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Brexit: Lots of countries want to do trade deals with UK. (Surprise, Surprise)

The fifth biggest economy in the world suddenly frees itself from worlds biggest bureaucratic basket case, and everyone else is knocking at the door?.

Daily Mail:  Countries are lining up to enter trade talks with Britain in the wake of the decision to leave the European Union, it was claimed last night.

American politicians are clamouring for an agreement, while talks could soon begin with Australia, South Korea and India.


Otherwise, Brexit is a disaster. Indeed it is so unthinkable, half the pundits are still thinking up reasons why it might not happen. Today uncertainty is what Tony Blair wants, and for as long as possible — “Let’s keep the options open” he says, as he thinks up a list of excuses to ignore a Yes:No vote, like an opinion poll.  “People can change their minds” he points out. And they do, which is why we elect governments then throw them out two weeks later when their polls fall below 50%.

On the Twelth Day of Brexit the excuses are hitting the Orwellian-Turbo-Booster: If Britain leaves the EU it will lose sovereign control says some guy in Ireland. Black is white. Up is down. And freedom is slavery. In order for Britain to have more sovereignty it needs to stay in the EU and let a bunch of faceless men tell it what hair-dryers they should use.  Makes sense. The EU aims to change the climate with household appliances — hair dryers, kettles, lawn mowers, and vacuum cleaners too.

If Britain leaves the EU, Merkel is going to send some really nasty weather.

Oh, and Nigel Farage has resigned from being leader of  UKIP. Sigh. He may well be tired, and deserves a break, but the UK hasn’t left the EU yet. (Bold words, link, added, sorry about being a bit vague).
h/t Another Ian, Pat.
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99 comments to Brexit: Lots of countries want to do trade deals with UK. (Surprise, Surprise)

  • #
    graphicconception

    I think Farage is only stepping down from his UKIP leadership position. He is still a member of UKIP and still an MEP – although he has said that he will not be in the European Parliament unless Brexit is on the agenda.

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    • #
      DavidH

      BBC news had a quite fair summary of Nigel Farage’s political career. They indicated that Farage had, earlier on and before the tonic of Brexit to keep him enthused, been suffering considerable back pain, a result of injuries he sustained from a plane crash a few years ago. He’s seen the vote to leave the EU come to fruition, so he can now take a deserved rest. Well done Nigel and thanks, from all of us whether EU serfs or not.

      50

  • #
    richard ilfeld

    Thus the motto of the progressive elites:
    One Man, One Vote, one time (if we win).
    Otherwise, the process must have been flawed.

    250

    • #
      John Smith

      The great champions of the common man, except when the common man does not do as he as told.
      (oh sorry … meant to say common non-gender specific person)

      170

    • #
      Russ Wood

      O/T: In Sir Terry Pratchett’s Ankh-Morpork, they DID have one man, one vote. The one man was the Patrician, and yes, he DID have the vote!

      00

  • #
    Roy Hogue

    After giving it just a little thought, if I were leader in country X, I think I would rather trade with a country Y, which is independent of some unelected bureaucrat in some office where Y has no advocate and no control. I could have a lot more confidence that Y can make its own deals to suit itself and not be second guessed by anyone, not have deals fall through after they’re signed, not have terms dictated to us that are not in the best interest of both of us, X and Y, etc.

    Makes sense to me. Bring it on! But of course, I’m the nut case who thinks the smaller entity can run itself much better than can the larger. So don’t put too much faith in me. What do I know? ;-)

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    • #
      Roy Hogue

      Better that the UK make up it’s collective mind that the deal is final and do it sooner rather than later. Hard medicine put off only gets harder. And there will be bumps in the road, no doubt about it. But the nation that gave us the Magna Charta upon which our whole concept of western democracy rests, surely can cope with getting things in order as England again rather than their former condition as a vassal state of the EU.

      That alternative leaves a bad taste in my mouth, notwithstanding that I have no right to tell them what they must do.

      170

      • #
        Rereke Whakaaro

        Better that the UK make up it’s collective mind that the deal is final and do it sooner rather than later.

        But it is not final, and will not be final, until Cameron moves aside, to allow somebody else, with more ba…, um… moral fortitude, to actually invoke incantation number fifty.

        In the mean time, the vaporous Armani set will keep on ignoring the fact that they were too busy, or too lazy, or too stupid, to vote in the actual referendum, but now seek to change the outcome by weight of protest body-count.

        Where is the stiff upper lip of the British Establishment? Above a nonexistant chin!

        I have now had my rant, and feel much better for the sharing of it.

        200

        • #
          Annie

          That dreadful person, Tony Blair, is now trying to say, never mind the 4% majority in favour of leave, that there might have to be a second referendum. When there was a vote of 0.6% in favour of a Welsh Assembley he thought that was sufficient! Talk about interfering hypocrisy!

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          • #
            Manfred

            Bliar is as Bliar does.

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          • #
            Analitik

            Blair saying to delay/stay is one of the best arguments to forge ahead at all possible speed with finalising the Brexit (as per the EU directive).

            Looks like even Obama is facing reality after his rhetoric that Britain would go to the “back of the queue” for a U.S. trade deal
            Obama Backtracks on UK Trade Warning to Limit Brexit Fallout

            This is all so predictable for anyone with a sense of reality

            100

            • #
              OriginalSteve

              Take away a globalist socialists’ favourite toy ( control ) and they all go crying to Mummy….boo hoo…..

              Britain managed to run 1/4 of the world, I think putting up with a few diplomatic temper tantrums fwom those poor sooks and poor losers in the EU will be easy….

              30

      • #
        PeterPetrum

        Roy, please do not use “UK” and “England” in the same paragraph, unless you mean to differentiate between them, which I do not think that you did as you seem to see them as synonymous. Despite what Scotland may be thinking at the moment and the fact that the English themselves often refer to the UK as “England” (and have done so since the Union of the Crowns when the first King of Britain was James VI of Scotland) the term UK refers to England, Scotland, Wales and N Ireland. England refers to England alone.

        30

        • #
          Roy Hogue

          Peter,

          I’m in your debt for the explanation and I apologize for my lack of knowledge.

          My own heritage is Scottish on my father’s side with the name Hogue being originally spelled Hogge. Family history has it that my grandfather whose first name I bear finally got tired of being called Hog and changed the spelling to Hogue. He even went to the extent of having a new headstone made for his father’s grave and changed the spelling there as well.

