<0·0001; saturated fat, HR 0·86 [0·76–0·99], ptrend=0·0088; monounsaturated fat: HR 0·81 [0·71–0·92], ptrend<0·0001; and polyunsaturated fat: HR 0·80 [0·71–0·89], ptrend<0·0001). Higher saturated fat intake was associated with lower risk of stroke (quintile 5 vs quintile 1, HR 0·79 [95% CI 0·64–0·98], ptrend=0·0498).

Total fat and saturated and unsaturated fats were not significantly associated with risk of myocardial infarction or cardiovascular disease mortality. Interpretation High carbohydrate intake was associated with higher risk of total mortality, whereas total fat and individual types of fat were related to lower total mortality. Total fat and types of fat were not associated with cardiovascular disease, myocardial infarction, or cardiovascular disease mortality, whereas saturated fat had an inverse association with stroke. Global dietary guidelines should be reconsidered in light of these findings.

Hints: Quintile means a fifth of the population. HR means “Hazard Ratio”. CI = Confidence Interval.  ptrend = statistical info, lower is more significant.

Those who want to stay healthy and strong,
And their years of existence prolong,
Should not eat like Jack Spratt,
But like Joan, choose the fat,
As the low-fat consensus is wrong.

    — Ruairi

 

*PURE = Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology

REFERENCE

Dr Mahshid Dehghan, et al (2017) Associations of fats and carbohydrate intake with cardiovascular disease and mortality in 18 countries from five continents (PURE): a prospective cohort study, The Lancet, August 2017 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(17)32252-3

Salim Yusuf, DPhil et al. (2017) Fruit, vegetable, and legume intake, and cardiovascular disease and deaths in 18 countries (PURE): a prospective cohort studyThe Lancet, August 2017 DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(17)32253-5

h/t Lance W. Thanks.

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122 comments to Low Fat consensus was wrong: High carb diets increase death rates

  • #

    When will there be a study saying that carbohydrates are less deadly than fats?

    17

    • #
      sophocles

      When will there be a study saying that carbohydrates are less deadly than fats?

      Umm, do you want one, Alf?
      You can get it any time you want if you pay for it.
      That’s when you get the finest science money can buy :-)

      The low fat, or Pritikin diet was attributed to Nathan Pritikin. It went stellar in the late 1970′s. It predates the so-called Paleolithic diet. Pritikin died by his own hand in 1985 after battling leukemia.

      Lack of sufficient saturated fats in one’s diet has been linked with depression. I have fought a rear-guard action against weight gain for some years and one of my stratagems was to severely limit my fat intake. Early this year, I brought butter and other saturated fats back into my diet. The lift in my mood was surprising. (Good rich New Zealand butter, the world’s best. :-) Use in moderation.) And my weight dropped another five kilos in as many weeks. Whoo Hoo!

      Salt is another dietary necessity we all tend to run low on. I exercise a lot and in the early days, I kept getting muscle cramps. I upped my intake of salt and the cramps stopped. I keep my salt intake up. ( `Salary’ is a word derived from `sal’ or salt. A Roman Legionary was paid a salarium, or an allotment of money, to enable him to buy salt (from Latin sal, or “salt”) which was expensive in those days but known to be necessary.) We perspire all the time as our temperature regulation and so lose salt by that excretion through our skins. Given the amount of walking required of a legionary, salt was important.

      More recent research I’ve been reading suggests that the slip, slop and slap sun avoidance campaign is to be treated with some caution, and my own experience tends to support that. Vitamin D is made in our skins by exposure to the sun, specifically to UVB, the cause of sunburn. Interestingly, Australia and New Zealand have the highest rates of skin cancers in the world. But what we’re not told is that we have far and away the highest survival rates. It may just be coincidence that the rise in Alzheimer’s Disease, and children’s asthma, ADHD, Autism, and allergies is all consonant with low levels of Vitamin D and low exposure to the sun by both their mothers when pregnant, and their early life. Some of the more recent research by the pill-pushers and other sources suggests Vitamin D helps with asthma. In half an hour’s exposure to UVB, our skin makes far and away more Vitamin D in an immediately usable format than any supplement. More on Vitamin D here.

      For the last eight years, after the shortest day, I have sat in the midday sun in a pair of shorts for between 20 – 30 minutes every day we have sunshine. That’s not often so I ‘ve only be able to do it maybe twice a week. I have a slight tan. Every year I have done this, I have missed out on the colds and influenza attacks everyone around me has suffered. During that time, I `forgot’ to sun myself twice and each time I caught a nasty one.

      Correlation is not causation but the coincidences are just a little startling. I’m very careful to not burn.

      Jo is commenting on good diet. That’s necessary. Healthy living though, is more than just a good diet. It seems to rest on four pillars:
      – good diet. I avoid all vegetable oils except for olive oil. (High Omega 6 and low Omega 3 levels seem to be associated with heart attacks and strokes. I have read about a `collapse of the consensus on cholesterol’ recently, but haven’t had the time to chase this up. Perhaps someone else knows more? However, I have ignored the advice to avoid eggs all my life. I love them. Look at just how good they are for chickens!) It seems that avoiding the white, refined and deadly ingredients, sugar, white flour, sugar, white rice and sugar, is a good start.

      – careful use of the sun (Vitamin D seems to drive our immune systems and maintaining high levels is a good cancer and dementia preventative. Be careful to limit exposure so as not to sunburn. (Oxybenzone, common in many sunscreens, is instant death to marine filter feeders (coral etc) in even very small concentrations, so use sun screens with care. Oxybenzone is absorbed through the skin; it has apparently been found in mother’s milk.)

      – proper regular exercise. It feels really good, too. Like the sun: use in moderation.

      – proper sleep. (this can be difficult!).

      Enjoy and live long.

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      • #
        Hanrahan

        My mother would have learnt nursing 100 yrs ago and told me the diet advice she got was “A little bit of everything, not too much of anything”. In this age of claim and counterclaim it still sounds a safe middle ground.
        I passed three score and ten a few years ago so it hasn’t done me any harm. And I agree about salt and D3. I have salted butter on my one slice of toast and it tastes good so I need no jam.

        50

      • #
        Ozwitch

        I read recently that the ‘fat is bad’ stuff was started by companies which had invested highly in sugar. NO surprise there.
        Fat helps you digest things. Without it you end up with lots of alimentary problems.
        Sugar is stored as fat. Fat isn’t.
        Diet Milk has a lot of additives (milk solids) added to make it taste better. These are ALL carbohydrates. Not better for you at all, and certainly not ‘diet.’
        Butter isn’t related to plastic. Margarine is.
        Guess who started the theory that butter is bad for you? Yup, margarine companies. They’re the ones who added yellow colouring to white margarine to make it look more palatable.
        All the above is easily sourced on the net. It’s not as if we aren’t informed if we want to be.

        00

  • #
    Eddy Aruda

    Sounds like it’s time to put a steak on the barbie!

    Diet? I eat what I want without being a glutton and exercise.

    So far, so good!

    261

    • #

      I wrote a story about the nanny state over a year ago and just keep adding updates on all the do-gooder failures that keep arising. It’s like the global warming scare, these health and other ‘experts’ are just in it for the money.

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      • #
        Greg Cavanagh

        I noticed from a young age that about every 5 to 10 years a new study comes out stating the complete opposite of what came before.

        I’ve been ignoring experts, studies, warnings and advice from TV talking heads for 30 years now.

        310

        • #

          There used to be an annual report from some Swedish group decades ago that updated the list of things that were deadly (usually everything caused cancer). I always remember one year when apples were on the ‘deadly list’. Naturally eggs and everything else were there as well and, as you pointed out, some years later these foods were subsequently deemed good for you.

          170

        • #
          OriginalSteve

          The original Framingham study that trumpetted that “saturated fat = bad” was based on cherry picked data.

          The people who set it up had ties back the UN, if I recall.

          Anyway, most saturated fat comes from animals, and in greenies eyes animals are more important than humans.

          But monosaturated fats ( mostly from plants = good in greenies eyes ) – this is just another thing to protect the mythical “Gaia”.

          So eating grains and carbs = good ( kill off plenty of those ‘nasty’ humans ) and proetct “Gaia”. Now add in CAGW to lock humans down even more into super crowded cities, add in Agenda 21 to kick humans out of most land, and you have the lunatic NWO/UN crowd attacking humanity from every angle…..

          Now wonder why they would set up a set vault in the artic if they arent going to try and destroy our food supply ( probably ) with GMOs…..

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          • #
            OriginalSteve

            should read

            “…set up a seed vault in the artic…..”

            40

          • #
            Power Grab

            Ah, Framingham. Can anything good come out of the Framingham study? Well, this is my personal favorite:

            “In Framingham, Mass., the more saturated fat one ate, the more cholesterol one ate, the more calories one ate, the lower the person’s serum cholesterol. . . we found that the people who ate the most cholesterol, ate the most saturated fat, ate the most calories, weighed the least and were the most physically active.”

            The reference for that is “Castelli, William, Archives of Internal Medicine, Jul 1992, 152:7:1371-1372.”

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      • #
        David Maddison

        Thanks for the link. I shared it to FB.

        31

  • #
    Patrick healy

    Tut tut, what a surprise. I am past 75 and approaching my beautiful ex finances 50th wedding anniversary.
    I am 8 pounds heavier now than on that momentous occasion.
    About 10 years ago I adopted a high protein, high fat, low carb diet. I still caddy 4 or 5 times a week and carry my own clubs when I play the rest of the time.
    Coincidentally,I became aware of that other great scientific fraud about 10 years – Mann made global warming.
    Is not science a fascinating subject?

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    • #
      daver

      I suspect it’s still kinda cool to still fit within a size 5 (42″) fit for bike jersey sizes. Used to consume about 3 thou kilocalories/day via protein/carb demolishment but great to see you’s folk’s Phil Anderson really demonstrating the energy stuff at Amstel Gold RR and CH4′s Kellogs: hope this vid coverage links – ’tis a real beut! –

      https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=phil+anderson+ch4+kellogs&&view=detail&mid=2C3113FC87070025F3BA2C3113FC87070025F3BA&FORM=VRDGAR

      10

    • #
      peter

      Drop the ‘high protein’ part of your diet. There is plenty of scientific evidence to show that high protein intake is associated strongly with higher cancer rates.

      01

      • #
        Gail Combs

        NOT if the beef is grass fed and you eat a variety of meats. What the animal eats makes a difference in the quality of the meat.

        Goat is especially good for you.

        Goat Meat for Your Heath

        ….higher in protein and iron than any of these meats. Goat meat is high in vitamin B12 and has balanced amino acids. Since goats are ruminants, goat meat is also a good source of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA,) a fatty acid that prevents and cures cancer and many inflammatory conditions in laboratory animals. Results of clinical studies with CLA in humans are still pending. There is much interest in the potential role of CLA in human health and nutrition….

        And if you want a scientific paper: Effects of Oils Rich in Linoleic and α-Linolenic Acids on Fatty Acid Profile and Gene Expression in Goat Meat

        Abstract

        Alteration of the lipid content and fatty acid (FA) composition of foods can result in a healthier product. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of flaxseed oil or sunflower oil in the goat diet on fatty acid composition of muscle and expression of lipogenic genes in the semitendinosus (ST) muscle. Twenty-one entire male Boer kid goats were fed diets containing different levels of linoleic acid (LA) and α-linolenic acid (LNA) for 100 days. Inclusion of flaxseed oil increased (p < 0.05) the α-linolenic acid (C18:3n-3) concentration in the ST muscle. The diet high in α-linolenic acid (p < 0.05) decreased the arachidonic acid (C20:4n-6) and conjugated linolenic acid (CLA) c-9 t-11 content in the ST muscle. There was a significant (p < 0.05) upregulation of PPARα and PPARγ gene expression and downregulation of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) gene in the ST muscle for the high α-linolenic acid group compared with the low α-linolenic acid group. The results of the present study show that flaxseed oil as a source of α-linolenic acid can be incorporated into the diets of goats to enrich goat meat with n-3 fatty acids, upregulate the PPARα and PPARγ, and downregulate the SCD gene expression.

        10

  • #

    funny old story – I came across the lower mortality for all causes research a time back. I discovered keto diets were a very successful treatment for childhood epilepsy, I also discovered my education had somehow managed to miss a few rather important facts along the line. I tried spreading the word and was assumed to be retarded by those folk who learn to chant the Public Health Mantras (sun = bad, fat = bad etc).

    Of the few who decided to listen and eyeball the studies, a diabetic friend I suggested try a keto diet found his insulin dependence declined, and others struggling with weight loss shed heaps when they switched to high fat diets.