          Somehow those little historical distinctions that can mean so much don’t get passed along. I would be much more aware of how the two Irelands see their situation.

          I shall endeavour to get it right from now on.

          Unfortunately, were granddad still alive today I would have to tell him it didn’t work because I was still called Hog unmercifully as I grew up. And I got just as tired of it too.

          10

    • #
      ATheoK

      Good observation; phrasing your point of rationale slightly differently.

      With who would you prefer to do a deal?
      A) A smaller simpler entity close to the source of the items you’re purchasing or selling to?
      - a) Simple short time frames for deal completion
      - b) Minimal interferences
      - c) Satisfied customers

      B) A massive bureaucratic institution with what appears to be never ending pages of regulations, requirements, limitations and dozens of approval stages for every item and service up for barter.
      - a) Lengthy periods of time for every decision level.
      - b) Interfering busybodies delaying deals seeking benefits for some other country.
      - c) Customers wondering when they’re going to escape bureaucratic limbo/hades.

      20

    • #
      Horace Jason Oxboggle

      Once again, UP is the new Down. Now, all that is required to do well in, or maybe even win, an election, is to concoct a lie and keep repeating it. Goebbels was right, and Bill Shorten used his technique, to achieve a “Brilliant” campaign! Readers are invited to submit a list of possible subjects on which he can run the next “brilliant” campaign.

      Another of his attacks was on a proposed levy of $5 to visit a doctor’s office, not dissimilar to what Bob Hawke proposed many years ago. Let’s subject that to a bit of perspective. EVERY SINGLE DAY, Australia pays interest of $40 Million on its borrowings that help fund its dreams. Spread across a population of 23 million, that amounts to just over $1.73 per citizen per day. So the share sustained daily by a family of three is $5.19! How many doctor’s visits are made PER DAY, 365 days per year, by a family of three? Get real, Bill Shorten!

      $40 Million per day gets us to $1 Billion in 25 days. How many schools, hospitals, or infrastructure could that produce over time? But we are led to believe that Wayne Swan was a better treasurer than Peter Costello! More Down is the new Up!

      20

  • #
    charplum

    I am so glad the link was put in the article to the regulation of hair dryers. I am not sure but didn’t they do the same on vacuum cleaners too? Weren’t people buying up the existing ones before the new regulations went into force.

    I hope they don’t weigh in on toilet paper. Maybe they have. If you go to Venezuela you are advised to BYOTP. They don’t have any.

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    • #
      • #
        PeterPetrum

        Angry, the REALLY stupid thing about this regulation (apart from the fact that it will make no difference to the climate) is that they have not realised that to brown a piece if toast, boil a kettle or dry your hair a finite amount of heat is required. So, by reducing the wattage of a toaster, kettle or hairdryer, all they are doing is forcing the user to use these pieces of equipment longer in order to acjphieve the required result. Thus the same amount of power will be used and the same amount of CO2 will be released. Sie sind Idioten!

        10

      • #
        Roy Hogue

        Don’t laugh. It’s coming everywhere. My plumber was recently here to replace a leaking pressure relief valve on the water heater. He told me that California has plans in the works to prohibit water heaters with the high recovery rate mine has. They may also begin to ban heaters with the 40 gallon capacity I have. I asked about tankless heaters but he told me they need a larger diameter gas feed than the 3/4 inch I have so it wouldn’t work properly. So I’ll tear up the house running 1 inch pipe to get tankless or take a giant step backward someday when this heater quits on me.

        There is no insanity a bunch of self righteous nut cases will not inflict upon the world around them in the name of saving the planet. Never mind that California alone will have no more impact on the world than will Australia’s grand plans.

        20

        • #
          Mari C

          Roy – my favorite (hah) measure taken to conserve resources was the toilet change. What once was an easy thing, a push of the handle and voila, water whooshed all the used food and liquids away, is now a question of how many flushes will it take, should I use the “only liquids” button? Will it all go dooowwwnnnnnn??? I was not as frustrated by the reduced-flow showers and taps, as that is (currently) an easy fix. Power-assist toilets only seem to spray water -everywhere- and given the stuff in that water, well, I won’t go that route. If it were just me, I could deal with it, but a 6′ 200+ lb fiancé puts a strain on the ability of those water-savers.

          My next favorite (sigh) measure will come about when I have to replace my old furnace and central A/C unit. I don’t mind the higher efficiency, I mind the circuit boards they come with – the ones that cost a fortune to repair or replace. My electrical bill averages under $50/month, and my natural gas bill isn’t much higher. But I will be forced to spend several thousands on new units soon, and the total savings I see -might- be $10-12/month on both gas and electric.

          My water heater would send the eco-police into fits in California – a 50 gallon natural gas tank that’s 16 or so years old. Takes a long while in the winter to get hot water through the taps, pipes run under the house in a crawl space that’s generally no more than 40 degrees (F) most days. On below 0 (F) days/weeks I leave a tap or two running at a heavy drip – hot and cold – so the pipes don’t freeze. Guess the water-police will be after me too. Hazard of living in a 1920s-built house in 2016. (Water bill is also low – it’s the sewer rates that are killing me, they’ve tripled in the last 5 or 6 years, thanks to old city pipes and mandates for new and improved sanitary (not) sewer controls, over-flow controls, treatment processes – none of which reduce the street runoff and flooding, and some of which was supposed to be dealt with years ago and somehow wasn’t)

          20

          • #
            Roy Hogue

            Mari,

            Re toilets: We managed to find, by dumb luck, a low water American Standard toilet that actually works. I was very surprised because in the past, well, you know what I would say if I go on. The plunger was constantly needed.

            We have central heating and air conditioning with a control circuit board in it that dates from 1998. That circuit board is exposed every time I open the blower housing to replace the filter and it’s still working like a charm almost 18 years later. A lot has been learned from putting sensitive electronics in automobiles that everyone else now benefits from. So you don’t need to be quite as afraid of the newer units as you think. Some simple precautions are enough — if you are likely to touch the circuit board or wiring connected to it, simply also touch the metal frame of the unit and you’ll be fine.

            About the water heater, I was able to resist cussing out the state in front of the plumber.

            10

    • #

      what I tire of (or maybe what draws me to them) on sites like this is misinformation (random myths about the EU) used to support a premise I agree with (Brexit). Maybe that is why my politics is questioned.

      Anyway, the toaster/hairdryer energy use proposal is still a draft report. Maybe the newly broken away U.K will independently take up the proposal that they helped draft, much in the way that they lead the way in Europe with phasing out of incandescent globes?