    My own story got even more silly – I am a long term sufferer of massive pains from eating or drinking and became food averse all following a snake envenomation 25 years back. When I say pain, it’s occasionally bad enough to make me pass out or upchuck from nausea.. no matter how hungry I am, eating has been very painful. Regular attempts to track the problem led to doctors presuming I was irrational and the standard treatment was prescribed (anti-depressant) which went in the bin. (innit funny doctors don’t like patients playing amateur doctor but they’re extremely happy playing amateur psychology)

    Going on a higher and higher fat diet I felt better but still not right. And there was the ongoing B12 deficiency which makes no sense and I always started feeling slightly better after courses of antibiotics – however doctors always frowned at a high fat diet and told me to eat a more balanced diet and so forth. Eventually I put many of the things together, many persistent symptoms and it was concluded by one doctor I suffered autonomic failure at the time of the dugite bite. Inability to sweat, random blood pressure changes , going into shock when shower water touched my skin, periods where breathing becomes difficult, utterly random sleep patterns and other absurd and bizarre things my body does with it’s scrambled signals.

    Anyhoo, the gut thing was something I couldn’t accommodate as well as the other problems so I had to see doctors who always insisted on telling me off for everything – eventually I stumbled across the idea peristalsis could have halted due to neural damage and put this to doctors. ‘nope, that can’t happen’ was their reply. I discovered a test was available (for SIBO) which measured hydrogen and methane exhalations and I asked for this “Oh no, that’s really rare” was the reply so I hunted for 2 years for a doctor who would conduct the test. I found one and had the test done and guess what? yah – off the chart positive and yup, peristalsis had halted.

    So the diet is NO carbs whatsoever, infrequent meals and as high a fat intake as I can manage (oh and none of the things they’d been yelling at me to consume all these years like fruit, fiber, laxatives and other things). I’m also now told my infrequency of eating is perfectly acceptable for this condition.

    Gory details aside, I’m starting to feel better and all the things I’d found my way to myself and been told were bad and wrong by doctors turn out to be the only way to actually live with this idiotic condition. Diet won’t cure it and it’s likely I’ll require ongoing antibiotics for life to keep the little beggers from overwhelming my small intestine and odds are I’ll suffer all manner of deficiencies but isn’t it funny how for such a condition the treatment is high fat?

    by the way, if anyone knows of any specialists in Perth who know what the hell dysautonomia is I’d love to hear of them. I’ve avoided doctors and proudly struggled on my own for quite a time but 10 years without employment or any social security at all makes things quite difficult – and for all my (good) GP can offer by way of support, without a specialist diagnosis DSS isn’t interested in releasing their purse strings. Sorry that bit was OT, but I could really do with any hints at finding a specialist doctor.

    240

    • #
      Greg Cavanagh

      Excellent story.

      When I was young, about 7 or so, I started having migraines. I was off school so much, and the migraines got worse and worse. I ended up in the Children’s hospital in Brisbane getting blood tests every 6 hours and got hooked to their EEG machine.

      After a week of this, they sent me home saying there was nothing wrong with me, I was bunging it on. My mother was furious, how can a 7 year old bung something like this on?

      She took me to an iridologists, which were newly on the scene and nobody believed in them. He looked into my eyes and said “your intestine muscles aren’t working properly”. He stated correctly that the muscles were contracting randomly, not in sequence. So the food was going off in my intestines and poisoning my entire system.

      He gave me some pills of something, and within about 4 days I was right and good. It’s never returned.

      40

      • #
        wert

        This is funny, sorry, but sometimes even an iridologist may do some good.

        00

      • #

        Glad to hear they sorted it for you Greg.

        I knew a Greg Cavanagh once, from Scarborough Senior High in Perth.. would you be that same Greg?

        Unfortunately no matter what they’ve forced down my gullet, not much seems to help.

        00

    • #
      wert

      Very interesting. There is a lot on dysautonomia at google scholar. It comes in different flavours, all rare, on the other hand, rare diseases are extremely common.

      10

  • #
    Uncle Gus

    All of these findings are EXACTLY what I was hearing from maverick food blogs ten or fifteen years ago.

    It seems some quite respectable studies had reached the same conclusions back then, but got buried because they didn’t fit the fashionable pronouncements and hysterias of the time. In fact, as I found out, if you consulted a professional nutritionist very often the advice you got totally contradicted government and BMA guidelines. (Nutritionists quite like their patients to live a long time, whereas the government and its cronies couldn’t give a shit…)

    150

    • #
      Greg Cavanagh

      It’s not that they didn’t give a shit.

      Government’s by their very nature are run by consensus and authority. The two pillars of what governs their thoughts.

      10

  • #
    Pathway

    My wife has been on a ketogenic diet for the last 10 months and has lost 50 pounds. Ketones are the bodies way of eating its own fat during times of crisis, such as you are on a forced march to avoid the enemy.

    150

    • #
      el gordo

      For the early Australians, like all hunter gatherers, life was either a feast or famine.

      When food is scarce the cells become energised because its a do or die situation, in many ways the modern five two diet appears to be effective and it helps people look normal.

      50

    • #
      wert

      The trouble is how to keep the weight, not how to loose weight.

      20

  • #
    Lionell Griffith

    Check out the following and decide for yourself: http://www.cholesterol-and-health.com/Does-Cholesterol-Cause-Heart-Disease-Myth.html

    Personal experience:

    My father died from a heart attack at the age of 66 due to uncontrolled type 2 diabetes. At about the same age, I was diagnosed as having type 2 diabetes. By applying the principles of process control to my diet and blood glucose levels, I rapidly brought them under control and maintained “normal” levels.

    I am now 80 and still alive. I have just returned from the hospital where I had a 99% blockage in a coronary artery cleared and a stint implanted. I have not experienced a heart attack and the only symptom I had was getting tired more easily than before. I had a slightly abnormal EKG and stress test witch led to the discovery and repair of the blockage.

    Clearly, I did not escape all of the problems associated with diabetes but I have avoided the big problems: blindness, kidney failure, amputation, and death by heart attack. I suspect it was largely because I did NOT listen to the American Diabetes Society advice and eat a high carbohydrate, low fat, almost vegan diet. What I did do, was listen to my body and what it needed to maintain normal blood glucose levels. Literally, for me, carbohydrates are to die for.

    Please note: this morning my fasting blood glucose was 82. My pre lunch level was 90. This without taking my usual diabetic medicine for two days, being in the hospital under stress for the better part of that two days, and eating selected portions of their so called cardiac diet.

    As they say, your mileage might vary. However, listen carefully and intelligently to what your body is telling you. That might possibly lead to a longer and healthier life.

    Achieving happiness might take some extra work but you can not be both happy and dead. That is unless you want to believe in an ancient religion. In that case you are on your own as to which one of the thousands to choose.

    100

    • #
      John F. Hultquist

      Other than hot rolled oats with whole milk, brown sugar, and fresh strawberries, I have never enjoyed a breakfast cereal. I guess that’s my body saying “Don’t give me anymore of that other stuff.”

      On the other hand, a breakfast with …
      bacon and eggs,
      ham and eggs,
      steak and eggs;
      sausage and eggs;
      … the body says “Bring it on.”

      81

      • #
        Greg Cavanagh

        Your body knows what it wants. Just listen to it, like any machine.

        60

      • #
        OriginalSteve

        Yep…..and I agree.

        My story – I used to eat lots of carbs for brekky and of course with a large slug of slow digesting food in my gut, my energy levels would drop and I’d go looking for sugar….roll on overweight and miserable teenager. Lost a lot of it once I had a keenie on this one girl.

        In my 20 & 30s, I was busy running around the globe, so kept weigh sort of under control.

        In my 40s, I still eating the carbs for brekky, but weight a problem, the cholesterol nonsense starts up in a fury and everyone is being slammed on statins. I start digging and relaise its all nonsense and start listening to my body, and now after gym sessions and hiogh protein low carb diets, am fit and loving it. I have LOADS more energy.

        Brekky is 3 eggs and cheese omlette with mushrooms……bring it on!

        Dont forget the pharma companies will suck you dry ( an dpump the govt to fund them, like most PBS rent seekers ) if you give them a chance, especially with the cholesterol nonsense. If you followed the cholesterol nonsense to the letter, literally 50% of the population would be on their drugs. I have a good mate who is on cholesterol drugs and my age…no thanks.

        I politely refused my doctors advice ( Doctors get schmoozed by drug companies the monent they graduate, if not before …Drs mean well, but….) but for most other things I’ll follow his advice.

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        • #
          Phil

          OS its not just the Drug companies, it’s also the Universities. They no longer teach Doctors(GP’s) to investigate the underlying issue (cause) of a symptom just give out a pill to treat the symptom and if you have side affects have another to counteract and so on and so on.

          41

        • #
          Another Ian

          Steve

          Re breakfast

          Eric Rolls quotes the advice of a neighbour when he started on his soldier settlement block, which was along the lines of

          “Eric – if you’re going to do a good days work then you need a bloody good breakfast”. Suggested was a pound and a half of steak and 13 eggs.

          40

    • #
      RoHa

      “you can not be both happy and dead.”

      I’m sure you can. You can be anything you want if you try hard enough.

      30

  • #
    Yonniestone

    An interesting read on this suject is the Framingham Heart Study which has been running since 1948 with over 10,000 participants, also the Weston A. Price Foundation has some ideas about the consumption of fats.

    50

  • #
    John F. Hultquist

    In the USA, diet guidelines are updated every 5 years. Last time in 2015.
    The lead-up to this involves various groups going for or against new ideas.
    Get your popcorn and favorite drinks handy — and watch for the fireworks.

    40

  • #
    John Smith

    Come on guys, fat is bad!
    Just like carbon.
    And gluten.
    Don’t forget to do lots of cardio.
    The world could be tenths of a degree cooler and we all might live months longer if we live right.

    41

  • #
    Ruairi

    Those who want to stay healthy and strong,
    And their years of existence prolong,
    Should not eat like Jack Spratt,
    But like Joan, choose the fat,
    As the low-fat consensus is wrong.

    160

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    Joe V.

    OT: If Jo would give Tony Abbott her kitchen for an hour & film it I could give the £100 for chocolate instead of for joining the GWPF to get an invite to see him in London.
    Tony Abbott to give 2017 GWPF Lecture

    40

  • #
    Roy Hogue

    Jo,

    I know you’re just reporting on some research findings, so don’t take this personally.

    Unlike climate change where you’re always dead if you don’t immediately do X, Y and Z and if you don’t immediately avoid doing A, B and C, eating guidelines have been like the horses on a merry go round, first up then down, then up and then, you guessed it, down again. Each horse could represent some food you can eat. When the horse is down it’s bad for you and when the horse is up it’s good for you. Sound familiar to anyone?

    I can count 3 different times that the benefit of coffee has been negative and then positive again. I can count at least 3 different times that there has been some benefit of a certain kind of wine pointed out, yet all the while alcohol was being named the big no-no of the century. Eggs, first bad then opps, they got a bad rap.

    Carbs vs. fat. What is the truth? And all the while my government and I’ve no doubt yours as well has seen it as its imperative to keep me eating healthy. My cardiologist prescribes a heart healthy diet. In the good ol’ USA the guidelines now look like a pyramid — did anyone notice that?

    The evident truth is that no one knows what the right way to eat is. Some groups still today eat mostly if not exclusively meat. Others are the very definition of a herbivore. Why has not one or the other of them disappeared from the face of the Earth by now?

    The schools dictate what you can send to school with your kid for him to eat for lunch. In fact a few have confiscated lunches they find unsatisfactory.

    When will they realise it’s none of their business how I eat and shut up about it? When will they realize I’m getting hot under the collar about it?

    At least here, the constitution doesn’t give the government even the limited right to think about how I eat, much less the right to interfere in how I eat. In fact, it doesn’t give the government the right to have a Department of Health and Human Services or any other department that could cook up a list of eating guidelines.

    Oh! And don’t forget about the obesity epidemic. Toss the Nintendo, stomp the smart phone into the ground, take a wire cutter to your internet connection and cable TV and that epidemic is solved, just as it was for my generation by playing with the neighborhood kids, good energy using games.

    100

  • #
    David Maddison

    O/T

    Alan Jones of Radio 2GB Sydney is in superb form this morning, as usual, talking about global warming lies and the high cost of unreliable “green” energy including the SA bird frier which he noted was obsolete technology. You should be able to listen to a podcast of the show some time after the show concludes or listed live now.

    http://www.2gb.com/listen-live/

    122

    • #
      Frank

      David,
      Yeah, Alan’s the go to guy for climate science.

      [Why don't we let readers decide instead of letting Frank dismiss him? Sounds reasonable to me.] AZ

      211

      • #
        Frank

        AZ
        I think it’s the scientific community that counts, not the brains trust here.

        29

        • #
          AndyG55

          Hey fronk, The fact you are dissing Jones, PROVES he is almost certainly CORRECT.

          81

        • #
          Greg Cavanagh

          This is where you go wrong Frank.

          We don’t trust anyone, be it Alan Jones or James Hansen, or even Frank.

          We look at the arguments presented, we consider the matter and compare it to what we know. If we don’t know we go looking for more answers. After what may be weeks or years we come to a conclusion, so-and-so what right. In this case, we generally agree with Alan Jones.