      211

    • #

      What about the regulation on bananas (the so-called bendy banana act) see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commission_Regulation_(EC)_No._2257/94 I do not think bananas are grown in the EU. The EU is bureaucratic nonsense and an exercise of power by the stupid people how would never be elected by a thinking public.

      30

  • #
    Fuel Filter

    The EU also has sixty + (yes, 60+) regs on damned pillowcases.

    Pillowcases…

    Living in Southern California, whenever I think we’ve got it bad here that’s the reg I bring to mind.

    Then I can sleep a little better.

    171

  • #
    diogenese2

    Roy; “Better that the UK make up it’s collective mind that the deal is final”

    It is, the result is final for no less reason that the whole world knows and has responded to it as of “seismic importance” to quote Tony Blair!. There is no way the UK can back away and retain any more credibility than our football team in the Euro’s.

    Tony Blair (who he?) will, in 2 days time be crucified for taking the country into the war in Iraq by deliberate deceit.

    “The public inquiry was launched in 2009 into the UK’s participation in the US-led invasion of Iraq – which led to the toppling of Saddam Hussein and led to British troops remaining on Iraqi soil for six years.”

    He admits

    “There is going to be a negotiation of extraordinary complexity where there are a thousand devils in every detail. Those we used to call “our European partners” are, unsurprisingly, divided and uncertain themselves,”

    Article 50: This is notice to quit/resign which the EU, by its own rules is obliged to accept. It is a process that cannot be rescinded. The (most probable) next UK Prime Minister (Teresa May) has already acknowledged that it will be invoked.

    As for that Irish lunatic Colm Keena, he is so unhinged that even his Irish logical makes no sense.

    “It would be a disaster for the UK to be turfed out of the EU without proper provision being made for continued trade. It would also, of course, be a disaster for the EU, and is probably unlikely to happen.”

    Of course it is a disaster for the EU therefore they are anxious to get it done and dusted as soon as possible.

    Things are moving very fast.

    On another point on this July 4th have you wondered why the US Presidential election takes place in November but inauguration is mid- January ? It is because, in 1789 it took that long to collect and count the votes. I note that the Aussies are maintaining the hallowed tradition.

    90

    • #
      pattoh

      The CFR/ROUND TABLE/RIIA/City built the EU so naturally their puppets will be spruiking their mantra/propaganda-

      “But WAIT! there’s More!” ( steak knives?)

      If the pre July 4 spike in Au/Ag is anything to go by; Wall Street is getting nervous.

      40

      • #
        joseph

        I think the Trilateral Commission should get a mention . . . . . .

        10

        • #
          pattoh

          Should have thrown in the Bilderberger too…

          But for the main thrust of this site I tend to look askance at the GS-UN Agenda 21 nexus ( & our current PM).

          The Dark Crew is alive & well here with no better recent example of the MSM blackout of the ALA & their election ads.

          / tin hat.

          31

          • #
            Angry

            The ALA should sue the outlets that refused to run their ads due to breach of the anti discrimination act !

            31

  • #
    diogenese2

    Probably O/T but this is too good to miss.
    I think I have mentioned that the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds now have an operating Wind Turbine at their headquarters in Sandy, Bedfordshire.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/rspb-bird-friendly-wind-turbine-will-cut-carbon-emissions-by-800-tons-a-year-a6902271.html

    Gratefully it is not visible from the cemetery where I expect to be laid to rest (not that I will be looking) but this might easy some qualms of conscience;

    http://www.breitbart.com/london/2016/07/04/wind-industry-lawyer-brexit-help-us-kill-birds-bats/

    91

  • #
    Cephus0

    Pro EU street demonstrations in cities across the UK. The remain side are now showing their true colours as genuine fascists. They were beaten in a fair referendum but refuse to accept the democratic vote – ergo they are totalitarians. They will of course get nowhere other than a very clear demonstration of their ugly natures.

    There is rampant elitism as banksters, multinational corp execs and ivory tower academics with their noses in the EU grant trough and no clue about the lives of ordinary working people claim that only they are well enough informed to make a rational vote and the ordinary people cannot be trusted to vote on issues like this. Anyone who voted to leave is branded by these totalitarians as pond scum, racist, bigots etc. – the customary response to any rational argument against their position

    Our Universities, like the Australian Universities and Universities across the Western World are infested with leftist totalitarian, global warming pseudoscientific, free speech suppressing elitists but now everyone can see them a little bit more clearly and there is at last some hope that ordinary people will rebel against this vile ideology.

    Brexit is a first strike and has gone home deep and hard and true. Many others across Europe are just waiting for their own referenda now and the ghastly, corrupt and dictatorial EU is not long for this world.

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    • #
      Rereke Whakaaro

      I always question why these “spontaneous” demonstrations, across multiple geographical locations occur. What do the protest organisers seek to achieve? why do the protestors bother to turn out now, when they may not have even bothered to vote in the referendum itself?

      Are their jobs on the line? Is there some other financial incentive? Are the afraid that they will not be able to travel in Europe any more? Or is it just for the sense of “belonging”?

      Or perhaps they are too self-absorbed in their extended social life, to realise how significant the referendum would be?

      I suspect the latter. Social media would have taken an informal vote on whether or not the referendum was important, and come to a collective opinion that it was not.

      They obviously feel let down. It will take a while, before they come to the realise that the ‘wisdom of crowds’, is only as wise as the average people in the group.

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      • #

        Back in the late 1970′s (when $20 was a lot of money for students), an enterprising young chap at the University of Western Australia ran a shadow organization called Rent-a-Crowd. When it wasn’t swot or exam week, he could usually muster dozens to hundreds for an event. Fees were per-capita. He was doing it for “fun”; to prove a point and passed the income to participants. Plenty of regulars; professional protesters, if you will.

        Same chap was also notorious for “stacking” soc. council meetings of Student Guild to get favourable treatment of the clubs that he liked.

        60

      • #
        delcon2

        I think you might find that”Brussels”may be pulling the strings,just like they do with Greenpiece,WWF,FOE and most of the other NGO’s.

        10

      • #
        Russ Wood

        Terry Pratchett: The IQ of a mob is the IQ of the dumbest member divided by the number in the mob.