          What do you do Frank? Please give us your considered thoughts on the matter.

          50

      • #
        Sceptical Sam

        Nobody is saying he’s the go to guy for climate “science”, Frank.

        He’d be the first to name the experts that you and others need to consult. People like:

        Professor Christopher Essex,
        Sir Samuel Brittan,
        Sir Ian Byatt,
        Dr John Constable,
        Professor Vincent Courtillot,
        Professor Freeman Dyson,
        Christian Gerondeau,
        Professor William Happer,
        Professor David Henderson,
        Professor Terence Kealey,
        Professor Deepak Lal,
        Professor Richard Lindzen,
        Professor Ross McKitrick,
        Professor Robert Mendelsohn,
        Professor Garth Paltridge,
        Professor Ian Plimer,
        Professor Paul Reiter,
        Dr Matt Ridley,
        Sir Alan Rudge,
        Professor Nir Shaviv,
        Professor Philip Stott,
        Professor Henrik Svensmark,
        Professor Anastasios Tsonis,
        Professor Richard Tol,
        Professor Fritz Vahrenholt,
        Dr David Whitehouse,
        Professor Judith Curry,
        Dr David Evans etc,. etc.

        However, you prefer to listen to mammalogists and railway engine drivers and other green/left assorted “yes” men and women who are on the public drip feed, bleeding the taxpayer at every turn.

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      • #
        tom0mason

        Frank,

        Real scientists know that they’re fallible that is why there’s verification and validation in real science. Engineers know they are fallible that is why there are engineering models, along with real material and construction test runs before the projects get built.

        Only the seriously deranged, the very religious, and the demented politicos believe all the blather and nonsense they spout as infallible decrees.

        You Frank seem to think that science is infallible, it is not and real scientist know this. And when the science is unproven (as in the case of climate science) many views and opinions get aired. However until somebody (scientist or other) does the work actually observing and measuring all that nature is doing, and then can construct a properly verified and validated working model of what is going on, it’s still all up in the air. And until that day dawns ‘climate science’ is just a fantasy, an argument, and so much hokum.

        51

  • #
    Frank

    I like the 97% parallel here, nice try.
    The difference is that science seems to have corrected the consensus using new data, unlike the climate consensus.
    Please provide evidence from the real world.

    39

  • #
    David Maddison

    Eskimos survive perfectly well on a diet of protein and fat from various marine mammals. There is sufficient vitamin C in raw meat to survive without needing fresh fruits and vegetables. Most mammals make their own vitamin C but humans don’t, nor monkeys and guinea pigs.

    72

    • #
      KinkyKeith

      And when those Eskimos move to more urbanized environments their cholesterol gets out of kilter and they have trouble.

      Read a good book about cholesterol many years ago.

      Title:The Queen of Fats.

      It’s the ratio that’s important not so much the absolute quantities.

      KK

      51

  • #
    Another Ian

    Something about the fatalities of consensuses?

    40

  • #
    el gordo

    If you look at North Korea there is no obesity apart from Kim, but in the US 160 million adults are overweight or obese and a third of the children are in the same boat.

    It would be terrific if Lancet could do a study to see if North Koreans live longer than in the western world.

    30

    • #
      David Maddison

      A lot of North Koreans don’t reach their natural age because Kim has them torn apart by wild dogs, shot with anti-aircraft guns, starved or worked to death.

      51

  • #
    Dennis

    The Cost Of Going Green

    ADAM CREIGHTON, JOE KELLY
    Taxpayers will have paid more than $60 billion through federal renewable energy subsidies by 2030.

    The Australian

    30

  • #
    Leonard Lane

    Well, it seems that the science is not settled on proper diet and nutrition.
    It is easy to believe (and perhaps show) that any science that is settled is a dead or dying science. If the science is settled in a given discipline, then why go on and do further studies?
    Sounds crazy huh? It is!
    Remember that about global warming and its wolf in sheep’s clothing climate change. Every time they say the science is settled, just remember how crazy that is.

    50

  • #
    John

    Things are changing, at least Health Canada has seen some light. (copied from The Healthy Home Economist)

    Health Canada Recommends Meat as Baby First Food
    by Sarah Updated: April 07, 2017Healthy Pregnancy, Baby & Child
    11.1k
    SHARES
    ShareTweetPinEmail One of most misguided and damaging pieces of advice coming from the vast majority of pediatricians, dieticians, and other “experts” is to give rice cereal as a baby first food around the age of 4-6 months. This advice is extremely harmful to the long term health of the child, contributing greatly to the epidemic of fat toddlers and the exploding problem of childhood obesity.
    Rice cereal is never a healthy baby first food. Not only is it an extremely high glycemic food when eaten alone (spikes the blood sugar) but it also contains ample amounts of double sugar (disaccharide) molecules, which are extremely hard for such an immature digestive system to digest. The small intestine of a baby mostly produces only one carbohydrate enzyme, lactase, for digestion of the lactose in milk. It produces little to no amylase, the enzyme needed for grain digestion until around age one.
    Now, at least one governmental body is waking up to the harmful notion of cereal grains as the “ideal” baby first food.
    Health Canada in collaboration with the Canadian Pediatric Society, Dietitians of Canada and Breastfeeding Committee for Canada has issued new guidelines for transitioning a baby to solid food and two of the first weaning foods recommended?
    Meat and eggs!
    While these guidelines are certain to rile vegetarian and vegan groups, the fact is that meat and eggs are indeed perfect weaning foods for a baby. Not only are these animal foods extremely easy to digest compared with cereal grains, but they also supply iron right at the time when a baby’s iron stores from birth start to run low.
    The inclusion of meat in these baby first food guidelines is in line with the wisdom of Ancestral Cultures which frequently utilized animal foods for weaning. A traditional first food in African cultures is actually raw liver which the mother would pre-chew in small amounts and then feed to her child.
    [Snip... read the link above for more information - j]

    Sarah
    The Healthy Home Economist holds a Master’s degree from the University of Pennsylvania. Mother to 3 healthy children, blogger, and best-selling author, she writes about the practical application of Traditional Diet and evidence-based wellness within the modern household. Her work has been featured by USA Today, The New York Times, ABC, NBC, and many others.

    [John, If for Sarah then link to Sarah. Thanks.] AZ
    [Link added, and snipped, sorry. Please don't copy whole articles unless you have permission. But thanks for the info. - Jo]

    30

  • #

    Don’t know if it’s correlation or cause but I’ve noticed people who eat with their heads are always in strife over food, digestion etc. Eat with the tummy, mouth and smell. Use your head for arithmetic homework if you still do that.