        10

    • #
      Ross

      Cephuso

      They will try another including legal challenges but they have got it very wrong this time by the looks of it. Picked this up from a comment on Breitbart

      ““Mishcon’s proposed challenge is devoid of all legal merit. As a matter of law, giving of notification under Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union is a matter of Crown prerogative. No Act or other parliamentary approval is required before this is done. In the European Union Act 2011, Parliament has chosen to require parliamentary approval before ministers are allowed to take certain actions under the European treaties, but notably has not extended any such restrictions to Article 50. Any argument that there is an implied restriction is therefore quite hopeless.

      As a matter of constitutional and political authority, the decision of the British people in a national referendum authorised by Act of Parliament not merely permits but mandates the giving of notice, without the need for any vote by Parliament. It is deeply objectionable but sadly not unexpected that those who suffer from a deep-rooted contempt for democracy should resort to legal antics of this kind in an attempt to frustrate the democratic decision of the British people.”

      Martin Howe QC
      Chairman
      Lawyers for Britain “

      60

  • #
    Robert O

    The point of the regulations seems to be one has to have low wattage appliances because the wind and solar farms don’t produce all that much electricity isn’t it? However, this is a false premise since they will take longer to boil water etc., but what do you expect from bureaucrats who think they can control the climate.

    Incidentally, here in Qld. AGL is going ahead with a windfarm at Coopers Gap as part of the Qld. government’s 50% renewable plan: 350 MW capacity, 115 turbines, 13,200 ha. of farmland, 25 year lifespan, but cannot find any production estimates, probably around about 85 MW on average.

    60

    • #
      Dennis

      Twenty five year lifespan, obviously stated design operating life but the real situation would be more like fifteen years or so I understand.

      So add the cost of early replacement to the analysis and then see a trap for shareholders.

      40

    • #

      This wind plant will have a Nameplate Capacity of 350MW.

      Each unit at Stanwell Power Station, 20KM from my front door has a Nameplate of 365MW and there are 4 units, so a Nameplate of 1460MW.

      One unit at Stanwell holds a World record for the longest continuous operation delivering its full power, 1073 days, just short of three years.

      This proposed wind plant will take ten years and four months to deliver the same power that ONE unit delivered in 1073 days.

      Pretend that this wind plant actually achieves normal operation for 25 years, a huge ask. Well Stanwell will deliver the same power at normal operation in just on TWO YEARS.

      Wind Power – worth every cent in subsidies. (Yeah! Right!)

      Tony.

      100

      • #

        Oh, and also here, keep in mind the Queensland Government’s plan to have 50% renewables by 2030, only 15 years from now.

        This Coopers Gap wind plant was first proposed in 2008, and was originally supposed to have a Nameplate of 500MW, so it’s nothing new here.

        They hope to have it delivering power by 2020, so 12 years for this one power plant from proposal to power delivery.

        And they want to have 50% by 2030. There is no way on Earth that will happen.

        Tony.

        80

        • #
          Robert O

          Is it a valid assumption that the wind speeds will be as strong as they are down south? It seems that one needs about winds of 40kph to provide max. production from the wind turbines and even down south they rarely do this, usually more like 70-80% when its windy.

          The capacity of the King Is. turbines is 2.5 MW, but for the last three weeks the most I have seen is 1850 KW, might have seen 2300 once.

          I am interested to make a valid comparison between diesel/wind/solar, but need some more data apart from saying the input of solar is negligible.

          10

          • #

            Having been doing all this for so long now, there was something I noticed during the second year of chasing up wind plant proposals, back in 2009.

            First I had to decipher the language used for the proposals to explain it in plain English for people who loved these d@mned things. You know, supply X number of homes, Number of Tonnes of CO2 saved. (umm, only saved if they construct the proposed wind plant INSTEAD of an equivalent nameplate old technology coal fired plant.)

            Once that was accomplished, (and they were really bad back in 09/10/11, full of ways to hide that they could not really do what was claimed) I found something really odd.

            All the modelling for actual power delivery (once I worked it out from their misdirection) was based around a Capacity Factor (CF) of 38%.

            It wasn’t just the occasional one either, you know, one here and another a little later on. I went back and checked and every single one of them used that 38% figure for the Capacity Factor for the plant.

            I used that 38% CF and Wind and different connotations and went searching, not just page one of the results, but patiently going through a number of pages.

            I finally found something, and I saved the link, but it was disappeared after a while, and very little can be found about that figure 38% now. (and now having said that, what’s the bet someone finds something)

            So now, have a look at the original Wikipedia information for Coopers Gap (at this link)

            See the text box at top right, and at the bottom of that box Power Generation.

            500MW Nameplate and 1.7TWH average generation.

            Don’t believe me. You do the Maths

            500 X 24 X 365.25 will give you the theoretical 100% Power generation, where the 500 is the Nameplate, 24 hours in a day, and 365.25 days in a year.

            Once you get the result compare that with the proposed average generation of 1.7TWH, and hey, surprise surprise, 38%.

            Incidentally, back in early April of 2011, I made a Post for my home site on this proposed wind plant and at that Post is the link to the original proposal, and the site was identified back in 2005, so 15 years to get power delivery from the thought bubble ….. with 14 years now until this ratbag outfit Government wants its 50% renewables by.

            How Renewable Power Disguises Its Failure To Deliver

            Tony.

            50

      • #
        tom0mason

        Tony,
        Ain’t it strange how ‘free’ energy costs so much?

        40

  • #
    Another Ian

    This looks an excellent reason to be Brexiting

    “EU Says Drinking Water Can’t Prevent Dehydration”

    http://realclimatescience.com/2016/07/eu-says-water-cant-prevent-a-lack-of-water/

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  • #
    MarloweJ

    “Black is white. Up is down. And freedom is slavery. In order for Britain to have more sovereignty it needs to stay in the EU and let a bunch of faceless men tell it what hair-dryers they should use.”

    This all sounds very familiar, like saving the planet from global warming. Fear and lies are the first rules from the totalitarian play book.

    120

  • #
    Ross

    One thing is absolutely sure –the Greens are extremely annoyed about the result.( Based on comments I’ve seen on various sites from the usual AGW supporters).

    Blair has just seen another big trough to put his snout in or another gravy train to hop on. He has no shame !!

    130

  • #
    Dennis

    The world will secure a much better future once the UN organisations, EU and other socialist manipulated agendas are dealt with and no longer funded.

    100

    • #
      Rereke Whakaaro

      The socialist institutions may well go away in time.

      But what will happen to the socialist people who currently work in, and identify with, those institutions?

      Socialist institutions are a many-headed hydra. You chop off one head, and another will emerge, in its place.

      It has taken the best part of fifty years for the EU to get to its present state.

      It will take a further fifty years, even with a shortage of funds, for the EU to die, and then reincarnate into something else that may be better, or may be worse.

      100

    • #
      tom0mason

      Dennis,
      The market for very slightly used lefty bureaucrats is already past over-capacity. Need to build even more sties and hog pens to house them all.
      Weren’t they sold as recyclable? For the life of me, I can’t see what they would be reused for.

      30

  • #
    pat

    4 Jul: CNBC: LSE shareholders vote in favor of Deutsche Boerse deal
    by Katy Barnato & Spriha Srivastava
    Shareholders of the U.K.’s London Stock Exchange Group (LSE) voted 99.89 percent in favor of an all-share merger with Germany’s Deutsche Boerse on Monday.
    The result indicates the vast majority of shareholders want the $27 billion (£20 billion) merger to proceed, despite the U.K.’s vote to leave the European Union (EU) last month…
    German market regulator BaFin has raised concerns about headquartering a euro zone exchange outside the EU.
    “German regulators are uncomfortable with the idea that the base of operations will be situated in London and given that this deal was always about the lucrative clearing operations and euro-denominated derivatives, this deal could well find itself susceptible to further regulatory tweaking in the weeks and months ahead,” Michael Hewson, chief markets analyst at CMC Markets, told CNBC via email.
    However, another expert said BaFin might not be able to veto the deal…
    The firms would continue to hold headquarters in London and Frankfurt, LSE has said.
    Sandstrom said Brexit might actually work in favor of the merger.
    “From the very beginning, they have said Brexit is not going to destroy the deal. It might make the deal even more compelling to have one leg in each — the U.K. and the EU,” he told CNBC.
    http://www.cnbc.com/2016/07/04/london-stock-exchange-group-shareholders-vote-9992-in-favor-of-deutsche-boerse-deal.html

    1 Jul: UK Sun: Robert Fisk: Britain is best for business: HSBC and Barclays will stay in Britain post-Brexit saying London is still the centre of the financial world
    Companies are showing their confidence in the UK and countries are clamouring to do trade deals with us
    Reassuring people about jobs he also said the referendum vote would not change HSBC’s hiring plans “to any meaningful degree”.
    The company already has a major presence in Paris and before the referendum was thinking post-Brexit about 1,000 London jobs might move there…
    Away from the financial world, oil giant Royal Dutch Shell is showing its confidence in Britain by saying a £4billion investment in the UK by 2018 would go ahead as planned…
    Business Secretary Sajid Javid is preparing for a hectic schedule of visits to countries across the world with nations wanting to increase trade with us when we leave the EU…
    Trade minister Lord Mark Price, who used to be the boss of Waitrose, is set to visit China, Hong Kong and Brazil.
    There have been initial discussions about partnerships with deals with Australia and South Korea and talks with India could also begin soon.
    Mail Online reports New Zealand has offered to lend its negotiators to hammer out deals across the globe.
    And in the USA, the House of Representatives speaker Paul Ryan says a trade deal between the UK and the States is vital…
    https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/1374318/hsbc-and-barclays-will-stay-in-britain-post-brexit-saying-london-is-still-the-centre-of-the-financial-world/

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    Another Ian

    “lots-of-countries-want-to-do-trade-deals-with-uk”

    Looks like they already were by the maps and comments in

    https://chiefio.wordpress.com/2016/06/17/fuding-brexit/

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    KinkyKeith

    I find it hard to believe that other countries want to make money by trading goods and services.

    Such an old fashioned concept.

    It’s much easier to set up a new political entity where you can levy taxes on the serfs and avoid work altogether.

    Existing entities such as the U.N., EU, IPCCCC do very well thank you as do many, not for profit countries which live off the U.N. and eeu.

    Life’s a ball when you know how it’s set up.

    KK

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    pat

    contender for Most Orwellian Brexit moment!
    note: Puttnam sits on the Labour benches in the House of Lords (Wikipedia)

    5 Jul: Guardian: John Plunkett: Media should rethink coverage in wake of Brexit vote, says (BBC presenter) Justin Webb
    Today presenter argues remain voters feel let down by the BBC’s coverage being hampered by impartiality rules
    (John Plunkett writes about radio, among many other things, for the Media Guardian and presents the weekly Media Talk podcast. He is also chairman of the Broadcasting Press Guild)
    Webb, one of the BBC Radio 4 Today team, spoke out after Oscar-winning film producer Lord Puttnam criticised the BBC’s coverage of the European debate as constipated and effectively hamstrung by its own strict rules on impartiality…
    Webb said some people who campaigned to remain in the EU had felt let down by the media’s coverage of the debate before the the historic poll result on 23 June. “A discussion about holding people to account, a discussion about impartiality in the modern era, is one I suspect the broadcasters would rather welcome, if only to sort out their own thinking,” the BBC’s former North America editor, wrote in the Radio Times…
    The aftermath of the vote has been marked by leading leave campaigners backtracking on claims made before the vote…
    Webb wrote: “Some of those on the losing side think they were let down. The Oscar-winning film producer Lord Puttnam is among those who wonder if impartiality rules torpedoed the search for truth: he accused the BBC in particular of providing ‘constipated’ coverage.
    “The impartiality question is a reasonable one to raise – and it is one the BBC has grappled with on subjects such as climate change, where most scientists are on one side of the argument but some very feisty campaigners think they’re wrong. But the question has to be part of a wider debate.”
    Puttnam, the former deputy chairman of Channel 4, said last week that media as a whole had failed to tackle the “Monty Pythonesque vision of Europe” which he said had been allowed to go unchallenged for the last 30 or 40 years.
    Puttnam himself had been one of the driving forces to change the way the BBC reports on climate change…

    The BBC’s former director general Greg Dyke echoed Puttnam’s thoughts at the launch last week of a report into the future of public service broadcasting. “I understand exactly why they ended up reporting it the way they did, because there’s people with stop watches and all the rest of it, but the result I thought … was a little bit dull to be honest,” said Dyke.
    Webb said: “We tend to regard campaigning as promising policies or aspirations that can be tested against the facts of the real world. A combination of forensic interviewing and zealous fact-checking strips away the nonsense and allows the public to make a balanced choice…ETC

    FROM COMMENTS:
    BeauNydle: Why are sore losers getting so much press?
    Jennischum: The BBC were extremely biased towards remain, their coverage was despicable. And leave still won, thank god
    In future the BBC must hire a 50-50 split of left-right leaning staff. The culture right now is to hire their leftie buddies.
    ChrisDR1968: This is a joke right?
    (BBC’s) Laura Kuenssberg may as well have had a Remain headband on her head during her news reports and Huw Edwards made his attitude perfectly clear during the referendum by his facial expressions when talking about the Brexit campaign.
    Even Sky had an obviously biased reporter (in favour of Remain) trailing Boris’s campaign bus…
    It’s a bit of a miracle Leave won this vote. A wonderful miracle but a miracle nonetheless.
    https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2016/jul/05/media-should-rethink-coverage-in-wake-of-brexit-vote-says-justin-webb

    more to come.