    Also, tradition is a better guide than fad. Health food kills because unnecessary decision and calculation subvert necessary appetite and instinct.

    Oh…and also…

    Margarine tastes disgusting for a reason and coffee that’s been roasted for longer than three weeks or ground for longer than three minutes is swill. (Hipsters are not always wrong, they just look and sound that way. Even men who wear scarves in summer do better coffee than most straight types.)

    Lastly…what’s cholesterol? (No, don’t tell me. Rhetorical.)

    41

  • #
    pat

    yes, this is EVERYTHING today.
    NOT behind paywall:

    1 Sept: Australian: The cost of going green: taxpayers hit with a $60bn power bill
    by Adam Creighton & Joe Kelly
    The government’s large and small-scale renewable energy ­targets, which will compel energy retailers to buy 33 terawatt hours of wind, solar and hydro energy by 2030, will deliver about $45bn of subsidies to renewable energy producers over 20 years, according to analysis by The Australian.

    The grab bag of direct subsidies from the Australian Renewable Energy Agency and the Clean Energy Finance Corporation — which have spent or lent concessionally, respectively, $870 million in grants since 2010, and $4.3bn since 2013 — are on top of that.

    Meanwhile, the proposed clean energy target arising from the government’s Finkel review, would mandate a further 33TWh of ­energy from renewable sources, costing an extra $11.3bn over the 10 years to 2030.

    Government MPs yesterday sounded the alarm over the subsidies and called for clarity over government plans for a new coal-fired power station…READ ALL
    FIRST COMMENT OF 170 AT TIME OF POSTING:
    Pat (NOT ME): $60 billion. And the rest.
    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/mining-energy/the-cost-of-going-green-taxpayers-hit-with-a-60bn-power-bill/news-story/ab391c41565a6429caff6e7c8eb947fc

    60

    • #
      pat

      should have said it is FRONT PAGE of The Australian.

      time to tell the politicians to drop the RET, etc, NOW.

      70

    • #

      Wow. Not even war, fire and drought could do to this country what Big Green is doing.

      Our coal, gas and nuke resources should be the world’s envy. WA should be gas central, SA should be nuke central, Vic should be all the latest lignite tech and Qld/NSW should be absolute energy powerhouses with centuries’ supply of the good straight black. (A bit more hydro might hit the spot, though not Back-to-the-Future Snowy fantasies. Park that Holden FX, Malcolm.)

      Instead…medieval junk that can’t even produce enough energy to make more medieval junk. And debt. And diesel bills. And generators made in China. And…Gawd.

      Just Gawd.

      80

  • #
    pat

    31 Aug: UK Sun: THIS IS HOW IT ENDS: Apocalypse predictions from Nobel Prize winners reveal the 10 greatest threats to humanity – from nuclear war to Donald Trump or Facebook
    A group of the world’s most intelligent people have spoken out about the doomsday fears which keep them awake at night
    By Jasper Hamill
    In a survey, the brainboxes revealed fears that nuclear war, ***environmental disaster and even Facebook pose a risk to the future of our species…
    Times Higher Education asked the boffins about the “biggest threat to mankind”.
    The experts who responded are known as laureates and represent one-quarter of the living Nobel prize winners in chemistry, physics, physiology, medicine and economics – making them arguably some of the cleverest people in the world.
    Just over a third (34 percent) said ***population rise or ***environmental degradation represented the gravest apocalypse risk…

    ***“Humans are very busy with the greatest climate change experiment since the ice ages,” John Mather, a senior scientist in cosmology at Nasa, told Times Higher Education, which carried out the survey…

    (INSERT)
    THE GREATEST THREATS TO CIVILISATION AS WE KNOW IT
    Fifty Nobel Prize winners were quizzed on they thought we’d be wiped out. Here’s how they responded:

    1) Population rise or environmental degradation: 34 per cent – 18 laureates
    The human population is set to soar to 9.7 billion in 2050 and 11.2 billion in 2100. Meanwhile, scientists expect climate change to cause grave environmental disaster…

    5) Donald Trump and ignorant leaders: 6 per cent – 3 laureates
    Scientists are no fan of Donald Trump, who is famous for questioning the existence of climate change. If populism continues to surge around the world, we could get leaders who fail to recognise threats to humanity and end up condemning us to a grim fate…
    —–

    Two people specifically mentioned Donald Trump as a threat to humanity.
    “I don’t think science can do much about him,” one said…
    https://www.thesun.co.uk/tech/4361323/apocalypse-predictions-from-nobel-prize-winners-reveal-the-10-greatest-threats-to-humanity-from-nuclear-war-to-donald-trump-or-facebook/

    Sun readers not taking kindly to this article in the comments.

    40

  • #
    Hasbeen

    This is an example of the Darwin principal working, when it is allowed to.

    Those who are silly enough to believe the rubbish that they should reduce fat, & eat more horse food will die younger, thus increasing the average IQ of the population.

    51

    • #

      I must be okay, then. Fer dinner tonite, sausages ‘n gravy,
      mashed potatoes…mmmm, steamed green vegetables. Pre-dinner
      glass of wine. )

      50

      • #
        Annie

        Yum. Tonight we are having roast leg of lamb, roast potatoes and carrots, cauliflower cheese made with LOTS of cheese and butter and other vegs if I get round to them. This is all a joint birthday bash as we were never all together to celebrate before.
        We usually eat loads of vegs along with our fish or meat or poultry or, sometimes, chickpeas (curried). Carbs usually at low doses but there will be a cheesecake tonight. It goes without saying that there will be wine!

        40

        • #

          Roast lamb and baked potatoes, my favorite, perhaps followed up
          by apricots and cream… Will there be music, Annie?

          40

        • #

          Annie, make sure you bake with dripping reserved from previous roasts. If unavailable, some bacon grease will serve. Actually, make that a lot of bacon grease.

          Serfs are on the right track with apricots and cream, but the cream must not be “lite”. “Lite” is for culinary Marxists who will be shot come the counter-revolution. (No real bullets used, but if you just say bang it’s enough to finish off a wretch who’s frightened of a few grams of milk fat.)

          Pork snags and lentils here tonight. Any added veg has been braised in bacon fat to make it safe. Some olive oil before serving should bring the whole thing up to human consumption fitness.

          50

          • #
            Annie

            I’d run out of dripping and bacon fat…used the last of the latter last night. I used butter instead. I wouldn’t dream of using so-called ‘lite’ cream…what an oxymoron. Proper thick full fat cream is the only stuff for me. However, as it was for birthdays we did indulge in some naughty cheesecake.

            30

          • #
            Annie

            I replied mosomoso but am in moderation! Maybe the use of the word f@t in relation to cream?!

            20

      • #
        AndyG55

        Crumbed chicken breast stuffed with ham, cheese and herds, with lightly tossed green salad and a nice Semillon to wash it down with. :-)

        40

        • #
          • #
            Annie

            Of cattle to produce the cream…

            30

            • #
              Hasbeen

              I can’t help laughing at people who use “light” or skim milk. I think it is brilliant of the dairy people to have come up with a way of selling the left over white stuff, after they have extracted the cream for manufacturing something good.

              That “light” stuff they boast has only 2% fat. Poor fools obviously don’t know, the real milk has only 4% fat anyway.

              61

  • #
  • #
    Toned-F

    My mother cooked everything she ate in animal fats. She lived to 99 years old, was rarely ill and and was fully mentally cognitive with no sign of dementia right up to her death which occurred shortly after falling and breaking her hip.

    90

    • #
      Hanrahan

      Mostly you break your hip and fall. I take osteoporosis seriously, while it doesn’t kill directly it has a major effect on quality of life.
      Again I trumpet D3 as great for bone health. Don’t rely on the few hundred IUs in a multi-vitamin, go for 10 times that amount if not getting sun.

      20

  • #
    OriginalSteve

    OT – The immoral desired impact by the lunatic NWO crowd and its huge power price hikes , is starting to happen….and hitting the most vulnerable….

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-09-01/canberrans-struggle-with-rising-electricity-prices/8860726?WT.ac=statenews_act

    “Canberra mum Grace Roberts often goes to bed hungry to ensure her five young children do not.

    She and her partner were already doing it tough as low-income earners, but the ACT’s soaring energy prices have left them struggling to feed their family.

    “I feel stressed a lot of the time with bills and budgeting … sometimes I don’t want to get out of bed.”

    The family is feeling the pressure of steadily rising power prices, having recently faced a gas bill more than triple the $247 they paid for the same period last year, after switching to gas heating.

    Their electricity bill set them back another $900 — and they are bracing for the arrival of even bigger bills in September, after a massive price hike came into effect on July 1.

    The changes, made in response to jumps in the wholesale market, were expected to add an average of $333 to the typical household’s electricity bill per year, and an average of $247 to gas payments.”

    60

  • #
    tom0mason

    Umm, what could go wrong with eating chemically synthesized fat substitutes.

    Well if you got plenty of spare underwear with you, and a good supply of bathroom tissue there’s always fake fat Olestra (aka Olean®) and fake oil Sorbestrin.
    However recent studies do not show it has a very good effect…

    http://abcnews.go.com/Health/Diet/eating-fake-fat-makes-real-fat-olestra-study/story?id=13893613

    20

  • #
    Dean_from_Ohio

    Shorter government: “Oops, our bad.”

    40

  • #
    Mark M

    O/T:

    Q. How many solar panels must Queensland install before Queensland prevents a “hottest winter evah!” climate event?

    Sept.1, 2017, Queensland weather: Hottest winter on record, Bureau of Meteorology says

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-09-01/queensland-has-hottest-winter-on-record-bom-says/8862422

    April 12, 2017: Queensland is leading the way in solar power and battery storage …

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-04-12/qld-leading-nation-in-household-solar-power-and-battery-storage/8440396

    A. It doesn’t matter, they have nothing to do with each other.

    21

  • #
    SMS

    If you’ve ever read the paper written by Ioannidis, then you know there is a good chance any study is wrong. At least four out of five are of no significance.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1c/Ioannidis_%282005%29_Why_Most_Published_Research_Findings_Are_False..pdf

    This is just another example of bad science based on bad research.

    30

  • #
    James

    Next time your Doctor tries to push statins on you, ask him how well it worked out for Lynn Smaha. It you are talking to your cardiologist, and he does not know about Lynn Samha, then you should probably cease to do business with him. Dr Lynn Smaha was the former President of the American Heart Association. He died at age 63 from a heart attack. He was a strong believer in the lipid hypothesis! He was also very much into fitness, and a very good pilot and flight instructor.

    There is another flight instructor who instructs at the same airport. This instructor likes to eat at McDonalds, and always has a little weight on him. He does not know what jogging is. They both used to joke about health issues. However the instructor who was doing everything ‘healthy’ died at age 63 the other fellow is still active and almost 80 years old.

    50

  • #
    James

    Next time your Doctor tries to push statins on you, ask him how well it worked out for Lynn Smaha. It you are talking to your cardiologist, and he does not know about Lynn Samha, then you should probably cease to do business with him. Dr Lynn Smaha was the former President of the American Heart Association. He died at age 63 from a heart attack. He was a strong believer in the lipid hypothesis! He was also very much into fitness, and a very good pilot and flight instructor.

    There is another flight instructor who instructs at the same airport. This instructor likes to eat at McDonalds, and always has a little weight on him. He does not know what jogging is. They both used to joke about health issues. However the instructor who was doing everything ‘healthy’ died at age 63 the other fellow is still active and almost 80 years old.

    30

    • #
      Bushkid

      Having had my beloved experience the full and awful “side effects” of statins, and with him still living with some of the residual effects some 3 years after stopping taking them, I would tell any doctor who tried to prescribe them for me to take a long walk off a short pier into very deep water with a length of stout chain fastened firmly around his own ankles. The “side effects” can be absolutely devastating, and in my beloved blokes case were well on their way to killing him faster than any possible heart trouble could have. And to rub salt into the wounds, it turns out that his cholesterol levels weren’t at all high. But that didn’t stop this “doctor” prescribing the highest possible dose for him. It seems doctors aren’t there for our health these days, but for the health of their own bank balances.

      50

    • #
      Hanrahan

      If taking statins supplementing with CoQ10 is essential IMHO. The process by which the statins prevent manufacture of cholesterol also prevents the manufacture of CoQ10, which we produce in decreasing amounts anyway as we age. I regularly read of another doctor recommending it for something or other.

      30

  • #
    Don A

    For an excellent study/review of the fat verses carbs argument read David Gillespie “Big Fat Lies” published 2012. Takes a long time for the message to get through.

    40

  • #
    Power Grab

    Oh, and here’s another random observation:

    Whenever I read the obituaries and they include the profession of the deceased, I have noticed that (more often than not) folks in the medical profession tend to die before retirement age, or shortly thereafter.

    One of those things that makes one go “Hmmm…”, right?