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    Owen Morgan

    The attempts to overturn the Brexit result continue. Along with the claim that Brexit supporters are racist (and should be denied the vote), there’s the assertion that we are too old (and should be disenfranchised for that, as well). There’s the petition, which demands that the result be set aside on the grounds that Brexit didn’t reach an arbitrary percentage of the vote; it’s a novel notion that one side can get fewer votes on a binary question, but still be declared the winner, but probably less so than the idea that a petition can trump a formal referendum. Volatility in the economy is supposed to justify a new referendum. The new mayor of London has been vocal on some of these points, pointing out that the vote in London was to remain in the EU, but overlooking the fact that a lot more Londoners voted for Brexit than supported his election.

    The world’s most admired, envied and impartial broadcaster, the Beebyanka, employs a political* interviewer called Andrew Marr, who decided to advertise his own definition of “impartiality”, by scribbling a piece in the “New Statesman”, in which he demanded a second referendum.

    His logic, such as it was, amounted to this:

    Since, following the Brexit vote, David Cameron resigned, Britain should hold a General Election, after which a second referendum should be held (he blithely assumes the foolish voters would get it right, next time, if there were one).

    Since Marr has spent his entire life imbibing politics, he is either extraordinarily disingenuous, or phenomenally ignorant. In British elections, we elect MPs, not PMs. A General Election is intended to establish who will sit in Parliament. According to Marr, however, we should treat this hypothetical election, in effect, as a de facto referendum on the outcome of the previous referendum, paving the way for a second actual referendum, because anything else would be undemocratic. Yep, makes lots of sense…

    Marr’s grasp of the Constitution is all wrong, as well. The Conservatives won last year’s election on a platform that included a promise to hold a referendum. It’s the outcome of the vote itself which mandates Brexit now. Cameron campaigned against Brexit and had to go for that reason, not for failing to deliver a manifesto commitment. Marr is saying, in effect, that a PM who finds himself on the losing side in a referendum can negate the vote, by the simple stratagem of resigning and thereby forcing another vote.

    (As for PMs who were replaced without General Elections, leaving out wartime ones and confining myself to the UK, I can think of Andrew Bonar Law, Stanley Baldwin, Anthony Eden, Harold Macmillan, Harold Wilson, Margaret Thatcher, Tony Blair…)

    * In every sense; he is a lifelong Labour supporter, prone to giving away his bias by referring to the party as “we”.

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    pat

    Guardian article included plenty of links, but NOT to the piece which Justin Webb “the BBC’s former North America editor, (ALLEGEDLY) wrote in the Radio Times”.
    i have searched & searched and cannot find anything relating to this piece.

    Guardian also doesn’t link to the following extraordinary & “inaccurate” attack on the BBC by Puttnam:

    29 Jun: RadioTimesUK: Ben Dowell: Lord Puttnam attacks BBC for “criminal act” of failing to take “idiot” Boris Johnson to task for contradictory EU message
    ***Lord Puttnam is factually inaccurate in his claim that the clip was never used on the BBC, however…(READ ALL INCL ENDING RE BBC FUNDING)
    http://www.radiotimes.com/news/2016-06-29/lord-puttnam-attacks-bbc-for-criminal-act-of-failing-to-take-idiot-boris-johnson-to-task-for-contradictory-eu-message

    just a few of BBC’s 24/7 anti-Brexit headlines:

    IMF says EU exit ‘largest near-term risk’ to British economy

    Brexit ‘would spark year-long recession

    Brexit poses global financial risk, Bank of England warns

    Would Brexit make Putin happy?

    EU exit could add two years to austerity, IFS says

    EU referendum petition signed by more than 2.5m

    Business pessimism ‘doubles after Brexit’

    Scared by Brexit, Europe asks what next

    London protest against ‘ugly’ Brexit campaigns

    Reality Check: Have Leave campaigners changed their tune?

    Can the law stop Brexit?

    & let’s not forget BBC invented “Regrexit”, which got MSM coverage worldwide, with references to BBC’s cherry-picked interviewees, once the twitterati made it go viral with #regrexit:

    27 Jun: BBC Radio 4 Twitter: #Brexit or Regrexit? http://bbc.in/28Ye9cF
    reply David Ackerman: I have a small hunch that the BBC is not overjoyed with a leave vote.
    reply The Ruminating Sheep: when are you going to stop trying to undermine the result with your propaganda?
    https://twitter.com/BBCr4today/status/747429586183557120

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    Farage’s departure from the limelight isn’t surprising. He has some difficult questions to answer about party finances. And, in the long run, he was out of a job anyway.

    Former UKIPer Dr North knows Farage too well:

    If one was to look for a political legacy, Farage was always a good spokesman and a moderately competent debater – let down by his indifferent grasp of detail, although so often paired with people who knew less, this was not always a handicap.

    But he was also rigorous in excluding competition and suppressing fresh talent, so we will never know whether someone better might have emerged to lead Ukip more effectively, making victory more assured.

    His “boyish charm” is wafer thin and behind the façade he is a liar, a bully and a braggart, who does not know the meaning of the word loyalty. Personally he has done me great harm and, in my view, has held back the development of the party to the extent that he is largely responsible for its current parlous state.

    I hope that UKIP can build a capable, fresh leadership team from the supporters that it drew during the campaign for the referendum. The UK needs a party for the transition away from the EU. Labour and Tory parties both seem incapable of thinking outside of the EU-box; whereas the public and (surprisingly) some of the public servants are already doing so.

    Such a transition will, realistically, take of the order of 10 years. There’s lots of untangling to do. Formal, orderly departure could be in 2020 but there will remain EU-originated regulations as part of established practice which need to be kept in place until explicitly repealed or replaced by indigenous legislation.