    20

  • #
    David Maddison

    Nearly all Green policies are environmentally destructive or life shortening. Of course, it is mainly the socialists behind the food fascism wanting us to be vegan and high carb.

    I’d be willing to bet conservatives eat more meat and fat and less carbs than socialists and are better nourished and live longer.

    Check out this meme of meat loving Nigella Lawson vs a vegan.

    https://pics.me.me/this-woman-is-51-years-old-she-is-tv-health-24877962.png

    31

  • #
    RoHa

    When I was a boy in the 50s, they used to show us a chart of The Good Foods (the boring stuff) and The Bad Foods (the good stuff).

    A few years later they moved half The Good (dairy, eggs, red meat) to The Bad. I was expecting them eventually to move all The Good to The Bad, and then put The Bad into The Good. That way I could claim to have eaten a healthy diet all my life. Instead, they decided we weren’t eating enough fibre. (Fibre?) We had to live on a diet of muesli made from ground-up coconut matting and builder’s rubble.

    Then they decided too much fibre caused colon cancer, and concentrated on 99% fat free.

    My mother never divagated from her traditional, vitamin-free, English diet of salt, sugar, and fat in roughly equal proportions. It got her eventually. She died last year, just a few weeks short of her 101st birthday.

    60

  • #
    Another Ian

    Somewhat O/T but may be linked to increased death rates for followers of things green due to worry

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2017/08/31/invest-with-greens-or-sinners/

    30

  • #
    pat

    CAGW is us:

    31 Aug: NorthernTerritoryNews: Darwin records hottest August on record according to weather bureau
    THIS year’s dry season is tracking towards its highest mean maximum temperature on record, according to Bureau of Meteorology forecasters.
    BOM said Darwin just sweated through its hottest August on record.
    Climatologist Greg Browning said the Top End was tracking at its second highest mean maximum temperature on record…

    “Darwin Airport, Centre Island, Jabiru, Gove, Tindal and Channel Point all recorded their highest August mean daily maximum temperatures,” he said…
    http://www.ntnews.com.au/news/northern-territory/darwin-records-hottest-august-on-record-according-to-weather-bureau/news-story/87a16f3ad1579b216465ec34b0f3656b

    10

    • #
      David Maddison

      When I see any “record” from Bureau of Meteorology I just think they’ve been faking data again.

      Are there any independent measurements available?

      61

      • #
        Joe V.

        Bureau Of Making-it-up – or stretching plausibility to the four corners.

        30

      • #
        Greg Cavanagh

        Australian records aren’t very long. It shouldn’t be a surprise to anybody that any given location will break a records of some description often.

        What records do we keep? Highest temperature, lowest temperature, (same for the month), (same for the year), highest rainfall, longest drought, strongest wind, number of rainy days, and probably a whole heap I can’t think of right now.

        So I’ve listed 12 records that could be broken at any given location, territory, town, or whole of Australia. It should be obvious that with our short recorded history, any of those 12 records can be broken at any of the thousands of towns and locations around Australia every year.

        31

      • #
        Ava

        Oh David you’re beginning to sound like a broken record.

        10

  • #
    ROM

    Max Planck (23 April 1858 – 4 October 1947) was the originator of modern quantum theories and one of the most important German physicists of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, winning the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1918.

    His well known quote paraphased from the german;— “Science advances one funeral at a time”.

    .

    Sadly it seems that this time around a much vaunted “Science” has finally advanced again not just one funeral at a time but perhaps it needed a couple of million funerals before Science finally recognised its life shortening and for some life destroying mistake.

    30

  • #
    Patrick healy

    P.S

    I forgot to mention two other things which contribute to longevity
    1/ Choose your parents very carefully
    2/ Drink copious amounts of good Aus red wine and Kiwi red (when I can afford the exorbitant price here in Scotland)
    Slainte.

    40

  • #
    Joe V.

    Cholesterol is essential to brain function. Remember that (if you can) when you ever get put on statins that destroy it, to consider something like a Coenzyme Q10 / Ubiquinol to counteract that.

    60

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    JustAnOldGuy

    Oh Jeeeze! Yet another don’t eat do eat study. Fur cryin’ out loud! If I like it I’m gonna eat it. After all I’m under a death sentence pronounced by the OBGYN that slapped my butt in lieu of pounding a gavel on a bench many, many years ago (and by the way he was wearing a green cap in lieu of a black one-I didn’t notice if he wore a wig under it). So I will choose my last meal and any and all other meals I take before sentence is carried out without too much regard for the latest study by anyone. I wonder if anyone has ever done a study on the effects of stress induced by dietary studies? I just picture some poor hypochondriac fearfully pondering his or her or its past dietary sins and sinking into deep and severe depression, perhaps even contemplating self destruction over too many helpings of whatever is now out of fashion.

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    Ross

    Years ago when the low fat diet became the rage and all the new low fat products came onto the market I started looking at the ingredients. What,almost universally, happened was the sugar content increased. Taking the fat out made the product lose it’s taste so they upped the sugar. It’s taken 20-30 years for them to work out the issue of excess sugar.

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    Ross Handsaker

    The easiest way to reduce carbohydrate intake is to cut out all fruits and vegetables in the diet. The dry weight of these foods is 95% carbohydrate!!

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    Deano

    Certain things have lead me to be entirely skeptical of the diet advice guru busine$$:-

    After years of hearing endlessly repeated advice to avoid substance X, we hear that “For the first time, scientists have studied substance X and discovered it is probably beneficial and there is no evidence linking it to health problems”. Why were the official government health advisors so confident in claiming they knew it was bad for our health?

    Most diet experts die young (but it probably feels like they’ve been alive for 150 years).

    How the hell did our bodies evolve to need all those supplements derived from unheard of rare plants sold in pharmacies and health shops?

    I can drink like a fish (occasionally!) and wake up feeling fine. My Chinese boss is under the table after half a glass of shandy. I love milk but he can’t digest it. We’re all different.

    Diet advice has a lot in common with end-of-the-world predictions – we keep getting new versions and each time “This one really, really is 100% TRUE!”

    Fans of Woody Allen might have seen his 70′s comedy ‘Sleeper’ in which he has been cryogenicly frozen and woken up in 2173. He is immediately given an injection of concentrated junk food to help revive him. As a health food shop proprietor, Allen is shocked at what the doctor is administering. The doctor explains to his medical students watching on that this poor fellow is from a bygone era when they actually believed that mung bean spouts and carrot juice was better than hamburgers and ice cream. His students laugh and looked shocked at Allen’s outdated beliefs.

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