    UKIP’s campaign “against” the EU has long been based on pointing to the mountain of regulations which “come from the EU”. The technical regulations have however increasingly been sourced from world trade standards bodies and e.g. UN/ECE and WTO. The EU adopted the standards and made them regulations. Australia has incorporated many of the same rules into Australian law. They’re not evil regulations. Some are pointless or counter-productive (such as making electric kettles take longer to boil water for a cuppa), but they are not evil.

    UKIP’s white lies are only useful if they’re not transparently false to the majority of the public. The process of leaving the EU will add transparency so UKIP had better change its tune to a more informed one if it wishes to remain credible as more people come to understand the origin of regulations.

    Public servants dealing with product regulations certainly need to understand which technical regulations are important for trade and which can be relaxed for products destined for domestic consumption. Such a relaxation wasn’t “possible” in the EU-mindset because all of the EU was “domestic market”. Thus, the benefits of independence won’t be fully reaped for quite some time as each regulation has to be dissected by (often) technical experts to work out what is important.

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      KinkyKeith

      Interesting

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      David

      Bernd I think you will find there is bad blood between North and Farage and one needs to read much further on the relationship between them before attributing too much credence to the opinions of one on the other.

      North’s abusive, opinionated, insulting ‘stream of consciousness’ on the subject of Mr. Farage may be well deserved but even if it is Farage deserves admiration for his determination over years to see Brexit become a reality.

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      • #
        KinkyKeith

        Agree, the conflict is interesting from a distance. Getting to the core of the thing ain’t that easy.

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    There’s something inherently ridiculous in all this that makes me just shake my head, something that only green urgers actually believe.

    This thing with jugs, (or kettles) toasters, hair dryers, vacuum cleaners, etc.

    The powers that be introduce these new lower power consumption items thinking it will eventually lead to a closing down of, well, face it, coal fired power plants, the large scale ones.

    If you have a lower powered, well anything really, then you have to run it for a longer period of time to do the same amount of ….. work (the electrical term here) eg, boil water, brown toast, dry hair, suck up dirt, whatever.

    In the long run, the same amount of electrical power is being consumed ….. in KWH, not just the nameplate power of the item, but the actual power consumption. (power multiplied by time ….. KiloWatt…..HOURS)

    There is no saving, and even if there was in the first place, that saving is so tiny as to be inconsequential at best, spread across a whole Country, and resulting in NO power plants at all lowering their output, hence burning less fossil fuel, hence lowering any emissions of CO2.

    Even if there was an ephemeral saving, it’s the tiniest fraction of residential consumption (say the number zero, insert a decimal point, add a few zeroes and then a number, so almost as close to actual zero as you can get) and that residential consumption is only around 25 to 30% tops of overall power consumption.

    The same applies for those twirly bulbs, those new wonder things. People had 60Watt incandescent bulbs and because those new CFL’s were so poor at actually providing lighting, (you know, their actual job) people replaced them with the bulbs of an equivalent 100Watts. (and even greater in some cases) Again, the power savings were a tiny fraction of a small fraction of overall power consumption.

    I just shakes me ‘ead!

    Tony.

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      I find it funny that people think that different methods of boiling water require the same amount of energy just because it takes the same amount of energy to bring to boil (say from 20C to 100C). They must think that all methods are 100% efficient.

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      • #
        KinkyKeith

        I find that really hard to believe.

        You said something that is both correct and relevant.

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    Analitik

    OT – Panic in the greenwash ranks
    Australia Is Being Swamped By Climate Change Deniers
    At some stage the MSM has to start reporting the truth that the majority of Australians DON’T see Climate Change as settled science let alone being one of the key challenges of our time. It may take a while but it will happen

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    pat

    comment #19 is in moderation.

    latest spin is turmoil will happen…eventually:

    5 Jul: BBC: Katya Adler: Why Angela Merkel is biding her time over Brexit
    One final reason Angela Merkel hopes for voices in Europe to be silent over the summer is to allow the chaotic proportions of Britain’s post-referendum political and economic firework display to make their full impact across the European side of the Channel.
    She hopes it will serve as a warning to the continent’s multitude of Eurosceptics to call for EU change by all means but to beware of EU departure for fear that that could happen to them too.
    http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-eu-referendum-36710399

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    pat

    it is never enough…

    4 Jul: Sacramento Bee: John Bozzella: California must offer more to reach electric vehicle goals
    But of the more than 2 million new vehicles that will be registered in California this year, less than 3 percent will be ZEVs. We need to fill that gap between hope and reality…
    Automakers are making huge investments to meet California’s mandate that 15 percent of new vehicles sold in the state by 2025 be ZEVs. Nine other states have also adopted that requirement. Gov. Jerry Brown and the governors of Oregon and six Northeastern states committed in 2013 to a goal of 3.3 million ZEVs on their roads by 2025.
    While 2015 was a record year for auto sales in the U.S., ZEV sales nationwide amounted to just 67,000 vehicles and actually decreased 8 percent in California…
    We can all do a better job of spreading the word, including about incentives and tax credits that can be worth as much as $10,000…
    California and other states must increase vehicle rebates and tax credits, invest in infrastructure development and offer perks such as access to car-pool lanes.
    (About the writer: John Bozzella is president and CEO of the Association of Global Automakers, which represents the U.S. divisions of 12 foreign car manufacturers)
    http://www.sacbee.com/opinion/op-ed/soapbox/article87262582.html

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    Mike

    “Brexit: Lots of countries want to do trade deals with UK. (Surprise, Surprise)”

    Should read….. Brexit: Lots of creditors in the process of looting largely privately owned (In Debt)countries want to do Debt Deal (trade) deals within the UK. (Surprise, Surprise)

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    Czech President wants to give the people a chance to Czech-Out.

    It is easier for non-Eurozone countries to leave the EU because they don’t have the full currency union baggage. While their own currency’s exchange rate may be tied to the Euro, letting it float freely gives the country enormous financial independence and control over its own destiny.

    Czechia (as it now prefers to be called as Czech Republic is a bit of a mouthful) has only been a member of the EU for a relatively short time (ca 12 years) compared to the UK’s 40+ years. The nation has definitely benefited; at least initially; from EU membership but has to increasingly deal with much more nonsense from the EU.

    The Czechs also have more recent experience with trans-national socialist embrace and are wary of having rules made for them by a “higher power”. That’s not just in recent history.

    Anti-EE sentiment is stronger in Czechia than it is in the UK. Ratios of 20:52 vs 17:44 in terms of perceiving the EU going in the right:wrong direction. There is however a majority of Czechs (surveyed) who think it’s the wrong direction and a lot less uncertainty in the population.

    The Danes’ regard for the EU is slightly more positive than the Britons’. Sweden, with 20:55 right:wrong ought to be looking at its EU relationship very critically, despite (because of?) their propensity to do as much good as they can.

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    pat

    5 Jul: Australian: Darren Davidson: The Drum: ABC to axe opinion website
    ABC director of news Gaven Morris has told staff opinion website The Drum will close on Monday, and revealed the public broadcaster will work with “community and academic partners to offer more analysis”…
    Mr Morris said the corporation will shift emphasis from “traditional opinion writing towards providing more of the essential context and analysis audiences need in order to fully understand and interpret the major stories and important issues”.
    ABC contributors such as Annabel Crabb, Barrie Cassidy and Ian Verrender and external writers will continue to write for online platforms, Mr Morris said…
    To replace the forum and “offer more analysis”, Mr Morris will announce plans in the weeks ahead to work with outside organisations such as universities…
    ***It comes after ABC Fact Check, a three-year old stand-alone unit, was disbanded with some staff absorbed by other parts of the news division.
    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/media/the-drum-guthrie-axes-abc-opinion-website/news-story/d549dc9ba7b98a7e14e04384c30e5c19

    ***will VoteCompass go? it should.

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    pat

    5 Jul: UK Express: Patrick Christys: Now Schulz calls for the EU to take MORE CONTROL and become ‘TRUE GOVERNMENT’ of Europe
    BRUSSELS figurehead Martin Schulz wants the EU to grab more power after the BREXIT so it can become a “true government” of Europe.
    The 60-year-old hopes to introduce a common company tax rate and end national vetoes on EU foreign policy…
    Schulz drew up the plan with Sigmar Gabriel, the vice-chancellor of Germany and Social Democratic Party, who is likely to stand in next year’s election against Angela Merkel at he next general election in Germany.
    Two German newspapers have called for Jean-Claude Juncker to be forced out and figures close to Merkel say that she would rather have a different commission president, but Schulz is understood to be more supportive of the Luxemburger…
    Schulz said: “We need an ambitious and powerful thrust and not a timid patchwork. We must continue to work so that the European Commission will be transformed into a true European government.”
    The plans echo Juncker’s claims that the EU is struggling to resolve the Euro and migrant crises because it is not strong enough…
    Schulz’s push for a greater federal system, making national governments a “second chamber” to the European parliament, was drawn up before the British referendum but has been released now to push for a closer union…
    He wants national vetoes of EU foreign policy to be scrapped so that Europe speaks with “one voice”.
    The ten point plan includes stronger measures to seize assets in tax havens and to harmonise company tax — contrasting sharply with George Osborne’s plans to reduce corporation tax in Britain…
    http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/686268/Schulz-Merkel-Tusk-EU-European-Union-Brexit-EU-referendum-politics

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    pat

    it’s a drawn-out process; perhaps one candidate will be eliminated today:

    5 Jul: UK Telegraph: Live: Conservative leadership election: Boris Johnson backs Andrea Leadsom for Prime Minister as Tory MPs vote
    Tory MPs vote between 11am and 6pm today
    One candidate will be knocked out of the race
    Boris Johnson gives backing to Andrea Leadsom
    Theresa May and Andrea Leadsom neck-and-neck in polling
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/07/05/boris-johnson-backs-andrea-leadsom-tory-mps-vote-leadership-race/

    5 Jul: UK Sun: ALAIN TOLHURST: ELECTING A NEW PRIME MINISTER: As the election gets underway just how do the Tories vote for a new leader?
    As MPs get ready to vote in the first round of the ballot we explain how the procedure takes place…
    PHOTO CAPTION: Andrea Leadsom is picking up momentum in the race to replace David Cameron
    The closing date for members to make their decision is September 8, with an announcement of the winning candidate made the following day, at the Tory conference…
    This process could be circumvented if all but one of the candidates decides to step down, leaving the remaining MP to be automatically selected as the new leader.
    In which case Britain could have a new Prime Minister as soon as by the end of this week. But if all goes to plan, then the replacement for David Cameron will be officially unveiled on September 9.
    https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/1391450/as-the-election-gets-underway-just-how-do-the-tories-vote-for-a-new-leader/

    4 Jul: UK Express: Tories accuse Ukip of trying to HIJACK leadership race by backing Andrea Leadsom

    Farage backed Leasdom in interview post-Brexit vote.

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    Graeme No.3

    Jo,
    you might look at the table in Pointman -brexit an analysis with a view to reproducing it here.

    https://thepointman.wordpress.com/2016/07/01/brexit-an-analysis-in-the-aftermath/#comment-22876

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  • #

    Say, off topic I know.

    You know that cattle farm that the Queensland Government purchased to, umm, protect the Reef, well it seems that same Queensland Government is assessing two mining leases on that same property.

    How lucky is that eh!

    Tony.

    Link to ABC article

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    charplum

    Bureaucrats could certainly come up with a more creative solution on the scourge of excess wattage hair dryers. Perhaps, instead they could have offered unisex buzz cuts for everyone. Who would have needed a hair dryer after that?

    Reminds me of my college days. Every quarter I would start the term with a crew cut. By mid term I am getting shaggy but then I always faced the dilemma of paying for a hair cut or buying a six pack. My priorities were in order and you know what I chose. I got another crew cut when I went home at the end of the term.

    Why would anyone think an effort to rein in the wattage of any device that is used intermittently is at all worthwhile?

    I am doing my part on the vacuum cleaner side in saving the planet. My usage of the vacuum cleaner is too infrequent now.

    I am convinced that the only way to put the hammer down on this nonsense is to defund the staffs at the agencies that draft regulations. Let them only have sufficient staff to handle inquiries on what has already been written. If new regulations are deemed necessary let the work be subcontracted. You should not need a permanent staff to write regulations that can only get involved in more mischief.

    I know our EPA has drafted regulations on bovine flatulence. I await their implementation.

    This has nothing to do with climate. It is only for the purpose of making meat too expensive for the average person. Out of necessity, we will all become vegans. The health benefits will be trumpeted by the progressives. It should be clear that the only proper choices in life are to live the way progressives mandate for us.

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    James J Strom

    Ouch. Maybe the US will find itself at the back of the queue of nations seeking freer trade with Britain.

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